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  • Why can't upload three files with FileUpload ?

    - by Valter Henrique
    Hi everyone, i'm trying to upload three images to my server, is working, but upload always the last file selected by the user, not the three selected. Here's my code: protected void doPost(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response){ boolean multipart = ServletFileUpload.isMultipartContent(request); if (multipart) { DiskFileItemFactory fileItemFactory = new DiskFileItemFactory(); fileItemFactory.setSizeThreshold(5 * 1024 * 1024); //5 MB fileItemFactory.setRepository(tmpDir); ServletFileUpload uploadHandler = new ServletFileUpload(fileItemFactory); try { List items = uploadHandler.parseRequest(request); Iterator itr = items.iterator(); while (itr.hasNext()) { FileItem item = (FileItem) itr.next(); File file = new File(dir, generateNewName()); item.write(file); } } catch (FileUploadException ex) { } catch (Exception ex) { } } } -- UPDATE: <html> <head> <title>Upload</title> </head> <body> <form action="Upload" method="post" enctype="multipart/form-data"> <input type="file" name="file1" /> <br /> <input type="file" name="file2" /> <br /> <input type="file" name="file3" /> <br /> <input type="submit" value="Enviar" /> </form> </body> </html> Best regards, Valter Henrique.

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  • Silverlight for Windows Embedded tutorial (step 6)

    - by Valter Minute
    In this tutorial step we will develop a very simple clock application that may be used as a screensaver on our devices and will allow us to discover a new feature of Silverlight for Windows Embedded (transforms) and how to use an “old” feature of Windows CE (timers) inside a Silverlight for Windows Embedded application. Let’s start with some XAML, as usual: <UserControl xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" Width="640" Height="480" FontSize="18" x:Name="Clock">   <Canvas x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="#FF000000"> <Grid Height="24" Width="150" Canvas.Left="320" Canvas.Top="234" x:Name="SecondsHand" Background="#FFFF0000"> <TextBlock Text="Seconds" TextWrapping="Wrap" Width="50" HorizontalAlignment="Right" VerticalAlignment="Center" x:Name="SecondsText" Foreground="#FFFFFFFF" TextAlignment="Right" Margin="2,2,2,2"/> </Grid> <Grid Height="24" x:Name="MinutesHand" Width="100" Background="#FF00FF00" Canvas.Left="320" Canvas.Top="234"> <TextBlock HorizontalAlignment="Right" x:Name="MinutesText" VerticalAlignment="Center" Width="50" Text="Minutes" TextWrapping="Wrap" Foreground="#FFFFFFFF" TextAlignment="Right" Margin="2,2,2,2"/> </Grid> <Grid Height="24" x:Name="HoursHand" Width="50" Background="#FF0000FF" Canvas.Left="320" Canvas.Top="234"> <TextBlock HorizontalAlignment="Right" x:Name="HoursText" VerticalAlignment="Center" Width="50" Text="Hours" TextWrapping="Wrap" Foreground="#FFFFFFFF" TextAlignment="Right" Margin="2,2,2,2"/> </Grid> </Canvas> </UserControl> This XAML file defines three grid panels, one for each hand of our clock (we are implementing an analog clock using one of the most advanced technologies of the digital world… how cool is that?). Inside each hand we put a TextBlock that will be used to display the current hour, minute, second inside the dial (you can’t do that on plain old analog clocks, but it looks nice). As usual we use XAML2CPP to generate the boring part of our code. We declare a class named “Clock” and derives from the TClock template that XAML2CPP has declared for us. class Clock : public TClock<Clock> { ... }; Our WinMain function is more or less the same we used in all the previous samples. It initializes the XAML runtime, create an instance of our class, initialize it and shows it as a dialog: int WINAPI WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, LPTSTR lpCmdLine, int nCmdShow) { if (!XamlRuntimeInitialize()) return -1;   HRESULT retcode;   IXRApplicationPtr app; if (FAILED(retcode=GetXRApplicationInstance(&app))) return -1; Clock clock;   if (FAILED(clock.Init(hInstance,app))) return -1;     UINT exitcode;   if (FAILED(clock.GetVisualHost()->StartDialog(&exitcode))) return -1;   return exitcode; } Silverlight for Windows Embedded provides a lot of features to implement our UI, but it does not provide timers. How we can update our clock if we don’t have a timer feature? We just use plain old Windows timers, as we do in “regular” Windows CE applications! To use a timer in WinCE we should declare an id for it: #define IDT_CLOCKUPDATE 0x12341234 We also need an HWND that will be used to receive WM_TIMER messages. Our Silverlight for Windows Embedded page is “hosted” inside a GWES Window and we can retrieve its handle using the GetContainerHWND function of our VisualHost object. Let’s see how this is implemented inside our Clock class’ Init method: HRESULT Init(HINSTANCE hInstance,IXRApplication* app) { HRESULT retcode;   if (FAILED(retcode=TClock<Clock>::Init(hInstance,app))) return retcode;   // create the timer user to update the clock HWND clockhwnd;   if (FAILED(GetVisualHost()->GetContainerHWND(&clockhwnd))) return -1;   timer=SetTimer(clockhwnd,IDT_CLOCKUPDATE,1000,NULL); return 0; } We use SetTimer to create a new timer and GWES will send a WM_TIMER to our window every second, giving us a chance to update our clock. That sounds great… but how could we handle the WM_TIMER message if we didn’t implement a window procedure for our window? We have to move a step back and look how a visual host is created. This code is generated by XAML2CPP and is inside xaml2cppbase.h: virtual HRESULT CreateHost(HINSTANCE hInstance,IXRApplication* app) { HRESULT retcode; XRWindowCreateParams wp;   ZeroMemory(&wp, sizeof(XRWindowCreateParams)); InitWindowParms(&wp);   XRXamlSource xamlsrc;   SetXAMLSource(hInstance,&xamlsrc); if (FAILED(retcode=app->CreateHostFromXaml(&xamlsrc, &wp, &vhost))) return retcode;   if (FAILED(retcode=vhost->GetRootElement(&root))) return retcode; return S_OK; } As you can see the CreateHostFromXaml function of IXRApplication accepts a structure named XRWindowCreateParams that control how the “plain old” GWES Window is created by the runtime. This structure is initialized inside the InitWindowParm method: // Initializes Windows parameters, can be overridden in the user class to change its appearance virtual void InitWindowParms(XRWindowCreateParams* wp) { wp->Style = WS_OVERLAPPED; wp->pTitle = windowtitle; wp->Left = 0; wp->Top = 0; } This method set up the window style, title and position. But the XRWindowCreateParams contains also other fields and, since the function is declared as virtual, we could initialize them inside our version of InitWindowParms: // add hook procedure to the standard windows creation parms virtual void InitWindowParms(XRWindowCreateParams* wp) { TClock<Clock>::InitWindowParms(wp);   wp->pHookProc=StaticHostHookProc; wp->pvUserParam=this; } This method calls the base class implementation (useful to not having to re-write some code, did I told you that I’m quite lazy?) and then initializes the pHookProc and pvUserParam members of the XRWindowsCreateParams structure. Those members will allow us to install a “hook” procedure that will be called each time the GWES window “hosting” our Silverlight for Windows Embedded UI receives a message. We can declare a hook procedure inside our Clock class: // static hook procedure static BOOL CALLBACK StaticHostHookProc(VOID* pv,HWND hwnd,UINT Msg,WPARAM wParam,LPARAM lParam,LRESULT* pRetVal) { ... } You should notice two things here. First that the function is declared as static. This is required because a non-static function has a “hidden” parameters, that is the “this” pointer of our object. Having an extra parameter is not allowed for the type defined for the pHookProc member of the XRWindowsCreateParams struct and so we should implement our hook procedure as static. But in a static procedure we will not have a this pointer. How could we access the data member of our class? Here’s the second thing to notice. We initialized also the pvUserParam of the XRWindowsCreateParams struct. We set it to our this pointer. This value will be passed as the first parameter of the hook procedure. In this way we can retrieve our this pointer and use it to call a non-static version of our hook procedure: // static hook procedure static BOOL CALLBACK StaticHostHookProc(VOID* pv,HWND hwnd,UINT Msg,WPARAM wParam,LPARAM lParam,LRESULT* pRetVal) { return ((Clock*)pv)->HostHookProc(hwnd,Msg,wParam,lParam,pRetVal); } Inside our non-static hook procedure we will have access to our this pointer and we will be able to update our clock: // hook procedure (handles timers) BOOL HostHookProc(HWND hwnd,UINT Msg,WPARAM wParam,LPARAM lParam,LRESULT* pRetVal) { switch (Msg) { case WM_TIMER: if (wParam==IDT_CLOCKUPDATE) UpdateClock(); *pRetVal=0; return TRUE; } return FALSE; } The UpdateClock member function will update the text inside our TextBlocks and rotate the hands to reflect current time: // udates Hands positions and labels HRESULT UpdateClock() { SYSTEMTIME time; HRESULT retcode;   GetLocalTime(&time);   //updates the text fields TCHAR timebuffer[32];   _itow(time.wSecond,timebuffer,10);   SecondsText->SetText(timebuffer);   _itow(time.wMinute,timebuffer,10);   MinutesText->SetText(timebuffer);   _itow(time.wHour,timebuffer,10);   HoursText->SetText(timebuffer);   if (FAILED(retcode=RotateHand(((float)time.wSecond)*6-90,SecondsHand))) return retcode;   if (FAILED(retcode=RotateHand(((float)time.wMinute)*6-90,MinutesHand))) return retcode;   if (FAILED(retcode=RotateHand(((float)(time.wHour%12))*30-90,HoursHand))) return retcode;   return S_OK; } The function retrieves current time, convert hours, minutes and seconds to strings and display those strings inside the three TextBlocks that we put inside our clock hands. Then it rotates the hands to position them at the right angle (angles are in degrees and we have to subtract 90 degrees because 0 degrees means horizontal on Silverlight for Windows Embedded and usually a clock 0 is in the top position of the dial. The code of the RotateHand function uses transforms to rotate our clock hands on the screen: // rotates a Hand HRESULT RotateHand(float angle,IXRFrameworkElement* Hand) { HRESULT retcode; IXRRotateTransformPtr rotatetransform; IXRApplicationPtr app;   if (FAILED(retcode=GetXRApplicationInstance(&app))) return retcode;   if (FAILED(retcode=app->CreateObject(IID_IXRRotateTransform,&rotatetransform))) return retcode;     if (FAILED(retcode=rotatetransform->SetAngle(angle))) return retcode;   if (FAILED(retcode=rotatetransform->SetCenterX(0.0))) return retcode;   float height;   if (FAILED(retcode==Hand->GetActualHeight(&height))) return retcode;   if (FAILED(retcode=rotatetransform->SetCenterY(height/2))) return retcode; if (FAILED(retcode=Hand->SetRenderTransform(rotatetransform))) return retcode;   return S_OK; } It creates a IXRotateTransform object, set its rotation angle and origin (the default origin is at the top-left corner of our Grid panel, we move it in the vertical center to keep the hand rotating around a single point in a more “clock like” way. Then we can apply the transform to our UI object using SetRenderTransform. Every UI element (derived from IXRFrameworkElement) can be rotated! And using different subclasses of IXRTransform also moved, scaled, skewed and distorted in many ways. You can also concatenate multiple transforms and apply them at once suing a IXRTransformGroup object. The XAML engine uses vector graphics and object will not look “pixelated” when they are rotated or scaled. As usual you can download the code here: http://cid-9b7b0aefe3514dc5.skydrive.live.com/self.aspx/.Public/Clock.zip If you read up to (down to?) this point you seem to be interested in Silverlight for Windows Embedded. If you want me to discuss some specific topic, please feel free to point it out in the comments! Technorati Tags: Silverlight for Windows Embedded,Windows CE

