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  • ~/.xsession-errors is 2.7gb big (and growing), on fresh install, caused by gnome-settings-daemon errors

    - by Alex Black
    I've just installed Ubuntu 10.10 x64, activated the recommended Nvidia drivers, and I noticed my hard disk space is disappearing, I narrowed the culprit down to this: [email protected]:~$ ls -la .x* -rw------- 1 alex alex 4436076400 2010-11-19 22:35 .xsession-errors -rw------- 1 alex alex 10495 2010-11-19 21:46 .xsession-errors.old Any idea what this file is, why its so big, and why its growing? A few seconds later: [email protected]:~$ ls -la .x* -rw------- 1 alex alex 5143604317 2010-11-19 22:36 .xsession-errors -rw------- 1 alex alex 10495 2010-11-19 21:46 .xsession-errors.old tailing it: [email protected]:~$ tail .xsession-errors (gnome-settings-daemon:1514): GLib-GObject-CRITICAL **: g_object_unref: assertion `G_IS_OBJECT (object)' failed (gnome-settings-daemon:1514): GLib-GObject-CRITICAL **: g_object_unref: assertion `G_IS_OBJECT (object)' failed (gnome-settings-daemon:1514): GLib-GObject-CRITICAL **: g_object_unref: assertion `G_IS_OBJECT (object)' failed (gnome-settings-daemon:1514): GLib-GObject-CRITICAL **: g_object_unref: assertion `G_IS_OBJECT (object)' failed (gnome-settings-daemon:1514): GLib-GObject-CRITICAL **: g_object_unref: assertion `G_IS_OBJECT (object)' failed Also, the process "gnome-settings" seems to be using 100% cpu: PID USER PR NI VIRT RES SHR S %CPU %MEM TIME+ COMMAND 1514 alex 20 0 268m 10m 7044 R 100 0.1 7:06.10 gnome-settings-

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  • QotD: Alex Buckley announcing Java™ SE 8 Early Access Builds with Type Annotation Support

    - by $utils.escapeXML($entry.author)
    I am pleased to announce that binary builds of the JSR 308 Reference Implementation are available at http://jdk8.java.net/type-annotations/.Please see the Type Annotations project page for a link to the JSR 308 Specification. There is also a changelog, which is important to review as there have been significant spec changes in 2012.The builds were generated from the type-annotations/type-annotations forest on 9/9. This forest is regularly updated from jdk8/jdk8 and jdk8/tl.Alex Buckley in a post on the type-annotations-dev mailing list.If you want to play with repeating annotations, check out http://jdk8.java.net/type-annotations/ ... thanks to superior code wrangling by Joel Franck (repeating annotations) and Werner Dietl (type annotations), support for repeating annotations on declarations is included in the build.Alex Buckley in a post on the enhanced-metadata-spec-discuss mailing list.

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  • Programme d'étude sur le C++ bas niveau, un article d'Alex Darby traduit par Bousk

    Nouvelle série d'articles annoncée dans Le programme de rentrée de la rubrique C++. L'objectif de cette série d'article d'Alex Darby sur la programmation "bas-niveau" est de permettre aux développeurs ayant déjà des connaissances de la programmation C++ de mieux comprendre comme vos programmes sont exécutés en pratique. Ce premier article explique l'importance de connaître le fonctionnement bas-niveau et comment récupérer le code assembleur généré par le compilateur et l'interpréter. Programme d'étude sur le C++ bas niveau

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  • Introducing .NET 4.0 with Visual Studio 2010 by Alex Mackey - Book review

    - by Malisa L. Ncube
    Alex (http://simpleisbest.co.uk/) does a very good job in covering the new features of .NET 4.0 and Visual Studio 2010. His focus is on the developers that have experience in development using previous versions of Visual Studio, more specifically Visual Studio 2008.     The following are my views towards his book. 1. Scope / Coverage Even as the book is labeled as introduction, it is covers a broad spectrum of technologies, features and references that are focused into helping a developer quickly decide what to use in the new .NET framework. a. Content The content included covers as much as possible the new additions that are included in the new .NET version 4.0. He shows the Visual Studio 2010 new features and quickly shows how to extend it using Managed Extensibility Framework. Some of my favorites are parallel debugging enhancements. The author delves into JQuery, which Microsoft has decided to support. Some of the very interesting content is on the out-of-band releases including ASP.NET MVC, Windows Azure Silverlight 3 and WCF Data Services. b. What is not included? Windows Phone 7 Series. This was only talked about in the MIX10. The data may not have been available at the time of writing. Microsoft Pinpoint (Microsoft code name "Dallas") Windows Embedded development. c. Table of Contents Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 2: Visual Studio IDE and MEF Chapter 3: Language and Dynamic Changes Chapter 4: CLR and BCL Changes Chapter 5: Parallelization and Threading Enhancements Chapter 6: Windows Workflow Foundation 4 Chapter 7: Windows Communication Foundation Chapter 8: Entity Framework Chapter 9: WCF Data Services Chapter 10: ASPNET Chapter 11: Microsoft AJAX Library Chapter 12: jQuery Chapter 13: ASPNET MVC Chapter 14: Silverlight Introduction Chapter 15: WPF 4.0 and Silverlight 3.0 Chapter 16: Windows Azure 2. Depth Avoids getting into depth on the topics presented, to present the new concepts in assumption of the developer’s existing knowledge. Code samples are on book and exist mostly as snippets and very easy to follow. There are no downloadable examples. 3. Complexity The book is written in a very simple way and easy to follow. There are no irrelevant intimidating details. So it’s a book that you can grab and never put down until you’ve finished reading the entire book. 4. References The author includes reference links to blogs, Wikis and a lot of online resources including the MSDN documentation, which is a very convenient strategy to avoid flooding the reader with details which may not be of interest to them. Most sites do not use url routing and that is really not nice. There are notes from interviews between the author and people behind the new technologies, in which they explain what some specific areas that need clarifications and what their future views are in relation to the features they are working on. 5. Target The author targets experts that want to make a transition from .NET 3.5 to 4.0. Some obvious 3.5 features have been purposely excluded from the text 6. Overrall It is evident that the author has made extensive research into the breadth of what MS is working on, in relation to .NET and Visual Studio and has also been watching the online community. What I would like to see in the next edition are some details on OData protocol, Expression Blend 4 and Embedded development and Windows Phone development. I should say I’m one of the beneficiaries of this book. Excellent work Alex.   Technorati Tags: .NET,Book-Review,Visual Studio

