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  • Translator by Moth v2

    - by Daniel Moth
    If you are looking for the full manual for this Windows Phone app you can find it here: "Translator by Moth". While the manual has no images (just text), in this post I will share images and if you like them, go get "Translator by Moth" from the Windows Phone marketplace. open the app from the app list or through a pinned tile (including secondary tiles for specific translations)    language picker (~40 languages)     "current" page     "saved" page    "about" page Like? Go get Translator by Moth! Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • Best of "The Moth" 2011

    - by Daniel Moth
    Once again (like in 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010) the time has come to wish you a Happy New Year and to share my favorite posts from the year we just left behind. 1. My first blog entry in January and last one in December were both about my Windows Phone app: Translator by Moth and Translator by Moth v2. In between, I shared a few code snippets for Windows Phone development including a watermark textbox, a scroll helper, an RTL helper and a network connectivity helper - there will be more coming in 2012. 2. Efficiently using Microsoft Office products is the hallmark of an efficient Program Manager (and not only), and I'll continue sharing tips on this blog in that area. An example from last year is tracking changes in SharePoint-hosted Word document. 3. Half-way through last year I moved from managing the parallel debugger team to managing the C++ AMP team (both of them in Visual Studio 11). That means I had to deprioritize sharing content on VS parallel debugging features (I promise to do that in 2012), and it also meant that I wrote a lot about C++ AMP. You'll need a few cups of coffee to go through all of it, and most of the links were aggregated on this single highly recommended post: Give a session on C++ AMP – here is how You can stay tuned for more by subscribing via one of the options on the left… Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • "Translator by Moth"

