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  • Virtualbox on Ubuntu 12.04 and 3.5 kernel

    - by kas
    I have installed the 3.5 kernel under Ubuntu 12.04. When I install virtualbox I recieve the following error. Setting up virtualbox (4.1.12-dfsg-2ubuntu0.2) ... * Stopping VirtualBox kernel modules [ OK ] * Starting VirtualBox kernel modules * No suitable module for running kernel found [fail] invoke-rc.d: initscript virtualbox, action "restart" failed. Processing triggers for python-central ... Setting up virtualbox-dkms (4.1.12-dfsg-2ubuntu0.2) ... Loading new virtualbox-4.1.12 DKMS files... First Installation: checking all kernels... Building only for 3.5.0-18-generic Building initial module for 3.5.0-18-generic Error! Bad return status for module build on kernel: 3.5.0-18-generic (x86_64) Consult /var/lib/dkms/virtualbox/4.1.12/build/make.log for more information. * Stopping VirtualBox kernel modules [ OK ] * Starting VirtualBox kernel modules * No suitable module for running kernel found [fail] invoke-rc.d: initscript virtualbox, action "restart" failed. Setting up virtualbox-qt (4.1.12-dfsg-2ubuntu0.2) ... Does anyone know how I might be able to resolve this? Edit -- Here is the make.log DKMS make.log for virtualbox-4.1.12 for kernel 3.5.0-18-generic (x86_64) Mon Nov 19 12:12:23 EST 2012 make: Entering directory `/usr/src/linux-headers-3.5.0-18-generic' LD /var/lib/dkms/virtualbox/4.1.12/build/built-in.o LD /var/lib/dkms/virtualbox/4.1.12/build/vboxdrv/built-in.o CC [M] /var/lib/dkms/virtualbox/4.1.12/build/vboxdrv/linux/SUPDrv-linux.o CC [M] /var/lib/dkms/virtualbox/4.1.12/build/vboxdrv/SUPDrv.o CC [M] /var/lib/dkms/virtualbox/4.1.12/build/vboxdrv/SUPDrvSem.o CC [M] /var/lib/dkms/virtualbox/4.1.12/build/vboxdrv/r0drv/alloc-r0drv.o CC [M] /var/lib/dkms/virtualbox/4.1.12/build/vboxdrv/r0drv/initterm-r0drv.o CC [M] /var/lib/dkms/virtualbox/4.1.12/build/vboxdrv/r0drv/memobj-r0drv.o CC [M] /var/lib/dkms/virtualbox/4.1.12/build/vboxdrv/r0drv/mpnotification-r0drv.o CC [M] /var/lib/dkms/virtualbox/4.1.12/build/vboxdrv/r0drv/powernotification-r0drv.o CC [M] /var/lib/dkms/virtualbox/4.1.12/build/vboxdrv/r0drv/linux/assert-r0drv-linux.o CC [M] /var/lib/dkms/virtualbox/4.1.12/build/vboxdrv/r0drv/linux/alloc-r0drv-linux.o CC [M] /var/lib/dkms/virtualbox/4.1.12/build/vboxdrv/r0drv/linux/initterm-r0drv-linux.o CC [M] /var/lib/dkms/virtualbox/4.1.12/build/vboxdrv/r0drv/linux/memobj-r0drv-linux.o /var/lib/dkms/virtualbox/4.1.12/build/vboxdrv/r0drv/linux/memobj-r0drv-linux.c: In function ‘rtR0MemObjLinuxDoMmap’: /var/lib/dkms/virtualbox/4.1.12/build/vboxdrv/r0drv/linux/memobj-r0drv-linux.c:1150:9: error: implicit declaration of function ‘do_mmap’ [-Werror=implicit-function-declaration] cc1: some warnings being treated as errors make[2]: *** [/var/lib/dkms/virtualbox/4.1.12/build/vboxdrv/r0drv/linux/memobj-r0drv-linux.o] Error 1 make[1]: *** [/var/lib/dkms/virtualbox/4.1.12/build/vboxdrv] Error 2 make: *** [_module_/var/lib/dkms/virtualbox/4.1.12/build] Error 2 make: Leaving directory `/usr/src/linux-headers-3.5.0-18-generic'

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  • Migrating from VMware to VirtualBox

    - by Fat Bloke
    We are getting more and more people asking how to move from VMware to VirtualBox so here are 2 handy blogs on the subject: Migrating an Oracle Enterprise Linux VMMigrating a Windows XP VMHope this is useful to someone out there.- FB

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  • Introducing Oracle VM VirtualBox