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  • XAML2CPP 1.0.2.0

    - by Valter Minute
    A new updated release of everybody favourite XAML to CPP conversion tool (at least because it’s the only one available!). New features: - support for resource dictionaries (app.xaml if you use Blend to generate your XAML) Bugfixes: - the parameters for the mouseleftbuttondown and up events were incorrect As usual you can download the new release here: http://cid-9b7b0aefe3514dc5.skydrive.live.com/self.aspx/.Public/XAML2CPP.zip Technorati Tags: XAML,Silverlight for Windows Embedded

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  • Silverlight for Windows Embedded tutorial (step 4)

    - by Valter Minute
    I’m back with my Silverlight for Windows Embedded tutorial. Sorry for the long delay between step 3 and step 4, the MVP summit and some work related issue prevented me from working on the tutorial during the last weeks. In our first,  second and third tutorial steps we implemented some very simple applications, just to understand the basic structure of a Silverlight for Windows Embedded application, learn how to handle events and how to operate on images. In this third step our sample application will be slightly more complicated, to introduce two new topics: list boxes and custom control. We will also learn how to create controls at runtime. I choose to explain those topics together and provide a sample a bit more complicated than usual just to start to give the feeling of how a “real” Silverlight for Windows Embedded application is organized. As usual we can start using Expression Blend to define our main page. In this case we will have a listbox and a textblock. Here’s the XAML code: <UserControl xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" x:Class="ListDemo.Page" Width="640" Height="480" x:Name="ListPage" xmlns:ListDemo="clr-namespace:ListDemo">   <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="White"> <ListBox Margin="19,57,19,66" x:Name="FileList" SelectionChanged="Filelist_SelectionChanged"/> <TextBlock Height="35" Margin="19,8,19,0" VerticalAlignment="Top" TextWrapping="Wrap" x:Name="CurrentDir" Text="TextBlock" FontSize="20"/> </Grid> </UserControl> In our listbox we will load a list of directories, starting from the filesystem root (there are no drives in Windows CE, the filesystem has a single root named “\”). When the user clicks on an item inside the list, the corresponding directory path will be displayed in the TextBlock object and the subdirectories of the selected branch will be shown inside the list. As you can see we declared an event handler for the SelectionChanged event of our listbox. We also used a different font size for the TextBlock, to make it more readable. XAML and Expression Blend allow you to customize your UI pretty heavily, experiment with the tools and discover how you can completely change the aspect of your application without changing a single line of code! Inside our ListBox we want to insert the directory presenting a nice icon and their name, just like you are used to see them inside Windows 7 file explorer, for example. To get this we will define a user control. This is a custom object that will behave like “regular” Silverlight for Windows Embedded objects inside our application. First of all we have to define the look of our custom control, named DirectoryItem, using XAML: <UserControl xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008" xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006" mc:Ignorable="d" x:Class="ListDemo.DirectoryItem" Width="500" Height="80">   <StackPanel x:Name="LayoutRoot" Orientation="Horizontal"> <Canvas Width="31.6667" Height="45.9583" Margin="10,10,10,10" RenderTransformOrigin="0.5,0.5"> <Canvas.RenderTransform> <TransformGroup> <ScaleTransform/> <SkewTransform/> <RotateTransform Angle="-31.27"/> <TranslateTransform/> </TransformGroup> </Canvas.RenderTransform> <Rectangle Width="31.6667" Height="45.8414" Canvas.Left="0" Canvas.Top="0.116943" Stretch="Fill"> <Rectangle.Fill> <LinearGradientBrush StartPoint="0.142631,0.75344" EndPoint="1.01886,0.75344"> <LinearGradientBrush.RelativeTransform> <TransformGroup> <SkewTransform CenterX="0.142631" CenterY="0.75344" AngleX="19.3128" AngleY="0"/> <RotateTransform CenterX="0.142631" CenterY="0.75344" Angle="-35.3436"/> </TransformGroup> </LinearGradientBrush.RelativeTransform> <LinearGradientBrush.GradientStops> <GradientStop Color="#FF7B6802" Offset="0"/> <GradientStop Color="#FFF3D42C" Offset="1"/> </LinearGradientBrush.GradientStops> </LinearGradientBrush> </Rectangle.Fill> </Rectangle> <Rectangle Width="29.8441" Height="43.1517" Canvas.Left="0.569519" Canvas.Top="1.05249" Stretch="Fill"> <Rectangle.Fill> <LinearGradientBrush StartPoint="0.142632,0.753441" EndPoint="1.01886,0.753441"> <LinearGradientBrush.RelativeTransform> <TransformGroup> <SkewTransform CenterX="0.142632" CenterY="0.753441" AngleX="19.3127" AngleY="0"/> <RotateTransform CenterX="0.142632" CenterY="0.753441" Angle="-35.3437"/> </TransformGroup> </LinearGradientBrush.RelativeTransform> <LinearGradientBrush.GradientStops> <GradientStop Color="#FFCDCDCD" Offset="0.0833333"/> <GradientStop Color="#FFFFFFFF" Offset="1"/> </LinearGradientBrush.GradientStops> </LinearGradientBrush> </Rectangle.Fill> </Rectangle> <Rectangle Width="29.8441" Height="43.1517" Canvas.Left="0.455627" Canvas.Top="2.28036" Stretch="Fill"> <Rectangle.Fill> <LinearGradientBrush StartPoint="0.142631,0.75344" EndPoint="1.01886,0.75344"> <LinearGradientBrush.RelativeTransform> <TransformGroup> <SkewTransform CenterX="0.142631" CenterY="0.75344" AngleX="19.3128" AngleY="0"/> <RotateTransform CenterX="0.142631" CenterY="0.75344" Angle="-35.3436"/> </TransformGroup> </LinearGradientBrush.RelativeTransform> <LinearGradientBrush.GradientStops> <GradientStop Color="#FFCDCDCD" Offset="0.0833333"/> <GradientStop Color="#FFFFFFFF" Offset="1"/> </LinearGradientBrush.GradientStops> </LinearGradientBrush> </Rectangle.Fill> </Rectangle> <Rectangle Width="29.8441" Height="43.1517" Canvas.Left="0.455627" Canvas.Top="1.34485" Stretch="Fill"> <Rectangle.Fill> <LinearGradientBrush StartPoint="0.142631,0.75344" EndPoint="1.01886,0.75344"> <LinearGradientBrush.RelativeTransform> <TransformGroup> <SkewTransform CenterX="0.142631" CenterY="0.75344" AngleX="19.3128" AngleY="0"/> <RotateTransform CenterX="0.142631" CenterY="0.75344" Angle="-35.3436"/> </TransformGroup> </LinearGradientBrush.RelativeTransform> <LinearGradientBrush.GradientStops> <GradientStop Color="#FFCDCDCD" Offset="0.0833333"/> <GradientStop Color="#FFFFFFFF" Offset="1"/> </LinearGradientBrush.GradientStops> </LinearGradientBrush> </Rectangle.Fill> </Rectangle> <Rectangle Width="26.4269" Height="45.8414" Canvas.Left="0.227798" Canvas.Top="0" Stretch="Fill"> <Rectangle.Fill> <LinearGradientBrush StartPoint="0.142631,0.75344" EndPoint="1.01886,0.75344"> <LinearGradientBrush.RelativeTransform> <TransformGroup> <SkewTransform CenterX="0.142631" CenterY="0.75344" AngleX="19.3127" AngleY="0"/> <RotateTransform CenterX="0.142631" CenterY="0.75344" Angle="-35.3436"/> </TransformGroup> </LinearGradientBrush.RelativeTransform> <LinearGradientBrush.GradientStops> <GradientStop Color="#FF7B6802" Offset="0"/> <GradientStop Color="#FFF3D42C" Offset="1"/> </LinearGradientBrush.GradientStops> </LinearGradientBrush> </Rectangle.Fill> </Rectangle> <Rectangle Width="1.25301" Height="45.8414" Canvas.Left="1.70862" Canvas.Top="0.116943" Stretch="Fill" Fill="#FFEBFF07"/> </Canvas> <TextBlock Height="80" x:Name="Name" Width="448" TextWrapping="Wrap" VerticalAlignment="Center" FontSize="24" Text="Directory"/> </StackPanel> </UserControl> As you can see, this XAML contains many graphic elements. Those elements are used to design the folder icon. The original drawing has been designed in Expression Design and then exported as XAML. In Silverlight for Windows Embedded you can use vector images. This means that your images will look good even when scaled or rotated. In our DirectoryItem custom control we have a TextBlock named Name, that will be used to display….