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  • Do 2D games have a future? [closed]

    - by Griffin
    I'm currently working on a 2D soft-body physics engine (since none exist right now -_-), but I'm worried that there's no point to spending what will most likely be years on it. Although I love working on it, I doubt such an engine would get any income considering anyone willing to pay money for the library will likely to be working in 3D. Do 2D games have any sort of future in the game industry? Should I just drop my engine and find something meaningful to work on? Bonus: I've been trying to think of a unique way to implement my physics engine in a 2d game by looking at games that are multiple dimensions, but still in 2d perspective like Paper Mario. Any ideas?

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  • Are high powered 3D game engines better at 2D games than engines made for 2D

    - by Adam
    I'm a software engineer that's new to game programming so forgive me if this is a dumb question as I don't know that much about game engines. If I was building a 2D game am I better off going with an engine like Torque that looks like it's built for 2D, or would higher powered engines like Unreal, Source and Unity work better? I'm mainly asking if 2D vs 3D is a large factor in choosing an engine. For the purpose of comparison, let's eliminate variables by saying price isn't a factor (even though it probably is). EDIT: I should probably also mention that the game we're developing has a lot of RTS and RPG elements regarding leveling up

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  • 2D Array of 2D Arrays (C# / XNA) [on hold]

    - by Lemoncreme
    I want to create a 2D array that contains many other 2D arrays. The problem is I'm not quite sure what I'm doing but this is the initialization code I have: int[,][,] chunk = new int[64, 64][32, 32]; For some reason Visual Studio doesn't like this and says that it's and 'invalid rank specifier'. Also, I'm not sure how to use the nested arrays once I've declared them... Some help and some insight, please?

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  • 2D Planet Gravity

    - by baked
    I'm trying to make a simple game where a spaceship is launched and then its path is effected by the gravity of planets. Similar to this game: http://sciencenetlinks.com/interactives/gravity.html I wish to know how to replicate the effect the planets have on the spaceship in this game so a spaceship can 'loop' around a planet to change direction. I have managed to achieve some bogus results where the spaceship loops in a huge ellipse around the planet or is only slightly affected by the gravity of a planet using Vectors. Thanks in advance. p.s I have plenty of coding experience just none to do with game dev.

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  • Add the 2D Version of the New Unity Interface to Ubuntu 10.10 and 11.04

    - by Asian Angel
    Is your computer or virtualization software unable to display the new 3D version of the Unity Interface in Ubuntu? Now you can access and enjoy the 2D version with just a little PPA magic added to your system! To add the new PPA open the Ubuntu Software Center, go to the Edit Menu, and select Software Sources. Access the Other Software Tab in the Software Sources Window and add the first of the PPAs shown below (outlined in red). The second PPA will be automatically added to your system. Once you have the new PPAs set up, go back to the Ubuntu Software Center and click on the PPA listing for Unity 2D on the left (highlighted with red in the image). Scroll down until you find the listing for “Unity interface for non-accelerated graphics cards – unity-2d” and click Install. Once that is done you are ready to go to System, Administration, and then select Login Screen in your Ubuntu Menu. Unlock the screen and select Unity 2D as the default session from the drop-down list as shown here. Log out and then back in to start enjoying that Unity 2D goodness! Here is how things will look when you click on the Ubuntu Menu Icon. Select the category that you would like to start with (such as Web) and get ready to have fun. This definitely looks (and works) awesome! Enjoy your new Unity 2D Interface! Unity 2D Packaging PPA [Launchpad] Latest Features How-To Geek ETC Internet Explorer 9 RC Now Available: Here’s the Most Interesting New Stuff Here’s a Super Simple Trick to Defeating Fake Anti-Virus Malware How to Change the Default Application for Android Tasks Stop Believing TV’s Lies: The Real Truth About "Enhancing" Images The How-To Geek Valentine’s Day Gift Guide Inspire Geek Love with These Hilarious Geek Valentines MyPaint is an Open-Source Graphics App for Digital Painters Can the Birds and Pigs Really Be Friends in the End? [Angry Birds Video] Add the 2D Version of the New Unity Interface to Ubuntu 10.10 and 11.04 MightyMintyBoost Is a 3-in-1 Gadget Charger Watson Ties Against Human Jeopardy Opponents Peaceful Tropical Cavern Wallpaper

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  • How do you structure a 2D level format with collisions etc. in Java (Slick 2D)?