    - by Fat Bloke
    I guess these things always take longer than expected and, while the dust is still not completely settled in all the ex-Sun geographies, it is high time we started looking at some of the great new assets in the Oracle VM portfolio. So let's start with one of the most exciting: Oracle VM VirtualBox. VirtualBox is cross-platform virtualization software, oftentimes called a hypervisor, and it runs on Windows, Linux, Solaris and the Mac. Which means that you download it, you install it on your existing platform, and start creating and running virtual machines alongside your existing applications. For example, on my Mac I can run Oracle Enterprise Linux and Windows 7 alongside my Mac apps like this...(Click to zoom)VirtualBox use has grown phenomenally to the point that at Sun it was the 3rd most popular download behind Java and MySQL. Its success can be attributed to the fact that it doesn't need dedicated hardware, it can be installed on either client or server classes of computers, is very easy to use and is free for personal use. And, as you might expect, VirtualBox has it's own vibrant community too, over at www.virtualbox.org There are hundreds of tutorials out there about how to use VirtualBox to create vm's and install different operating systems ranging from Windows 7 to ChromeOS, and if you don't want to install an operating system yourself, you can download pre-built virtual appliances from community sites such as VirtualBox Images or commercial companies selling subscriptions to whole application stacks, such as JumpBox . In no time you'll be creating and sharing your own vm's using the VirtualBox OVF export and import function. VirtualBox is deceptively powerful. Under the simple GUI lies a formidable engine capable of running heavyweight multi-CPU virtual workloads, exhibiting Enterprise capabilities including a built-in remote display server, an iSCSI initiator for connecting to shared storage, and the ability to teleport running vm's from one host to another. And for solution builders, you should be aware that VirtualBox has a scriptable command line interface and an SDK and rich web service APIs. To get a further feel for what VirtualBox is capable of, check out some of these short movies or simply go download it for yourself.- FB

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  • Que es Virtualbox?

    - by [email protected]
    VIRTUALBOX (Open Source para virtualización)Las herrramientas de virtualización se han puesto de moda de manera casi exponencial durante los últimos años. Una de ellas es VirtualBox, esta corre sobre diferentes sistemas operativos y para los desarrolladores e ingenieros en computo que desean realizar pruebas de productos sin afectar sus maquinas, esta es una de las mejores alternativas. Adicionalmente hay algo que tiene VirtualBox que aun es mejor, es un program Open Source, eso significa que la podras usar en tu maquina teniendo un costo de $0.Esta herramienta realiza basicamente la misma funcion que Vmware Workstation, e incluso puede ejecutar la maquinas virtuales creadas con vmware workstation sin necesidad de realizar conversiones de alguna manera.La ultima version disponible al dia de hoy es la 3.1.6 y este puede ser descargado facilmente.  Solo visita uno de estos sites."Get  the lastest VirtualBox version at here"http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloadso en la pagina de Oracle"Get  the lastest VirtualBox version at here"http://dlc.sun.com/virtualbox/vboxdownload.html

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  • Ubuntu 12.10 - VirtualBox not sharing internet with guest system

    - by Fernando Briano
    I went from ArchLinux to Ubuntu on my dev box. I use VirtualBox to test web sites on Windows and IE. I have my Windows 7 VirtualBox image running on Ubuntu's VirtualBox. Back with ArchLinux, internet worked "out of the box" on the Windows boxes. I left the default options on the box's Network Options (NAT). The Windows machine shows as "connected to ethernet" but reports: The dns server isn't responding So I can't access Internet from there. I tried searching for Ubuntu's official docs but they seem pretty outdated. I tried using my old boxes from Arch (which boot normally but have no internet) and creating a new box from Ubuntu itself, but still get the same results. Update: I'm using VirtualBox 4.1.18 from Ubuntu's repository (apt-get install virtualbox).

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  • How to open a VirtualBox (.VDI) Virtual Machine

    - by [email protected]
     How to open a .VDI Virtual MachineSometimes someone share with us one Virtual machine with extension .VDI, after that we can wonder how and what with?Well the answer is... It is a VirtualBox - Virtual Machine. If you have not downloaded it you can do this easily, just follow this post.http://listeningoracle.blogspot.com/2010/04/que-es-virtualbox.htmlorhttp://oracleoforacle.wordpress.com/2010/04/14/ques-es-virtualbox/Ok, Now with VirtualBox Installed open it and proceed with the following:1. Open the Virtual File Manager. 2. Click on Actions ? Add and select the .VDI fileClick "Ok"3.  A new Virtual machine will be displayed, (in this Case, an OEL5 32GB Virtual Machine is available.)4. This step is important. Once you have open the settings, under General option click the advanced settings. Here you must change the default directory to save your Snapshots; my recommendation set it to the same directory where the .Vdi file is. Otherwise you can have the same Virtual Machine and its snapshots in different paths.5. Now Click on System, and proceed to assign the correct memory and define the processors for the Virtual machine. Note: Enable  "Enable IO APIC" if you are planning to assign more than one CPU to the Virtual Machine.6. Associated the storage disk to the Virtual machineThe disk must be selected as IDE Primary Master. 7. Well you can verify the other options, but with these changes you will be able to start the VM. Note: Sometime the VM owner may share some instructions, if so follow his instructions.8. Click Ok and Push Start Button, and enjoy your Virtual Machine

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  • How to open a VirtualBox (.VDI) Virtual Machine