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  • Red Gate Coder interviews: Alex Davies

    - by Michael Williamson
    Alex Davies has been a software engineer at Red Gate since graduating from university, and is currently busy working on .NET Demon. We talked about tackling parallel programming with his actors framework, a scientific approach to debugging, and how JavaScript is going to affect the programming languages we use in years to come. So, if we start at the start, how did you get started in programming? When I was seven or eight, I was given a BBC Micro for Christmas. I had asked for a Game Boy, but my dad thought it would be better to give me a proper computer. For a year or so, I only played games on it, but then I found the user guide for writing programs in it. I gradually started doing more stuff on it and found it fun. I liked creating. As I went into senior school I continued to write stuff on there, trying to write games that weren’t very good. I got a real computer when I was fourteen and found ways to write BASIC on it. Visual Basic to start with, and then something more interesting than that. How did you learn to program? Was there someone helping you out? Absolutely not! I learnt out of a book, or by experimenting. I remember the first time I found a loop, I was like “Oh my God! I don’t have to write out the same line over and over and over again any more. It’s amazing!” When did you think this might be something that you actually wanted to do as a career? For a long time, I thought it wasn’t something that you would do as a career, because it was too much fun to be a career. I thought I’d do chemistry at university and some kind of career based on chemical engineering. And then I went to a careers fair at school when I was seventeen or eighteen, and it just didn’t interest me whatsoever. I thought “I could be a programmer, and there’s loads of money there, and I’m good at it, and it’s fun”, but also that I shouldn’t spoil my hobby. Now I don’t really program in my spare time any more, which is a bit of a shame, but I program all the rest of the time, so I can live with it. Do you think you learnt much about programming at university? Yes, definitely! I went into university knowing how to make computers do anything I wanted them to do. However, I didn’t have the language to talk about algorithms, so the algorithms course in my first year was massively important. Learning other language paradigms like functional programming was really good for breadth of understanding. Functional programming influences normal programming through design rather than actually using it all the time. I draw inspiration from it to write imperative programs which I think is actually becoming really fashionable now, but I’ve been doing it for ages. I did it first! There were also some courses on really odd programming languages, a bit of Prolog, a little bit of C. Having a little bit of each of those is something that I would have never done on my own, so it was important. And then there are knowledge-based courses which are about not programming itself but things that have been programmed like TCP. Those are really important for examples for how to approach things. Did you do any internships while you were at university? Yeah, I spent both of my summers at the same company. I thought I could code well before I went there. Looking back at the crap that I produced, it was only surpassed in its crappiness by all of the other code already in that company. I’m so much better at writing nice code now than I used to be back then. Was there just not a culture of looking after your code? There was, they just didn’t hire people for their abilities in that area. They hired people for raw IQ. The first indicator of it going wrong was that they didn’t have any computer scientists, which is a bit odd in a programming company. But even beyond that they didn’t have people who learnt architecture from anyone else. Most of them had started straight out of university, so never really had experience or mentors to learn from. There wasn’t the experience to draw from to teach each other. In the second half of my second internship, I was being given tasks like looking at new technologies and teaching people stuff. Interns shouldn’t be teaching people how to do their jobs! All interns are going to have little nuggets of things that you don’t know about, but they shouldn’t consistently be the ones who know the most. It’s not a good environment to learn. I was going to ask how you found working with people who were more experienced than you… When I reached Red Gate, I found some people who were more experienced programmers than me, and that was difficult. I’ve been coding since I was tiny. At university there were people who were cleverer than me, but there weren’t very many who were more experienced programmers than me. During my internship, I didn’t find anyone who I classed as being a noticeably more experienced programmer than me. So, it was a shock to the system to have valid criticisms rather than just formatting criticisms. However, Red Gate’s not so big on the actual code review, at least it wasn’t when I started. We did an entire product release and then somebody looked over all of the UI of that product which I’d written and say what they didn’t like. By that point, it was way too late and I’d disagree with them. Do you think the lack of code reviews was a bad thing? I think if there’s going to be any oversight of new people, then it should be continuous rather than chunky. For me I don’t mind too much, I could go out and get oversight if I wanted it, and in those situations I felt comfortable without it. If I was managing the new person, then maybe I’d be keener on oversight and then the right way to do it is continuously and in very, very small chunks. Have you had any significant projects you’ve worked on outside of a job? When I was a teenager I wrote all sorts of stuff. I used to write games, I derived how to do isomorphic projections myself once. I didn’t know what the word was so I couldn’t Google for it, so I worked it out myself. It was horrifically complicated. But it sort of tailed off when I started at university, and is now basically zero. If I do side-projects now, they tend to be work-related side projects like my actors framework, NAct, which I started in a down tools week. Could you explain a little more about NAct? It is a little C# framework for writing parallel code more easily. Parallel programming is difficult when you need to write to shared data. Sometimes parallel programming is easy because you don’t need to write to shared data. When you do need to access shared data, you could just have your threads pile in and do their work, but then you would screw up the data because the threads would trample on each other’s toes. You could lock, but locks are really dangerous if you’re using more than one of them. You get interactions like deadlocks, and that’s just nasty. Actors instead allows you to say this piece of data belongs to this thread of execution, and nobody else can read it. If you want to read it, then ask that thread of execution for a piece of it by sending a message, and it will send the data back by a message. And that avoids deadlocks as long as you follow some obvious rules about not making your actors sit around waiting for other actors to do something. There are lots of ways to write actors, NAct allows you to do it as if it was method calls on other objects, which means you get all the strong type-safety that C# programmers like. Do you think that this is suitable for the majority of parallel programming, or do you think it’s only suitable for specific cases? It’s suitable for most difficult parallel programming. If you’ve just got a hundred web requests which are all independent of each other, then I wouldn’t bother because it’s easier to