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  • CHAT ROOMs 7 by 6

    - by user2939942
    I am looking for chatroom on one page with 7 loggedin users and 6+rows for say 42 users.these users will keep on adding wthnew users.Need urgent help.A PRETTY UNUSUAL Q FOR MOST OF U.What is MORE REQ new features: Usernames are unique to users currently chatting You can see a "currently chatting" user list There are multiple rooms for chatting <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd"> <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" /> <title>Simpla Admin</title> <link rel="stylesheet" href="resources/css/reset.css" type="text/css" media="screen" /> <link rel="stylesheet" href="resources/css/style.css" type="text/css" media="screen" /> <link rel="stylesheet" href="resources/css/invalid.css" type="text/css" media="screen" /> <script type="text/javascript" src="resources/scripts/jquery-1.3.2.min.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript" src="resources/scripts/simpla.jquery.configuration.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript" src="resources/scripts/facebox.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript" src="resources/scripts/jquery.wysiwyg.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript" src="resources/scripts/jquery.datePicker.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript" src="resources/scripts/jquery.date.js"></script> <script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="suggest3.js"></script><script language="javascript"> function popitappup4() { var aid=document.a.cid.value; var url="followup.php?id="+aid; alert(url); newwindow=window.open(url,'name','height=480,width=480, scrollbars=yes'); if (window.focus) {newwindow.focus()} return false; } </script> <script type="text/javascript" src="highslide-with-html.js"></script> <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="highslide.css" /> <script type="text/javascript"> hs.graphicsDir = 'graphics/'; hs.outlineType = 'rounded-white'; hs.wrapperClassName = 'draggable-header'; </script> <link type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" media="all" href="css/chat.css" /> <link type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" media="all" href="css/screen.css" /> </head> <body onload="fnew()"><div id="body-wrapper"> <!-- Wrapper for the radial gradient background --> <div id="sidebar"> <link type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" media="all" href="css/chat.css" /> <link type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" media="all" href="css/screen.css" /> <script type="text/javascript" src="js/jquery.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript" src="js/chat.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript"> function fnew() { document.getElementById("psearch").focus(); } </script> <div id="sidebar-wrapper"> <!-- Sidebar with logo and menu --> <h1 id="sidebar-title"><a href="#"></a></h1> <!-- Logo (221px wide) --> <a href="#"><img id="logo" src="resources/images/logo.png" alt="Simpla Admin logo" /></a> <!-- Sidebar Profile links --> <form name="frm" action="opd_view1.php"> <table width="240" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tr> <td width="210"><div align="right" style="font-size:22px; color:#FFFFFF"><b>OPD Search</b></div></td> <td width="30"><div align="right"></div></td> </tr> <tr> <td align="right">&nbsp;</td> <td align="right">&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td align="right"><div align="right"> <input type="text" name="psearch" id="psearch" class="text-input" style="width:45mm;" /> </div></td> <td align="right"><div align="right"></div></td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td><div align="right"></div></td> <td><div align="right"></div></td> </tr> </table> </form> <div id="profile-links"> <a href="welcome.php" title="Sign Out" style="font-size:16px" ><b> </b></a> <br /> <a href="sample.php" title="Chat">Chat</a> </div></div> <!-- End #sidebar --> <div id="main-content"> <!-- Main Content Section with everything --> <noscript> <!-- Show a notification if the user has disabled javascript --> </noscript> <div style="width:100%; height: 600px; overflow-x: scroll; scrollbar-arrow-color: blue; scrollbar-face-color: #e7e7e7; scrollbar-3dlight-color: #a0a0a0; scrollbar-darkshadow-color: #888888; background-color:#FFFFFF "> <ul class="shortcut-buttons-set"> <!-- Page Head --> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drabhinit')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drabhinit</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drvarun')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drvarun</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('sameer')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>sameer</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drchetan')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drchetan</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('neema')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>neema</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drpriya')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drpriya</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drchhavi')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drchhavi</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drsanjay')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drsanjay</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('ruchi')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>ruchi</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drarchana')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drarchana</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drshraddha')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drshraddha</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('sunita')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>sunita</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('reshma')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>reshma</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('riya')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>riya</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drritesh')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drritesh</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('rachana')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>rachana</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('sunita')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>sunita</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('kavye')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>kavye</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('paridhi')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>paridhi</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('paridhi')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>paridhi</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drsonika')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drsonika</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('anny')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>anny</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('nitansh')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>nitansh</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drekta')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drekta</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drritesh')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drritesh</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('neeraj')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>neeraj</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('neeraj')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>neeraj</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drneha')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drneha</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('kirti')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>kirti</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drratna')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drratna</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drratana')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drratana</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drnoopur')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drnoopur</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('admin k')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>admin k</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('web')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>web</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drarti')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drarti</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drsaqib')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drsaqib</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('neelesh')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>neelesh</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('pooja')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>pooja</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drneha')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drneha</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drnupur')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drnupur</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('isha')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>isha</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('isha')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>isha</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drnamrata')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drnamrata</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('ashish')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>ashish</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('ambrish')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>ambrish</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drrashmi')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drrashmi</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drsapna')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drsapna</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('manisha')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>manisha</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('Isha')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>Isha</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drrashmi')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drrashmi</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('Dr Meghna')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>Dr Meghna</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('akanksha')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>akanksha</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drashish')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drashish</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drpriya')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drpriya</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drnitya')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drnitya</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drmanoj')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drmanoj</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('sonali')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>sonali</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drkhushbu')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drkhushbu</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drpriyanka')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drpriyanka</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drabhishek')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drabhishek</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drpoonam')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drpoonam</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drprachi')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drprachi</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drpeenal')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drpeenal</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('neerajpune')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>neerajpune</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('paridhipune')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>paridhipune</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('faeem')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>faeem</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('rahul')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>rahul</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('DrNeha')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>DrNeha</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drmrigendra')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drmrigendra</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('neetu')" rel="modal" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>neetu</span></a></li> <li> <a class="shortcut-button" href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="javascript:chatWith('drriteshpawar')" rel="modal" style=" background-color:#00FF00" ><span><img src="resources/images/icons/comment_48.png" alt="icon" width="48" height="48" /> <br/>drriteshpawar</span></a></li> </ul> </div> <script type="text/javascript" src="js/jquery.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript" src="js/chat.js"></script> <!-- End .shortcut-buttons-set --> <div class="clear"></div> <div class="clear"></div>