    - by Daniel Moth
    This article serves as the manual for the free Windows Phone 7 app called "Translator by Moth". The app is available from the following link (browse the link on your Window Phone 7 phone, or from your PC with zune software installed): http://social.zune.net/redirect?type=phoneApp&id=bcd09f8e-8211-e011-9264-00237de2db9e   Startup At startup the app makes a connection to the bing Microsoft Translator service to retrieve the available languages, and also which languages offer playback support (two network calls total). It populates with the results the two list pickers ("from" and "to") on the "current" page. If for whatever reason the network call fails, you are informed via a message box, and the app keeps trying to make a connection every few seconds. When it eventually succeeds, the language pickers on the "current" page get updated. Until it succeeds, the language pickers remain blank and hence no new translations are possible. As you can guess, if the Microsoft Translation service add more languages for textual translation (or enables more for playback) the app will automatically pick those up. "current" page The "current" page is the main page of the app with language pickers, translation boxes and the application bar. Language list pickers The "current" page allows you to pick the "from" and "to" languages, which are populated at start time. Until these language get populated with the results of the network calls, they remain empty and disabled. When enabled, tapping on either of them brings up on a full screen popup the list of languages to pick from, formatted as English Name followed by Native Name (when the latter is known). The "to" list, in addition to the language names, indicates which languages have playback support via a * in front of the language name. When making a selection for the "to" language, and if there is text entered for translation, a translation is performed (so there is no need to tap on the "translate" application bar button). Note that both language choices are remembered between different launches of the application.   text for translation The textbox where you enter the translation is always enabled. When there is nothing entered in it, it displays (centered and in italics) text prompting you to enter some text for translation. When you tap on it, the prompt text disappears and it becomes truly empty, waiting for input via the keyboard that automatically pops up. The text you type is left aligned and not in italic font. The keyboard shows suggestions of text as you type. The keyboard can be dismissed either by tapping somewhere else on the screen, or via tapping on the Windows Phone hardware "back" button, or via taping on the "enter" key. In the latter case (tapping on the "enter" key), if there was text entered and if the "from" language is not blank, a translation is performed (so there is no need to tap on the "translate" application bar button). The last text entered is remembered between application launches. translated text The translated text appears below the "to" language (left aligned in normal font). Until a translation is performed, there is a message in that space informing you of what to expect (translation appearing there). When the "current" page is cleared via the "clear" application bar button, the translated text reverts back to the message. Note a subtle point: when a translation has been performed and subsequently you change the "from" language or the text for translation, the translated text remains in place but is now in italic font (attempting to indicate that it may be out of date). In any case, this text is not remembered between application launches. application bar buttons and menus There are 4 application bar buttons and 4 application bar menus. "translate" button takes the text for translation and translates it to the translated text, via a single network call to the bing Microsoft Translator service. If the network call fails, the user is informed via a message box. The button is disabled when there is no "from" language available or when there is not text for translation entered. "play" button takes the translated text and plays it out loud in a native speaker's voice (of the "to" language), via a single network call to the bing Microsoft Translator service. If the network call fails, the user is informed via a message box. The button is disabled when there is no "to" language available or when there is no translated text available. "clear" button clears any user text entered in the text for translation box and any translation present in the translated text box. If both of those are already empty, the button is disabled. It also stops any playback if there is one in flight. "save" button saves the entire translation ("from" language, "to" language, text for translation, and translated text) to the bottom of the "saved" page (described later), and simultaneously switches to the "saved" page. The button is disabled if there is no translation or the translation is not up to date (i.e. one of the elements have been changed). "swap to and from languages" menu swaps around the "from" and "to" languages. It also takes the translated text and inserts it in the text for translation area. The translated text area becomes blank. The menu is disabled when there is no "from" and "to" language info. "send translation via sms" menu takes the translated text and creates an SMS message containing it. The menu is disabled when there is no translation present. "send translation via email" menu takes the translated text and creates an email message containing it (after you choose which email account you want to use). The menu is disabled when there is no translation present. "about" menu shows the "about" page described later. "saved" page The "saved" page is initially empty. You can add translations to it by translating text on the "current" page and then tapping the application bar "save" button. Once a translation appears in the list, you can read it all offline (both the "from" and "to" text). Thus, you can create your own phrasebook list, which is remembered between application launches (it is stored on your device). To listen to the translation, simply tap on it – this is only available for languages that support playback, as indicated by the * in front of them. The sound is retrieved via a single network call to the bing Microsoft Translator service (if it fails an appropriate message is displayed in a message box). Tap and hold on a saved translation to bring up a context menu with 4 items: "move to top" menu moves the selected item to the top of the saved list (and scrolls there so it is still in view) "copy to current" menu takes the "from" and "to" information (language and text), and populates the "current" page with it (switching at the same time to the current page). This allows you to make tweaks to the translation (text or languages) and potentially save it back as a new item. Note that the action makes a copy of the translation, so you are not actually editing the existing saved translation (which remains intact). "delete" menu deletes the selected translation. "delete all" menu deletes all saved translations from the "saved" page – there is no way to get that info back other than re-entering it, so be cautious. Note: Once playback of a translation has been retrieved via a network call, Windows Phone 7 caches the results. What this means is that as long as you play a saved translation once, it is likely that it will be available to you for some time, even when there is no network connection.   "about" page The "about" page provides some textual information (that you can view in the screenshot) including a link to the creator's blog (that you can follow on your Windows Phone 7 device). Use that link to discover the email for any feedback. Other UI design info As you can see in the screenshots above, "Translator by Moth" has been designed from scratch for Windows Phone 7, using the nice pivot control and application bar. It also supports both portrait and landscape orientations, and looks equally good in both the light and the dark theme. Other than the default black and white colors, it uses the user's chosen accent color (which is blue in the screenshot examples above). Feedback and support Please report (via the email on the blog) any bugs you encounter or opportunities for performance improvements and they will be fixed in the next update. Suggestions for new features will be considered, but given that the app is FREE, no promises are made. If you like the app, don't forget to rate "Translator by Moth" on the marketplace. Comments about this post welcome at the original blog.

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  • Best of “The Moth” 2013

    - by Daniel Moth
    As previously (2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012) the time has come again to look back over the year’s activities on this blog, and as predicted there were 3 themes 1. It has been just 15 months since I changed role from what at Microsoft we call an “Individual Contributor” (IC) to a managerial role where ICs report to me. Part of being a manager entails sharing career tips with your team and some of those I have put up on my blog over the last year (and hope to continue to next year): Effectiveness and Efficiency, Lead, Follow, or Get out of the way, and Perfect is the enemy of “Good Enough”. 2. It has also been a 15 months that I joined the Visual Studio Diagnostics team, and we have shipped many capabilities in Visual Studio 2013. I helped the members of my team blog about every single one and create videos of many, and then I created a table of contents pointing to all of their blog posts, so if you are interested in what I have been working on over the last year please follow the links from the master blog post here: Visual Studio 2013 Diagnostics Investments. We are busy working on future Visual Studio releases/updates and I will link to those when we are ready… 3. Finally, I used some of my free time (which is becoming eve so scarce) to do some device development and as part of that I shared a few thoughts and code: Debug.Assert replacement for Phone and Store apps, asynchrony is viral, and MyMessageBox for Phone and Store apps. To see what 2014 will bring to this blog, please subscribe using the link on the left… Happy New Year! Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • Best of "The Moth" 2012