(suspense)…. the directory name (I’m too lazy to invent fancy names for controls, and using “boring” intuitive names will make code more readable, I hope!). Now that we have some XAML code, we may execute XAML2CPP to generate part of the aplication code for us. We should then add references to our XAML2CPP generated resource file and include in our code and add a reference to the XAML runtime library to our sources file (you can follow the instruction of the first tutorial step to do that), To generate the code used in this tutorial you need XAML2CPP ver 1.0.1.0, that is downloadable here: http://geekswithblogs.net/WindowsEmbeddedCookbook/archive/2010/03/08/xaml2cpp-1.0.1.0.aspx We can now create our usual simple Win32 application inside Platform Builder, using the same step described in the first chapter of this tutorial (http://geekswithblogs.net/WindowsEmbeddedCookbook/archive/2009/10/01/silverlight-for-embedded-tutorial.aspx). We can declare a class for our main page, deriving it from the template that XAML2CPP generated for us: class ListPage : public TListPage<ListPage> { ... } We will see the ListPage class code in a short time, but before we will see the code of our DirectoryItem user control. This object will be used to populate our list, one item for each directory. To declare a user control things are a bit more complicated (but also in this case XAML2CPP will write most of the “boilerplate” code for use. To interact with a user control you should declare an interface. An interface defines the functions of a user control that can be called inside the application code. Our custom control is currently quite simple and we just need some member functions to store and retrieve a full pathname inside our control. The control will display just the last part of the path inside the control. An interface is declared as a C++ class that has only abstract virtual members. It should also have an UUID associated with it. UUID means Universal Unique IDentifier and it’s a 128 bit number that will identify our interface without the need of specifying its fully qualified name. UUIDs are used to identify COM interfaces and, as we discovered in chapter one, Silverlight for Windows Embedded is based on COM or, at least, provides a COM-like Application Programming Interface (API). Here’s the declaration of the DirectoryItem interface: class __declspec(novtable,uuid("{D38C66E5-2725-4111-B422-D75B32AA8702}")) IDirectoryItem : public IXRCustomUserControl { public:   virtual HRESULT SetFullPath(BSTR fullpath) = 0; virtual HRESULT GetFullPath(BSTR* retval) = 0; }; The interface is derived from IXRCustomControl, this will allow us to add our object to a XAML tree. It declares the two functions needed to set and get the full path, but don’t implement them. Implementation will be done inside the control class. The interface only defines the functions of our control class that are accessible from the outside. It’s a sort of “contract” between our control and the applications that will use it. We must support what’s inside the contract and the application code should know nothing else about our own control. To reference our interface we will use the UUID, to make code more readable we can declare a #define in this way: #define IID_IDirectoryItem __uuidof(IDirectoryItem) Silverlight for Windows Embedded objects (like COM objects) use a reference counting mechanism to handle object destruction. Every time you store a pointer to an object you should call its AddRef function and every time you no longer need that pointer you should call Release. The object keeps an internal counter, incremented for each AddRef and decremented on Release. When the counter reaches 0, the object is destroyed. Managing reference counting in our code can be quite complicated and, since we are lazy (I am, at least!), we will use a great feature of Silverlight for Windows Embedded: smart pointers.A smart pointer can be connected to a Silverlight for Windows Embedded object and manages its reference counting. To declare a smart pointer we must use the XRPtr template: typedef XRPtr<IDirectoryItem> IDirectoryItemPtr; Now that we have defined our interface, it’s time to implement our user control class. XAML2CPP has implemented a class for us, and we have only to derive our class from it, defining the main class and interface of our new custom control: class DirectoryItem : public DirectoryItemUserControlRegister<DirectoryItem,IDirectoryItem> { ... } XAML2CPP has generated some code for us to support the user control, we don’t have to mind too much about that code, since it will be generated (or written by hand, if you like) always in the same way, for every user control. But knowing how does this works “under the hood” is still useful to understand the architecture of Silverlight for Windows Embedded. Our base class declaration is a bit more complex than the one we used for a simple page in the previous chapters: template <class A,class B> class DirectoryItemUserControlRegister : public XRCustomUserControlImpl<A,B>,public TDirectoryItem<A,XAML2CPPUserControl> { ... } This class derives from the XAML2CPP generated template class, like the ListPage class, but it uses XAML2CPPUserControl for the implementation of some features. This class shares the same ancestor of XAML2CPPPage (base class for “regular” XAML pages), XAML2CPPBase, implements binding of member variables and event handlers but, instead of loading and creating its own XAML tree, it attaches to an existing one. The XAML tree (and UI) of our custom control is created and loaded by the XRCustomUserControlImpl class. This class is part of the Silverlight for Windows Embedded framework and implements most of the functions needed to build-up a custom control in Silverlight (the guys that developed Silverlight for Windows Embedded seem to care about lazy programmers!). We have just to initialize it, providing our class (DirectoryItem) and interface (IDirectoryItem). Our user control class has also a static member: protected:   static HINSTANCE hInstance; This is used to store the HINSTANCE of the modules that contain our user control class. I don’t like this implementation, but I can’t find a better one, so if somebody has good ideas about how to handle the HINSTANCE object, I’ll be happy to hear suggestions! It also implements two static members required by XRCustomUserControlImpl. The first one is used to load the XAML UI of our custom control: static HRESULT GetXamlSource(XRXamlSource* pXamlSource) { pXamlSource->SetResource(hInstance,TEXT("XAML"),IDR_XAML_DirectoryItem); return S_OK; }   It initializes a XRXamlSource object, connecting it to the XAML resource that XAML2CPP has included in our resource script. The other method is used to register our custom control, allowing Silverlight for Windows Embedded to create it when it load some XAML or when an application creates a new control at runtime (more about this later): static HRESULT Register() { return XRCustomUserControlImpl<A,B>::Register(__uuidof(B), L"DirectoryItem", L"clr-namespace:DirectoryItemNamespace"); } To register our control we should provide its interface UUID, the name of the corresponding element in the XAML tree and its current namespace (namespaces compatible with Silverlight must use the “clr-namespace” prefix. We may also register additional properties for our objects, allowing them to be loaded and saved inside XAML. In this case we have no permanent properties and the Register method will just register our control. An additional static method is implemented to allow easy registration of our custom control inside our application WinMain function: static HRESULT RegisterUserControl(HINSTANCE hInstance) { DirectoryItemUserControlRegister::hInstance=hInstance; return DirectoryItemUserControlRegister<A,B>::Register(); } Now our control is registered and we will be able to create it using the Silverlight for Windows Embedded runtime functions. But we need to bind our members and event handlers to have them available like we are