Search Results

Search found 1257 results on 51 pages for 'fonts'.

Page 1/51 | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  | Next Page >

  • Netbeans and LibreOffice do not recognize the new fonts in /usr/share/fonts

    - by Pavel
    I installed some new fonts following this guide https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Fonts. Netbeans and LibreOffice do not recognize the new fonts in /usr/share/fonts and Mousepad recognizes them. Netbeans7.4(from Netbeans.com) recognizes the fonts if they are located in .fonts/ in my home folder. How can I make Netbeans and Libre Office recognize the new fonts located in /usr/share/fonts. I am using Xubuntu 13.10

    Read the article

  • Using real fonts in HTML 5 & CSS 3 pages

    - by nikolaosk
    This is going to be the fifth post in a series of posts regarding HTML 5. You can find the other posts here, here , here and here.In this post I will provide a hands-on example on how to use real fonts in HTML 5 pages with the use of CSS 3.Font issues have been appearing in all websites and caused all sorts of problems for web designers.The real problem with fonts for web developers until now was that they were forced to use only a handful of fonts.CSS 3 allows web designers not to use only web-safe fonts.These fonts are in wide use in most user's operating systems.Some designers (when they wanted to make their site stand out) resorted in various techniques like using images instead of fonts. That solution is not very accessible-friendly and definitely less SEO friendly.CSS (through CSS3's Fonts module) 3 allows web developers to embed fonts directly on a web page.First we need to define the font and then attach the font to elements.Obviously we have various formats for fonts. Some are supported by all modern browsers and some are not.The most common formats are, Embedded OpenType (EOT),TrueType(TTF),OpenType(OTF). I will use the @font-face declaration to define the font used in this page.  Before you download fonts (in any format) make sure you have understood all the licensing issues. Please note that all these real fonts will be downloaded in the client's computer.A great resource on the web (maybe the best) is http://www.typekit.com/.They have an abundance of web fonts for use. Please note that they sell those fonts.Another free (best things in life a free, aren't they?) resource is the http://www.google.com/webfonts website. I have visited the website and downloaded the Aladin webfont.When you download any font you like make sure you read the license first. Aladin webfont is released under the Open Font License (OFL) license. Before I go on with the actual demo I will use the (http://www.caniuse.com) to see the support for web fonts from the latest versions of modern browsers.Please have a look at the picture below. We see that all the latest versions of modern browsers support this feature. In order to be absolutely clear this is not (and could not be) a detailed tutorial on HTML 5. There are other great resources for that.Navigate to the excellent interactive tutorials of W3School.Another excellent resource is HTML 5 Doctor.Two very nice sites that show you what features and specifications are implemented by various browsers and their versions are http://caniuse.com/ and http://html5test.com/. At this times Chrome seems to support most of HTML 5 specifications.Another excellent way to find out if the browser supports HTML 5 and CSS 3 features is to use the Javascript lightweight library Modernizr.In this hands-on example I will be using Expression Web 4.0.This application is not a free application. You can use any HTML editor you like.You can use Visual Studio 2012 Express edition. You can download it here.I create a simple HTML 5 page. The markup follows and it is very easy to use and understand<!DOCTYPE html><html lang="en">  <head>    <title>HTML 5, CSS3 and JQuery</title>    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html;charset=utf-8" >    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="style.css">       </head>  <body>      <div id="header">      <h1>Learn cutting edge technologies</h1>      <p>HTML 5, JQuery, CSS3</p>    </div>        <div id="main">          <h2>HTML 5</h2>                        <p>            HTML5 is the latest version of HTML and XHTML. The HTML standard defines a single language that can be written in HTML and XML. It attempts to solve issues found in previous iterations of HTML and addresses the needs of Web Applications, an area previously not adequately covered by HTML.          </p>      </div>             </body>  </html> Then I create the style.css file.<style type="text/css">@font-face{font-family:Aladin;src: url('Aladin-Regular.ttf')}h1{font-family:Aladin,Georgia,serif;}</style> As you can see we want to style the h1 tag in our HTML 5 markup.I just use the @font-face property,specifying the font-family and the source of the web font. Then I just use the name in the font-family property to style the h1 tag.Have a look below to see my page in IE10. Make sure you open this page in all your browsers installed in your machine. Make sure you have downloaded the latest versions. Now we can make our site stand out with web fonts and give it a really unique look and feel. Hope it helps!!!  