    - by [email protected]
     How to open a .VDI Virtual MachineSometimes someone share with us one Virtual machine with extension .VDI, after that we can wonder how and what with?Well the answer is... It is a VirtualBox - Virtual Machine. If you have not downloaded it you can do this easily, just follow this post.http://listeningoracle.blogspot.com/2010/04/que-es-virtualbox.htmlorhttp://oracleoforacle.wordpress.com/2010/04/14/ques-es-virtualbox/Ok, Now with VirtualBox Installed open it and proceed with the following:1. Open the Virtual File Manager. 2. Click on Actions ? Add and select the .VDI fileClick "Ok"3.  A new Virtual machine will be displayed, (in this Case, an OEL5 32GB Virtual Machine is available.)4. This step is important. Once you have open the settings, under General option click the advanced settings. Here you must change the default directory to save your Snapshots; my recommendation set it to the same directory where the .Vdi file is. Otherwise you can have the same Virtual Machine and its snapshots in different paths.5. Now Click on System, and proceed to assign the correct memory and define the processors for the Virtual machine. Note: Enable  "Enable IO APIC" if you are planning to assign more than one CPU to the Virtual Machine.6. Associated the storage disk to the Virtual machineThe disk must be selected as IDE Primary Master. 7. Well you can verify the other options, but with these changes you will be able to start the VM. Note: Sometime the VM owner may share some instructions, if so follow his instructions.8. Click Ok and Push Start Button, and enjoy your Virtual Machine

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  • VirtualBox 3.2 is released! A Red Letter Day?

    - by Fat Bloke
    Big news today! A new release of VirtualBox packed full of innovation and improvements. Over the next few weeks we'll take a closer look at some of these new features in a lot more depth, but today we'll whet your appetite with the headline descriptions. To start with, we should point out that this is the first Oracle-branded version which makes today a real Red-letter day ;-)  Oracle VM VirtualBox 3.2 Version 3.2 moves VirtualBox forward in 3 main areas ( handily, all beginning with "P" ) : performance, power and supported guest operating system platforms.  Let's take a look: Performance New Latest Intel hardware support - Harnessing the latest in chip-level support for virtualization, VirtualBox 3.2 supports new Intel Core i5 and i7 processor and Intel Xeon processor 5600 Series support for Unrestricted Guest Execution bringing faster boot times for everything from Windows to Solaris guests; New Large Page support - Reducing the size and overhead of key system resources, Large Page support delivers increased performance by enabling faster lookups and shorter table creation times. New In-hypervisor Networking - Significant optimization of the networking subsystem has reduced context switching between guests and host, increasing network throughput by up to 25%. New New Storage I/O subsystem - VirtualBox 3.2 offers a completely re-worked virtual disk subsystem which utilizes asynchronous I/O to achieve high-performance whilst maintaining high data integrity; New Remote Video Acceleration - The unique built-in VirtualBox Remote Display Protocol (VRDP), which is primarily used in virtual desktop infrastructure deployments, has been enhanced to deliver video acceleration. This delivers a rich user experience coupled with reduced computational expense, which is vital when servers are running hundreds of virtual machines; Power New Page Fusion - Traditional Page Sharing techniques have suffered from long and expensive cache construction as pages are scrutinized as candidates for de-duplication. Taking a smarter approach, VirtualBox Page Fusion uses intelligence in the guest virtual machine to determine much more rapidly and accurately those pages which can be eliminated thereby increasing the capacity or vm density of the system; New Memory Ballooning- Ballooning provides another method to increase vm density by allowing the memory of one guest to be recouped and made available to others; New Multiple Virtual Monitors - VirtualBox 3.2 now supports multi-headed virtual machines with up to 8 virtual monitors attached to a guest. Each virtual monitor can be a host window, or be mapped to the hosts physical monitors; New Hot-plug CPU's - Modern operating systems such Windows Server 2008 x64 Data Center Edition or the latest Linux server platforms allow CPUs to be dynamically inserted into a system to provide incremental computing power while the system is running. Version 3.2 introduces support for Hot-plug vCPUs, allowing VirtualBox virtual machines to be given more power, with zero-downtime of the guest; New Virtual SAS Controller - VirtualBox 3.2 now offers a virtual SAS controller, enabling it to run the most demanding of high-end guests; New Online Snapshot Merging - Snapshots are powerful but can eat up disk space and need to be pruned from time to time. Historically, machines have needed to be turned off to delete or merge snapshots but with VirtualBox 3.2 this operation can be done whilst the machines are running. This allows sophisticated system management with minimal interruption of operations; New OVF Enhancements - VirtualBox has supported the OVF standard for virtual machine portability for some time. Now with 3.2, VirtualBox specific configuration data is also stored in the standard allowing richer virtual machine definitions without compromising portability; New Guest Automation - The Guest Automation APIs allow host-based logic to drive operations in the guest; Platforms New USB Keyboard and Mouse - Support more guests that require USB input devices; New Oracle Enterprise Linux 5.5 - Support for the latest version of Oracle's flagship Linux platform; New Ubuntu 10.04 ("Lucid Lynx") - Support for both the desktop and server version of the popular Ubuntu Linux distribution; And as a man once said, "just one more thing" ... New Mac OS X (experimental) - On Apple hardware only, support for creating virtual machines run Mac OS X. All in all this is a pretty powerful release packed full of innovation and speedups. So what are you waiting for?  -FB 

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  • Playing Age of Empires II multiplayer in VirtualBox Over wi fi network

