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  • What's wrong with this bash prompt?

    - by takeshin
    I use the following entry in ~/.bashrc file to colorize the prompt and display current branch of git repository: PS1='\[\e[1;32m\]\[\[email protected]\h\]\[\e[m\] \[\w\]\[\e[1;1m\]\[$(__git_ps1 " (%s)")\] \[\e[1;1m\]\[$\] \[\e[m\]' This works almost fine, except when I use bash history (up arrow key few times), the command line becomes 'outdented' (just the first characters of the prompt remains untouched), and the visible is: usemmand when my username is user and the command is command.

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  • The Command Prompt is Outdated: 2 Command Prompt Replacements for Windows

    - by Chris Hoffman
    The Command Prompt window included with Windows is outdated. The command line itself isn’t outdated – the Command Prompt just lacks modern features like tabs, transparency, support for other shells, easy selection of text, and other modern Windows features. If you spend any time at all with the Command Prompt, you’ll want to check out one of these two open-source Command Prompt replacements that improves on the original Command Prompt. HTG Explains: Does Your Android Phone Need an Antivirus? How To Use USB Drives With the Nexus 7 and Other Android Devices Why Does 64-Bit Windows Need a Separate “Program Files (x86)” Folder?

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  • Auto-execute command after going to a folder with the CD command

    - by Patrick
    Is it possible to auto-execute a command in a folder if you move to it via the cd command? Of course I can define my own command (e.g. CHD.BAT) doing something like this: @echo off cd %1 if exist init.bat ( init.bat ) else ( color 0F title Command Prompt ) But I wonder if something like this would be possible using the standard CD command.

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  • command to show the shell command prompt

    - by LinuxPenseur
    Hi, Is there a shell command to display the command prompt. I will explain what i want through the illustration below. When i execute script.sh, i should get the following output $sh script.sh $ /* command prompt and then print hi */ hi My script.sh is like this #! /bin/bash <command to display the shell command prompt> echo "hi" exit 0 what should the code that has to go in the place of angle brackets to get an output like above? Thanks

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  • Bash prompt doesn't print until I interact with console again

    - by durron597
    I don't even know where to begin to diagnose this one. Usually, when a command finishes, the prompt prints itself for the next command. However, that is not happening. Hard to explain with words, I'll just use an example: [email protected]:~$ cp /mnt/mountname/directory/textfile.txt . After waiting several seconds (far too long for this operation on a small file) I press Enter, and see: [email protected]:~$ cp /mnt/mountname/directory/textfile.txt . [email protected]:~$ [email protected]:~$ So clearly the operation had finished, but the prompt didn't display... until I pressed enter, and then BOTH prompts instantly displayed. This error does not happen with commands like cd.

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  • Run command in command prompt from Ruby application

    - by Julian
    I have a command-line Ruby application that uses Curses to create a GUI. This GUI is absolutely mangled by Windows' command prompt if the command prompt window is too small. The command prompt window can be resized in properties. However, I want to resize it programatically. Running this command in the command prompt (nothing to do with Ruby) will resize the command prompt window to desired variables. mode con:cols=120 lines=40 Can I do this purely in Ruby? Or, failing that (I suspect doing it purely in Ruby may be impossible) can my ruby application actually run that command and 'hit enter', and resize window it's running in?

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  • Open Elevated "Administrator:" cmd prompt instead of "cmd prompt (Running as Administrator)"

    - by naspinski
    If you open a command prompt with a runas command, you will see a window that shows (Running as some_user) In the title bar, but if you right click on cmd.exe and choose Run as Administrator you will get a window that has: Administrator cmd.exe In the title bar. Oddly enough, these windows exhibit different behavior. My question is how can I get the Administrator cmd.exe command prompt via command line? Or if it is even possible?

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  • Learning the command line [duplicate]

    - by Billy
    This question already has an answer here: What is the best way to learn how to use Ubuntu with terminal? 3 answers This isn't really a technical question but I am curious as to how long it takes to learn the linux command line. I would like to learn how to be able to do as much as possible easily from the command line. I just bought a book, linux command line and shell scripting bible. I know that this book will be of great help, but i just have no clue how long it will be before i can successfully naviagte the terminal with ease. If you could post and let me know about your experience with the terminal, and the learning process, that would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance.