    Read the article

  • Fonts look squashed or stretched in the browser on Ubuntu

    - by Arjun Menon
    Fonts in the browser on Ubuntu look look squashed/stretched compared to Windows/OSX. This image shows exactly what I mean: http://i.stack.imgur.com/suUXX.png I installed msttcorefonts and configured both Chrome & FF to use Microsoft fonts (Arial, Times New Roman) instead of the default ones. While MS fonts made web pages appear a bit different, regardless of what font it was the squashed/stretched look remained. FreeSans looks a little different from Arial, but it too is rendered squashed/stretched like Arial on both FF & Chrome. Opera renders the Wikipedia page differently from FF & Chrome, but the fonts looks squashed/stretched on it as well. I used to run Kubuntu prior to switching to Ubuntu and at some point I managed to get the fonts on Chrome (only Chrome) look exactly like in the image on the left. I have no idea how I did it though. Firefox and Rekonq retained the squashed/stretched look. I had been using Rekonq for a while, then switched to FF. While using both browsers I had done various things to get the fonts to look better on them with no success - like installing MS fonts & configuring both browsers to use them. I then, after some time, installed Chrome and the fonts magically looked perfect on them - just like on right-hand side of the image. In fact, the font smoothing looked better (to my eye) compared to Windows and OSX. All 3 OSes use subtly different font smoothing strategies and the differences stand out. Later, I formatted & installed Ubuntu 12.04. The first thing I did was install msttcorefonts & then install Chrome. To my dismay, the fonts on Chrome looked just as squashed/stretched as it did in Firefox. There's no browser (except Wine Internet Explorer) that renders fonts properly on my Ubuntu setup right now. Fixing this is definitely possible, since I was able to do it on Kubuntu, but apparently it requires some mysterious tweaking. Would anyone be willing to help me out?

    Read the article

  • Fonts look bad in Microsoft Office using Wine

    - by amfcosta
    Office fonts in wine look very different from what they look in Windows or LibreOffice. As can be seen from the attached screenshots, they look blurry in some sizes and aliased in other sizes. You can see the differences not only in the document text but also in the ribbon menu. It happens with a lot of fonts. I'm testing it with Office 2010 now, but it also happens in Office 2007. Things I've tried: Changing fontsmooth settings with winetricks - made no difference. Copying fonts from a Windows system - made no difference. Using Ubuntu's fonts (by removing the Windows/Fonts from the wineprefix) - removed the blurriness in some fonts but increased aliasing. The three screenshots correspond to different "configurations": office_wine.png - Office Word in Wine using Wine's original fonts; office_nowinefonts.png - Office Word in Wine using Ubuntu's fonts; office_windows.png - Office Word in Windows. PS: please make sure to see the screenshots without scaling them to notice the problem. EDIT: A screenshot of how Calibri behaves in Wine here.

    Read the article

  • Why I can't install new fonts in LibreOffice?

    - by uzumaki
    I have installed a lot of fonts before, but this time things are really different. I have downloaded some True Type Font (ttf) fonts. Then paste them in the directory usr/share/fonts after that I've restarted LibreOffice writer but don't find them in the font list. No better result with PC rebooting. Then again paste them in the directory usr/share/fonts/truetype and again restarted LibreOffice writer, but still they aren't on the font list. I've tried in another way. Opened the fonts with font viewer and click on the "install" but the result is same. No improvement at all. Latest I've just found that those specific fonts are installed on my system, they present on gedit font list,but not in the LibreOffice font list. So, may be the problem is with LibreOffice. Very surprising and irritating issue indeed.