    - by liamzebedee
    I am developing a game in Java. 2D Fighter, Kind of like the 2d flash game Raze(http://armorgames.com/play/5395/raze). I currently am using the Slick 2D game library and am researching how to structure my levels. I am currently stuck on the problem of the level format(e.g. file format). How do you structure a 2d level with collisions etc.? Level Notes: Will go up down left right NOTE: New to gamedev

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  • How to fetch only the sprites in the player's range of motion for collision testing? (2D, axis aligned sprites)

    - by Twodordan
    I am working on a 2D sprite game for educational purposes. (In case you want to know, it uses WebGl and Javascript) I've implemented movement using the Euler method (and delta time) to keep things simple. Now I'm trying to tackle collisions. The way I wrote things, my game only has rectangular sprites (axis aligned, never rotated) of various/variable sizes. So I need to figure out what I hit and which side of the target sprite I hit (and I'm probably going to use these intersection tests). The old fashioned method seems to be to use tile based grids, to target only a few tiles at a time, but that sounds silly and impractical for my game. (Splitting the whole level into blocks, having each sprite's bounding box fit multiple blocks I might abide. But if the sprites change size and move around, you have to keep changing which tiles they belong to, every frame, it doesn't sound right.) In Flash you can test collision under one point, but it's not efficient to iterate through all the elements on stage each frame. (hence why people use the tile method). Bottom line is, I'm trying to figure out how to test only the elements within the player's range of motion. (I know how to get the range of motion, I have a good idea of how to write a collisionCheck(playerSprite, targetSprite) function. But how do I know which sprites are currently in the player's vicinity to fetch only them?) Please discuss. Cheers!

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  • Development platform for 2D web and mobile games

    - by Robert Vella
    Is there a game development platform -- similar to Torque, or Unity -- which can be used to deploy 2D games on the following platforms: Web iOs Android Xbox Live Arcade (Preferred but not required) And which has an integrated or mature physics engine? Perhaps, even a built in editor? I've looked at the following possibilities but I've found something missing in each one. Of course in each case I may be guilty of misconception. Corona SDK (No web deployment, no windows support) Torque 2D (No web deployment) Flash + Flash Punk or Flixel (No native android deployment, and I'm not sure if it is stable on mobile platforms) Unity + SpriteManager2 (Not really optimised for 2D games, and I haven't seen enough advanced 2D examples -- like say platformers -- to really have any confidence in using it for something like this) Has anyone had any luck with this?

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  • Sony PSM SDK's 2D game engine

    - by Notbad
    I have started with the Sony PSM SDK this week, I'm interested in creating a little 2D game and have been reading through the web about a so called "2D game engine" integrated into the SDK. Some information I read suggested that it was added on January 2012, but I have been going through the documentation and haven't been able to find any reference to it. Does anybody know if they finally introduced the 2D game engine for the PSM SDK? Thanks in advance.

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  • How to take first step for making 2d games in Xcode [on hold]

    - by josh
    I have 2 years experience in Xcode in business and socials Apps. Now I am going into 2d game development so I want to know that how to take first step for making 2d games in Xcode either using external framework or its native iOS games. Looking for game like angry bird. What are the key points I should keep in mind before jumping into 2d games development. Any suggestion or related helping materials share with me. Thanks.

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  • Sony PSM sdk and 2d Game engine

    - by Notbad
    I have started with Sony PSM sdk this week. I'm interested to create a little 2D game and have been reading through the web about a so called "2D game engine" integrated in psm. Some information I read suggested that it was going to be added on january 2012, but I have been going through the documentation and haven't been able to find any reference to it. Does anybody know if they finally introduced the 2D game engien for psm? Thanks in advance.

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  • 2d shapes in XNA 4.0?

    - by Lautaro
    Having some experience of XNA but none of 3D programming. I have an idea i want to realize but i have not decided to do it in 3d or 2d. Im not sure which one will be best in XNA. I want to have a shape like a blob that can reshape depending on input. The morphing does not need to be very advanced. It could be a circle (2d) or globe (3d) that just has one point that moves slightly in a random direction. In ASP.NET i have made this through the 2d Draw classes where i can make lines, circles, squares etc and then modify the points that makes them up. But it seems to me that XNA does not have classes for making 2d shapes (can i get this confirmed?). If it had, then this would be the quickest solution for me.

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  • Which techniques to study?