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  • Command prompt hangs/freezes/crashes sporadically

    - by Leonard Challis
    I'm finding it very difficult to Google this, I don't seem to be able to find anyone with the same issue and I don't know enough about the Windows operating system to troubleshoot. The machine(s) we are seeing the problem on are Windows 7 (professional) both 64bit and 32bit. The problem is with the command prompt freezing up, seemingly randomly. When it does freeze nothing will bring it back to life (i.e. keypress) and it's nothing to do with Quick Insert mode either. It doesn't seem to be when I run standard commands, such as cd, dir, etc, but when I run different programs from the command line. The annoying thing is that sometimes the prompt will freeze and at other times it won't, using the same program/command in the prompt. To add to the frustration, one of my colleagues who had the same problem seems to not have experienced it for a few days now (we're pretty heavy on the command line). It's not a VPN/RDP thing as suggested in other questions and forum posts, as I've seen this both locally and remotely. I thought it was to do with the return code signifying an error or some error state in the program, i.e.: C:\Users\leonardc>mysql -u lalala ERROR 1045 (28000): Access denied for user 'lalala'@'localhost' (using password: NO) but this isn't always the case either. In fact the above command hasn't crashed the shell before. Elevating the prompt to run as Administrator doesn't seem to have any bearing on the problem either. Disabling my anti-virus doesn't have an effect either. Update: I tried the same commands in PowerShell, but I still get the same problem, it will freeze at random times (more often than not, as with the command prompt, but not always). It's not the same as command prompt in the fact that one might work while the other doesn't, but then the next time I try run the same command in both it will suddenly be different again.

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  • Ask the Readers: Do You Use the Command Line?

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    Despite over two decades of GUI interfaces many power users still turn to the command prompt. This week we want to hear about when and how you use the command prompt on your computer. Long ago in a time before you could manipulate your computer with a mouse and a series of buttons and windows, the command line ruled all. Even after years of GUI development and refinement many people still turn to the command line to get things done. This week we want to hear all about your command line tips and tricks. Do you use the default command line for your OS? Have you enhanced it? Replaced it? What keeps you coming back to the command line when everyone happily works away in the OS’s GUI? Sound off in the comments and don’t forget to check back in on Friday to see the What You Said roundup. What is a Histogram, and How Can I Use it to Improve My Photos?How To Easily Access Your Home Network From Anywhere With DDNSHow To Recover After Your Email Password Is Compromised

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  • Execute command from file in current shell

    - by Pandya
    I want to executed command from file (which is script) in current shell in terminal. Example: I have file ch_dir contains following: #!/bin/bash cd /usr Now if I execute file usually as following then it executes commands in different shell: [email protected]:~$ ./ch_dir [email protected]:~$ Here cd /user is executed in different shell. But I want to execute in Current shell. How do I do that? Note: Here cd is only used to explain. Question's aim is to execute any command in current shell

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  • What You Said: Do You Use the Command Line?

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    Earlier this week we asked you to sound off with your love (or lack there of) for the command line. You sounded off in force and now we’re back with a comment roundup. It turns out you all pretty much love the command line with that love ranging from not even liking Graphic User Interfaces (GUIs) to using the command line to get serious work done but having a long standing affair with your OS’s GUI. Many of you lamented the poor command line implementation in Windows—especially after you’d had experience with other operation systems. Mike writes: Of course. Some things are easier that was. Like ping and ipconfig. With a strong Unix background I still write and use batch files. It would be nice is the command line included more nice things like grep, sleep, touch. Maybe, someday, Windows will mature into a full OS. What is a Histogram, and How Can I Use it to Improve My Photos?How To Easily Access Your Home Network From Anywhere With DDNSHow To Recover After Your Email Password Is Compromised

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  • disable possword policy using command prompt in Server 2008

    - by user50273
    Is there a way to disable password policy in Windows Server 2008 using command prompt. I know how to do it using Local Security Policy in Administrative Tools. I was wondering if there is a way to change using command prompt. I guess there must be some registry settings that needs to be changed but I do not know which entry in registry will disable the password policy. If you can tell me which registry entry I can write the command prompt myself. Thanks

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  • How to See What Web Sites Your Computer is Secretly Connecting To

    - by Lori Kaufman
    Has your internet connection become slower than it should be? There may be a chance that you have some malware, spyware, or adware that is using your internet connection in the background without your knowledge. Here’s how to see what’s going on under the hood. Secret Squirrel by akumath HTG Explains: When Do You Need to Update Your Drivers? How to Make the Kindle Fire Silk Browser *Actually* Fast! Amazon’s New Kindle Fire Tablet: the How-To Geek Review

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  • What’s new in SQL Prompt 6.3?