    Read the article

  • How do I select a subset of the available fonts for a particular application

    - by Aleve Sicofante
    Having all those exotic fonts (for an European), like Chinese, Hindi or Russian fonts, is nice for a web browser. You never get those ugly unicode blocks and get the original glyphs instead. However, having the font menu in LibreOffice or AbiWord populated with all of those fonts is cumbersome and useless for most installations. Having more than a few fonts in note taking applications is also somewhat overkill. Is there a way I can designate a subset of all the available fonts to work with a particular application? I understand the app itself could do it, but I'm asking for a way to make LibreOffice, for instance, not see certain fonts, only my selection of "useful for text processing" subset.

    Read the article

  • Legal Web Fonts & Licensing

    - by Phill
    So I'm a little confused in regards to legality of using fonts for web. Often from designers I get a PSD file and it uses a special font, and the font is supplied. However attempting to convert the font using: http://www.fontsquirrel.com/fontface/generator Ends up with a message saying it's blocked by Adobe. Not only that sometimes if the font can be converted, it often looks like crap when viewed in a browser. I assume that the generator is primarily for people to convert their own fonts, but if you purchase the use of a font then you can only use it for Web if the terms allows you to? The fonts used in PSD's are often Adobe Fonts, I can't find anything that suggests I can convert those and use them on the web. So I'm wondering if anyone knows the legal rights around using Photoshop supplied fonts on the web? In addition I'm wondering what resources are available (free/paid) that provide fonts that can be used on the web. Free: http://www.fontsquirrel.com http://www.google.com/webfonts Paid: http://www.fontshop.com This is the only one's I've found so far that aren't cartoon type fonts like what's primarily on www.dafont.com

    Read the article

  • Fixing Google Chrome text antialias for .ttf fonts

    - by 71GA
    I have found a topic which presents a solution on how to get antialising working in Google Chrome - Windows, but they use .svg format. I have a .ttf format and I import all of my fonts like this at the moment: @font-face {font-family: "t1"; src: url(../fonts/title/circle.ttf);} @font-face {font-family: "t2"; src: url(../fonts/title/sanserifing.ttf);} @font-face {font-family: "t3"; src: url(../fonts/title/serveroff.ttf);} @font-face {font-family: "t4"; src: url(../fonts/title/pupcat.ttf);} How can I achieve antialising done right in Google Chrome Windows?

    Read the article

  • Add Microsoft Core Fonts to Ubuntu

    - by Matthew Guay
    Have you ever needed the standard Microsoft fonts such as Times New Roman on your Ubuntu computer?  Here’s how you can easily add the core Microsoft fonts to Ubuntu. Times New Roman, Arial, and other core Microsoft fonts are still some of the most commonly used fonts in documents and websites.  Times New Roman especially is often required for college essays, legal docs, and other critical documents that you may need to write or edit.  Ubuntu includes the Liberation alternate fonts that include similar alternates to Times New Roman, Arial, and Courier New, but these may not be accepted by professors and others when a certain font is required.  But, don’t worry; it only takes a couple clicks to add these fonts to Ubuntu for free. Installing the Core Microsoft Fonts Microsoft has released their core fonts, including Times New Roman and Arial, for free, and you can easily download these from the Software Center.  Open your Applications menu, and select Ubuntu Software Center.   In the search box enter the following: ttf-mscorefonts Click Install on the “Installer for Microsoft TrueType core fonts” directly in the search results. Enter your password when requested, and click Authenticate. The fonts will then automatically download and install in a couple minutes depending on your internet connection speed. Once the install is finished, you can launch OpenOffice Writer to try out the new fonts.  Here’s a preview of all the fonts included in this pack.  And, yes, this does included the infamous Comic Sans and Webdings fonts as well as the all-important Times New Roman. Please Note:  By default in Ubuntu, OpenOffice uses Liberation Serif as the default font, but after installing this font pack, the default font will switch to Times New Roman. Adding Other Fonts In addition to the Microsoft Core Fonts, the Ubuntu Software Center has hundreds of free fonts available.  Click the Fonts link on the front page to explore these, and install the same as above. If you’ve downloaded another font individually, you can also install it easily in Ubuntu.  Just double-click it, and then click Install in the preview window. Conclusion Although you may prefer the fonts that are included with Ubuntu, there are many reasons why having the Microsoft core fonts can be helpful.  Thankfully it’s easy in Ubuntu to install them, so you’ll never have to worry about not having them when you need to edit an important document. Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Enable Smooth fonts on Ubuntu LinuxEmbed True Type Fonts in Word and PowerPoint 2007 DocumentsNew Vista Syntax for Opening Control Panel Items from the Command-lineStupid Geek Tricks: Enable More Fonts for the Windows Command PromptAdding extra Repositories on Ubuntu TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 Awe inspiring, inter-galactic theme (Win 7) Case Study – How to Optimize Popular Wordpress Sites Restore Hidden Updates in Windows 7 & Vista Iceland an Insurance Job? Find Downloads and Add-ins for Outlook Recycle !