    - by Daniel Moth
    As with previous years (2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011) I’d like to wish you a Happy New Year and share a quick review of my blog posts from 2012 (plus speculate on my 2013 blog focus). 1. Like 2011, my professional energy in 2012 was dominated by C++ AMP including articles, blog posts, demos, slides, and screencasts. I summarized that over two posts on the official team blog that I linked to from my blog post here titled: “The last word on C++ AMP”, which also subtly hinted at my change of role which I confirmed in my other post titled “Visual Studio Continued Excitement”. 2. Even before I moved to the Visual Studio Diagnostics team in September, earlier in the year I had started sharing blog posts with my thoughts on that space, something I expect to continue in the new year. You can read some of that in these posts: The way I think about Diagnostic tools, Live Debugging, Attach to Process in Visual Studio, Start Debugging in Visual Studio, Visual Studio Exceptions dialogs. 3. What you should also expect to see more of is thoughts, tips, checklists, etc around Professional Communication and on how to be more efficient and effective with that, e.g. Link instead of Attaching, Sending Outlook Invites, Responding to Invites, and OOF checklist. 4. As always, I sometimes share random information, and noteworthy from 2012 is the one where I outlined the Visual Studio versioning story (“Visual Studio 11 not 2011”, and after that post VS 11 was officially baptized VS2012) and the one on “How I Record Screencasts”. Looking back, unlike 2011 there were no posts in 2012 related to device development, e.g. for Windows Phone. Expect that to be rectified in 2013 as I hope to find more time for such coding… stay tuned by subscribing using the link on the left. Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • Best of "The Moth" 2010

    - by Daniel Moth
    It is the time again (like in 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009) to look back at my blog for the past year and identify areas of interest that seem to be more prominent than others. After doing so, representative posts follow in my top 5 list (in random order). 1. This was the year where I had to move for the first time since 2004 my blog engine (blogger.com –> dasBlog), host provider (zen –> godaddy), web server technology and OS (apache on Linux –> IIS on Windows Server). My goal was not to break any permalinks or the look and feel of this website. A series of posts covered how I achieved that goal, culminating in a tool for others to use if they wanted to do the same: Tool to convert blogger.com content to dasBlog. Going forward I aim to be sharing more small code utilities like that one… 2. At work I am known for being fairly responsive on email, and more importantly never dropping email balls on the floor. This is due to my email processing system, which I shared here: Processing Email in Outlook. I will be sharing more tips with regards to making the best of the Office products. 3. There is no doubt in my mind that this is the year people will remember as the one where Microsoft finally fights back in the mobile space. Even though the new platform means my Windows Mobile book sales will dwindle :-), I am ecstatic about Windows Phone 7 both as a consumer and as a developer. On the release day, to get you started I shared the top 10 Windows Phone 7 developer resources. I will be sharing my tips from my experience in writing code for and consuming this new platform… 4. For my HPC developer friends using Visual Studio, I shared Slides and code for MPI Cluster Debugger and also gave you all the links you need for getting started with Dryad and DryadLINQ from MSR. Expect more from me on cluster development in the coming year… 5. Still in the HPC space, but actually also in the game and even mainstream development, the big disruption and opportunity comes in the form of GPGPU and, on the Microsoft platform, (currently) DirectCompute. Expect more from me on gpgpu development in the coming year… Subscribe via the link on the left to stay tuned for 2011… I wish you a very Happy New Year (with whatever definition of happiness works for you)! Comments about this post welcome at the original blog.