used to do for other XAML2CPP generated objects. To bind events and members we need to implement the On_Loaded function: virtual HRESULT OnLoaded(__in IXRDependencyObject* pRoot) { HRESULT retcode; IXRApplicationPtr app; if (FAILED(retcode=GetXRApplicationInstance(&app))) return retcode; return ((A*)this)->Init(pRoot,hInstance,app); } This function will call the XAML2CPPUserControl::Init member that will connect the “root” member with the XAML sub tree that has been created for our control and then calls BindObjects and BindEvents to bind members and events to our code. Now we can go back to our application code (the code that you’ll have to actually write) to see the contents of our DirectoryItem class: class DirectoryItem : public DirectoryItemUserControlRegister<DirectoryItem,IDirectoryItem> { protected:   WCHAR fullpath[_MAX_PATH+1];   public:   DirectoryItem() { *fullpath=0; }   virtual HRESULT SetFullPath(BSTR fullpath) { wcscpy_s(this->fullpath,fullpath);   WCHAR* p=fullpath;   for(WCHAR*q=wcsstr(p,L"\\");q;p=q+1,q=wcsstr(p,L"\\")) ;   Name->SetText(p); return S_OK; }   virtual HRESULT GetFullPath(BSTR* retval) { *retval=SysAllocString(fullpath); return S_OK; } }; It’s pretty easy and contains a fullpath member (used to store that path of the directory connected with the user control) and the implementation of the two interface members that can be used to set and retrieve the path. The SetFullPath member parses the full path and displays just the last branch directory name inside the “Name” TextBlock object. As you can see, implementing a user control in Silverlight for Windows Embedded is not too complex and using XAML also for the UI of the control allows us to re-use the same mechanisms that we learnt and used in the previous steps of our tutorial. Now let’s see how the main page is managed by the ListPage class. class ListPage : public TListPage<ListPage> { protected:   // current path TCHAR curpath[_MAX_PATH+1]; It has a member named “curpath” that is used to store the current directory. It’s initialized inside the constructor: ListPage() { *curpath=0; } And it’s value is displayed inside the “CurrentDir” TextBlock inside the initialization function: virtual HRESULT Init(HINSTANCE hInstance,IXRApplication* app) { HRESULT retcode;   if (FAILED(retcode=TListPage<ListPage>::Init(hInstance,app))) return retcode;   CurrentDir->SetText(L"\\"); return S_OK; } The FillFileList function is used to enumerate subdirectories of the current dir and add entries for each one inside the list box that fills most of the client area of our main page: HRESULT FillFileList() { HRESULT retcode; IXRItemCollectionPtr items; IXRApplicationPtr app;   if (FAILED(retcode=GetXRApplicationInstance(&app))) return retcode; // retrieves the items contained in the listbox if (FAILED(retcode=FileList->GetItems(&items))) return retcode;   // clears the list if (FAILED(retcode=items->Clear())) return retcode;   // enumerates files and directory in the current path WCHAR filemask[_MAX_PATH+1];   wcscpy_s(filemask,curpath); wcscat_s(filemask,L"\\*.*");   WIN32_FIND_DATA finddata; HANDLE findhandle;   findhandle=FindFirstFile(filemask,&finddata);   // the directory is empty? if (findhandle==INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE) return S_OK;   do { if (finddata.dwFileAttributes&=FILE_ATTRIBUTE_DIRECTORY) { IXRListBoxItemPtr listboxitem;   // add a new item to the listbox if (FAILED(retcode=app->CreateObject(IID_IXRListBoxItem,&listboxitem))) { FindClose(findhandle); return retcode; }   if (FAILED(retcode=items->Add(listboxitem,NULL))) { FindClose(findhandle); return retcode; }   IDirectoryItemPtr directoryitem;   if (FAILED(retcode=app->CreateObject(IID_IDirectoryItem,&directoryitem))) { FindClose(findhandle); return retcode; }   WCHAR fullpath[_MAX_PATH+1];   wcscpy_s(fullpath,curpath); wcscat_s(fullpath,L"\\"); wcscat_s(fullpath,finddata.cFileName);   if (FAILED(retcode=directoryitem->SetFullPath(fullpath))) { FindClose(findhandle); return retcode; }   XAML2CPPXRValue value((IXRDependencyObject*)directoryitem);   if (FAILED(retcode=listboxitem->SetContent(&value))) { FindClose(findhandle); return retcode; } } } while (FindNextFile(findhandle,&finddata));   FindClose(findhandle); return S_OK; } This functions retrieve a pointer to the collection of the items contained in the directory listbox. The IXRItemCollection interface is used by listboxes and comboboxes and allow you to clear the list (using Clear(), as our function does at the beginning) and change its contents by adding and removing elements. This function uses the FindFirstFile/FindNextFile functions to enumerate all the objects inside our current directory and for each subdirectory creates a IXRListBoxItem object. You can insert any kind of control inside a list box, you don’t need a IXRListBoxItem, but using it will allow you to handle the selected state of an item, highlighting it inside the list. The function creates a list box item using the CreateObject function of XRApplication. The same function is then used to create an instance of our custom control. The function returns a pointer to the control IDirectoryItem interface and we can use it to store the directory full path inside the object and add it as content of the IXRListBox item object, adding it to the listbox contents. The listbox generates an event (SelectionChanged) each time the user clicks on one of the items contained in the listbox. We implement an event handler for that event and use it to change our current directory and repopulate the listbox. The current directory full path will be displayed in the TextBlock: HRESULT Filelist_SelectionChanged(IXRDependencyObject* source,XRSelectionChangedEventArgs* args) { HRESULT retcode;   IXRListBoxItemPtr listboxitem;   if (!args->pAddedItem) return S_OK;   if (FAILED(retcode=args->pAddedItem->QueryInterface(IID_IXRListBoxItem,(void**)&listboxitem))) return retcode;   XRValue content; if (FAILED(retcode=listboxitem->GetContent(&content))) return retcode;   if (content.vType!=VTYPE_OBJECT) return E_FAIL;   IDirectoryItemPtr directoryitem;   if (FAILED(retcode=content.pObjectVal->QueryInterface(IID_IDirectoryItem,(void**)&directoryitem))) return retcode;   content.pObjectVal->Release(); content.pObjectVal=NULL;   BSTR fullpath=NULL;   if (FAILED(retcode=directoryitem->GetFullPath(&fullpath))) return retcode;   CurrentDir->SetText(fullpath);   wcscpy_s(curpath,fullpath); FillFileList(); SysFreeString(fullpath);     return S_OK; } }; The function uses the pAddedItem member of the XRSelectionChangedEventArgs object to retrieve the currently selected item, converts it to a IXRListBoxItem interface using QueryInterface, and then retrives its contents (IDirectoryItem object). Using the GetFullPath method we can get the full path of our selected directory and assing it to the curdir member. A call to FillFileList will update the listbox contents, displaying the list of subdirectories of the selected folder. To build our sample we just need to add code to our WinMain function: int WINAPI WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, LPTSTR lpCmdLine, int nCmdShow) { if (!XamlRuntimeInitialize()) return -1;   HRESULT retcode;   IXRApplicationPtr app; if (FAILED(retcode=GetXRApplicationInstance(&app))) return -1;   if (FAILED(retcode=DirectoryItem::RegisterUserControl(hInstance))) return retcode;   ListPage page;   if (FAILED(page.Init(hInstance,app))) return -1;   page.FillFileList();   UINT exitcode;   if (FAILED(page.GetVisualHost()->StartDialog(&exitcode))) return -1;   return 0; } This code is very similar to the one of the WinMains of our previous samples. The main differences are that we register our custom control (you should do that as soon as you have initialized the XAML runtime) and call FillFileList after the initialization of our ListPage object to load the contents of the root folder of our device inside the listbox. As usual you can download the full sample source code from here: http://cid-9b7b0aefe3514dc5.skydrive.live.com/self.aspx/.Public/ListBoxTest.zip