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  • How to create a link to Nintex Start Workflow Page in the document set home page

    - by ybbest
    In this blog post, I’d like to show you how to create a link to start Nintex Workflow Page in the document set home page. 1. Firstly, you need to upload the latest version of jQuery to the style library of your team site. 2. Then, upload a text file to the style library for writing your own html and JavaScript 3. In the document set home page, insert a new content editor web part and link the text file you just upload. 4. Update the text file with the following content, you can download this file here. <script type="text/javascript" src="/Style%20Library/jquery-1.9.0.min.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript" src="/_layouts/sp.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript"> $(document).ready(function() { listItemId=getParameterByName("ID"); setTheWorkflowLink("YBBESTDocumentLibrary"); }); function buildWorkflowLink(webRelativeUrl,listId,itemId) { var workflowLink =webRelativeUrl+"_layouts/NintexWorkflow/StartWorkflow.aspx?list="+listId+"&ID="+itemId+"&WorkflowName=Start Approval"; return workflowLink; } function getParameterByName(name) { name = name.replace(/[\[]/, "\\\[").replace(/[\]]/, "\\\]"); var regexS = "[\\?&]" + name + "=([^&#]*)"; var regex = new RegExp(regexS); var results = regex.exec(window.location.search); if(results == null){ return ""; } else{ return decodeURIComponent(results[1].replace(/\+/g, " ")); } } function setTheWorkflowLink(listName) { var SPContext = new SP.ClientContext.get_current(); web = SPContext.get_web(); list = web.get_lists().getByTitle(listName); SPContext.load(web,"ServerRelativeUrl"); SPContext.load(list, 'Title', 'Id'); SPContext.executeQueryAsync(setTheWorkflowLink_Success, setTheWorkflowLink_Fail); } function setTheWorkflowLink_Success(sender, args) { var listId = list.get_id(); var listTitle = list.get_title(); var webRelativeUrl = web.get_serverRelativeUrl(); var startWorkflowLink=buildWorkflowLink(webRelativeUrl,listId,listItemId) $("a#submitLink").attr('href',startWorkflowLink); } function setTheWorkflowLink_Fail(sender, args) { alert("There is a problem setting up the submit exam approval link"); } </script> <a href="" target="_blank" id="submitLink"><span style="font-size:14pt">Start the approval process.</span></a> 5. Save your changes and go to the document set Item, you will see the link is on the home page now. Notes: 1. You can create a link to start the workflow using the following build dynamic string configuration: {Common:WebUrl}/_layouts/NintexWorkflow/StartWorkflow.aspx?list={Common:ListID}&ID={ItemProperty:ID}&WorkflowName=workflowname. With this link you will still need to click the start button, this is standard SharePoint behaviour and cannot be altered. References: http://connect.nintex.com/forums/27143/ShowThread.aspx How to use html and JavaScript in Content Editor web part in SharePoint2010

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  • Integrating JavaScript Unit Tests with Visual Studio