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  • Java Spotlight Episode 99: Daniel Blaukopf on JavaFX for Embedded Systems

    - by Roger Brinkley
    Interview with  Daniel Blaukopf on JavaFX for Embedded Systems Right-click or Control-click to download this MP3 file. You can also subscribe to the Java Spotlight Podcast Feed to get the latest podcast automatically. If you use iTunes you can open iTunes and subscribe with this link:  Java Spotlight Podcast in iTunes. Show Notes News Top 5 Reasons to go to JavaOne 5. Chance to see the future of Java Technical Keynotes and sessions The pavillion The new [email protected] conference 4. The meetings outside the scope of the conference Top 10 Reasons to Attend the Oracle Appreciation Event GlassFish Community Event at JavaOne 2012 Sundays User Group Forum 3. It’s like drinking from firehose Less keynotes more sessions - 20% more 60% of the talks are external to HOLs Tutorials OracleJava University classes on Sunday - Top Five Reasons You Should Attend Java University at JavaOne 2. Students are free 1. It’s not what you see it’s who you will meet Events Sep 10-15, IMTS 2012 Conference,  Chicago Sep 12,  The Coming M2M Revolution: Critical Issues for End-to-End Software and Systems Development,  Webinar Sep 30-Oct 4, JavaONE, San Francisco Oct 3-4, Java Embedded @ JavaONE, San Francisco Oct 15-17, JAX London Oct 30-Nov 1, Arm TechCon, Santa Clara Oct 22-23, Freescale Technology Forum - Japan, Tokyo Oct 31, JFall, Netherlands Nov 2-3, JMagreb, Morocco Nov 13-17, Devoxx, Belgium Feature InterviewDaniel Blaukopf is the Embedded Java Client Architect at Oracle, working on JavaFX. Daniel's focus in his 14 years in the Java organization has been mobile and embedded devices, including working with device manufacturers to port and tune all levels of the Java stack to their hardware and software environments. Daniel's particular interests are: graphics, performance optimization and functional programming.

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  • Le C en 20 heures d'Eric Berthomier et Daniel Schang

    Nous avons le plaisir de vous présenter le livre "Le C en 20 heures" d'Eric Berthomier et Daniel Schang à consulter ou à télécharger gratuitement. Citation: L'ouvrage que vous tenez dans les mains ou que vous consultez sur votre écran a pour objectif de vous faire découvrir, par la pratique, la programmation en langage C. Il a été testé par de nombreux étudiants qui n'avaient aucune connaissance préalable de ce langage. En 20 à 30 heures de ...

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  • Best of "The Moth" 2009

    Not wanting to break the tradition (2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008) below are some blog posts I picked from my blogging last year. As you can see by comparing with the links above, 2009 marks my lowest output yet with only 64 posts, but hopefully the quality has not been lowered ;-) 1. Parallel Computing was a strong focus of course. You can find links to most of that content aggregated in the post where I shared my entire parallelism session. Related to that was the link to the screencast I shared of the Parallel Computing Features Tour.2. Parallel Debugging is obviously part of the parallel computing links above, but I created more in depth content around that area of Visual Studio 2010 since it is the one I directly own. I aggregated all the links to that content in my post: Parallel Debugging.3. High Performance Computing through clusters is an area I'll be focusing more next year (besides parallelism on a single node on the client captured above) and I started introducing the topic on my blog this year. Read the (currently) 6 posts bottom up from my category on HPC.4. Windows 7 Task Manager. In April I shared a screenshot which was the most "borrowed" item from my blog (I should have watermarked it ;-)5. Windows Phone non-support in VS2010. Did my bit to spread clarification of the story.6. Window positions in Visual Studio is a long post, but one that I strongly advise all VS users to read and benefit from.7. Bug Triage gives you a glimpse into one thing all (Microsoft) product teams do.If you haven't yet, you can subscribe via one of the options on the left. Either way, thank you for staying tuned… Happy New Year! Comments about this post welcome at the original blog.