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  • Windows CE training in Italy

    - by Valter Minute
    Se volete approfondire le vostre conoscenze su Windows CE (anche relativamente alle novità introdotte con la versione R3), o desiderate acquisire le basi per cominciare a lavorare con questo sistema operativo, questa è un'occasione da non perdere. Dal 12 al 16 Aprile si terrà presso gli uffici di Fortech Embedded Labs di Saronno (VA) il corso "Building Solutions with Windows Embedded CE 6.0", tenuto dal sottoscritto. Per maggiori informazioni sui contenuti e i costi: http://www.fortechembeddedlabs.it/node/27

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  • Silverlight for Windows Embedded Tutorial (step 5 and a bit of Windows Phone 7)

    - by Valter Minute
    If you haven’t spent the last week in the middle of the Sahara desert or traveling on a sled in the north pole area you should have heard something about the launch of Windows Phone 7 Series (or Windows Phone Series 7, or Windows Series Phone 7 or something like that). Even if you are in the middle of the desert or somewhere around the north pole you may have been reached by the news, since it seems that WP7S (using the full name will kill my available bandwidth!) is generating a lot of buzz in the development and IT communities. One of the most important aspects of this new platform is that it will be programmed using a new set of tools and frameworks, completely different from the ones used on older releases of Windows Mobile (or SmartPhone, or PocketPC or whatever…). WP7S applications can be developed using Silverlight or XNA. If you want to learn something more about WP7S development you can download the preview of Charles Petzold’s book about it: http://www.charlespetzold.com/phone/index.html Charles Petzold is also the author of “Programming Windows”, the first book I ever read about programming on Windows (it was Windows 3.0 at that time!). The fact that even I was able to learn how to develop Windows application is a proof of the quality of Petzold’s work. This book is up to his standards and the 150pages preview is already rich in technical contents without being boring or complicated to understand. I may be able to become a Windows Phone developer thanks to mr. Petzold. Mr. Petzold uses some nice samples to introduce the basic concepts of Silverlight development on WP7S. On this new platform you’ll use managed code to develop your application, so those samples can’t be ported on Windows CE R3 as they are, but I would like to take one of the first samples (called “SilverlightTapHello1”) and adapt it to Silverlight for Windows Embedded to show that even plain old native code can be used to develop “cool” user interfaces! The sample shows the standard WP7S title header and a textbox with an hello world message inside it. When the user touches the textbox, it will change its color. When the user touches the background (Grid) behind it, its default color (plain old White) will be restored. Let’s see how we can implement the same features on our embedded device! I took the XAML code of the sample (you can download the book samples here: http://download.microsoft.com/download/1/D/B/1DB49641-3956-41F1-BAFA-A021673C709E/CodeSamples_DRAFTPreview_ProgrammingWindowsPhone7Series.zip) and changed it a little bit to remove references to WP7S or managed runtime. If you compare the resulting files you will see that I was able to keep all the resources inside the App.xaml files and the structure of  MainPage.XAML almost intact. This is the Silverlight for Windows Embedded version of MainPage.XAML: <UserControl x:Class="SilverlightTapHello1.MainPage" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" xmlns:phoneNavigation="clr-namespace:Microsoft.Phone.Controls;assembly=Microsoft.Phone.Controls.Navigation" xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008" xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006" mc:Ignorable="d" d:DesignWidth="480" d:DesignHeight="800" FontFamily="{StaticResource PhoneFontFamilyNormal}" FontSize="{StaticResource PhoneFontSizeNormal}" Foreground="{StaticResource PhoneForegroundBrush}" Width="640" Height="480">   <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="{StaticResource PhoneBackgroundBrush}"> <Grid.RowDefinitions> <RowDefinition Height="Auto"/> <RowDefinition Height="*"/> </Grid.RowDefinitions>   <!--TitleGrid is the name of the application and page title--> <Grid x:Name="TitleGrid" Grid.Row="0"> <TextBlock Text="SILVERLIGHT TAP HELLO #1" x:Name="textBlockPageTitle" Style="{StaticResource PhoneTextPageTitle1Style}"/> <TextBlock Text="main page" x:Name="textBlockListTitle" Style="{StaticResource PhoneTextPageTitle2Style}"/> </Grid>   <!--ContentGrid is empty. Place new content here--> <Grid x:Name="ContentGrid" Grid.Row="1" MouseLeftButtonDown="ContentGrid_MouseButtonDown" Background="{StaticResource PhoneBackgroundBrush}"> <TextBlock x:Name="TextBlock" Text="Hello, Silverlight for Windows Embedded!" HorizontalAlignment="Center" VerticalAlignment="Center" /> </Grid> </Grid> </UserControl> If you compare it to the WP7S sample (not reported here to avoid any copyright issue) you’ll notice that I had to replace the original phoneNavigation:PhoneApplicationPage with UserControl as the root node. This make sense because there is not support for phone applications on CE 6. I also had to specify width and height of my main page (on the WP7S device this will be adjusted by the OS) and I had to replace the multi-touch event handler with the MouseLeftButtonDown event (no multitouch support for Windows CE R3, still). I also changed the hello message, of course. I used XAML2CPP to generate the boring part of our application and then added the initialization code to WinMain: int WINAPI WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, LPTSTR lpCmdLine, int nCmdShow) { if (!XamlRuntimeInitialize()) return -1;   HRESULT retcode;   IXRApplicationPtr app; if (FAILED(retcode=GetXRApplicationInstance(&app))) return -1; XRXamlSource dictsrc;   dictsrc.SetResource(hInstance,TEXT("XAML"),IDR_XAML_App);   if (FAILED(retcode=app->LoadResourceDictionary(&dictsrc,NULL))) return -1;   MainPage page;   if (FAILED(page.Init(hInstance,app))) return -1;   UINT exitcode;   if (FAILED(page.GetVisualHost()->StartDialog(&exitcode))) return -1;   return exitcode; }   You may have noticed that there is something different from the previous samples. I added the code to load a resource dictionary. Resources are an important feature of XAML that allows you to define some values that could be replaced inside any XAML file loaded by the runtime. You can use resources to define custom styles for your fonts, backgrounds, controls etc. and to support internationalization, by providing different strings for different languages. The rest of our WinMain isn’t that different. It creates an instances of our MainPage object and displays it. The MainPage class implements an event handler for the MouseLeftButtonDown event of the ContentGrid: class MainPage : public TMainPage<MainPage> { public:   HRESULT ContentGrid_MouseButtonDown(IXRDependencyObject* source,XRMouseButtonEventArgs* args) { HRESULT retcode; IXRSolidColorBrushPtr brush; IXRApplicationPtr app;   if (FAILED(retcode=GetXRApplicationInstance(&app))) return retcode;   if (FAILED(retcode=app->CreateObject(IID_IXRSolidColorBrush,&brush))) return retcode;   COLORREF color=RGBA(0xff,0xff,0xff,0xff);   if (args->pOriginalSource==TextBlock) color=RGBA(rand()&0xFF,rand()&0xFF,rand()&0xFF,0xFF);   if (FAILED(retcode=brush->SetColor(color))) return retcode;   if (FAILED(retcode=TextBlock->SetForeground(brush))) return retcode; return S_OK; } }; As you can see this event is generated when a used clicks inside the grid or inside one of the objects it contains. Since our TextBlock is inside the grid, we don’t need to provide an event handler for its MouseLeftButtonDown event. We can just use the pOriginalSource member of the event arguments to check if the event was generated inside the textblock. If the event was generated inside the grid we create a white brush,if it’s inside the textblock we create some randomly colored brush. Notice that we need to use the RGBA macro to create colors, specifying also a transparency value for them. If we use the RGB macro the resulting color will have its Alpha channel set to zero and will be transparent. Using the SetForeground method we can change the color of our control. You can compare this to the managed code that you can find at page 40-41 of Petzold’s preview book and you’ll see that the native version isn’t much more complex than the managed one. As usual you can download the full code of the sample here: http://cid-9b7b0aefe3514dc5.skydrive.live.com/self.aspx/.Public/SilverlightTapHello1.zip And remember to pre-order Charles Petzold’s “Programming Windows Phone 7 series”, I bet it will be a best-seller! Technorati Tags: Silverlight for Windows Embedded,Windows CE