just spin them up in separate threads and they can proceed independently of each other. But where you’ve got difficult parallel programming, where you’ve got multiple threads accessing multiple bits of data in multiple ways at different times, then actors is at least as good as all other ways, and is, I reckon, easier to think about. When you’re using actors, you presumably still have to write your code in a different way from you would otherwise using single-threaded code. You can’t use actors with any methods that have return types, because you’re not allowed to call into another actor and wait for it. If you want to get a piece of data out of another actor, then you’ve got to use tasks so that you can use “async” and “await” to await asynchronously for it. But other than that, you can still stick things in classes so it’s not too different really. Rather than having thousands of objects with mutable state, you can use component-orientated design, where there are only a few mutable classes which each have a small number of instances. Then there can be thousands of immutable objects. If you tend to do that anyway, then actors isn’t much of a jump. If I’ve already built my system without any parallelism, how hard is it to add actors to exploit all eight cores on my desktop? Usually pretty easy. If you can identify even one boundary where things look like messages and you have components where some objects live on one side and these other objects live on the other side, then you can have a granddaddy object on one side be an actor and it will parallelise as it goes across that boundary. Not too difficult. If we do get 1000-core desktop PCs, do you think actors will scale up? It’s hard. There are always in the order of twenty to fifty actors in my whole program because I tend to write each component as actors, and I tend to have one instance of each component. So this won’t scale to a thousand cores. What you can do is write data structures out of actors. I use dictionaries all over the place, and if you need a dictionary that is going to be accessed concurrently, then you could build one of those out of actors in no time. You can use queuing to marshal requests between different slices of the dictionary which are living on different threads. So it’s like a distributed hash table but all of the chunks of it are on the same machine. That means that each of these thousand processors has cached one small piece of the dictionary. I reckon it wouldn’t be too big a leap to start doing proper parallelism. Do you think it helps if actors get baked into the language, similarly to Erlang? Erlang is excellent in that it has thread-local garbage collection. C# doesn’t, so there’s a limit to how well C# actors can possibly scale because there’s a single garbage collected heap shared between all of them. When you do a global garbage collection, you’ve got to stop all of the actors, which is seriously expensive, whereas in Erlang garbage collections happen per-actor, so they’re insanely cheap. However, Erlang deviated from all the sensible language design that people have used recently and has just come up with crazy stuff. You can definitely retrofit thread-local garbage collection to .NET, and then it’s quite well-suited to support actors, even if it’s not baked into the language. Speaking of language design, do you have a favourite programming language? I’ll choose a language which I’ve never written before. I like the idea of Scala. It sounds like C#, only with some of the niggles gone. I enjoy writing static types. It means you don’t have to writing tests so much. When you say it doesn’t have some of the niggles? C# doesn’t allow the use of a property as a method group. It doesn’t have Scala case classes, or sum types, where you can do a switch statement and the compiler checks that you’ve checked all the cases, which is really useful in functional-style programming. Pattern-matching, in other words. That’s actually the major niggle. C# is pretty good, and I’m quite happy with C#. And what about going even further with the type system to remove the need for tests to something like Haskell? Or is that a step too far? I’m quite a pragmatist, I don’t think I could deal with trying to write big systems in languages with too few other users, especially when learning how to structure things. I just don’t know anyone who can teach me, and the Internet won’t teach me. That’s the main reason I wouldn’t use it. If I turned up at a company that writes big systems in Haskell, I would have no objection to that, but I wouldn’t instigate it. What about things in C#? For instance, there’s contracts in C#, so you can try to statically verify a bit more about your code. Do you think that’s useful, or just not worthwhile? I’ve not really tried it. My hunch is that it needs to be built into the language and be quite mathematical for it to work in real life, and that doesn’t seem to have ended up true for C# contracts. I don’t think anyone who’s tried them thinks they’re any good. I might be wrong. On a slightly different note, how do you like to debug code? I think I’m quite an odd debugger. I use guesswork extremely rarely, especially if something seems quite difficult to debug. I’ve been bitten spending hours and hours on guesswork and not being scientific about debugging in the past, so now I’m scientific to a fault. What I want is to see the bug happening in the debugger, to step through the bug happening. To watch the program going from a valid state to an invalid state. When there’s a bug and I can’t work out why it’s happening, I try to find some piece of evidence which places the bug in one section of the code. From that experiment, I binary chop on the possible causes of the bug. I suppose that means binary chopping on places in the code, or binary chopping on a stage through a processing cycle. Basically, I’m very stupid about how I debug. I won’t make any guesses, I won’t use any intuition, I will only identify the experiment that’s going to binary chop most effectively and repeat rather than trying to guess anything. I suppose it’s quite top-down. Is most of the time then spent in the debugger? Absolutely, if at all possible I will never debug using print statements or logs. I don’t really hold much stock in outputting logs. If there’s any bug which can be reproduced locally, I’d rather do it in the debugger than outputting logs. And with SmartAssembly error reporting, there’s not a lot that can’t be either observed in an error report and just fixed, or reproduced locally. And in those other situations, maybe I’ll use logs. But I hate using logs. You stare at the log, trying to guess what’s going on, and that’s exactly what I don’t like doing. You have to just look at it and see does this look right or wrong. We’ve covered how you get to grip with bugs. How do you get to grips with an entire codebase? I watch it in the debugger. I find little bugs and then try to fix them, and mostly do it by watching them in the debugger and gradually getting an understanding of how the code works using my process of binary chopping. I have to do a lot of reading and watching code to choose where my slicing-in-half experiment is going to be. The last time I did it was SmartAssembly. The old code was a complete mess, but at least it did things top to bottom. There wasn’t too much of some of the big abstractions where flow of control goes all over the place, into a base class and back again. Code’s really hard to understand when that happens. So I like to choose a little bug and try to fix it, and choose a bigger bug and try to fix it. Definitely learn by doing. I want to always have an aim so that I get a little achievement after every few hours of debugging. Once I’ve learnt the codebase I might be able to fix all the bugs in an hour, but I’d rather be using them as an aim while I’m learning the codebase. If