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  • Critical Patch Update For Oracle Fusion Middleware – CPU October 2012 by Daniel Mortimer

    - by JuergenKress
    The latest Critical Patch Update (CPU) has been released for Oracle products. Start your reading here. Patch Set Update and Critical Patch Update October 2012 Availability Document [ID 1477727.1] Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g Release 2 11.1.2.0 Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g Release 1 11.1.1.4 (Portal,Forms,Reports and Discoverer) 11.1.1.5 11.1.1.6 Oracle Application Server 10g Release 3 10.1.3.5 Read the full article here. WebLogic Partner Community For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center. BlogTwitterLinkedInMixForumWiki Technorati Tags: patch ofm,critical patch,WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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  • SQL last day in moth select

    - by Saif Khan
    I have the following table which is basically the summary of daily transactions and is loaded nightly. +++++++++++++++++++++++ + DateCreated + Sale + +++++++++++++++++++++++ + 20100101 + 1000 + + 20100131 + 2000 + + 20100210 + 2000 + + 20100331 + 4000 + +++++++++++++++++++++++ I need to display the sale by month, but only for the last day in each month. eg JAN 2000 FEB 0 MAR 4000 I could probably accomplish this with CASE in my select, but is this efficient? This is SQL Server 2000.

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  • How do I fix "bzr: ERROR: Unable to determine your name. "?

    - by Daniel
    I am trying to quickly create my first app and am getting gtk errors when I try to run or create an application. Here is a copy of what I executed and what results I got: [email protected]:~/PyDevelopment$ quickly create ubuntu-application app001 Creating project directory app001 Creating bzr repository and committing Launching your newly created project! /usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/gi/overrides/Gtk.py:391: Warning: g_object_set_property: construct property "type" for object `Window' can't be set after construction Gtk.Window.__init__(self, type=type, **kwds) /usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/gi/overrides/Gtk.py:391: Warning: g_object_set_property: construct property "type" for object `App001Window' can't be set after construction Gtk.Window.__init__(self, type=type, **kwds) Congrats, your new project is setup! cd /home/daniel/PyDevelopment/app001/ to start hacking. [email protected]:~/PyDevelopment$ cd app001 [email protected]:~/PyDevelopment/app001$ quickly design [email protected]:~/PyDevelopment/app001$ quickly rub ERROR: No rub command found in template ubuntu-application. Candidate commands are: add, commands, configure, create, debug, design, edit, getstarted, help, license, package, quickly, release, run, save, share, submitubuntu, test, tutorial, upgrade [email protected]:~/PyDevelopment/app001$ quickly run /usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/gi/overrides/Gtk.py:391: Warning: g_object_set_property: construct property "type" for object `Window' can't be set after construction Gtk.Window.__init__(self, type=type, **kwds) /usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/gi/overrides/Gtk.py:391: Warning: g_object_set_property: construct property "type" for object `App001Window' can't be set after construction Gtk.Window.__init__(self, type=type, **kwds) [email protected]:~/PyDevelopment/app001$ quickly package .......Ubuntu packaging created in debian/ ....... ---------------------------------- Command returned some ERRORS: ---------------------------------- bzr: ERROR: Unable to determine your name. ---------------------------------- ERROR: can't create or update ubuntu package ERROR: package command failed Aborting

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  • Compiling libcurl for mingw32 (Windows) on mac os x 10.6

    - by Daniel
    Hello. I'm compiling libcurl for mingw32 as follows: ./configure --prefix=/Users/daniel/mingw32 "CFLAGS= -ABI=32" make make install But when compiling a program using mingw32-gcc: i386-mingw32-gcc -lcurl -o bin/remote-win.exe remote.c i get: In file included from /Users/daniel/mingw32/usr/local/include/curl/curl.h:34, from remote.c:6: /Users/daniel/mingw32/usr/local/include/curl/curlbuild.h:152:26: sys/socket.h: No such file or directory In file included from /Users/daniel/mingw32/usr/local/include/curl/curl.h:34, from remote.c:6: /Users/daniel/mingw32/usr/local/include/curl/curlbuild.h:165: error: syntax error before "curl_socklen_t" In file included from /Users/daniel/mingw32/usr/local/include/curl/curl.h:35, from remote.c:6: /Users/daniel/mingw32/usr/local/include/curl/curlrules.h:143: error: size of array `__curl_rule_01__' is negative /Users/daniel/mingw32/usr/local/include/curl/curlrules.h:153: error: size of array `__curl_rule_02__' is negative I'm pretty sure the error is because curl_socklen_t does not exist on windows. I've tried --target=--mingw32 but still no success. Please help