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  • Windows Embedded Compact 7 and Silverlight for Windows Embedded

    - by Valter Minute
    If you want to see a preview of Windows Embedded Compact 7 you can attend a one-day workshop in Milan on the 7th of February. During the workshop you’ll have a chance to use the new tools and see the OS image running on a ARMv7 device. You can register here for the event (registration may already be overbooked, but if you register you’ll notified of other events in your area): http://www.arroweurope.com/it/news-events/arrow-events/dettaglio/article/microsoft-embedded-windows-ce-products-seminar-compact-7-1.html If you want to discover the potential of Silverlight for Windows Embedded running on CE 6.0 R3 or Windows Embedded Compact 7 you can attend a one day workshop at the Microsoft Innovation Center in Tourin on the 14th of February. In a full-day event you’ll be able to learn the theory and use the tools in practice, getting a good overview of this technology and a chance to experiment with the tools. You can register here: https://msevents.microsoft.com/CUI/EventDetail.aspx?EventID=1032473933&Culture=it-IT

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  • Better Embedded 2013

    - by Valter Minute
    Originally posted on: http://geekswithblogs.net/WindowsEmbeddedCookbook/archive/2013/07/30/better-embedded-2013.aspx On July 8th and 9th I had a chance to attend and speak at the Better Embedded 2013 conference in Florence. Visiting Florence is always a pleasure, but having a chance to attend to such an interesting conference and to meet Marco Dal Pino, Paolo Patierno, Mirco Vanini and many other embedded developers made those two days an experience to be remembered. I did two sessions, one on Windows Embedded Standard and “PCs” usage in the embedded world and another one on Android for Embedded devices, you can find the slides on the better embedded website: www.betterembedded.it. You can also find slides for many other interesting session, ranging from the .NET microframework to Linux Embedded, from QT Quick to software licenses. Packing many different resources about embedded systems in a conference was not easy but the result is a very nice mix of contents ranging from firmware development to cloud-based systems. This is a great way to have an overview of what’s new or interesting in embedded systems and to get great ideas about how to build your new device. Don’t forget to follow @Better_Embedded on twitter to not miss next year conference! Thanks to the better embedded team for having allowed me to use some of the official pictures in this blog post. You can find a good selection of those pictures (just to experience the atmosphere of the conference) on its Facebook page: http://dvlr.it/DHDB

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  • Using Dependency Walker

    - by Valter Minute
    Dependency Walker is a very useful tool that can be used to find dependencies of a Portable Executable module. The PE format is used also on Windows CE and this means that Dependency Walker can be used to analyze also Windows CE/Windows Embedded Compact module. On Win32 it can be used also to monitor modules loaded by an application during runtime, this feature is not supported on CE. You can download dependency walker for free here: http://dependencywalker.com/. To analyze the dependencies of a Windows CE/Windows Embedded Compact 7 module you can just open it using Dependency Walker. If you want to check if a specific module can run on a Windows CE/Windows Compact 7 OS Image you can copy the executable in the same directory that contains your OS binaries (FLATRELEASEDIR). In this way Dependency Walker will highlight missing dlls or missing entry points inside existing dlls. Let’s do a quick sample. You need to check if myapp.exe (an application from a third party) can run on an image generated with your Test01 OSDesign. Copy Myapp.exe to the flat release directory of your OS Design. Launch depends.exe and use the File\Open option of its main menu to open the application executable file you just copied. You may receive an error if some of the modules required by your applications are missing. Before you analyze the module dependencies is important to configure Dependency Walker to check DLL in the same folder where your application file is stored. This is needed because some Windows CE DLLs have the same name of Win32 system DLLs but different entry points. To configure the DLL search path select “Options\Configure Module Search Order…” from Depenency Walker main menu. Select “The application directory” from the “Current Search Order” list, select it, and move it to the top of the list using the “Move Up” button. The system will ask to refresh the window contents to reflect your configuration change, click on “Yes” to proceed. Now you can inspect myapp.exe dependencies. Some DLLs are missing (XAMLRUNTIME.DLL and TILEENGINE.DLL) and OLE32.DLL exists but does not export the “CoInitialize” entry point that is required by myapp.exe. The bad news is that MyApp.exe will not run on your OS Image, the good news is that now you know what’s missing and you can add the required modules to your OS Design and fix the problem!

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  • Windows Embedded Compact 7

    - by Valter Minute
    I’m back from Seattle where I attended the MVP Summit and presented the Windows Embedded Compact 7 training materials during the Train The Trainer in Bellevue (many thanks to all the people attending and providing great suggestions to improve the materials!). The MVP summit was a great chance to discover new things about all the different technologies, to see old friends and meet new ones. The TTT location (Microsoft training facilities at Lincoln square in Bellevue) was great and here’s the landscape that the attendees could enjoy (partially ruined by my presence in the foreground!). In the meantime Windows Embedded Compact 7 has been released: http://www.microsoft.com/windowsembedded/en-us/evaluate/windows-embedded-compact-7.aspx You can download an evaluation version and start to discover its new features (SMP support, support for 3GBs of RAM, Silverlight for Windows Embedded tools, ARM v5,v6 and v7 compilers and many more…) and, maybe, decide to attend a training about it.

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  • TOSM e WPC

    - by Valter Minute
    Per chi ha tempo e voglia di fare quattro chiacchiere sui sistemi embedded microsoft, il sottoscritto parteciperà al TOSM, dal 16 al 18 Novembre a Torino e, in qualità di speaker, a WPC 2011, il principale evento formativo Italiano per le tecnologie Microsoft dal 22 al 24 Novembre a Milano (Assago). Saranno due occasioni per presentare queste tecnologie a un’audience un po’ diversa da quella che di solito frequenta gli eventi embedded e per scambiare idee e opinioni con chi non lavora sui sistemi embedded ma, magari, pensa di poterli utilizzare in futuro.

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  • On the Road(Map)

    - by Valter Minute
    The new roadmap of Windows Embedded has been announced, this is great news for anyone that wants to use Windows Embedded technologies in her/his device. Roadmaps are usually stuff for marketing people, but as a technician is important to know that you are basing your product on a system that is going to be supported for some years and that you can evolve it and will not have to re-design it completely to change its OS (unless this proves to be more convenient, of course!). Here you can read the press release: http://www.microsoft.com/Presspass/Features/2011/nov11/11-14RoadMap.mspx and here Olivier Bloch’s summary (the part that should interest tech people): http://blogs.msdn.com/b/obloch/archive/2011/11/14/windows-embedded-roadmap-update.aspx

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  • XAML2CPP 1.0.4.4

    - by Valter Minute
    My friends Arnaud Debaene and Alban Marie Lemonet of Adeneo Embedded worked on XAML2CPP fixing some bugs and adding new features to it. BugFixes: Corrected handling of x:Class attribute Corrected handling of namespaces for user controls Corrected code generated for user controls to fix a circular reference New features: Added handling of Storyboard generated events Added support for ItemsControl class. Many thanks to them for the great work they did on this utility and for sharing it with the community. You can download the new release here: http://cid-9b7b0aefe3514dc5.office.live.com/self.aspx/.Public/XAML2CPP.zip

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  • Windows Embedded Compact 7 Online Training

    - by Valter Minute
    If you want to increase your knowledge about Windows Embedded Compact and want to hear my voice, you can go to the brand new Windows Embedded Compact 7 Online Training website and check all the videos (many of them recorded by me, so be prepared for a funny accent!) showing many of the features and tools of this real time embedded OS from Microsoft. So, buy the pop-corn, sit on your most confortable chair and enjoy the show!