    Read the article

  • Fonts totally unreadable

    - by Toni
    I've just upgraded from 10.04 to 10.10 and my fonts are all just small rectangles with nothing in them. They are completely unreadable. EVEN THE FONTS IN THE TERMINAL. Thank god the fonts in my Chromium were ok, because I wouldn't be able to find this site or write this message. So far I've tried to use the Appearance - Font thing and it doesn't work. For some reason there was an error with the fonts during the installation. Please help, this is an utter nightmare...

    Read the article

  • How to use Fixedsys in the Gnome Terminal, or wherever monospaced fonts are required

    - by Walter Tross
    I think that the Fixedsys font is one of the most readable monospaced fonts for programming. It has zero antialiasing, with vertical lines mostly 2 pixels wide. Close to ideal for current monitor dot pitches, in my eyes (literally). After years of Windows at home (for family reasons) and Linux servers at work accessed through Cygwin on Windows (for company policy reasons), with Fixedsys as the shell and IDE font, I have decided to switch to the Ubuntu desktop. Eclipse and gedit are no problem, they accept the Fixedsys Excelsior TTF font. But the Gnome Terminal only accepts monospaced fonts. Although Fixedsys Excelsior is essentially monospaced, it contains larger glyphs (mostly for eastern languages), and also some ligatures. Since apparently ALL characters must have the same width for a font to be recognized as monospaced, Fixedsys Excelsior cannot be selected in all those contexts where monospaced fonts are required, including gnome-terminal. So what is the easiest/cleanest way to use a Fixedsys clone font in contexts that only accept monospaced fonts?

    Read the article

  • Fonts totally unreadable

    - by user11181
    I've just upgraded from 10.04 to 10.10 and my fonts are all just small rectangles with nothing in them. They are completely unreadable. EVEN THE FONTS IN THE TERMINAL. Thank god the fonts in my Chromium were ok, because I wouldn't be able to find this site or write this message. So far I've tried to use the Appearance - Font thing and it doesn't work. For some reason there was an error with the fonts during the installation. Please help, this is an utter nightmare...

    Read the article

  • Is there a graphical way of installing fonts in 11.10/Gnome 3

    - by appi2012
    When testing 11.10, I wanted to install some fonts. However, it seems that I cannot simply double click a font file to install it. I've tried searching google, but I haven't found anything that says the gnome3 can't do this. Is this going to be addressed? Is there a way I can install new fonts easily? (I know of the manual copying of the fonts to /usr/share/fonts/, but I'm just curious if there is something easier I've been missing.) Thanks

    Read the article

  • Location of truetype fonts

    - by StackedCrooked
    I would like to create a small script that installs a few truetype fonts on the user's system. On my Ubuntu machine the truetype fonts are located at /usr/share/fonts/truetype. However, I'm not sure if this location is the same on all machines. Is there a way to find out where truetypes fonts are stored on any Linux system? Update After some research I found that the path usr/share/fonts/truetype is specified in the XML file /etc/fonts/fonts.conf. It's an XML file, so I can use XPath to get the dir: xpath -q -e 'fontconfig/dir[1]/text()[1]' /etc/fonts/fonts.conf I don't know however if this file will exist on all (or most) Linux systems.

