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  • Any career related single one-stop forum hub..

    - by learnerforever
    Hi, Stumbling into SO and then its sibling sites like programmers.stackexchange,superuser has been tremendously useful to me and is a single stop for my technical problems,long unanswered curiosities and it has been very useful to get perspective from mature professionals. I am an IT professional.I am looking for a similar one-stop career related forum, where I can understand job descriptions of different professions, career growth path, what a day looks like, salary,strengths needed with people having been there. I am confused about my career and particularly of interest are things like professors in academia,researchers in R&D lab, software developers,architectures,testers,business analyst,it analyst and related. Thanks,

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  • career advice for PhD scientist seeking to program?

    - by C SD
    I'm largely a self-taught programmer. In fact, I first started programming about half way through biophysics grad school, and even though I think I've done some pretty nice work, I've never worked as part of a 'serious' development team that had more than one or two other developers (and I wouldn't hesitate to call them equally inexperienced in software development as a profession). After finishing my PhD I applied to Google, on a lark, since I had some confidence in my abilities, if not necessarily my experience, and I was hoping to maybe slip in and absorb all the experience and talent I'd be surrounded with and become productive enough, quickly enough, that they wouldn't immediately regret their decision. I was excited to actually get invited to interview up at Mountain View (this was ~ mid 2008). Overall, my memory of the interview was very positive, but after close to a three month wait (is that normal?) they ended up turning me down. I wasn't too surprised or disappointed (aside from the uncomfortably long wait) given my unusual background and admitted lack of experience. I decided to continue as a postdoc, but focus on improving my skills rather than doing research. I've done about three years of that, and my honest assessment is that I've learned a ton more, but I really need more of a peer group to maintain or accelerate my growth. Google invited me to interview again about eight months ago, and the interview process went even better than the first time around (I thought), though they again declined to give me an offer. I have to admit this second rejection was much more discouraging. They had insisted I interview even after I mentioned to them that a move on my part was unlikely given that I had bought a house, gotten married, etc. since the first interview. I guess I was hoping they'd at least give me an offer that I could parlay into a more conventional, but still interesting, programming position close to home. So here I am, going on my third year out of grad school, a glorified postdoc and I'm starting to get pretty discouraged. Even though I could technically get 'back-on-track' for a career in science, I have been focusing the vast majority of this time on gaining programming experience rather than on research and publications. The problem is, whenever I look, most job listings have requirements that seem impossibly grandiose and I hesitate to apply. That, or the job/project seems incredibly dull. Ironically, applying to Google struck me as less intimidating. I suspect that either most people are just a lot less realistic than I am when it comes to assessing how long it will take for them to get up to speed, or they don't care; my fear is that I'm just woefully unqualified for any interesting, well paying work. IE: I'm confident I could switch fully back into C++ mode with a couple weeks work (I mostly use C,Python,C# daily) but I don't list myself as being 'proficient' in C++ on my CV, or applying for jobs that 'require' such knowledge. The few applications for which I did feel I was a legitimately good match have not elicited a response. I suspect the following things are potential problems with my application/CV and I would like feedback on: I don't have a CS degree. My BS was in biochemistry and molecular biology, my PhD in biophysics. I took a undergrad and grad level CS course at UCSD and completely killed them, but I don't know how to translate that to my CV effectively. I have a PhD, but it's not in CS... I've been debating if I should remove it from my CV, and wether or not it would then be misleading to list at least some of those years as some kind of 'programming' job (in many respects it was). I think there are sometimes strong stigmas associated with 'self-taught' programmers. I am certainly one of those. I even recognize that some of those stigmas hold a hint of truth, but I really do want to be an asset to a team. How do I communicate that even though I have been largely self-directing for ~8 years I can still take marching orders when needed? Do I just say so outright? Should I just become a lot less scrupulous about the whole process? anecdote: I have a friend who applied for positions where he completely fudged his qualifications to get past the first culling. He was much more honest and forthcoming about his actual qualifications when contacted and he still managed to get invited to a couple of interviews and even got some offers. His balls are larger than mine though.