I was a maintainer of a codebase, what should I do to make it as easy as possible for you to understand? Keep distinct concepts in different places. And name your stuff so that it’s obvious which concepts live there. You shouldn’t have some variable that gets set miles up the top of somewhere, and then is read miles down to choose some later behaviour. I’m talking from a very much SmartAssembly point of view because the old SmartAssembly codebase had tons and tons of these things, where it would read some property of the code and then deal with it later. Just thousands of variables in scope. Loads of things to think about. If you can keep concepts separate, then it aids me in my process of fixing bugs one at a time, because each bug is going to more or less be understandable in the one place where it is. And what about tests? Do you think they help at all? I’ve never had the opportunity to learn a codebase which has had tests, I don’t know what it’s like! What about when you’re actually developing? How useful do you find tests in finding bugs or regressions? Finding regressions, absolutely. Running bits of code that would be quite hard to run otherwise, definitely. It doesn’t happen very often that a test finds a bug in the first place. I don’t really buy nebulous promises like tests being a good way to think about the spec of the code. My thinking goes something like “This code works at the moment, great, ship it! Ah, there’s a way that this code doesn’t work. Okay, write a test, demonstrate that it doesn’t work, fix it, use the test to demonstrate that it’s now fixed, and keep the test for future regressions.” The most valuable tests are for bugs that have actually happened at some point, because bugs that have actually happened at some point, despite the fact that you think you’ve fixed them, are way more likely to appear again than new bugs are. Does that mean that when you write your code the first time, there are no tests? Often. The chance of there being a bug in a new feature is relatively unaffected by whether I’ve written a test for that new feature because I’m not good enough at writing tests to think of bugs that I would have written into the code. So not writing regression tests for all of your code hasn’t affected you too badly? There are different kinds of features. Some of them just always work, and are just not flaky, they just continue working whatever you throw at them. Maybe because the type-checker is particularly effective around them. Writing tests for those features which just tend to always work is a waste of time. And because it’s a waste of time I’ll tend to wait until a feature has demonstrated its flakiness by having bugs in it before I start trying to test it. You can get a feel for whether it’s going to be flaky code as you’re writing it. I try to write it to make it not flaky, but there are some things that are just inherently flaky. And very occasionally, I’ll think “this is going to be flaky” as I’m writing, and then maybe do a test, but not most of the time. How do you think your programming style has changed over time? I’ve got clearer about what the right way of doing things is. I used to flip-flop a lot between different ideas. Five years ago I came up with some really good ideas and some really terrible ideas. All of them seemed great when I thought of them, but they were quite diverse ideas, whereas now I have a smaller set of reliable ideas that are actually good for structuring code. So my code is probably more similar to itself than it used to be back in the day, when I was trying stuff out. I’ve got more disciplined about encapsulation, I think. There are operational things like I use actors more now than I used to, and that forces me to use immutability more than I used to. The first code that I wrote in Red Gate was the memory profiler UI, and that was an actor, I just didn’t know the name of it at the time. I don’t really use object-orientation. By object-orientation, I mean having n objects of the same type which are mutable. I want a constant number of objects that are mutable, and they should be different types. I stick stuff in dictionaries and then have one thing that owns the dictionary and puts stuff in and out of it. That’s definitely a pattern that I’ve seen recently. I think maybe I’m doing functional programming. Possibly. It’s plausible. If you had to summarise the essence of programming in a pithy sentence, how would you do it? Programming is the form of art that, without losing any of the beauty of architecture or fine art, allows you to produce things that people love and you make money from. So you think it’s an art rather than a science? It’s a little bit of engineering, a smidgeon of maths, but it’s not science. Like architecture, programming is on that boundary between art and engineering. If you want to do it really nicely, it’s mostly art. You can get away with doing architecture and programming entirely by having a good engineering mind, but you’re not going to produce anything nice. You’re not going to have joy doing it if you’re an engineering mind. Architects who are just engineering minds are not going to enjoy their job. I suppose engineering is the foundation on which you build the art. Exactly. How do you think programming is going to change over the next ten years? There will be an unfortunate shift towards dynamically-typed languages, because of JavaScript. JavaScript has an unfair advantage. JavaScript’s unfair advantage will cause more people to be exposed to dynamically-typed languages, which means other dynamically-typed languages crop up and the best features go into dynamically-typed languages. Then people conflate the good features with the fact that it’s dynamically-typed, and more investment goes into dynamically-typed languages. They end up better, so people use them. What about the idea of compiling other languages, possibly statically-typed, to JavaScript? It’s a reasonable idea. I would like to do it, but I don’t think enough people in the world are going to do it to make it pick up. The hordes of beginners are the lifeblood of a language community. They are what makes there be good tools and what makes there be vibrant community websites. And any particular thing which is the same as JavaScript only with extra stuff added to it, although it might be technically great, is not going to have the hordes of beginners. JavaScript is always to be quickest and easiest way for a beginner to start programming in the browser. And dynamically-typed languages are great for beginners. Compilers are pretty scary and beginners don’t write big code. And having your errors come up in the same place, whether they’re statically checkable errors or not, is quite nice for a beginner. If someone asked me to teach them some programming, I’d teach them JavaScript. If dynamically-typed languages are great for beginners, when do you think the benefits of static typing start to kick in? The value of having a statically typed program is in the tools that rely on the static types to produce a smooth IDE experience rather than actually telling me my compile errors. And only once you’re experienced enough a programmer that having a really smooth IDE experience makes a blind bit of difference, does static typing make a blind bit of difference. So it’s not really about size of codebase. If I go and write up a tiny program, I’m still going to get value out of writing it in C# using ReSharper because I’m experienced with C# and ReSharper enough to be able to write code five times faster if I have that help. Any other visions of the future? Nobody’s going to use actors. Because everyone’s going to be running on single-core VMs connected over network-ready protocols like JSON over HTTP. So, parallelism within one operating system is going to die. But until then, you should use actors. More Red Gater Coder interviews