    - by Djentleman
    Just to give you some background info, I'm studying a programming major at a tertiary level and am in my third year, so I'm not a newbie off the street. However, I am still quite new to game programming as a subset of programming. One of my personal projects for next semester is to design and create a 2D platformer game with emphasis on procedural generation and "neato" effects (think metroidvania). I've written up a list of some techniques to help me improve my personal skills (using XNA for the time being). The list is as follows: QuadTrees: Build a basic program in XNA that moves basic 2D sprites (circles and squares) around a set path and speed and changes their colour when they collide. Add functionality to add and delete objects of different sizes (select a direction and speed when adding and just drag and drop them in). Particles: Build a basic program in XNA in which you can select different colours and create particle effects of those colours on screen by clicking and dragging the mouse around (simple particles emerging from where the mouse is clicked). Add functionality where you can change the amount of particles to be drawn and the speed at which they travel and when they expire. Possibly implement gravity and wind after part 3 is complete. Physics: Build a basic program in XNA where you have a ball in a set 2D environment, a wind slider, and a gravity slider (can go to negative for reverse gravity). You can click to drag the ball around and release to throw it and, depending on what you do, the ball interacts with the environment. Implement other shapes afterwards. Random 2D terrain generation: Build a basic program in XNA that randomly generates terrain (including hills, caves, etc) created from 2D tiles. Add functionality that draws the tiles from a tileset and places different tiles depending on where they lie on the y-axis (dirt on top, then rock, then lava, etc). Randomised objects: Build a basic program in XNA that, when a button is clicked, displays a randomised item sprite based on parameters (type, colour, etc) with the images pulled from tilesets. Add the ability to save the item as an object, which stores it in a side-pane where it can be selected for viewing. Movement: Build a basic program in XNA where you can move an object around in an environment (tile-based) with a camera that pans with it. No gravity. Implement gravity and wind, allow the character to jump and fall with some basic platforms. So my question is this: Are there any other commonly used techniques that I should research, and can I get some suggestions as to the effectiveness of the techniques I've chosen to work on (e.g., don't do QuadTree stuff because [insert reason here], or, do [insert technique here] before you start working on particles because [insert reason here])? I hope this is clear enough and please let me know if I can further clarify anything!

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  • 2D graphics - why use spritesheets?

    - by Columbo
    I have seen many examples of how to render sprites from a spritesheet but I havent grasped why it is the most common way of dealing with sprites in 2d games. I have started out with 2d sprite rendering in the few demo applications I've made by dealing with each animation frame for any given sprite type as its own texture - and this collection of textures is stored in a dictionary. This seems to work for me, and suits my workflow pretty well, as I tend to make my animations as gif/mng files and then extract the frames to individual pngs. Is there a noticeable performance advantage to rendering from a single sheet rather than from individual textures? With modern hardware that is capable of drawing millions of polygons to the screen a hundred times a second, does it even matter for my 2d games which just deal with a few dozen 50x100px rectangles? The implementation details of loading a texture into graphics memory and displaying it in XNA seems pretty abstracted. All I know is that textures are bound to the graphics device when they are loaded, then during the game loop, the textures get rendered in batches. So it's not clear to me whether my choice affects performance. I suspect that there are some very good reasons most 2d game developers seem to be using them, I just don't understand why.

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  • 2D map/plane with nodes overlayed that supports panning, scaling and clicking on nodes

    - by garlicman
    I'm trying my hand at Android development and seem to be running into an invisible ceiling in trying to get what I want accomplished. Basically I'm trying to create an app that renders a 2D surface map that I can (pinch) zoom and pan. I'll have to place nodes on the surface of the map that will scale/zoom and pan in relation to the surface. I started out with a 2D ImageView approach and got as far as pinch zoom, pan and laying nodes as relative ImageViews, but all the methods I tried to get X,Y,W,H for the 2D surface were always off for some reason. Additionally, I was never able to scale the node ImageViews correctly, and as a result never got far enough to try and work out their X,Y scaled offset. So I decided to get back to 3D rendering. Conceptually pan/zoom is camera manipulation, so I don't have to mess with how to scale the 2D map or the nodes. But I need a starting point or sample to get me going that's close to what I'm trying to achieve. A sample on a translucent spinning cube isn't helping as much as I need it to. Any tips? Links, insults and sympathy are all welcome!

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  • Rendering of 2d water

    - by luke
    Suppose you have a nice way to move your 2D particles in order to simulate a fluid (like water). Any ideas on how to render it? Consider the fact that the game is a 2D game. The perspective is like this (the first image i have found): an example of 2d water. The water will be contained in boxes that can be broken in order to let it fall down and interact with other objects. The most simple way that comes to my mind is to use a small image for each particle. I am interested in hearing more ways of rendering water. Thank you.

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  • Homemaking a 2d soft body physics engine

    - by Griffin
    hey so I've decided to Code my own 2D soft-body physics engine in C++ since apparently none exist and I'm starting only with a general idea/understanding on how physics work and could be simulated: by giving points and connections between points properties such as elasticity, density, mass, shape retention, friction, stickiness, etc. What I want is a starting point: resources and helpful examples/sites that could give me the specifics needed to actually make this such as equations and required physics knowledge. It would be great if anyone out there also would give me their attempts or ideas. finally I was wondering if it was possible to... use the source code of an existing 3D engine such as Bullet and transform it to be 2D based? use the source code of a 2D Rigid body physics engine such as box2d as a starting point?

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  • How to autohide Unity 2D?