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  • What should I expect from a system engineer university career

    - by Trufa
    I'm starting tomorrow a series of interviews to decide which university should I choose to get a degree in System Engineer. I know this is a serious university but I would like to get some feedback about what should I expect or "demand" from the university. My experience in the technology field is (obviously) limited and would like to be aware of what should I to be aware if the university might be good or not. Specially in following fields: Infrastructure: what are the essentials? big pluses? Theoretical vs Practical: how practical should it be? what is a "good" mix? Programming languages, frameworks, etc: Which are the ideal for learning? Most demand? Latest technologies: What should they be teaching right know to "prove" they are up to date. Qualification system: What exam methods do you think are ideal for this kind of degree, good ol' Q&A, multiple choice, projects, a fair mix? What other points do you think I should care about? What isn't important? Thanks in advance. I realize this is might be a very subjective topic so I tried to make it as specific and on topic as I could but any recommendations are of course welcome. I also understand that none of this questions will guarantee this will be a good university but it might give me another reference as to which should I choose when the moment comes.

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  • If not gamedev, what do I do !

    - by brainydexter
    Hi, I am a game dev who was working in the game-industry and then..got laid off. Ever since then, life couldn't get less stressful! During this time, I have met so many other devs who have also been laid off irrespective of the number of years they have been in the game. Now, the problem really gets worse, since I am not a US citizen (yes, I am in US) , and am on an international visa here, I might have to soon pack my bags and go back to my native country. Going back is not bad at all, apart from the fact, that gamedev is still in a very nascent stage there. There just aren't many opportunities. So, employment is the key to maintain a valid visa status. After giving it a lot of thought, I am thinking of staying away from gamedev jobs for the time being, given its job unstablity. This brings me to my current problem. I can't think of a domain/place where I can use my game development skills. I know graphics/simulation/visualization is huge, but I can't think straight and am left clueless where to go from here. What are some of the domains/companies where I can use my skills ? I'd appreciate any insight on this (and I apologize if this is not the place to post this kind of a question).

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  • Career paths after web development?

    - by Mike
    I know this is open ended, but I'm just curious what you've done after your web development career, or if you've stayed loyal. I have a feeling/read/heard that web development salaries top out at a certain amount.. even after 10-15 years of experience. Reason I ask is that I graduated last summer with a BS in Chemical Engineering.. but have not been able to find a job in California. I've been web designing/developing since high school and thought that I should start a career, even if its not related to my major and not lose more time. Even though I'd really like to have an engineering career, I don't think that will happen. Do you guys have any suggestions or experiences for choices after/ways to enhance your career after several years in web development? Thanks! Update: Thanks for the responses guys! One more question: Is it likely to be accepted into a MS/PhD program if you've been out of uni for a couple years? Or with semi-related job experience? Would I be a bit of a misfit with a BS in ChemE studying CS/CompE for an MS?

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  • Web application development over C++ development..

    - by learnerforever
    Hi, I am CS undergrad and CS grad. In college I used to program in C/C++/java and have pretty much stuck to the same skill set in industry with 3 years experience. I like thinking,reading,applying logic etc, designing data structures, but I have little patience with debugging large C++ code. And having to deal with low level stuff like memory fault,memory corruption,compilation/linking issues. My confidence in programming is getting down due to this, but I like being in technical field. Does web application development like LAMP suit (Linux,apache,mysql,php),CSS,scripting (AMONG OTHER WEB DEVELOPMENT RELATED SKILLS) etc need lesser patience with debugging,and understanding of low level stuff, but your analysis/logical skills also get used? Also opportunities in web application development look more. Things like scalability, most of the stuff that Google does fascinates me, but for patience needed for dealing with C++ debugging. I make blunders while coding. How does the field look like outside C++? I am beginning to wonder if as a female, by moving to web application development, I can better manage work life balance. I have seen relatively lesser females in C++ than in Java/.net. Not very sure about web related stuff though. Also, what are the other hot technologies being used in web application development? lamp,css is something I know vaguely. Not in touch with keywords going on in this area. Please help!!.

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  • Shift career path [on hold]

    - by Rnet
    I have been programming in web services and applications in java, python for about 6 years. Over the past two years I have been gaining a steady interest in networking and I find it very intriguing but due to non existent experience in that field I cannot pursue a serious career in that path. At this point in my career would it be wise to make the shift? What would you do/work on/study(masters?) to make a successful transition?