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  • Exporting makefile from Eclipse CDT

    - by Alex Farber
    I have C++ project in the Ubuntu OS, Eclipse CDT. My final goal is to build the project binaries for FreeBSD OS. The first test. I create simple C++ CDT project with main.cpp file: cout << "OK" << endl; and build it. Then I open Terminal window in Release directory: [email protected]:~/workspace/HelloWorld/Release$ ls HelloWorld main.d main.o makefile objects.mk sources.mk subdir.mk [email protected]:~/workspace/HelloWorld/Release$ rm HelloWorld main.d main.o [email protected]:~/workspace/HelloWorld/Release$ ls makefile objects.mk sources.mk subdir.mk [email protected]:~/workspace/HelloWorld/Release$ make Building file: ../main.cpp Invoking: GCC C++ Compiler g++ -O3 -Wall -c -fmessage-length=0 -MMD -MP -MF"main.d" -MT"main.d" -o"main.o" "../main.cpp" Finished building: ../main.cpp Building target: HelloWorld Invoking: GCC C++ Linker g++ -o"HelloWorld" ./main.o Finished building target: HelloWorld [email protected]:~/workspace/HelloWorld/Release$ ./HelloWorld OK [email protected]ux:~/workspace/HelloWorld/Release$ So far, so good. Now I copy the whole project tree to FreeBSD and trying to build it: $ cd /home/alex/project $ ls main.cpp release $ cd release $ ls makefile objects.mk sources.mk subdir.mk $ make "makefile", line 5: Need an operator "makefile", line 10: Need an operator "makefile", line 11: Need an operator "makefile", line 12: Need an operator CDT-generated makefile doesn't work. This is makefile beginning: $ Automatically-generated file. Do not edit! -include ../makefile.init RM := rm -rf $ All of the sources participating in the build are defined here -include sources.mk -include subdir.mk -include objects.mk ... Line 5 is -include ../makefile.init. Really, there is no such file. But it works by some way on Ubuntu computer. What is the trick, how can I build this? BTW, manually written makefile works: all: g++ -O0 -g3 -Wall -c -fmessage-length=0 -MMD -MP -MF"main.d" -MT"main.d" -o"main.o" "../main.cpp" g++ -o"HelloWorld" ./main.o Note: $ in makefile is actually #, I replaced it because # creates formatting problems inside of stackoverflow pre block.

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  • Programme d'étude sur le C++ bas niveau n° 2 : les types de données, un article d'Alex Darby traduit par Bousk

    Dans ce deuxième article sur le C++ bas niveau, Alex Darby aborde les types de données et leurs représentations internes. Programme d'étude sur le C++ bas niveau n° 2 : les types de données Quels sont les points les plus importants pour vous à connaître sur les types ? Connaissez-vous d'autres subtilités sur les types de données ? Bonne lecture. Retrouver l'ensemble des articles de cette série sur la

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  • Programme d'étude sur le C++ bas niveau n° 3 : la Pile, un article d'Alex Darby traduit par ram-0000

    L'objectif de cette série d'articles d'Alex Darby sur la programmation « bas-niveau » est de permettre aux développeurs ayant déjà des connaissances de la programmation C++ de mieux comprendre comment ses programmes sont exécutés en pratique. Ce troisième article explique le rôle et le fonctionnement de la Pile, son usage lors de l'appel d'une fonction, la gestion des variables locales ainsi que la gestion de la valeur de retour d'une fonction. Programme d'étude sur le C++ bas niveau n° 3 : la Pile Connaissiez-vous bien le fonctionnement de la Pile et des appels de fonctions ?

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  • Plug-in jQuery RoyalSlider de Dmitry Semenov : tutoriel et révision du code par Alex Young, traduction de vermine

    Je vous propose une traduction d'un tutoriel et d'une révision de code d'Alex Young à propos du plugin jQuery (payant) RoyalSlider de Dmitry Semenov. Ce plugin a reçu beaucoup de retours positifs. Il y a beaucoup de plugins du style des carrousels (slide), et ils ont tous des forces et des faiblesses différentes. Cependant, RoyalSlider est une très bonne galerie d'images jQuery réactive et activable également via les touches du clavier. Cet article montre que ce plugin est bien conçu et qu'il est performant.

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  • what is wrong with this easy script

    - by alex
    what is wrong with this easy script? I just want to write an script which change my directory: A. I put below commands on the file witch its name is pathABC on the /home/alex directory, #!/bin/sh cd /home/alex/Documents/A/B/C echo HelloWorld B. also I did chmod +x pathABC , On the terminal when I am on the /home/alex directory, I run ./pathABC . But the output is just HelloWorld and the current directory remains with no change. I mean my directory remains as /home/alex and not go to the /home/alex/Documents/A/B/C. So where is wrong?

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  • Why doesn't `cd` work in a shell script?

    - by alex
    what is wrong with this easy script? I just want to write an script which change my directory: A. I put below commands on the file witch its name is pathABC on the /home/alex directory, #!/bin/sh cd /home/alex/Documents/A/B/C echo HelloWorld B. also I did chmod +x pathABC , On the terminal when I am on the /home/alex directory, I run ./pathABC . But the output is just HelloWorld and the current directory remains with no change. I mean my directory remains as /home/alex and not go to the /home/alex/Documents/A/B/C. So where is wrong?