    - by Gaurav_Java
    I installed Age of Empires II (Expansion) in VirtualBox (hosting Windows XP). It works great in single player mode. Unfortunately, I tried playing multiplayer via WI-FI which I created on my Ubuntu machine and can't seem to join games. But when I connected to my WI-FI router other able to connect to my system and we can play multiplayer mode This is what I've done so far to try to resolve the issue: I noticed that the IP address of my virtual machine was 10.0.x.x, While the local IP on Ubuntu is 192.168.x.x, which I figured was a Problem. So I changed from NAT networking to bridged networking in VirtualBox . I turned off the Windows firewall in the virtual machine and don't have any ports blocked by Ubuntu, so no software firewall should be at fault. However I'm still unable to play multiplayer games, and suspect that some kind of networking issue lies at the heart of the problem. I'm not sure what else I would need to change, however. So essentially I was wondering if anyone else here has managed to play AOE2, or any similar game, inside VirtualBox from Ubuntu, and if so what you needed to do to make it possible. Or if anyone has suggestions on where else to look to figure out the problem, I'd appreciate that as well. Unfortunately AOE2 itself doesn't provide any debugging information to troubleshoot the inability to connect to network games. Here MY IP result both for Ubuntu and Virtualbox XP I want to play game on multiplayer mode in virtualbox on my system(Own Created on Ubuntu ) wi-fi on which other can connect and play hope someone will answer this

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  • Ubuntu 13.10 install ISO crashes on VirtualBox Mac 4.3

    - by John Allsup
    Does anybody know what to do about this? Machine is a 2008 Core 2 Duo iMac with 4GB RAM. (And 64bit Debian 7 boots OK, but I've not tried installing under the latest version of VirtualBox as I have just upgraded VBox today.) VirtualBox 4.3, upon trying to boot a machine with the Ubuntu 13.10 (64bit) iso (with the VM configured for Ubuntu 64bit) crashes, with the following information: Failed to open a session for the virtual machine Ubuntu64. The VM session was aborted. Result Code: NS_ERROR_FAILURE (0x80004005) Component: SessionMachine Interface: ISession {12f4dcdb-12b2-4ec1-b7cd-ddd9f6c5bf4d} === Head of crash dump is below Process: VirtualBoxVM [716] Path: /Applications/VirtualBox.app/Contents/MacOS/VirtualBoxVM Identifier: VirtualBoxVM Version: ??? (???) Code Type: X86 (Native) Parent Process: VBoxSVC [644] Date/Time: 2013-10-17 22:58:23.679 +0100 OS Version: Mac OS X 10.6.8 (10K549) Report Version: 6 Exception Type: EXC_BAD_ACCESS (SIGBUS) Exception Codes: KERN_PROTECTION_FAILURE at 0x0000000000000040 Crashed Thread: 0 Dispatch queue: com.apple.main-thread Thread 0 Crashed: Dispatch queue: com.apple.main-thread 0 com.apple.CoreFoundation 0x92a25c03 CFSetApplyFunction + 83 1 com.apple.framework.IOKit 0x95557ad4 __IOHIDManagerInitialEnumCallback + 69 2 com.apple.CoreFoundation 0x92a2442b __CFRunLoopDoSources0 + 1563 3 com.apple.CoreFoundation 0x92a21eef __CFRunLoopRun + 1071 4 com.apple.CoreFoundation 0x92a213c4 CFRunLoopRunSpecific + 452 5 com.apple.CoreFoundation 0x92a211f1 CFRunLoopRunInMode + 97 6 com.apple.HIToolbox 0x98eb5e04 RunCurrentEventLoopInMode + 392 7 com.apple.HIToolbox 0x98eb5af5 ReceiveNextEventCommon + 158 8 com.apple.HIToolbox 0x98eb5a3e BlockUntilNextEventMatchingListInMode + 81 9 com.apple.AppKit 0x9971b595 _DPSNextEvent + 847 10 com.apple.AppKit 0x9971add6 -[NSApplication nextEventMatchingMask:untilDate:inMode:dequeue:] + 156 11 com.apple.AppKit 0x996dd1f3 -[NSApplication run] + 821 12 QtGuiVBox 0x019f19e1 QEventDispatcherMac::processEvents(QFlags<QEventLoop::ProcessEventsFlag>) + 1505 13 QtCoreVBox 0x018083b1 QEventLoop::processEvents(QFlags<QEventLoop::ProcessEventsFlag>) + 65 14 QtCoreVBox 0x018086fa QEventLoop::exec(QFlags<QEventLoop::ProcessEventsFlag>) + 170 15 QtGuiVBox 0x01eea9e5 QDialog::exec() + 261 16 VirtualBox.dylib 0x011234b8 TrustedMain + 1108104 17 VirtualBox.dylib 0x01126d68 TrustedMain + 1122616 18 VirtualBox.dylib 0x010fac19 TrustedMain + 942057 19 VirtualBox.dylib 0x010f9b3d TrustedMain + 937741 20 VirtualBox.dylib 0x010f81dd TrustedMain + 931245 21 VirtualBox.dylib 0x010f85b8 TrustedMain + 932232 22 VirtualBox.dylib 0x0109d4f8 TrustedMain + 559304 23 VirtualBox.dylib 0x0101521e TrustedMain + 1518 24 ...virtualbox.app.VirtualBoxVM 0x00002e7e start + 2766 25 ...virtualbox.app.VirtualBoxVM 0x000024b5 start + 261 26 ...virtualbox.app.VirtualBoxVM 0x000023e5 start + 53 ==== And please somebody fix the code so that you can just delimit large blocks of code at the start and the end without indenting every line manually by 4 spaces.