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  • career in Mobile sw/Application Development [closed]

    - by pramod
    i m planning to do a course on Wireless & mobile computing.The syllabus are given below.Please check & let me know whether its worth to do.How is the job prospects after that.I m a fresher & from electronic Engg.The modules are- *Wireless and Mobile Computing (WiMC) – Modules* C, C++ Programming and Data Structures 100 Hours C Revision C, C++ programming tools on linux(Vi editor, gdb etc.) OOP concepts Programming constructs Functions Access Specifiers Classes and Objects Overloading Inheritance Polymorphism Templates Data Structures in C++ Arrays, stacks, Queues, Linked Lists( Singly, Doubly, Circular) Trees, Threaded trees, AVL Trees Graphs, Sorting (bubble, Quick, Heap , Merge) System Development Methodology 18 Hours Software life cycle and various life cycle models Project Management Software: A Process Various Phases in s/w Development Risk Analysis and Management Software Quality Assurance Introduction to Coding Standards Software Project Management Testing Strategies and Tactics Project Management and Introduction to Risk Management Java Programming 110 Hours Data Types, Operators and Language Constructs Classes and Objects, Inner Classes and Inheritance Inheritance Interface and Package Exceptions Threads Java.lang Java.util Java.awt Java.io Java.applet Java.swing XML, XSL, DTD Java n/w programming Introduction to servlet Mobile and Wireless Technologies 30 Hours Basics of Wireless Technologies Cellular Communication: Single cell systems, multi-cell systems, frequency reuse, analog cellular systems, digital cellular systems GSM standard: Mobile Station, BTS, BSC, MSC, SMS sever, call processing and protocols CDMA standard: spread spectrum technologies, 2.5G and 3G Systems: HSCSD, GPRS, W-CDMA/UMTS,3GPP and international roaming, Multimedia services CDMA based cellular mobile communication systems Wireless Personal Area Networks: Bluetooth, IEEE 802.11a/b/g standards Mobile Handset Device Interfacing: Data Cables, IrDA, Bluetooth, Touch- Screen Interfacing Wireless Security, Telemetry Java Wireless Programming and Applications Development(J2ME) 100 Hours J2ME Architecture The CLDC and the KVM Tools and Development Process Classification of CLDC Target Devices CLDC Collections API CLDC Streams Model MIDlets MIDlet Lifecycle MIDP Programming MIDP Event Architecture High-Level Event Handling Low-Level Event Handling The CLDC Streams Model The CLDC Networking Package The MIDP Implementation Introduction to WAP, WML Script and XHTML Introduction to Multimedia Messaging Services (MMS) Symbian Programming 60 Hours Symbian OS basics Symbian OS services Symbian OS organization GUI approaches ROM building Debugging Hardware abstraction Base porting Symbian OS reference design porting File systems Overview of Symbian OS Development – DevKits, CustKits and SDKs CodeWarrior Tool Application & UI Development Client Server Framework ECOM STDLIB in Symbian iPhone Programming 80 Hours Introducing iPhone core specifications Understanding iPhone input and output Designing web pages for the iPhone Capturing iPhone events Introducing the webkit CSS transforms transitions and animations Using iUI for web apps Using Canvas for web apps Building web apps with Dashcode Writing Dashcode programs Debugging iPhone web pages SDK programming for web developers An introduction to object-oriented programming Introducing the iPhone OS Using Xcode and Interface builder Programming with the SDK Toolkit OS Concepts & Linux Programming 60 Hours Operating System Concepts What is an OS? Processes Scheduling & Synchronization Memory management Virtual Memory and Paging Linux Architecture Programming in Linux Linux Shell Programming Writing Device Drivers Configuring and Building GNU Cross-tool chain Configuring and Compiling Linux Virtual File System Porting Linux on Target Hardware WinCE.NET and Database Technology 80 Hours Execution Process in .NET Environment Language Interoperability Assemblies Need of C# Operators Namespaces & Assemblies Arrays Preprocessors Delegates and Events Boxing and Unboxing Regular Expression Collections Multithreading Programming Memory Management Exceptions Handling Win Forms Working with database ASP .NET Server Controls and client-side scripts ASP .NET Web Server Controls Validation Controls Principles of database management Need of RDBMS etc Client/Server Computing RDBMS Technologies Codd’s Rules Data Models Normalization Techniques ER Diagrams Data Flow Diagrams Database recovery & backup SQL Android Application 80 Hours Introduction of android Why develop for android Android SDK features Creating android activities Fundamental android UI design Intents, adapters, dialogs Android Technique for saving data Data base in Androids Maps, Geocoding, Location based services Toast, using alarms, Instant messaging Using blue tooth Using Telephony Introducing sensor manager Managing network and wi-fi connection Advanced androids development Linux kernel security Implement AIDL Interface. Project 120 Hours