    - by ph1b
    In the regular Unity 3D, I used Compiz Config Manager where I could config the Unity-Plugin to autohide the left start-bar and not to show it when moving my mouse to the left. So it was perfect for using Docky. But with Unity 2D the Unity settings don't have any effect. How can I completely hide the start-panel and just have it shown when pressing the windows-key? With the following: dconf write /com/canonical/unity-2d/launcher/hide-mode 1 dconf write /com/canonical/unity-2d/launcher/use-strut false it still opens the bar when going with my mouse to the left.

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  • 2D Pixel/sprite game in unity? [on hold]

    - by acidzombie24
    Hi I'm an absolute newbie in unity. In the past I was told unity is terrible for 2d games so I look away after looking at it for a few days. I don't remember if this was right before unity4 came out or after. I hear unity is fairly good at 2d now. I tried googling for tutorials but I'm doing it wrong. I could not find a good tetris or tic tac toe tutorial. What assets/tutorials do I want for a 2D game? Side question is what tutorials are good if I want to make a fire emblem/advance wars type game (HUD heavy grid base game)

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  • Implementing 2D CSG (for collision shapes)?

    - by bluescrn
    Are there any simple (or well documented) algorithms for basic CSG operations on 2D polygons? I'm looking for a way to 'add' a number of overlapping 2D collision shapes. These may be convex or concave, but will be closed shapes, defined as a set of line segments, with no self-intersections. The use of this would be to construct a clean set of collision edges, for use with a 2D physics engine, from a scene consisting of many arbitrarily placed (and frequently overlapping) objects, each with their own collision shape. To begin with, I only need to 'add' shapes, but the ability to 'subtract', to create holes, may also be useful.

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  • Homemaking a 2d soft body physics engine

    - by Griffin
    hey so I've decided to Code my own 2D soft-body physics engine in C++ since apparently none exist and I'm starting only with a general idea/understanding on how physics work and could be simulated: by giving points and connections between points properties such as elasticity, density, mass, shape retention, friction, stickiness, etc. What I want is a starting point: resources and helpful examples/sites that could give me the specifics needed to actually make this such as equations and required physics knowledge. It would be great if anyone out there also would give me their attempts or ideas. finally I was wondering if it was possible to... use the source code of an existing 3D engine such as Bullet and transform it to be 2D based? use the source code of a 2D Rigid body physics engine such as box2d as a starting point?

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  • Why use 3d matrix and camera in 2D world for 2d geometric figures?

    - by Navy Seal
    I'm working in XNA on a 2d isometric world/game and I'm using DrawUserPrimitives to draw some geometric figures... I saw some tutorials about creating dynamic shadows but I didn't understood why they use a "3d" matrix to control the transformations since the figure I'm drawing is in 2d perspective. I know I'm drawing a 2d figure in 3d but I still can't understand if I really need to work with the matrix. Is there any advantage in using a 3d Matrix to control camera and view? Any reason why I can't just update my vertex's positions by using a regular method since the view is always the same... And since I want to work only with single figures, won't this cause all the geometric figures have the same transformations simultaneously? To understand better what I mean here's a video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LjvsGHXaGEA&feature=player_embedded

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  • Resources for 2D rendering using OpenGL?

    - by nightcracker
    I noticed that there is quite some difference between 3D and 2D rendering using OpenGL, the techniques are different - pixel-perfect placing is a lot more desirable, among other things. Are there any good (complete) references on using OpenGL for rendering 2D graphics? There are quite a few "tutorials" around on the net that help you open a window, set up a half-decent environment and draw a sprite, but no real good information on rotation, blending, lightning, drawing order, using the z-buffer, particles, "complex" primitives (circles, stars, cross symbols), ensuring pixel-perfect rendering, instancing and many other staple 2D effects/techniques. Any books, great blogs, anything? Any particular awesome libraries to read?

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  • Can I still use unity 2d [duplicate]

    - by dragonloverlord
    This question already has an answer here: Is it possible to change Unity 3D to 2D and will I gain any performance boost after that? 3 answers I can not run unity 3d on my Chromebook but unity 2d in Ubuntu 12.04 works fine so is it possible to run unity low graphics mode on Ubuntu 14.04 as an alternative? If I can run low graphics mode as an alternative then how would I go about that? If I can not then what would be a good unity like alternative for Ubuntu 14.04?

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  • spinning a 2d Cube

    - by Rahul Verma
    I know that a cube is actually a 3d shape , but i have some other problem over here. I have been doing 2D Game dev using libgdx but have never touched 3D rendering. Now what I want in my 2D game is that instead of coins I make my player collect magical cubes. But those cubes need to be spinning on one Diagonal, same can be seen in popular game Vector. Here is a screenshot. Can someone explaing the mathematics of such an animation

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