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  • VirtualBox host-only networking fails on Ubuntu 11.10 host

    - by Jeremy Kendall
    I've installed Ubuntu 11.10 on a new Lenovo Thinkpad 420s and I'm trying to get some VirtualBox VMs up and running (using Vagrant). Everything works fine until I try to add host-only networking. This is the failure I get in the terminal: I set logging to debug and tried again. Here's a paste of the relevant portion of the log. When I try to add host-only networks with the VirtualBox gui (File-Preferences-Networking-Add host-only networking), I get the following error message: This error is occurring with three different virtual boxes, all Ubuntu 11.10 64bit guests, one of which I've run without issue on a Windows host and an OSX host. Here is the Vagrantfile for the box I've successfully run on Windows and OSX: Vagrant::Config.run do |config| config.vm.box = "ubuntu-11.10" config.vm.box_url = "http://timhuegdon.com/vagrant-boxes/ubuntu-11.10.box" config.vm.network :hostonly, "192.168.33.10" config.vm.customize ["modifyvm", :id, "--memory", "512"] config.vm.customize ["modifyvm", :id, "--natnet1", "10.0.28.0/24"] config.vm.forward_port 80, 4567 end I've tried two other boxes as well, one of which I built last night with veewee, all of which are getting the exact same error. I've used rvm to install ruby 1.9.3-p125 [ x86_64 ], and I've got Vagrant running in its own gemset. I've Googled quite a lot and haven't been able to find any resolution. Suggestions?

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  • Ubuntu and VirtualBox

    - by Sinan
    I have the following configuration, A host running Windows 7; A guest running Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (VirtualBox); I am connecting a Cisco router directly to my PC running Windows 7 and testing the router for netflow packets in the virtualBox I am having a difficulty capturing the traffic of the netflow from the Cisco device in my virtualBox using port 2222. I tried to use the many different networking modes provided by virutalBox (i.e. NAT, Bridged Adapter, Host only adapter) but I am not successful in capturing the netflow traffic. Could you please advise me on the configuration setup that need to be done on the virtual box to allow capturing the traffic coming from the router. I successfully capture the netflow traffic on my PC (windows 7). Thank you

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  • TCP port are filtered in VirtualBox

    - by iUngi
    I'm running Ubuntu using VirtualBox to test a server application, but I couldn't get it work the communication. I used nmap to check whether the port is open or not: nmap -T4 -n vbip -p 30000 Host is up (0.00061s latency). PORT STATE SERVICE 30000/tcp filtered unknown when I'm checking the port inside the VirtualBox, than the port is open Host is up (0.00061s latency). PORT STATE SERVICE 30000/tcp open unknown I'm using bridge connection, does the VB filter the ports?

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  • How to access network folders from within windows 7 virtualbox

    - by musher
    At work we have fileshare storages accessible via the network. I'm not super familiar with this kind of networking, so I'm not 100% sure how to word this question/give enough details right away so please ask for any clarifications. That being said: Host: Xubuntu 14.04 Guest: Windows 7 enterprise Via thunar I can access these network drives fine by going to Browse Network > Windows Network > Server I want to use The name given in the address bar is: smb://SERVER-NAME So my question now, is how do I go about accessing these folders via my win 7 machine in virtualbox? I've searched but all I get is people who can't figure out shared folders between host/guest (which I've got working)

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  • 12.04 on VirtualBox -No internet access on Guest OS

    - by Muzab
    I have Windows 7 as my Host OS which has wired Ethernet working. My guest OS on VirtualBox is Ubuntu 12.04. The problem is that I cannot browse. I have: Enabled sharing on Windows; Have used NAT, Bridged Adapter etc ( all possible combinations); With NAT, used PCnet-FAST II (Am79c973) combination. Ubuntu says "connected to wired ethernet1" but I cannot access websites. VirtualBox Host-Only Network in the Network and Sharing center shows that I don't have IPV4 and IPV6 connectivity. Meaning I don't have DHCP configured. Strangely I have DNS address correct in the Ubuntu properties.

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  • Help to setup networking in Virtualbox Ubuntu Guest from Windows vista Host

    - by Ramesh Vel
    Hi, I am trying to access the MYSQL installed inside the Ubuntu Guest (In VirtualBox) from my Windows vista Host. It always says not able to find the given IP in the network. I have tried ping the ubuntu virtual machine, but it was not working. So i believe root cause for this is, some bridging between Host & Guest is not enabled. Since i am very new to Ubuntu, am not able to troubleshoot this. Can someone help me out? Cheers

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  • Virtualbox: host only networking - proxy internet connection

    - by Russell
    I'll ask my question first, then give details about where I am coming from: Is it possible to use host only, then have ubuntu act as a proxy to provide internet access to windows? If so, how? I am trying to get the right combination of networking for my virtualbox windows client VM (win7). My host is ubuntu 10.10 (maverick). I believe I understand the basic network options (please correct me if I am incorrect): NAT - Host can't communicate with guest but guest has access to all host's adapters Host only - Separate adapter but guest has no net access Bridged - bridge an adapter in the host with the virtual adapter to give the host access to the host adapter I am trying to give my win guest internet access, but also access the host in a separate network. Bridged only works when the host is connected to the internet (this is a laptop) so when it's not connected the network is down. Thanks I appreciate your help.