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  • CS Concentrations and Career Paths

    - by xbonez
    I'm approaching the end of Sophomore year in college (Studying Computer Science), and very soon I'm going to have to decide on my concentration, but I honestly don't know what each concentration means. I basically have two questions: 1. How much influence does your concentration have on your career path? For example, would a video game development company only look at people with a concentration in Game Development? 2.It would be great if you guys could, in a line or two, tell me what sort of jobs am I looking at for each of the concentrations? I need to pick at least two of the 9 below. - Algorithms and Data Structures - Artificial Intelligence - Computer and Network Society - Computer graphics and vision - Human-Computer Interaction - Game Development and Design - Numeric and Symbolic Computation - Programming languages - Systems

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  • Android SDK vs NDK in oppurtunities and career scope

    - by Gopal S Akshintala
    Hi I am very much interested in Android Mobile Developement and I am equally comfortable with Java and C/C++. I would like to build my career in Android. So I am confused on to which way to go, wheather as Android SDK developer or NDK developer. Please advice me pros n cons of both and also the career scope and oppurtunities in both(With factors like excitement in Job, Payroll, competetion, Openings in Job Market, career growth etc).Thanks...:)

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  • Lack of ideas for startup equals slack career?

    - by Fanatic23
    After 12-15 years of working in the same industry, if a person does not have any new ideas for a startup then is it safe to say that his/her career has not reached its potential? We are not talking of implementation strategies or insights here to fructify the startup -- just great ideas which can change things for the better. Not your source code optimization. I mean a radical way of looking at things. If you lot disagree with this line of thinking, then please share some examples where despite such a long span a person can end up without new ideas.

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  • Career guidance/advice for Junior-level Software Engineer [closed]

    - by John Do
    I have quite a few questions on my mind, so please bare with me. Please don't feel obligated to answer all of them, any as you choose will do. I'd appreciate if you could share some insight on any of these. Before I begin, some context: I currently have almost two years of professional experience as a Software Engineer, mainly developing software in Java. At this point, I feel that I have reached the peak in my career growth at the current company I am at and therefore I am looking for a new job, ideally again, as a Software Engineer. I have been interviewing for the past few months casually but have not had luck with companies I have a passion for. So, in no particular order - 1) In general, what are your thoughts on having graduate degrees in CS / Software Engineering. How much does it influence a salary increase, and do you think it's beneficial when working on real-world problems? I get the sense that a graduate degree in the field is trivial unless you really have a passion for research. 2) In general, in professional practice, how often had you have to write your own data structures and "complex" algorithms from scratch? In my own work, I have found myself relying mainly on third-party frameworks and the Java standard library to implement solutions as per business requirements. What are your thoughts on this? 3) In terms of resume, I feel the most ambivalent here. I want to be able to "blemish" my resume to a certain extent so that it stands out from others', but at the same time I do not want to over-exagerate my abilities. How do you strike a balance here? For example: I say that I am proficient in Java with data structures and algorithms. This is obviously a subjective and relative statement. I've taken the classes in my undergrad, and I've applied it in my work experience. What I feel as "prociency" can be seen as junior-level to others. How do you know what to say? Most of the time, recruiters (with no technical background) will be looking for keywords that stand out. This leads me to my next question (4). 4) Just from interviewing for the past few months (and getting plenty of rejections), I've come to realize that I may not be as proficient in data structures and algorithms as I thought I was. Do you think it's a good idea to remove the "proficient in java/data structure and algorithms"? I feel that being too hoenst on the resume will impede me from scoring opportunities to even have an interview with top-notch companies. What are your thoughts? 5) What is the absolute "must-have" knowledge going into a technical interview? I've been practicing several algorithmic and data sturcture problems now, and I feel that my abilities to solve arbitrary problems efficiently has not gotten significantly better. Do you think these abilities are something innate - it's either you have in you, or you don't? How can you teach yourself to learn, if you will? 6) How easy is it to go from industry/function to the next? I work mainly with backend technologies and I'm now interested in working with the frontend, i.e javascript,jquery,php or even mobile development. In your own experience, how did you not get pidgeon holed in your career? I feel that the choices you make now ultimately decide your future. As cliche as it sounds, I think it may be true. Here's what I mean: you've worked mainly as a backend engineer, people are interested in you doing the same thing since you've already accumulated experience in that function. How do get experience in a new function if people won't accept you because you don't already have it? It's a catch 22, you see... Are side projects the only real way to help you move from one function to another that you're truly interested in? For example: I could start writing my own mobile applications, even though I've worked mainly on the backend. Thanks so much for the long read. As a relatively new engineer to the real world, I am very humble and would like those who are experienced to shed some light. Thank you so much.