    Read the article

  • Can I override fonts installed by ttf-mscorefonts-installer, prefer Liberation fonts?

    - by conner_bw
    I had to apt-get install ttf-mscorefonts-installer on Ubuntu 12.04/12.10. The short version is I need to pipe PDF files out of an application that requires these fonts for certain glyphs. The problem, after running this command, is that the fonts in my web browser (and some java apps) are now "ugly." Obviously this is a subjective opinion but it is the one I hold. I want the old fonts back for most cases (Liberation, DejaVu, Ubuntu, ...). I'm not sure how best to describe this but here's an example: Example CSS in Webbrowser font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; Without ttf-mscorefonts-installer (Case 1): $ fc-match Verdana LiberationSans-Regular.ttf: "Liberation Sans" "Regular" $ fc-match Arial LiberationSans-Regular.ttf: "Liberation Sans" "Regular" $ fc-match sans-serif LiberationSans-Regular.ttf: "Liberation Sans" "Regular"` With ttf-mscorefonts-installer (Case 2): $ fc-match Verdana Verdana.ttf: "Verdana" "Normal" $ fc-match Arial Arial.ttf: "Arial" "Normal" $ fc-match sans-serif LiberationSans-Regular.ttf: "Liberation Sans" "Regular"` I want (Case 1). Optionally, I want the fonts in (Case 2) not to look "ugly" IE. they are more jagged, less smooth than their free alternatives in my web browsers. Is this possible?

    Read the article

  • Doesn't installing "All locales" install necessary fonts too?

    - by its_me
    I recently noticed that my browsers rendered blank text (or invisible text?) on some websites in foreign languages, like Chinese. inside.com.tw, for example. Later I learnt that by default Debian only installs one locale (the one you choose during the installation process), and others need to be installed manually. So, I ran the command: # dpkg-reconfigure locales And selected All locales from the options screen that followed, and proceeded with the rest of the process, which also includes changing the default locale (which I set to en_US.UTF-8). Then I restarted my system. I still can't read the website that I mentioned earlier (inside.com.tw). Most of the text is blank, i.e. invisible. With the page translated by Chrome to my default language (en_US), the text is visible; BUT not in the original language. Why is this happening? Does this mean that installing locales isn't actually necessary, and all I have to do is install the fonts for all supported languages? If so, how do I install all the fonts necessary for All locales? UPDATE: An easy fix is to install the unifont package which adds support for all Unicode 5.1 characters. But the rendering is of very bad quality. So, how I install all font packages? I notice that there are three sets, ones starting with fonts-*, another with xfonts-*, and ttf-*? Which set should I exactly go with, and how do I install that set of fonts. Looking for a knowledgeable solution.

    Read the article

  • Fonts look worse after ATI proprietary driver install

    - by Utkonos
    I've installed the (almost) current version of the Catalyst 12.4 proprietary driver (8.960). I used the version that is in precise's restricted repository with the following command: sudo apt-get install fglrx fglrx-amdcccle After the install, I am encountering the following two problems: The splash screens for Kubuntu look crooked like they're the wrong resolution (not a big deal; who really cares). All the fonts are lighter, more pixelated (very annoying). This is what it looks like with the open source driver included in 12.04: http://imgur.com/1DxRj And this is what it looks like with the Catalyst driver: http://imgur.com/x6BpP I realize that it is hard to tell the difference with these two screen captures, but it really is quite different and annoying on my monitor. With the open source drivers the fonts look solid and clean the way they are supposed to. With the proprietary drivers the fonts looks fuzzier and more harsh. The only reason I need to use the proprietary driver is to play Minecraft. It does not run under the open source driver, unfortunately. What can I do to fix the fonts and get the proprietary driver to work as well as the open source driver?