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  • Packages are not available for installation

    - by Alex Farber
    Changing some Software Update settings I possibly corrupted something, and now I don't see many packages in the list. For example: [email protected]:~$ sudo apt-get install codeblocks [sudo] password for alex: Reading package lists... Done Building dependency tree Reading state information... Done E: Unable to locate package codeblocks I checked all options in the Software Sources dialog, but packages are still not available. How can I fix this? OS: Ubuntu 12.04, 64 bit. Additional information. [email protected]:~$ sudo apt-get update [sudo] password for alex: Ign http://extras.ubuntu.com precise InRelease Ign http://security.ubuntu.com precise-security InRelease Ign http://archive.canonical.com precise InRelease Ign http://archive.ubuntu.com precise InRelease Ign http://archive.ubuntu.com precise-updates InRelease ... It looks like most Ubuntu repositories are not searched, how can I restore default update behaviour?

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  • Simple python oo issue

    - by Alex K
    Hello, Have a look a this simple example. I don't quite understand why o1 prints "Hello Alex" twice. I would think that because of the default self.a is always reset to the empty list. Could someone explain to me what's the rationale here? Thank you so much. class A(object): def __init__(self, a=[]): self.a = a o = A() o.a.append('Hello') o.a.append('Alex') print ' '.join(o.a) # >> prints Hello Alex o1 = A() o1.a.append('Hello') o1.a.append('Alex') print ' '.join(o1.a) # >> prints Hello Alex Hello Alex

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  • IASA South East Florida Chapter Meeting Recap - June 2011

    - by Sam Abraham
    Erik Russell and Giles Marino were our speakers for the June 2011 IASA South East Florida Chapter meeting.    Attendees filled all available seats at the Microsoft office conference room where the event was held. This highlights the high interest in Enterprise Architecture as a career track and chartered project role. Also in attendance were our Board of Directors and Alex Funkhouser, President, Sherlock Technology.   Rainer Habermann, Chapter President, kicked off the meeting by introducing our speakers and Board of Directors.   Alex Funkhouser, President of South Florida’s staffing firm Sherlock Technology spoke briefly about available Software Architect positions in the area. Alex also congratulated and presented this week’s Sherlock Raffle winner with $500 in cash.   Our speakers Giles and Erik then proceeded with their talk. Erik presented a business case in the government sector where Enterprise Architecture helped a government entity cut costs and streamline its various business operations. Technologies leveraged in Erik’s demonstrated project were Java-based.   Giles then followed with a thorough demonstration of the Architecture patterns he used to migrate a complete backend system for an insurance company to the .Net Platform.   Audience was very engaged with our speakers as evidenced by the large number of follow-up questions asked at the end of the talk.   We greatly enjoyed Giles and Erik’s talk and look forward to having them share with us more of their adventures as Enterprise Architects in the near future.   Below are some photos of the event.   Sam Abraham Secretary- IASA South East Florida Chapter. http://www.iasaglobal.org/iasa/South_East_Florida.asp Chapter President - Rainer Habermann kicks off our meeting.   Sherlock Technology President Alex Funkhouser holding Sherlock's weekly cash prize. Alex shares available Software Architect opportunities with our members Erik Russell addressing our membership Giles Marino sharing his architecture experience in the insurance industry In this photo: Dave Noderer, Rainer Habermann, Quent Herschelman and Alex Funkhouser. Event attracted a large audience and filled the Microsoft conference room where it was held

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  • Custom PHPINIDir setting in VirtualHost affecting other VirtualHosts

    - by Radio
    One of the clients requested a personal php.ini configuration for his website, so I have set his VirtualHost as follows: <VirtualHost *:80> DocumentRoot "/home/alex/www.domain.tld" ServerName www.domain.tld AssignUserID alex alex PHPINIDir /home/alex/php.ini </VirtualHost> The client created php.ini file under /home/alex/ which contains only this setting: session.save_path = "/home/alex/.php_sessions/" Afterall he started to complaint that he sees all other session files generated by other clients' websites. After doing some basic troubleshooting, I realized, that his php.ini settings are affecting all websites specified in the httpd-vhosts.conf. Question is why? Since PHPINIDir is only specified inside one specific VirtualHost?

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  • Merge\Combine two datatables

    - by madlan
    I'm trying to merge\combine two datatables. I've looked at various examples and answers but they seem to create duplicate rows or require indexes (merge on datatable etc) I can't do this via SQL as one source is from a linked Oracle server accessed via MSSQL and the other from a different MSSQL Server that does not have linked access. The data is currently very simple: Name, Email, Phone DataTable1: "John Clark", "", "01522 55231" "Alex King", "alex[email protected]", "01522 55266" "Marcus Jones", "[email protected]", "01522 55461" DataTable2: "John Clark", "[email protected]", "01522 55231" "Alex King", "alex[email protected]", "" "Marcus Jones", "[email protected]", "01522 55461" "Warren bean", "[email protected]", "01522 522311" Giving a datatable with the following: "John Clark", "[email protected]", "01522 55231" "Alex King", "alex[email protected]", "01522 55266" "Marcus Jones", "[email protected]", "01522 55461" "Warren bean", "[email protected]", "01522 522311" Name is the field to match records on, with the first datatable taking priority.

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  • Need help with Swift mailer with Kohana wrapper

    - by alex
    My current code is this $swift = email::connect(); $swift->setSubject('hello') ->setFrom(array('[email protected]' => 'Alex')) ->setTo(array('[email protected]' => 'Alex')) ->setBody('hello') ->attach(Swift_Attachment::fromPath(DOCROOT . 'assets/attachments/instructions.pdf')); $swift->send(); The email::connect() returns an instance of SwiftMailer. As per these docs, it would seem that it should work. However, I get an error Fatal error: Call to undefined method Swift_Mailer::setSubject() in /home/user/public_html/application/classes/controller/properties.php on line 45 I've seen that email::connect() does exactly what the example code in the docs does. That is include the correct file return an instance of the library What am I doing wrong? Thanks

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  • Prevent * to be expanded in the bash script

    - by Alex Farber
    Linux bash script: #!/bin/bash function Print() { echo $1 } var="*" Print $var Execution results: [email protected]:~/tmp$ ./sample-script sample-script "*" is expanded to the list of files, which is actually script itself. How can I prevent this and see actual variable value? In general case, var can be more complicated than "*", for example: "home/alex/mydir/*".