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  • Getting out of web-development before I make a huge investment? [closed]

    - by zhenka
    I am still in college. I've been doing web-app development for about a year now and I'm growing to hate it more and more. The whole thing feels like a huge hack and I am loosing my interest in programming because of it. Too much time is spent on learning tricks and libraries in javascript/css/html and battling the statelessness of it all. I don't so much mind back-end development, I just hate ALL of the frontend technology stack. What attracted me to programming was software architecture. I love design patterns, clean code, etc... I just feel like there is a lot more to play with in that regard in other forms of development. Moreover I feel like by becoming a Java or .Net expert I will be able to do A LOT more in terms of career choices. I would be able to do anything from server-side to desktop to mobile, but ruby, javascript, php, css etc... makes me completely unemployable in any other sub-domain of SE. Plus most of the learning on web seems to be technology tricks rather then becoming a better developer and expanding one's mind. Should I get out of it and start coding side mobile projects before I invest too much into it? Does anyone have any advice or perhaps share this feeling and moved out of it successfully? Thanks!

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  • Frustrated where I am, but not sure where to go with my career [closed]

    - by Tom Pickles
    I work (3 years now) as a lead developer for a team developing internal tools and websites for a customer account within large outsourcing company. I'm a self taught programmer and my previous incarnation was a 3rd line support guy, so I have a solid infrastructure knowledge. We use VB.Net/MSSQL/SSIS/SSRS ASP.NET (nTier) in house and I have about 8 years coding experience. Without going into too much detail, my boss is very ambitious and uses our team as his footing to get up the ladder. I've been in the team from the start and the only new dev's we have brought in have been people with a bit of VBA/VBScript experience, much to my chagrin, to bolster his empire. It's been a lot of hard work to bring them up to a standard, but there's still a lot for them to learn. This makes my life stressful as I always get the high profile/complex project work to do as other's simply cannot do it, or it'd take them twice/three times longer to do it. My boss is always seeking stuff for us to build for people who haven't asked for it, which usually get's thrown to me as I have the most experience and can pick new API's (etc) up quicker. He doesn't give us proper requirements, we don't get time to design properly before we code, he wants us to throw something (quick and dirty as he calls it) together so we can get it out ASAP. I take pride in my work so I like to do it properly, make my code clean, maintainable etc, and I train the other guys in the team to do the same. But, we always fall on our faces. The customer we drop the apps on say it doesn't do what they need (due to few requirements), or my boss doesn't like it/changes the spec, so we have to rework it, it get's drawn out, and it makes us and me look and feel like fools. We then get accused by boss of not being reactive enough to change. I've had enough. In order to get my skills and knowledge gap's filled, I've been reading Code Complete 2nd Ed (McConnell) and the Head First Design Patterns books. I'm forcing myself to move into C# from VB at home to broaden my horizons. I'm not sure where to go from here. I don't want to code all my life as I'd like to move into a higher level design/architects role at some point in time (I'm 35). Where do I/can I go from here?