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  • Un plugin jQuery multitâche : méthode de construction personnelle et exemples. Adapter jQuery à vos besoins, niveau 2, par Daniel Hagnoul

    Plugin multitâche : méthode de construction personnelle et exemples Adapter jQuery à vos besoins, niveau 2 Résumé : La plupart des plugins exécutent une seule tâche et les méthodes d'écriture de plugin utilisées dans « Mon Cahier d'exercices », dans la FAQ jQuery et dans l'article « Adapter jQuery à vos besoins » couvrent la majorité des besoins. Lorsque l'on souhaite inclure la modification des options et implémenter plusieurs méthodes on doit penser multitâche . Dans cet ...

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  • ScrollViewer.EnsureVisible for Windows Phone

    - by Daniel Moth
    In my Translator By Moth app, on both the current and saved pivot pages the need arose to programmatically scroll to the bottom. In the former, case it is when a translation takes place (if the text is too long, I want to scroll to the bottom of the translation so the user can focus on that, and not their input text for translation). In the latter case it was when a new translation is saved (it is added to the bottom of the list, so scrolling is required to make it visible). On both pages a ScrollViewer is used. In my exploration of the APIs through intellisense and msdn I could not find a method that auto scrolled to the bottom. So I hacked together a solution where I added a blank textblock to the bottom of each page (within the ScrollViewer, but above the translated textblock and the saved list) and tried to make it scroll it into view from code. After searching the web I found a little algorithm that did most of what I wanted (sorry, I do not have the reference handy, but thank you whoever it was) that after minor tweaking I turned into an extension method for the ScrollViewer that is very easy to use: this.Scroller.EnsureVisible(this.BlankText); The method itself I share with you here: public static void EnsureVisible(this System.Windows.Controls.ScrollViewer scroller, System.Windows.UIElement uiElem) { System.Diagnostics.Debug.Assert(scroller != null); System.Diagnostics.Debug.Assert(uiElem != null); scroller.UpdateLayout(); double maxScrollPos = scroller.ExtentHeight - scroller.ViewportHeight; double scrollPos = scroller.VerticalOffset - scroller.TransformToVisual(uiElem).Transform(new System.Windows.Point(0, 0)).Y; if (scrollPos > maxScrollPos) scrollPos = maxScrollPos; else if (scrollPos < 0) scrollPos = 0; scroller.ScrollToVerticalOffset(scrollPos); } I am sure there are better ways, but this "worked for me" :-) Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • Debug.Assert replacement for Phone and Store apps

    - by Daniel Moth
    I don’t know about you, but all my code is, and always has been, littered with Debug.Assert statements. I think it all started way back in my (short-lived, but impactful to me) Eiffel days, when I was applying Design by Contract. Anyway, I can’t live without Debug.Assert. Imagine my dismay when I upgraded my Windows Phone 7.x app (Translator By Moth) to Windows Phone 8 and discovered that my Debug.Assert statements would not display anything on the target and would not break in the debugger any longer! Luckily, the solution was simple and in this post I share it with you – feel free to teak it to meet your needs. Steps to use Add a new code file to your project, delete all its contents, and paste in the code from MyDebug.cs Perform a global search in your solution replacing Debug.Assert with MyDebug.Assert Build solution and test Now, I do not know why this functionality was broken, but I do know that it exhibits the same broken characteristics for Windows Store apps. There is a simple workaround there to use Contract.Assert which does display a message and offers an option to break in the debugger (although it doesn’t output the message to the Output window). Because I plan on code sharing between Phone and Windows 8 projects, I prefer to have the conditional compilation centralized, so I added the Contract.Assert workaround directly in MyDebug class, so that you can use this class for both platforms – enjoy and enhance! Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • C++ AMP Video Overview

    - by Daniel Moth
    I hope to be recording some C++ AMP screencasts for channel9 soon (you'll find them through my regular screencasts link on the left), and in all of them I will assume you have watched this short interview overview of C++ AMP.   Note: I think there were some technical problems with streaming so best to download the "High Quality WMV" or switch to progressive format. Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • Debugging and Profiling in Visual Studio 2013