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  • XAML2CPP 1.0.1.0

    - by Valter Minute
    I upgraded XAML2CPP to fix some bugs and support some new features that will be used in my next tutorial step (that I hope to publish very soon!). Bug fixed: the listbox selection changed event was generated with an incorrect prototype events generated by the XAML tree root element (UserControl) were not handled. New features: XAML2CPP generates panels (dynamically generated XAML subtrees that may be added to a page) and user controls (those will be the object of my next post, stay tuned!). XAML2CPPXRValue class has been added to XAML2CPPbase.h. This class will allow single-line declaration of XRValue objects (I’m lazy!) and destroys automatically objects and string XRValues when the object itself is destroyed. You can download the latest XAML2CPP release here: http://cid-9b7b0aefe3514dc5.skydrive.live.com/self.aspx/.Public/XAML2CPP.zip

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  • Windows CE support forums

    - by Valter Minute
    As you may already know, microsoft is moving its communities to a new platform, based on web forums. The “old” USENET newsgroups are going to be replaced by web forums organized by categories. One for low-level platform development (for the guys working with Platform Builder), another one for native application development (for people writing their real-time applications in C/C++ or people using Silverlight for Windows Embedded) and, last but not least, a forum dedicated to managed application development (for people that are quickly developing their applications with the .NET Compact Framework). You can find the new forums here: http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/category/windowsembeddedcompact Read the “welcome” message to choose the best forum for your question and never forget that to have a good answer you should ask your question in a good way. Here you can find some suggestions about how you can ask questions (in newsgroup or forums): http://guruce.com/blogpost/howtoaskquestionsonnewsgroups (Thanks to Michel Verhagen for the article)

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  • Windows Embedded in Padua

    - by Valter Minute
    Martedì 8 Giugno, presso l’università di Padova terrò un intervento su Windows CE all’interno dell’evento: “Workshop sulle nuove architetture per sistemi embedded”. All’interno dello stesso evento altre sessioni tratteranno dell’architettura ARM e in particolare dei nuovi core Cortex A8, di applicazioni avanzate e di Linux Embedded. L’agenda (fitta e interessante) e il link per le iscrizioni potete trovarli qui: http://www.arrowitaly.it/training-events/training-events/dettaglio-training/article/workshop-sulle-nuove-architetture-per-sistemi-embedded/?tx_ttnews[backPid]=1336&cHash=ae34e269e1

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  • RSS blues

    - by Valter Minute
    It seems that the RSS feed is not updating. If you missed the last post, here's a list: Silverlight for Windows Embedded tutorial (step 4): http://geekswithblogs.net/WindowsEmbeddedCookbook/archive/2010/03/09/silverlight-for-windows-embedded-tutorial-step-3-again.aspx XAML2CPP 1.0.1.0: http://geekswithblogs.net/WindowsEmbeddedCookbook/archive/2010/03/08/xaml2cpp-1.0.1.0.aspx

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  • Windows CE and the Compact Framework are dead?

    - by Valter Minute
    This is one of the question that I’ve been asked more and more frequently at my public speeches and each time I meet customers. The announcement of the new Windows Phone 7 platform and the release of Visual Studio 2010 generated a bit of confusion around Windows CE and some of the technologies it supports. Windows CE is still alive and a lot of good programmers are working on the new releases (I had a chance to know some of them during the MVP summit in February). Here’s a blog post from Olivier Bloch that describes the situation and provides some good news about the OS: http://blogs.msdn.com/obloch/archive/2010/05/03/windows-ce-is-not-dead.aspx As you can read here, Windows Phone 7 keeps its “roots” inside Windows CE. Regarding the .NET Compact Framework, this article from the excellent “I know the answer (it’s 42)” blog from Abhinaba (it seems that we share a passion for photography, Douglas Adams and embedded development), explains that the .NET CF is the foundation of XNA and Silverlight implementation on the WP7 platform: http://blogs.msdn.com/abhinaba/archive/2010/03/18/what-is-netcf.aspx So Windows CE is here to stay, powering one of the most interesting smart phone platforms and ready to power also your devices. Add those blogs to your RSS reader list and stay tuned for more good news about CE and the Compact Framework!

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  • Windows for IoT, continued

    - by Valter Minute
    Originally posted on: http://geekswithblogs.net/WindowsEmbeddedCookbook/archive/2014/08/05/windows-for-iot-continued.aspxI received many interesting feedbacks on my previous blog post and I tried to find some time to do some additional tests. Bert Kleinschmidt pointed out that pins 2,3 and 10 of the Galileo are connected directly to the SOC, while pin 13, the one used for the sample sketch is controlled via an I2C I/O expander. I changed my code to use pin 2 instead of 13 (just changing the variable assignment at the beginning of the code) and latency was greatly reduced. Now each pulse lasts for 1.44ms, 44% more than the expected time, but ways better that the result we got using pin 13. I also used SetThreadPriority to increase the priority of the thread that was running the sketch to THREAD_PRIORITY_HIGHEST but that didn't change the results. When I was using the I2C-controlled pin I tried the same and the timings got ways worse (increasing more than 10 times) and so I did not commented on that part, wanting to investigate the issua a bit more in detail. It seems that increasing the priority of the application thread impacts negatively the I2C communication. I tried to use also the Linux-based implementation (using a different Galileo board since the one provided by MS seems to use a different firmware) and the results of running the sample blink sketch modified to use pin 2 and blink the led for 1ms are similar to those we got on the same board running Windows. Here the difference between expected time and measured time is worse, getting around 3.2ms instead of 1 (320% compared to 150% using Windows but far from the 100.1% we got with the 8-bit Arduino). Both systems were not under load during the test, maybe loading some applications that use part of the CPU time would make those timings even less reliable, but I think that those numbers are enough to draw some conclusions. It may not be worth running a full OS if what you need is Arduino compatibility. The Arduino UNO is probably the best Arduino you can find to perform this kind of development. The Galileo running the Linux-based stack or running Windows for IoT is targeted to be a platform for "Internet of Things" devices, whatever that means. At the moment I don't see the "I" part of IoT. We have low level interfaces (SPI, I2C, the GPIO pins) that can be used to connect sensors but the support for connectivity is limited and the amount of work required to deliver some data to the cloud (using a secure HTTP request or a message queuing system like APMQS or MQTT) is still big and the rich OS underneath seems to not provide any help doing that.Why should I use sockets and can't access all the high level connectivity features we have on "full" Windows?I know that it's possible to use some third party libraries, try to build them using the Windows For IoT SDK etc. but this means re-inventing the wheel every time and can also lead to some IP concerns if used for products meant to be closed-source. I hope that MS and Intel (and others) will focus less on the "coolness" of running (some) Arduino sketches and more on providing a better platform to people that really want to design devices that leverage internet connectivity and the cloud processing power to deliver better products and services. Providing a reliable set of connectivity services would be a great start. Providing support for .NET would be even better, leaving native code available for hardware access etc. I know that those components may require additional storage and memory etc. So making the OS componentizable (or, at least, provide a way to install additional components) would be a great way to let developers pick the parts of the system they need to develop their solution, knowing that they will integrate well together. I can understand that the Arduino and Raspberry Pi* success may have attracted the attention of marketing departments worldwide and almost any new development board those days is promoted as "XXX response to Arduino" or "YYYY alternative to Raspberry Pi", but this is misleading and prevents companies from focusing on how to deliver good products and how to integrate "IoT" features with their existing offer to provide, at the end, a better product or service to their customers. Marketing is important, but can't decide the key features of a product (the OS) that is going to be used to develop full products for end customers integrating it with hardware and application software. I really like the "hackable" nature of open-source devices and like to see that companies are getting more and more open in releasing information, providing "hackable" devices and supporting developers with documentation, good samples etc. On the other side being able to run a sketch designed for an 8 bit microcontroller on a full-featured application processor may sound cool and an easy upgrade path for people that just experimented with sensors etc. on Arduino but it's not, in my humble opinion, the main path to follow for people who want to deliver real products.   *Shameless self-promotion: if you are looking for a good book in Italian about the Raspberry Pi , try mine: http://www.amazon.it/Raspberry-Pi-alluso-Digital-LifeStyle-ebook/dp/B00GYY3OKO

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  • Penne alla MVP

    - by Valter Minute
    I’m sorry for the long silence on this blog and the long delay in replying to the friends that commented on my articles. I’ve been quite busy in the last weeks and I spent a lot of time traveling around Italy (not for pleasure!). In the meantime I’ve been renewed as an MVP on April the 1st (nice date to renew someone with such a bad sense of humor…). I decided to celebrate my MVP award with a new recipe (to be honest, I celebrated by eating the results of this recipe!) and I decided to call it “penne alla MVP”… just because I’m not good in finding nice names for my recipes. Ingredients (for 4 people): 360g pasta (penne or other short pasta) 300g small shrimps 1 cup of whipped cream 2 tablespoons of olive oil 1 small leek 1 glass of beer (I used Hoegaarden dutch white beer… but just because I like it and I finished the rest of the bootle while cooking) Chives Salt, pepper Prepare the pasta by boiling it in salted water, as usual. In the meantime chop the leek in very small bits, heat the oil inside a pan and when the oil is hot, drop the leek chops and let them cook for a few minutes. Add the shrimps and the glass of beer. Let them cook inside beer until they are cooked (if you used pre-cooked shrimps a couple of minutes would be enough to heat them and gave them the flavour of beer). Add the whipped cream and mix it well with the shrimps and the sauce. Dry the pasta and drop the sauce on top of it and then add the chives finely chopped.