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  • Mismatch between the program and library build versions detected

    - by Alex Farber
    I built wxWidgets on Linux using this command: ../configure --enable-shared --disable-debug It see results of this build: /usr/local/lib/wx/config/gtk2-ansi-release-2.8 /usr/local/lib/wx/include/gtk2-ansi-release-2.8/wx/setup.h wx-config output: [email protected]:~$ wx-config --list Default config is gtk2-ansi-release-2.8 Default config will be used for output Alternate matches: gtk2-ansi-debug-2.8 gtk2-ansi-debug-static-2.8 gtk2-ansi-release-static-2.8 [email protected]:~$ wx-config --cppflags --release 2.8 -I/usr/local/lib/wx/include/gtk2-ansi-release-2.8 -I/usr/local/include/wx-2.8 -D_FILE_OFFSET_BITS=64 -D_LARGE_FILES -D__WXGTK__ [email protected]:~$ wx-config --libs --release 2.8 -L/usr/local/lib -pthread -lwx_gtk2_richtext-2.8 -lwx_gtk2_aui-2.8 -lwx_gtk2_xrc-2.8 -lwx_gtk2_qa-2.8 -lwx_gtk2_html-2.8 -lwx_gtk2_adv-2.8 -lwx_gtk2_core-2.8 -lwx_base_xml-2.8 -lwx_base_net-2.8 -lwx_base-2.8 Now I am trying to build Hello wxWidgets program with Release version: g++ -I/usr/local/lib/wx/include/gtk2-ansi-release-2.8 -I/usr/local/include/wx-2.8 -D_FILE_OFFSET_BITS=64 -D_LARGE_FILES -D__WXGTK__ hello.cpp -o hello -L/usr/local/lib -pthread -lwx_gtk2_richtext-2.8 -lwx_gtk2_aui-2.8 -lwx_gtk2_xrc-2.8 -lwx_gtk2_qa-2.8 -lwx_gtk2_html-2.8 -lwx_gtk2_adv-2.8 -lwx_gtk2_core-2.8 -lwx_base_xml-2.8 -lwx_base_net-2.8 -lwx_base-2.8 It compiles and runs successfully on my computer. Program dependencies: ldd hello linux-gate.so.1 = (0x006ef000) libwx_gtk2_richtext-2.8.so.0 = /usr/local/lib/libwx_gtk2_richtext-2.8.so.0 (0x00253000) libwx_gtk2_aui-2.8.so.0 = /usr/local/lib/libwx_gtk2_aui-2.8.so.0 (0x005ff000) libwx_gtk2_xrc-2.8.so.0 = /usr/local/lib/libwx_gtk2_xrc-2.8.so.0 (0x00110000) libwx_gtk2_qa-2.8.so.0 = /usr/local/lib/libwx_gtk2_qa-2.8.so.0 (0x00a3c000) libwx_gtk2_html-2.8.so.0 = /usr/local/lib/libwx_gtk2_html-2.8.so.0 (0x0019d000) libwx_gtk2_adv-2.8.so.0 = /usr/local/lib/libwx_gtk2_adv-2.8.so.0 (0x00c18000) libwx_gtk2_core-2.8.so.0 = /usr/local/lib/libwx_gtk2_core-2.8.so.0 (0x00ef8000) libwx_base_xml-2.8.so.0 = /usr/local/lib/libwx_base_xml-2.8.so.0 (0x0047e000) libwx_base_net-2.8.so.0 = /usr/local/lib/libwx_base_net-2.8.so.0 (0x00353000) libwx_base-2.8.so.0 = /usr/local/lib/libwx_base-2.8.so.0 (0x006f0000) ... Now I want to execute this program on another computer without wxWidgets installed. I copy the program and all shared libraries to another computer: hello libwx_gtk2_core-2.8.so libwx_base-2.8.so libwx_gtk2_core-2.8.so.0 libwx_base-2.8.so.0 libwx_gtk2_core-2.8.so.0.6.0 libwx_base-2.8.so.0.6.0 libwx_gtk2_html-2.8.so libwx_base_net-2.8.so libwx_gtk2_html-2.8.so.0 libwx_base_net-2.8.so.0 libwx_gtk2_html-2.8.so.0.6.0 libwx_base_net-2.8.so.0.6.0 libwx_gtk2_qa-2.8.so libwx_base_xml-2.8.so libwx_gtk2_qa-2.8.so.0 libwx_base_xml-2.8.so.0 libwx_gtk2_qa-2.8.so.0.6.0 libwx_base_xml-2.8.so.0.6.0 libwx_gtk2_richtext-2.8.so libwx_gtk2_adv-2.8.so libwx_gtk2_richtext-2.8.so.0 libwx_gtk2_adv-2.8.so.0 libwx_gtk2_richtext-2.8.so.0.6.0 libwx_gtk2_adv-2.8.so.0.6.0 libwx_gtk2_xrc-2.8.so libwx_gtk2_aui-2.8.so libwx_gtk2_xrc-2.8.so.0 libwx_gtk2_aui-2.8.so.0 libwx_gtk2_xrc-2.8.so.0.6.0 libwx_gtk2_aui-2.8.so.0.6.0 And run it: LD_LIBRARY_PATH=. ./hello Result: Fatal Error: Mismatch between the program and library build versions detected. The library used 2.8 (debug,ANSI,compiler with C++ ABI 1002,wx containers,compatible with 2.6), and your program used 2.8 (no debug,ANSI,compiler with C++ ABI 1002,wx containers,compatible with 2.6). ./run.sh: line 1: 1810 Aborted LD_LIBRARY_PATH=. ./hello What is wrong?