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  • Install VirtualBox Guest Additions "Feisty Fawn"

    - by codebone
    I am trying to install the virtualbox guest additions into a feisty fawn (7.04) VM. The problem I am running into is that when I Click install guest additions, or place the iso in the drive manually, the disk never shows up in the machine. I even manually mounted and went to the mounted directory and it was empty. When using the file browser, doubling clicking on the cdrom yields Unable to mount the selected volume. mount: special device /dev/hdc does not exist. Secondly, I tried installing via repository... but according to the system, I have no internet connection. But, I can browse the web using firefox just fine (in the guest). Here is my /etc/network/interfaces file... code auto lo iface lo inet loopback auto eth0 iface eth0 inet dhcp I also tryed setting a static ip... auto lo iface lo inet loopback auto eth0 iface eth0 inet static address 192.168.1.253 netmask 255.255.255.0 gateway 192.168.1.1 The reason I am trying to get this particular installation running is because it is part of a book, "Hacking: The Art of Exploitation" (Jon Erickson), and is fully loaded wilh tools and such to go along exactly with the book. I appreciate any effort into finding a solution for this! Thanks

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  • Internet is not working in base machine

    - by surendar
    I have a Ubuntu desktop. I am running a virtual windows machine using virtual box. Few days before Internet is not working in Ubuntu but it is working in the virtual machine. Even the samba shares are also accessible. I don't know why internet is not working in the base machine. I have tried to ping google.com, but it returns [email protected]:~$ ping google.com ping: unknown host google.com ifconfig command's output [email protected]:~$ ifconfig eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:27:0e:1b:86:2a inet addr:192.168.1.7 Bcast:192.168.1.255 Mask:255.255.255.0 inet6 addr: fe80::227:eff:fe1b:862a/64 Scope:Link UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1 RX packets:38221 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0 TX packets:28161 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0 collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000 RX bytes:39144616 (39.1 MB) TX bytes:6143919 (6.1 MB) Interrupt:27 Base address:0x2000 eth0:0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:27:0e:1b:86:2a inet addr:192.168.2.7 Bcast:192.168.2.255 Mask:255.255.255.0 UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1 Interrupt:27 Base address:0x2000 lo Link encap:Local Loopback inet addr:127.0.0.1 Mask:255.0.0.0 inet6 addr: ::1/128 Scope:Host UP LOOPBACK RUNNING MTU:16436 Metric:1 RX packets:14944 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0 TX packets:14944 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0 collisions:0 txqueuelen:0 RX bytes:1735451 (1.7 MB) TX bytes:1735451 (1.7 MB) vmnet1 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:50:56:c0:00:01 inet addr:192.168.243.1 Bcast:192.168.243.255 Mask:255.255.255.0 inet6 addr: fe80::250:56ff:fec0:1/64 Scope:Link UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1 RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0 TX packets:77 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0 collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000 RX bytes:0 (0.0 B) TX bytes:0 (0.0 B) vmnet8 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:50:56:c0:00:08 inet addr:172.16.162.1 Bcast:172.16.162.255 Mask:255.255.255.0 inet6 addr: fe80::250:56ff:fec0:8/64 Scope:Link UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1 RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0 TX packets:78 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0 collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000 RX bytes:0 (0.0 B) TX bytes:0 (0.0 B)

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  • Networking in VirtualBox