    Read the article

  • What free icons fonts are available? [closed]

    - by Paulocoghi
    With the possibility to embed fonts in websites using @font-face CSS, some creative webdesigners developed their way to display icons using fonts, instead of images. But most of the available icon fonts (or "font-face" kits) are paid, such as: Pictos Fico Tipogram KDN Media IconMoon *free version, with less icons So, what free icons pack in font format do you know? Please limit one "font-face" kit per answer - and include why you enjoy/recommend it. Edit: This question can be converted into a community wiki, if the moderators want, because there is no best answer, and each response is welcome as a knowledge that can be enjoyed by many.

    Read the article

  • How to change fonts using gnome-tweak-tool?

    - by john the fatbloke
    As a non-techie type user, I've managed to find the "Advanced Settings" option in the "other" menu listing, which is good (sort of). In the past, I've routinely installed the windows fonts from my windows partition. Now even though I have the msttcorefonts package installed, and all of the .ttf windows fonts installed (as far as I can tell), it doesn't matter whether I log out and back in (which in the past has brought up some of the stuff I've wanted installed), or even if I just restart the Ubuntu completely from boot, none of them are listed. So how do I make the gnome tweek tool see the directory with all the fonts in it please ?

    Read the article

  • Multiple fonts in a website

    - by Akito
    I have been creating a blog and now its almost done. I am thinking of adding fonts to it. I am curious if having more than 1 font in a website makes it look unprofessional? I understand that it is a personal opinion of a person how the site should look but my site is a blog so I want to consider how visitors might feel seeing multiple fonts on a website. Does it look standard? In short: How many fonts should one use so that readability does not get affected? Thanks in advance.

    Read the article

  • Including Specific Characters with Google Web Fonts

    - by S.K.
    I'm using the Open Sans web font from Google Web Fonts on my website. I only need the basic latin subset, but I do use the Psi (?) character quite often as well and I would like to use the Open Sans version of that character, without having to include the entire greek subset. I looked at this help page which shows how to embed specific characters only using the text parameter, but there's no mention of including specific characters. I tried doing the following to try to combine both font requests into one, but it didn't end up working. <link href='http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans:400,400italic,700&subset=latin' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css'> <link href='http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans:400,400italic,700&text=%CE%A8' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css'> Is there anyway to accomplish this?

    Read the article

  • Are icon fonts bad for SEO?

    - by user359650
    Instead of using <img> tags for your icons, you can use icon fonts on <span> tags (which offer some advantages such as not having to create a sprite, being able to scale icons up/down without degrading quality...). However, by using an icon font you give up the <img> alt attribute (that attribute can help you with SEO). There is a way to add text to the <span> and hide it, but I wonder whether this is recognized / penalized by Google (as it seems to go against the quality guidelines). Are icon fonts bad for SEO (i.e. by using icon fonts you give up the alt attribute) ? Would inserting text in font icon tag and hiding it with CSS (text-indent: -9999px) be recognized / penalized by Google ?

    Read the article

  • What are your favourite free fonts?

    - by Rich Bradshaw
    As super users, using nicer fonts is often an important issue. Now that many sites are using @font-face to embed fonts in the page, having the same fonts installed locally means less downloading, and producing documents with custom fonts often look nicer. What are your favourite fonts? Ideally fonts that have unicode support and that have proper ligatures and kerning. Please add pictures if possible!

    Read the article

  • Gujarat Fonts - Indic

    - by Navin Talati
    Sir, I need to install Gujarat Fonts - INDIC. From where shell I get the concerned font file to install? I had previously Win XP and the fonts were installed but the same is not applicable for the Ubuntu. In indic case there is a facility to type gujarati as per the pronounciation using english alphabets and also gives display at a corner for guidance that which character required to be typed. Please suggest how to avail the same facility in this Ubuntu.

    Read the article

  • List of fonts containing selected character

    - by ShreevatsaR
    On Mac OS X, the Character Viewer (equivalent to Character Map on Ubuntu) has a feature where, when looking at a certain character, it can show a list of all fonts that contain that character. Is there something equivalent on Ubuntu? The use case is that, for instance, I could click on a Kannada character and see all fonts that cover that character (and presumably, the rest of the Kannada language range).

    Read the article

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  | Next Page >