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  • IPv6 address is not working in Ubuntu

    - by Alex Farber
    Telnet connection with echo service succeeds for localhost and 127.0.0.1 host names, but fails with ::1 host name: [email protected]:~$ telnet localhost 7 Trying 127.0.0.1... Connected to localhost. Escape character is '^]'. 123 123 ^] telnet q Connection closed. [email protected]:~$ telnet ::1 7 Trying ::1... telnet: Unable to connect to remote host: Connection refused [email protected]:~$ My own program trying to talk using IPv6 address fails as well. Why IPv6 address is rejected? OS: Ubuntu 12.04 32 bit.

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  • Quickly, syntax error: media_grid.show()

    - by Alex
    i run the app and get this error. the little arrow points to the 'd', dont know what that means. plus i had the same error just before but on this line: from quickly.widgets.dictionary grid import DictionaryGrid the arrow pointed to the 'd' in grid as well. then i changed it to this: from quickly.widgets.dictionary_grid import DictionaryGrid i added a '_' in the middle. and now i have the syntax error in the question. Thanks for any help that is given! Traceback (most recent call last): File "bin/simple-player", line 32, in <module> import simple_player File "/home/alex/simple-player/simple_player/__init__.py", line 14, in <module> from simple_player import SimplePlayerWindow File "/home/alex/simple-player/simple_player/SimplePlayerWindow.py", line 51 media_grid.show() ^ SyntaxError: invalid syntax

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  • Fix overlapping partitions

    - by Alex
    I have problem with overlapping partitions. GParted shows me all my disk as unallocated area, output of fdisk below: [email protected]:~$ sudo fdisk -l /dev/sda Disk /dev/sda: 320.1 GB, 320072933376 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 38913 cylinders, total 625142448 sectors Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes Disk identifier: 0xfb4b9b90 Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/sda1 * 2048 2457599 1227776 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT /dev/sda2 2457600 571351724 284447062+ 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT /dev/sda3 571342846 604661759 16659457 5 Extended /dev/sda4 604661760 625137663 10237952 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT /dev/sda5 598650880 604661759 3005440 82 Linux swap / Solaris /dev/sda6 571342848 598650879 13654016 83 Linux Partition table entries are not in disk order Do I understand correctly that overlapping partitions are sda2 and sda3 (sda2 and sda6 overlaps too, because sda6 is the first chunk of sda3, sda3 has type "extended")? Are sda2 and sda3 the cause of problem? How can i fix it without deleting partitions? My OS is Ubuntu 12.04, 64 bit. Thanks in advance.

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  • How to install new Intel Ethernet driver

    - by Alex Farber
    Ubuntu 12.04 x64 doesn't recognize newest Intel Ethernet adapter on my desktop (Intel Ethernet Connection i217-V). I downloaded required driver from Intel and compiled it using make. Now I have: [email protected]:~$ find / -name 'e1000e.ko' 2>/dev/null /home/alex/Documents/IntelEthernetDriver/e1000e-3.0.4/src/e1000e.ko /lib/modules/3.2.0-64-generic/kernel/drivers/net/ethernet/intel/e1000e/e1000e.ko The first line is new driver compiled from Intel sources. The second line is probably existing driver from Ubuntu distribution, which doesn't recognize new Ethernet adapter. How can I apply the new driver instead of existing one? Any other solution is welcome. For now, I cannot upgrade to latest Ubuntu release, because I use some third-party products.

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  • how get validation messages from mangomapper using rails console ?

    - by Alex
    Hi, I am basically teaching myself how to use RoR and MongoDB at the same time. I am following the very good book / tutorial : http://railstutorial.org/ I decided to replace Sqlite3 by MongoDB using the mongomapper gem. Everything works out about alright, but I am having some non-blocking little issues that I truly wish I could get rid of. In chapter 6, when working with validation I got 2 issues: - I don't know how to get the validations messages back like with Sqlite3. The "standard" code is: $ rails console --sandbox >> user = User.new(:name => "", :email => "[email protected]") >> user.save => false >> user.valid? => false >> user.errors.full_messages => ["Name can't be blank"] but if I try to do the same with MongoMapper, it throws an error saying that errors is undefined function. So does it mean that this is simply not implemented in mongomapper / mongo driver ? Or is there some other clever way to do this that I could not figure ? Additional, 2 things here: - I following the exemple in the book to the line, so I was expecting to be able to use the console in sandbox mode, but apparently that does not work either: (...)[email protected]/gems/railties-3.0.3/lib/rails/console/sandbox.rb:1:in `<top (required)>': uninitialized constant ActiveRecord (NameError) from /Users/Alex/.rvm/gems/[email protected]/gems/railties-3.0.3/lib/rails/application.rb:226:in `initialize_console' from /Users/Alex/.rvm/gems/[email protected]/gems/railties-3.0.3/lib/rails/application.rb:153:in `load_console' from /Users/Alex/.rvm/gems/[email protected]/gems/railties-3.0.3/lib/rails/commands/console.rb:26:in `start' from /Users/Alex/.rvm/gems/[email protected]/gems/railties-3.0.3/lib/rails/commands/console.rb:8:in `start' from /Users/Alex/.rvm/gems/[email protected]/gems/railties-3.0.3/lib/rails/commands.rb:23:in `<top (required)>' from script/rails:6:in `require' from script/rails:6:in `<main>' Also, in the book they call "user" but I need to call "User" (note the capital U) why is that ? Is it like mangomapper does not follow the Ruby naming convention or something ? And finally, I am trying to validate the field email with a regex as shown in the tutorial. It does not throws any errors at the code, but whenever I try to insert it just won't ever accept it unless I comment out the :format option... class User include MongoMapper::Document key :name, String, :required => true, :length => { :maximum => 50 } key :email, String, :required => true, # :format => { :with => email_regex }, :uniqueness => { :case_sentitive => false} timestamps! end Any advices you can provide on those topics would help me a lot ! Thanks, Alex

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