    - by Fat Bloke
    Networking in VirtualBox is extremely powerful, but can also be a bit daunting, so here's a quick overview of the different ways you can setup networking in VirtualBox, with a few pointers as to which configurations should be used and when. VirtualBox allows you to configure up to 8 virtual NICs (Network Interface Controllers) for each guest vm (although only 4 are exposed in the GUI) and for each of these NICs you can configure: Which virtualized NIC-type is exposed to the Guest. Examples include: Intel PRO/1000 MT Server (82545EM),  AMD PCNet FAST III (Am79C973, the default) or  a Paravirtualized network adapter (virtio-net). How the NIC operates with respect to your Host's physical networking. The main modes are: Network Address Translation (NAT) Bridged networking Internal networking Host-only networking NAT with Port-forwarding The choice of NIC-type comes down to whether the guest has drivers for that NIC.  VirtualBox, suggests a NIC based on the guest OS-type that you specify during creation of the vm, and you rarely need to modify this. But the choice of networking mode depends on how you want to use your vm (client or server) and whether you want other machines on your network to see it. So let's look at each mode in a bit more detail... Network Address Translation (NAT) This is the default mode for new vm's and works great in most situations when the Guest is a "client" type of vm. (i.e. most network connections are outbound). Here's how it works: When the guest OS boots,  it typically uses DHCP to get an IP address. VirtualBox will field this DHCP request and tell the guest OS its assigned IP address and the gateway address for routing outbound connections. In this mode, every vm is assigned the same IP address (10.0.2.15) because each vm thinks they are on their own isolated network. And when they send their traffic via the gateway (10.0.2.2) VirtualBox rewrites the packets to make them appear as though they originated from the Host, rather than the Guest (running inside the Host). This means that the Guest will work even as the Host moves from network to network (e.g. laptop moving between locations), and from wireless to wired connections too. However, how does another computer initiate a connection into a Guest?  e.g. connecting to a web server running in the Guest. This is not (normally) possible using NAT mode as there is no route into the Guest OS. So for vm's running servers we need a different networking mode.... Bridged Networking Bridged Networking is used when you want your vm to be a full network citizen, i.e. to be an equal to your host machine on the network. In this mode, a virtual NIC is "bridged" to a physical NIC on your host, like this: The effect of this is that each VM has access to the physical network in the same way as your host. It can access any service on the network such as external DHCP services, name lookup services, and routing information just as the host does. Logically, the network looks like this: The downside of this mode is that if you run many vm's you can quickly run out of IP addresses or your network administrator gets fed up with you asking for statically assigned IP addresses. Secondly, if your host has multiple physical NICs (e.g. Wireless and Wired) you must reconfigure the bridge when your host jumps networks.  Hmm, so what if you want to run servers in vm's but don't want to involve your network administrator? Maybe one of the next 2 modes is for you... Internal Networking When you configure one or more vm's to sit on an Internal network, VirtualBox ensures that all traffic on that network stays within the host and is only visible to vm's on that virtual network. Configuration looks like this: The internal network ( in this example "intnet" ) is a totally isolated network and so is very "quiet". This is good for testing when you need a separate, clean network, and you can create sophisticated internal networks with vm's that provide their own services to the internal network. (e.g. Active Directory, DHCP, etc). Note that not even the Host is a member of the internal network, but this mode allows vm's to function even when the Host is not connected to a network (e.g. on a plane). Note that in this mode, VirtualBox provides no "convenience" services such as DHCP, so your machines must be statically configured or one of the vm's needs to provide a DHCP/Name service. Multiple internal networks are possible and you can configure vm's to have multiple NICs to sit across internal and other network modes and thereby provide routes if needed. But all this sounds tricky. What if you want an Internal Network that the host participates on with VirtualBox providing IP addresses to the Guests? Ah, then for this, you might want to consider Host-only Networking... Host-only Networking Host-only Networking is like Internal Networking in that you indicate which network the Guest sits on, in this case, "vboxnet0": All vm's sitting on this "vboxnet0" network will see each other, and additionally, the host can see these vm's too. However, other external machines cannot see Guests on this network, hence the name "Host-only". Logically, the network looks like this: This looks very similar to Internal Networking but the host is now on "vboxnet0" and can provide DHCP services. To configure how a Host-only network behaves, look in the VirtualBox Manager...Preferences...Network dialog: Port-Forwarding with NAT Networking Now you may think that we've provided enough modes here to handle every eventuality but here's just one more... What if you cart around a mobile-demo or dev environment on, say, a laptop and you have one or more vm's that you need other machines to connect into? And you are continually hopping onto different (customer?) networks. In this scenario: NAT - won't work because external machines need to connect in. Bridged - possibly an option, but does your customer want you eating IP addresses and can your software cope with changing networks? Internal - we need the vm(s) to be visible on the network, so this is no good. Host-only - same problem as above, we want external machines to connect in to the vm's. Enter Port-forwarding to save the day! Configure your vm's to use NAT networking; Add Port Forwarding rules; External machines connect to "host":"port number" and connections are forwarded by VirtualBox to the guest:port number specified. For example, if your vm runs a web server on port 80, you could set up rules like this:  ...which reads: "any connections on port 8080 on the Host will be forwarded onto this vm's port 80".  This provides a mobile demo system which won't need re-configuring every time you open your laptop lid. Summary VirtualBox has a very powerful set of options allowing you to set up almost any configuration your heart desires. For more information, check out the VirtualBox User Manual on Virtual Networking. -FB 

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  • Complete Guide to Networking Windows 7 with XP and Vista