    - by Tom Crossman
    This post describes some of the improvements we’ve made in the latest version of SQL Prompt. Code suggestions In recent months, the focus of the SQL Prompt development team has been to remove annoyances and improve code suggestions. Here’s just a few of the improvements to code suggestions we’ve made in SQL Prompt 6.3: The suggestions box is no longer shown when there are no suggestions Suggestions are now shown if you continue to type a half-completed word More suggestions for new SQL Server 2014 syntax Improvements to partial match suggestions Improved suggestion ordering As well as improving suggestions, we’ve also added some new features. Select in Object Explorer You can now use SQL Prompt to select an object in the Object Explorer from a query window. This is useful because many SSMS features are available from an object’s Object Explorer context menu (eg select top 1000 rows, design, script as). To select an object in the Object Explorer, place the cursor over the object you want to select and press Ctrl + F12: Here’s a short video of the feature in action. $SELECTIONSTART$ and $SELECTIONEND$ placeholders You can now use $SELECTIONSTART$ and $SELECTIONEND$ placeholders in your snippet code. The code between these placeholders is selected when you insert the snippet. For example, the following snippet: $SELECTIONSTART$SELECT TOP 100 * FROM Table1$SELECTIONEND$ is inserted as: You can then press F5 to run the selected snippet code. For the full list of snippet placeholders you can use, see the documentation. Highlighting matching parentheses If your cursor is next to an opening or closing parenthesis in a query, SQL Prompt now automatically highlights the matching parenthesis: You can then use the SSMS and Visual Studio shortcut Ctrl + ] to move between parentheses. More improvements Those are just a few of the improvements in SQL Prompt 6.3. For the full list of features and bug fixes, see the release notes.

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  • How To Personalize the Windows Command Prompt

    - by Matthew Guay
    Command line interfaces can be downright boring, and always seem to miss out on the fresh coats of paint liberally applied to the rest of Windows.  Here’s how to add a splash of color to Command Prompt and make it unique. By default, Windows Command Prompt is white text on a black background. It get’s the job done, but maybe you want to add some color to it.   To get an overview of what we can do with the color command, let’s enter: color /? So, to get the color you want, enter color then the option for the background color followed by the font color.  For example, let’s make an old-fashioned green on black look by entering: color 02   There are a bunch of different combinations you can do, like this black background with red text. color 04 You can’t mess it up too much.  The color command won’t let you set both the font and the background to the same color, which would make it unreadable.  Also, if you want to get back to the default settings, just enter: color Now we’re back to plain-old black and white. Personalize Command Prompt Without Commands If you’d prefer to change the color without entering commands, just click on the Command Prompt icon in the top left corner of the window and select Properties. Select the Colors tab, and then choose the color you want for the screen text and background.  You can also enter your own RGB color combination if you want.   Here we entered the RGB values to get a purple background color like Ubuntu 10.04. Back in the Properties dialog, you can also change your Command Prompt font from the font tab.  Choose any font you want, as long as the one you want is one of the three listed here. Customizations you make via the Properties dialog are saved and will be used any time you open Command Prompt, but any customizations you make with the Color command are only for that session. Conclusion Whether you want to make your command prompt bright enough to cause a sunburn or old-style enough to scare a mainframe operator, with these settings, you can make Command Prompt a bit more unique.   Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Use "Command Prompt Here" in Windows VistaVerify the Integrity of Windows Vista System FilesKeyboard Ninja: Scrolling the Windows Command Prompt With Only the KeyboardRun a Command as Administrator from the Windows 7 / Vista Run boxStart an Application Assigned to a Specific CPU in Windows Vista TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 How to Add Exceptions to the Windows Firewall Office 2010 reviewed in depth by Ed Bott FoxClocks adds World Times in your Statusbar (Firefox) Have Fun Editing Photo Editing with Citrify Outlook Connector Upgrade Error Gadfly is a cool Twitter/Silverlight app

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  • What is the best way to hide a command prompt window

    - by detj
    I'm running the headless interface of VirtualBox (VBoxHeadless.exe) with Ubuntu Server running on it. Every time I run VBoxHeadless, it starts a command prompt window which just sits on the taskbar taking space which could have been used by more useful programs. I want to hide this non-functional command prompt window (minimize to system tray or anything that just removes it visibly). How can I do this? It would be really cool, if this can be achieved without installing any 'minimize to system tray' utility. Any ideas??