    - by Daniel Moth
    The recently released Visual Studio 2013 Preview includes a boat-load of new features in the diagnostics space, that my team delivered (along with other teams at Microsoft). I enumerated my favorites over on the official Visual Studio blog so if you are interested go read the list and follow the links: Visual Studio 2013 Diagnostics Investments Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • GPU Debugging with VS 11

    - by Daniel Moth
    With VS 11 Developer Preview we have invested tremendously in parallel debugging for both CPU (managed and native) and GPU debugging. I'll be doing a whole bunch of blog posts on those topics, and in this post I just wanted to get people started with GPU debugging, i.e. with debugging C++ AMP code. First I invite you to watch 6 minutes of a glimpse of the C++ AMP debugging experience though this video (ffw to minute 51:54, up until minute 59:16). Don't read the rest of this post, just go watch that video, ideally download the High Quality WMV. Summary GPU debugging essentially means debugging the lambda that you pass to the parallel_for_each call (plus any functions you call from the lambda, of course). CPU debugging means debugging all the code above and below the parallel_for_each call, i.e. all the code except the restrict(direct3d) lambda and the functions that it calls. With VS 11 you have to choose what debugger you want to use for a particular debugging session, CPU or GPU. So you can place breakpoints all over your code, then choose what debugger you want (CPU or GPU), and you'll only be able to hit breakpoints for the code type that the debugger engine understands – the remaining breakpoints will appear as unbound. If you want to hit the unbound breakpoints, you'd have to stop debugging, and start again with the other debugger. Sorry. We suck. We know. But once you are past that limitation, I think you'll find the experience truly rewarding – seriously! Switching debugger engines With the Developer Preview bits, one way to switch the debugger engine is through the project properties – see the screenshots that follow. This one is showing the CPU option selected, which is basically the default that you are all familiar with: This screenshot is showing the GPU option selected, by changing the debugger launcher (notice that this applies for both the local and remote case): You actually do not have to open the project properties just for switching the debugger engine, you can switch the selection from the toolbar in VS 11 Developer Preview too – see following screenshot (the effect is the same as if you opened the project properties and switched there) Breakpoint behavior Here are two screenshots, one showing a debugging session for CPU and the other a debugging session for GPU (notice the unbound breakpoints in each case) …and here is the GPU case (where we cannot bind the CPU breakpoints but can the GPU breakpoint, which is actually hit) Give C++ AMP debugging a try So to debug your C++ AMP code, pull down the drop down under the 'play' button to select the 'GPU C++ Direct3D Compute Debugger' menu option, then hit F5 (or the 'play' button itself). Then you can explore debugging by exploring the menus under the Debug and under the Debug->Windows menus. One way to do that exploration is through the C++ AMP debugging walkthrough on MSDN. Another way to explore the C++ AMP debugging experience, you can use the moth.cpp code file, which is what I used in my BUILD session debugger demo. Note that for my demo I was using the latest internal VS11 bits, so your experience with the Developer Preview bits won't be identical to what you saw me demonstrate, but it shouldn't be far off. Stay tuned for a lot more content on the parallel debugger in VS 11, both CPU and GPU, both managed and native. Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • asynchrony is viral