    - by Mysticgeek
    Since there are three versions of Windows out in the field these days, chances are you need to share data between them. Today we show how to get each version to be share files and printers with one another. In a perfect world, getting your computers with different Microsoft operating systems to network would be as easy as clicking a button. With the Windows 7 Homegroup feature, it’s almost that easy. However, getting all three of them to communicate with each other can be a bit of a challenge. Today we’ve put together a guide that will help you share files and printers in whatever scenario of the three versions you might encounter on your home network. Sharing Between Windows 7 and XP The most common scenario you’re probably going to run into is sharing between Windows 7 and XP.  Essentially you’ll want to make sure both machines are part of the same workgroup, set up the correct sharing settings, and making sure network discovery is enabled on Windows 7. The biggest problem you may run into is finding the correct printer drivers for both versions of Windows. Share Files and Printers Between Windows 7 & XP  Map a Network Drive Another method of sharing data between XP and Windows 7 is mapping a network drive. If you don’t need to share a printer and only want to share a drive, then you can just map an XP drive to Windows 7. Although it might sound complicated, the process is not bad. The trickiest part is making sure you add the appropriate local user. This will allow you to share the contents of an XP drive to your Windows 7 computer. Map a Network Drive from XP to Windows 7 Sharing between Vista and Windows 7 Another scenario you might run into is having to share files and printers between a Vista and Windows 7 machine. The process is a bit easier than sharing between XP and Windows 7, but takes a bit of work. The Homegroup feature isn’t compatible with Vista, so we need to go through a few different steps. Depending on what your printer is, sharing it should be easier as Vista and Windows 7 do a much better job of automatically locating the drivers. How to Share Files and Printers Between Windows 7 and Vista Sharing between Vista and XP When Windows Vista came out, hardware requirements were intensive, drivers weren’t ready, and sharing between them was complicated due to the new Vista structure. The sharing process is pretty straight-forward if you’re not using password protection…as you just need to drop what you want to share into the Vista Public folder. On the other hand, sharing with password protection becomes a bit more difficult. Basically you need to add a user and set up sharing on the XP machine. But once again, we have a complete tutorial for that situation. Share Files and Folders Between Vista and XP Machines Sharing Between Windows 7 with Homegroup If you have one or more Windows 7 machine, sharing files and devices becomes extremely easy with the Homegroup feature. It’s as simple as creating a Homegroup on on machine then joining the other to it. It allows you to stream media, control what data is shared, and can also be password protected. If you don’t want to make your Windows 7 machines part of the same Homegroup, you can still share files through the Public Folder, and setup a printer to be shared as well.   Use the Homegroup Feature in Windows 7 to Share Printers and Files Create a Homegroup & Join a New Computer To It Change which Files are Shared in a Homegroup Windows Home Server If you want an ultimate setup that creates a centralized location to share files between all systems on your home network, regardless of the operating system, then set up a Windows Home Server. It allows you to centralize your important documents and digital media files on one box and provides easy access to data and the ability to stream media to other machines on your network. Not only that, but it provides easy backup of all your machines to the server, in case disaster strikes. How to Install and Setup Windows Home Server How to Manage Shared Folders on Windows Home Server Conclusion The biggest annoyance is dealing with printers that have a different set of drivers for each OS. There is no real easy way to solve this problem. Our best advice is to try to connect it to one machine, and if the drivers won’t work, hook it up to the other computer and see if that works. Each printer manufacturer is different, and Windows doesn’t always automatically install the correct drivers for the device. We hope this guide helps you share your data between whichever Microsoft OS scenario you might run into! Here are some other articles that will help you accomplish your home networking needs: Share a Printer on a Home Network from Vista or XP to Windows 7 How to Share a Folder the XP Way in Windows Vista Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Delete Wrong AutoComplete Entries in Windows Vista MailSvchost Viewer Shows Exactly What Each svchost.exe Instance is DoingFixing "BOOTMGR is missing" Error While Trying to Boot Windows VistaShow Hidden Files and Folders in Windows 7 or VistaAdd Color Coding to Windows 7 Media Center Program Guide TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 Icelandic Volcano Webcams Open Multiple Links At One Go NachoFoto Searches Images in Real-time Office 2010 Product Guides Google Maps Place marks – Pizza, Guns or Strip Clubs Monitor Applications With Kiwi

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  • Unable to Install VirtualBox Due to Missing Kernel Module

    - by SoftTimur
    I am trying to install VirtualBox on my Ubuntu. I first tried to sudo apt-get install virtualbox-ose in a terminal, but after the configuration step, it fails with an error: No suitable module for running kernel found When proceeding with starting virtualbox, I get this error: WARNING: The character device /dev/vboxdrv does not exist. Please install the virtualbox-ose-dkms package and the appropriate headers, most likely linux-headers-generic. You will not be able to start VMs until this problem is fixed. So I tried the package from http://www.virtualbox.org/, but starting VirtualBox fails with: WARNING: The vboxdrv kernel module is not loaded. Either there is no module available for the current kernel (2.6.38-8-generic-pae) or it failed to load. Please recompile the kernel module and install it by sudo /etc/init.d/vboxdrv setup You will not be able to start VMs until this problem is fixed. So I ran sudo /etc/init.d/vboxdrv setup, but it fails too: * Stopping VirtualBox kernel modules [ OK ] * Uninstalling old VirtualBox DKMS kernel modules [ OK ] * Trying to register the VirtualBox kernel modules using DKMS Error! Your kernel headers for kernel 2.6.38-8-generic-pae cannot be found at /lib/modules/2.6.38-8-generic-pae/build or /lib/modules/2.6.38-8-generic-pae/source. * Failed, trying without DKMS * Recompiling VirtualBox kernel modules * Look at /var/log/vbox-install.log to find out what went wrong The contents of /var/log/vbox-install.log. As I am stuck, I also tried to install kernel-devel with yum, still fruitless: [email protected]# yum install kernel-devel Setting up Install Process No package kernel-devel available. Nothing to do Now I've no idea how to correct this. Any ideas?

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