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  • Command prompt print dialog command

    - by wrongusername
    Is there any way a C++ commandline program on Windows can produce a graphical GUI print dialog for printing to a printer, just like usual GUI programs? I've combed through this webpage and it seems there are only commands that print files in the background to a pre-determined printer.

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  • Unix style command line history in windows

    - by dean20007
    This may be a duplicate so feel free to close and point me in the right direction but is there a way of getting Unix style command line recall in windows. E.g. Opening a new command window and using the up arrow key will recall the last x number of statements. I know this works in the command window per command window session but is there a way to persist across sessions?

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  • a unix single-line editor/prompt?

    - by jes5199
    I've got a bash script that would be nicer if when I prompt the user, rather than just asking for input, if it provided a line that the user could edit (but a full text editor would be overkill, it's only one line) What tool provides this? dialog's inputbox is almost right, but I'd rather it didn't paint the whole screen.

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  • Windows CMD, show the current folder name at prompt dynamically like Bash

    - by guneysus
    I am trying to modify my CMD, to show only current dir name dynamically like: Desktop $ When i switched the folder, it must be updated. It is not required to be code in purely batch file, it may depend any external commands, cygwin bash, etc. @echo off set a=bash -c "pwd | sed 's,^\(.*/\)\?\([^/]*\),\2,'" %a% cmd outputs _test-et Microsoft Windows [Version 6.3.9600] (c) 2013 Microsoft Corporation. Tüm haklari saklidir. >> But >> prompt %a% gives bash -c "pwd | sed 's,^\(.*/\)\?\([^/]*\),\2,'"

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  • Change Command Prompt width from the Command Line

    - by Starkers
    Don't really know what more I can say really. That window captured below will simply not get any larger. Are there some settings somewhere that will allow me to resize it? See, this limited window thing has left me in a bit of a pickle. Basically I've created an application with a command line GUI (With Ruby's Curses Library), and while everything works beautifully on OSX and Ubuntu Terminals, with Command Prompt, if the Curses Windows are larger than the Command Prompt window as shown below, the whole application crashes with a 'window already closed' error. So, is there a setting that allows users to resize their Command Prompt window, something that I'll have to put in the documentation. Here's what the holy grail answer would, be though: Is there a way to do this from the command line? Could my application detect if the Command Prompt it's running on is of fixed width, and actually programatically run the command to allow the Command Prompt window to be enlarged? Or at least give the user a helpful error message?

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  • Determine/resolve filepath/alias of a certain command in the Windows command prompt

    - by porg
    How can I find out to which filepath (or alias) a certain command input will point to, in the Windows command prompt? Specifically Windows XP, info on other versions also appreciated! On Unix systems I simply use: $ which commandname /a/commandname Or: $ type -a commandname commandname is aliased to `/b/commandname' commandname is /a/commandname commandname is /b/commandname And I am simply looking for the equivalent in the Windows Shell (specifically Win XP). I came to this general question, from a specific issue: I had installed robocopy.exe (version 026), but the command line "robocopy" always triggers version 010, and I would like to determine where this command points to, in order to correct this mistake.

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  • Modify cmd.exe properties using the command prompt

    - by CodexArcanum
    Isn't that nicely recursive? I've got a portable command prompt on my external drive, and it has a nice .bat file to configure some initial settings, but I'd like more! Here's what I know how to set from .bat: Colors = (color XY) where x and y are hex digits for the predefined colors Prompt = (prompt $p$g) sets the prompt to "C:\etc\etc " the default prompt Title = (title "text") sets the window title to "text" Screen Size = (mode con: cols=XX lines=YY) sets the columns and lines size of the window Path = (SET PATH=%~d0\bin;%PATH%) sets up local path to my tools and appends the computer's path So that's all great. But there are a few settings I can't seem to set from the bat. Like, how would I set these up wihtout using the Properties dialogue: Buffer = not screen size, but the buffer Options like quick edit mode and autocomplete Popup colors Font. And can you use a font on the portable drive, or must it be installed to work? Command history options

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