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  • Windows Embedded Compact 7

    - by Valter Minute
    This will be the official name of the new release of Windows CE. Windows Embedded Compact 7 is available as a public CTP and it already supports a wide range of CPUs and both the device emulator and VirtualPC emulated environments. So I’ll have to learn a new (and longer) name for my favorite OS… but I (and all my two readers!) will be able to test it as soon as the download from connect web site completes (I'm sorry for my readers, but you'll have to download it by yourselves). Here’s a link for the download (it's free but you’ll have to register on connect with a valid LiveId): https://connect.microsoft.com/windowsembeddedce Remember that this is still a beta (or “Community Technology Preview” if you speak marketing language) and so it’s better to not install it on your main development PC (or, at least, backup everything before installation) and that the features and performances you’ll get from this beta may not be the same ones of the final release of the OS. You can discover the new features of Windows Embedded Compact on the new “official” webpage on microsoft website: http://www.microsoft.com/windowsembedded/en-us/products/windowsce/compact7.mspx or on Olivier’s blog: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/obloch/archive/2010/06/01/windows-embedded-compact-7-announced-and-public-ctp-available.aspx I hope to be able to post some interesting content about Windows Embedded Compact 7 soon (and maybe be able to shorten it’s name in CE7 in my blog posts, when I'll ensure that both my readers are not worketing for Microsoft's marketing department …). Technorati Tags: "Windows Embedded Compact 7"

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  • Embedded Spark 2010 Summer Challenge

    - by Valter Minute
    If you have a good idea for a cool embedded device based on Windows Embedded 7 and some free time to work on it you can partecipate to the Embedded Spark 2010 Summer Challenge. Just submit a short paper describing your idea and, if your idea is one of the 75 selected by the judges, you’ll receive some hardware to put your idea in practice and a chance to attend ESC Boston for free and win 15.000 dollars. The latest challenge has been won by Marco Bodoira, a fellow Italian embedded developer, so I hope to see many Italian developers (and non developers) presenting their ideas and project for this new challenge! You can find rules, ideas, forums and all the information you need at the challenge web site: http://www.embeddedspark.com/

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  • Better Embedded 2012

    - by Valter Minute
    Il 24 e 25 Settembre 2012 a Firenze si svolgerà la conferenza “Better Embedded 2012”. Lo scopo della conferenza è quello di parlare di sistemi embedded a 360°, abbracciando sia lo sviluppo firmware, che i sistemi operativi e i toolkit dedicati alla realizzazione di sistemi dedicati. E’ un’ottima occasione per confrontarsi e, in soli due giorni, avere una panoramica ampia dall’hardware a Linux, da Android a Windows CE, dal .NET microframework a QT, senza troppi messaggi commerciali e con un’ottima apertura sia alle tecnologie commerciali che a quelle free e open source. Io parteciperò come speaker, parlando di Windows CE, ma anche come spettatore interessato a molte delle track di un programma che si va popolando e diventa mano a mano più interessante. Se volete cogliere l’occasione per visitare Firenze (che già sarebbe un motivo più che sufficiente!) e parlare di embedded, contattatemi perchè come speaker posso fornire un codice sconto che vi farà risparmiare un 20% sul prezzo della conferenza (che già è vantaggiosissimo, vista la quantità di contenuti dedicati all’embedded). Arrivederci a Firenze!

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  • My Feelings About Microsoft Surface

    - by Valter Minute
    Advice: read the title carefully, I’m talking about “feelings” and not about advanced technical points proved in a scientific and objective way I still haven’t had a chance to play with a MS Surface tablet (I would love to, of course) and so my ideas just came from reading different articles on the net and MS official statements. Remember also that the MVP motto begins with “Independent” (“Independent Experts. Real World Answers.”) and this is just my humble opinion about a product and a technology. I know that, being an MS MVP you can be called an “MS-fanboy”, I don’t care, I hope that people can appreciate my opinion, even if it doesn’t match theirs. The “Surface” brand can be confusing for techies that knew the “original” surface concept but I think that will be a fresh new brand name for most of the people out there. But marketing department are here to confuse people… so I can understand this “recycle” of an existing name. So Microsoft is entering the hardware arena… for me this is good news. Microsoft developed some nice hardware in the past: the xbox, zune (even if the commercial success was quite limited) and, last but not least, the two arc mices (old and new model) that I use and appreciate. In the past Microsoft worked with OEMs and that model lead to good and bad things. Good thing (for microsoft, at least) is market domination by windows-based PCs that only in the last years has been reduced by the return of the Mac and tablets. Google is also moving in the hardware business with its acquisition of Motorola, and Apple leveraged his control of both the hardware and software sides to develop innovative products. Microsoft can scare OEMs and make them fly away from windows (but where?) or just lead the pack, showing how devices should be designed to compete in the market and bring back some of the innovation that disappeared from recent PC products (look at the shelves of your favorite electronics store and try to distinguish a laptop between the huge mass of anonymous PCs on displays… only Macs shine out there…). Having to compete with MS “official” hardware will force OEMs to develop better product and bring back some real competition in a market that was ruled only by prices (the lower the better even when that means low quality) and no innovative features at all (when it was the last time that a new PC surprised you?). Moving into a new market is a big and risky move, but with Windows 8 Microsoft is playing a crucial move for its future, trying to be back in the innovation run against apple and google. MS can’t afford to fail this time. I saw the new devices (the WinRT and Pro) and the specifications are scarce, misleading and confusing. The first impression is that the device looks like an iPad with a nice keyboard cover… Using “HD” and “full HD” to define display resolution instead of using the real figures and reviving the “ClearType” brand (now dead on Win8 as reported here and missed by people who hate to read text on displays, like myself) without providing clear figures (couldn’t you count those damned pixels?) seems to imply that MS was caught by surprise by apple recent “retina” displays that brought very high definition screens on tablets.Also there are no specifications about the processors used (even if some sources report NVidia Tegra for the ARM tablet and i5 for the x86 one) and expected battery life (a critical point for tablets and the point that killed Windows7 x86 based tablets). Also nothing about the price, and this will be another critical point because other platform out there already provide lots of applications and have a good user base, if MS want to enter this market tablets pricing must be competitive. There are some expansion ports (SD and USB), so no fixed storage model (even if the specs talks about 32-64GB for RT and 128-256GB for pro). I like this and don’t like the apple model where flash memory (that it’s dirt cheap used in thumdrives or SD cards) is as expensive as gold (or cocaine to have a more accurate per gram measurement) when mounted inside a tablet/phone. For big files you’ll be able to use external media and an SD card could be used to store files that don’t require super-fast SSD-like access times, I hope. To be honest I really don’t like the marketplace model and the limitation of Windows RT APIs (no local database? from a company that based a good share of its success on VB6+Access!) and lack of desktop support on the ARM (even if the support is here and has been used to port office). It’s a step toward the consumer market (where competitors are making big money), but may impact enterprise (and embedded) users that may not appreciate Windows 8 new UI or the limitations of the new app model (if you aren’t connected you are dead ). Not having compatibility with the desktop will require brand new applications and honestly made all the CPU cycles spent to convert .NET IL into real machine code in the past like a huge waste of time… as soon as a new processor architecture is supported by Windows you still have to rewrite part of your application (and MS is pushing HTML5+JS and native code more than .NET in my perception). On the other side I believe that the development experience provided by Visual Studio is still miles (or kilometres) ahead of the competition and even the all-uppercase menu of VS2012 hasn’t changed this situation. The new metro UI got mixed reviews. On my side I should say that is very pleasant to use on a touch screen, I like the minimalist design (even if sometimes is too minimal and hides stuff that, in my opinion, should be visible) but I should also say that using it with mouse and keyboard is like trying to pick your nose with boxing gloves… Metro is also very interesting for embedded devices where touch screen usage is quite common and where having an application taking all the screen is the norm. For devices like kiosks, vending machines etc. this kind of UI can be a great selling point. I don’t need a new tablet (to be honest I’m pretty happy with my wife’s iPad and with my PC), but I may change my opinion after having a chance to play a little bit with those new devices and understand what’s hidden under all this mysterious and generic announcements and specifications!

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