    - by Daniel Moth
    It is becoming hard to write code today without introducing some form of asynchrony and, if you are using .NET (e.g. for Windows Phone 8 or Windows Store apps), that means sooner or later you have to await something and mark your method as async. My most recent examples included introducing speech recognition in my Translator By Moth phone app where I had to await mySpeechRecognizerUI.RecognizeWithUIAsync() and when moving that code base to a Windows Store project just to show a MessageBox I had to await myMessageDialog.ShowAsync(). Any time you need to invoke an asynchronous method in your code, you have a choice to make: kick off the operation but don’t wait for it to complete (otherwise known as fire-and-forget), synchronously wait for it to complete (which will entail blocking, which can be bad, especially on a UI thread), or asynchronously wait for it to complete before continuing on with the rest of the method’s work. In most cases, you want the latter, and the await keyword makes that trivial to implement.  When you use the magical await keyword in front of an API call, then you typically have to make additional changes to your code: This await usage is within a method of course, and now you have to annotate that method with async. Furthermore, you have to change the return type of the method you just annotated so it returns a Task (if it previously returned void), or Task<myOldReturnType> (if it previously returned myOldReturnType). Note that if it returns void, in some cases you could cheat and stop there. Furthermore, any method that called this method you just annotated with async will now also be invoking an asynchronous operation, so you have to make that change in the body of the caller method to introduce the await keyword before the call to the method. …you guessed it, you now have to change this caller method to be annotated with async and have its return types tweaked... …and it goes on virally… At some point you reach the root of your user code, e.g. a GUI event handler, and whoever calls that void method can already deal with the fact that you marked it as async and the viral introduction of the keywords stops there… This is all wonderful progress and a very powerful mechanism, and I just wish someone had written a refactoring tool to take care of this… anyone? I mentioned earlier that you have a choice when invoking an asynchronous operation. If the first time you encounter this you wish to localize the impact of all these changes and essentially try to turn the asynchronous behavior into synchronous by blocking - don't! For reasons why you don't want to do that, read Toub's excellent blog post (and check out the rest of his blog with gems on async programming starting with the Async FAQ). Just embrace the pattern knowing that when you use one instance of an await, you'll propagate the change all the way to the root user code method, e.g. typically an event handler. Related aside: I just finished re-writing my MessageBox wrapper class for Phone projects, including making it work in Windows Store projects, and it does expect you to use it with an await :-). I'll share that in an upcoming post for those of you that have the same need… Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • Screencasts introducing C++ AMP

    - by Daniel Moth
    It has been almost 2.5 years since I last recorded a screencast, and I had forgotten how time consuming they are to plan/record/edit/produce/publish, but at the same time so much fun to see the end result! So below are links to 4 screencasts to teach you C++ AMP basics from scratch (even if you class yourself as a .NET developer you'll be able to follow). Setup code - part 1 array_view, extent, index - part 2 parallel_for_each - part 3 accelerator - part 4 If you have comments/questions about what is shown in each video, please leave them at each video recoding. If you have generic questions about C++ AMP, please ask in the C++ AMP MSDN forum. Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • Windows 8 Task Manager

    - by Daniel Moth
    If you are a user of Task Manager (btw, make sure you've read my Task Manager shortcut tips), you must read the blog post on the overhaul coming to Task Manager in Windows 8 – coo stuff! Also, long time readers of my blog will know that back in 2008 I wrote about Windows Vista and Windows 7 number_of_cores support, and in 2009 I shared a widely borrowed screenshot of Task Manager from one of our 128-core machines. So I was excited to just read on the Windows 8 blog that Windows 8 will support up to 640 cores. They shared a screenshot of a 160-core machine, so there goes my record ;-) Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • C++ AMP open specification

    - by Daniel Moth
    Those of you interested in C++ AMP should know that I blog about that topic on our team blog. Just now I posted (and encourage you to go read) our much awaited announcement about the publication of the C++ AMP open specification. For those of you into compiling instead of reading, 3 days ago I posted a list of over a dozen C++ AMP samples. To follow what I and others on my team write about C++ AMP, stay tuned on our RSS feed. Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • My MSDN magazine articles are live

    - by Daniel Moth
    Five years ago I wrote my first MSDN magazine article, and 21 months later I wrote my second MSDN Magazine article (during the VS 2010 Beta). By my calculation, that makes it two and a half years without having written anything for my favorite developer magazine! So, I came back with a vengeance, and in this month's April issue of the MSDN magazine you can find two articles from yours truly - enjoy: A Code-Based Introduction to C++ AMP Introduction to Tiling in C++ AMP For more on C++ AMP, please remember that I blog about it on our team blog, and we take questions in our MSDN forum. Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • Get started with C++ AMP

    - by Daniel Moth
    With the imminent release of Visual Studio 2012, even if you do not classify yourself as a C++ developer, C++ AMP is something you should learn so you can understand how to speed up your loops by offloading to the GPU the computation performed in the loop (assuming you have large number of iterations/data). We have many C# customers who are using C++ AMP through pinvoke, and of course many more directly from C++. So regardless of your programming language, I hope you'll find helpful these short videos that help you get started with C++ AMP C++ AMP core API introduction... from scratch Tiling Introduction - C++ AMP Matrix Multiplication with C++ AMP GPU debugging in Visual Studio 2012 In particular the work we have done for parallel and GPU debugging in Visual Studio 2012 is market leading, so check it out! Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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