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  • Please help me, I need some solid career advice, put myself in a dumb situation

    - by Kevin
    Hi, First off, I just want to say thank you in advance for looking at my question and would really value your input on this subject. My core question is how do I proceed from the following predicament. I will be honest with you, I wasted my College Experience. I slacked off and didn't take any of my comp sci classes that seriously, somehow i still got out with a 3.25 GPA. But truth be told I learned nothing. I befriended most of my professors who went pretty lenient on me in terms of grading. However, I basically came out of College knowing how to program a simple calculator in VB.Net. I was (to my great surprise) hired by a very large respected company in Denver as a Junior developer. Well the long and the short of it is that I knew so little about programming that I quickly became the office pariah and was almost fired due to my incompetence. It has been 8 months now and I feel I have learned some basic things and I am not as picked on as I used to be by the other developers. However, everyone hates me and the first few months have given the other developers a horrible perception of me. I am no longer afraid of code or learning, but I have put my self in the precarious position of being the scapegoat of our department. I hate going to work every day because no one there is my friend and pretty much everyone is hostile to me. What should I do? Any advice?

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  • Starting a career in quantitative finance

    - by Vitor Braga
    I've been reading John Hull book (Options, Futures and Other Derivatives) mostly on curiosity. I've read other books about financial markets in the past (like Elder's Trading for Living and the novel Reminiscences of a Stock Operator). But I'm really hooked by the John Hull book. My background is mostly scientific computing: number crunching, visualization and image processing. Mostly in C++, with some C, Fortran, Python, Ruby here and there. I've been thinking on moving on to quantitative finance - I'd like to do that. What would be the best way to start? Any tips?

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  • Career path to get into computer science research

    - by srinathhs
    I taught this question will be appropriate to ask here. I am currently a software engineer working mainly on Java stuff , along with some android. My question : I want to be a researcher in "computer science" down the line 6 - 7 yrs, what do you folks suggest should be my path to reach it ? Constraints : I cannot cannot do formal MS or PHD , I simply cant afford it. I can dedicate certain amount of time per day to study and research.

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  • Computer Science Degree or Computer Engineering Degree?

    - by Paul
    Hello everyone, I'm 23 years old living in Italy and this year I will be getting my high school diploma. I'm interested in pursuing a collage degree and work in the IT field. At the moment I'm self teaching myself Java (I also know python, html, css and mysql). I'm also learning about algorithms and OO design. I'm curious how important a college degree is for me, considering my age and if there is a big difference between computer science and computer engineer. There is a computer science university where I currently live but not a computer engineer one. For some reason universities that offer computer engineering courses are only in bigger cities such as Milan, Bologna, Roma. Cost wise, it would be cheaper for me to study near home at a computer science school. Career wise, would a computer engineering university offer me more work opportunities instead of a computer science degree ? Is it easier transiting from CS to CEN or vice-versa? I'm not exactly sure what type of job I want to pursue in the future since I'm still a bit undecided but definitely not system/network administrator, database administrator, game developer.

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  • Which career path to take to get hired by big companies like Google and Microsoft

    - by Wonder
    I am in second year computer science program. This summer I am starting a quality database developer position at RIM for 8 months. My goal is to work as a software developer (architect or consultant eventually) at Google. After this 8 months, I am still going to do 12 months of co-op. In which direction should I be trying to steer my career in? Is there any certain positions (other than software developer) or companies I should work for?

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  • Do I deserve a promotion/higher salary?

    - by anonCoder
    I'm a software developer and have been working at my current employer for almost 2 years. I joined straight out of university, so this is my first real full-time job. I was employed as a junior developer with no real responsibilities. In the last year, I have been given more responsiibility. I am the official contact person at my company for a number of clients. I have represented the company by myself in off-site meetings with clients. My software development role has grown. I now have specialised knowledge in certain tools/products/technologies that no one else here does. My problem is that I am still officially a junior developer, and still earning less than I feel I am worth. Am I being taken advantage of? How long should I reasonably expect to stay a junior developer before I expect a promotion of some kind? What would you do in my situation?

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  • Web development starting a career [closed]

    - by user985482
    Hi I am in the 3rd and last year at college of informatics and I am interested to follow a career in web development when I finish(2 more months). From what I understand this days to get hired you need to be able to know a variety of technologies at least that is the case in Romania.Most of the jobs I have seen even at entry level asks you to know the following: HTML/CSS Javascript , a framework preferable jQuery , Ajax a server side language in my case PHP and a framework SQL and an RDBMS in my case MySql a CMS in my case Wordpress My question is how well should me or anyone looking to get hired as a web developer for there first job should we know this technologies in order to get hired and what else should we aim to learn to have a better chance of getting hired. I don't know if the question is right for this forum but I believe that this could help many of the students and anyone who is taking an interest in web development to know what they should expect from there employers when they try to find work.

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  • C# development with Mono and MonoDevelop

    - by developerit
    In the past two years, I have been developing .NET from my MacBook by running Windows XP into VM Ware and more recently into Virtual Box from OS X. This way, I could install Visual Studio and be able to work seamlessly. But, this way of working has a major down side: it kills the battery of my laptop… I can easiely last for 3 hours if I stay in OS X, but can only last 45 min when XP is running. Recently, I gave MonoDevelop a try for developing Developer IT‘s tools and web site. While being way less complete then Visual Studio, it provides essentials tools when it comes to developping software. It works well with solutions and projects files created from Visual Studio, it has Intellisence (word completion), it can compile your code and can even target your .NET app to linux or unix. This tools can save me a lot of time and batteries! Although I could not only work with MonoDevelop, I find it way better than a simple text editor like Smultron. Thanks to Novell, we can now bring Microsoft technology to OS X.

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  • Shared Development Space

    - by PatrickWalker
    Currently the company I work in gives each developer their own development virtual machine. On this machine (Windows 7) they install the entire stack of the product (minus database) this stack is normally spread amongst multiple machines of differing OS (although moving towards windows 2008 and 2008r2) So when a developer has a new project they are likely to be updating only a small piece of their stack and as such the rest of it can become out of date with the latest production code. The isolation from others means some issues won't be found until the code goes into shared test environments/production. I'm suggesting a move from functional testing on these isolated machines to plugging machines into a shared environment. The goal being to move towards a deployment thats closer to production in mechanism and server type. Developers would still make code changes on their Win7 vm and run unit/component testing locally but for functionally testing they would leverage a shared enviornment. Does anyone else use a shared development environment like this? Are there many reasons against this sort of sandbox environment? The biggest drawback is a move away from only checking in code when you've done local functional testing to checking in after static testing. I'm hoping an intelligent git branching strategy can take care of this for us.

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  • yet another question about migrating to Java

    - by aloneguid
    Hi, There are plenty similar questions, but maybe responses to this one will save a developer's life :) I want to migrate to Java. The reasons are very clear: all the .NET vacancies are client and windows oriented (Silverlight developer, ASP.NET developer, WPF developer etc.) and none of them are any interest to me. I worked with .NET since it's beginning as our company decided to invest in .NET having C++ stack and all the natual problems, so I was just blindly following and actually enjoyed it as the products were mostly server oriented with mixed C++/C# code. Today I have beforementioned problem - can't find an inspiring job. I'd rather kill myself than start working on a Silverlight or WPF project. Searching Java vacancies shows promising results, however they all require a huge java-related technology stack and experience. The question is is there any chance to find a job quickly and without dramatic salary drop (I know that Java guys are usually better paid, so there must be a kind of a credit) and if not, how must time and effort does it take to migrate (my .NET knowledge mostly includes server-oriented technologies like NHibernate, WCF, threading, sockets, ASP.NET web services, Enterprise Library, NInject etc etc etc, and (still) some C++ leftovers). Thanks!

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  • Importance of a 1st Class Degree

    - by Nipuna Silva
    I'm currently at the 3rd year following a degree in Software Engineering. I'm thinking of moving into a research field in the future (programming language design, AI etc.) My problems are, What is the advantage/importance of carrying a 1st Class Degree (Honors for Americans) in to the industry rather than with just simple pass. Is it really important to have a 1st Class? Is it the practical knowledge i have to give priority or the theoretical knowledge, or both?

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