    - by Stephen Walther
    Modern ASP.NET web applications take full advantage of client-side JavaScript to provide better interactivity and responsiveness. If you are building an ASP.NET application in the right way, you quickly end up with lots and lots of JavaScript code. When writing server code, you should be writing unit tests. One big advantage of unit tests is that they provide you with a safety net that enable you to safely modify your existing code – for example, fix bugs, add new features, and make performance enhancements -- without breaking your existing code. Every time you modify your code, you can execute your unit tests to verify that you have not broken anything. For the same reason that you should write unit tests for your server code, you should write unit tests for your client code. JavaScript is just as susceptible to bugs as C#. There is no shortage of unit testing frameworks for JavaScript. Each of the major JavaScript libraries has its own unit testing framework. For example, jQuery has QUnit, Prototype has UnitTestJS, YUI has YUI Test, and Dojo has Dojo Objective Harness (DOH). The challenge is integrating a JavaScript unit testing framework with Visual Studio. Visual Studio and Visual Studio ALM provide fantastic support for server-side unit tests. You can easily view the results of running your unit tests in the Visual Studio Test Results window. You can set up a check-in policy which requires that all unit tests pass before your source code can be committed to the source code repository. In addition, you can set up Team Build to execute your unit tests automatically. Unfortunately, Visual Studio does not provide “out-of-the-box” support for JavaScript unit tests. MS Test, the unit testing framework included in Visual Studio, does not support JavaScript unit tests. As soon as you leave the server world, you are left on your own. The goal of this blog entry is to describe one approach to integrating JavaScript unit tests with MS Test so that you can execute your JavaScript unit tests side-by-side with your C# unit tests. The goal is to enable you to execute JavaScript unit tests in exactly the same way as server-side unit tests. You can download the source code described by this project by scrolling to the end of this blog entry. Rejected Approach: Browser Launchers One popular approach to executing JavaScript unit tests is to use a browser as a test-driver. When you use a browser as a test-driver, you open up a browser window to execute and view the results of executing your JavaScript unit tests. For example, QUnit – the unit testing framework for jQuery – takes this approach. The following HTML page illustrates how you can use QUnit to create a unit test for a function named addNumbers(). <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd"> <html> <head> <title>Using QUnit</title> <link rel="stylesheet" href="http://github.com/jquery/qunit/raw/master/qunit/qunit.css" type="text/css" /> </head> <body> <h1 id="qunit-header">QUnit example</h1> <h2 id="qunit-banner"></h2> <div id="qunit-testrunner-toolbar"></div> <h2 id="qunit-userAgent"></h2> <ol id="qunit-tests"></ol> <div id="qunit-fixture">test markup, will be hidden</div> <script type="text/javascript" src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-latest.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript" src="http://github.com/jquery/qunit/raw/master/qunit/qunit.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript"> // The function to test function addNumbers(a, b) { return a+b; } // The unit test test("Test of addNumbers", function () { equals(4, addNumbers(1,3), "1+3 should be 4"); }); </script> </body> </html> This test verifies that calling addNumbers(1,3) returns the expected value 4. When you open this page in a browser, you can see that this test does, in fact, pass. The idea is that you can quickly refresh this QUnit HTML JavaScript test driver page in your browser whenever you modify your JavaScript code. In other words, you can keep a browser window open and keep refreshing it over and over while you are developing your application. That way, you can know very quickly whenever you have broken your JavaScript code. While easy to setup, there are several big disadvantages to this approach to executing JavaScript unit tests: You must view your JavaScript unit test results in a different location than your server unit test results. The JavaScript unit test results appear in the browser and the server unit test results appear in the Visual Studio Test Results window. Because all of your unit test results don’t appear in a single location, you are more likely to introduce bugs into your code without noticing it. Because your unit tests are not integrated with Visual Studio – in particular, MS Test -- you cannot easily include your JavaScript unit tests when setting up check-in policies or when performing automated builds with Team Build. A more sophisticated approach to using a browser as a test-driver is to automate the web browser. Instead of launching the browser and loading the test code yourself, you use a framework to automate this process. There are several different testing frameworks that support this approach: · Selenium – Selenium is a very powerful framework for automating browser tests. You can create your tests by recording a Firefox session or by writing the test driver code in server code such as C#. You can learn more about Selenium at http://seleniumhq.org/. LTAF – The ASP.NET team uses the Lightweight Test Automation Framework to test JavaScript code in the ASP.NET framework. You can learn more about LTAF by visiting the project home at CodePlex: http://aspnet.codeplex.com/releases/view/35501 jsTestDriver – This framework uses Java to automate the browser. jsTestDriver creates a server which can be used to automate multiple browsers simultaneously. This project is located at http://code.google.com/p/js-test-driver/ TestSwam – This framework, created by John Resig, uses PHP to automate the browser. Like jsTestDriver, the framework creates a test server. You can open multiple browsers that are automated by the test server. Learn more about TestSwarm by visiting the following address: https://github.com/jeresig/testswarm/wiki Yeti – This is the framework introduced by Yahoo for automating browser tests. Yeti uses server-side JavaScript and depends on Node.js. Learn more about Yeti at http://www.yuiblog.com/blog/2010/08/25/introducing-yeti-the-yui-easy-testing-interface/ All of these frameworks are great for integration tests – however, they are not the best frameworks to use for unit tests. In one way or another, all of these frameworks depend on executing tests within the context of a “living and breathing” browser. If you create an ASP.NET Unit Test then Visual Studio will launch a web server before executing the unit test. Why is launching a web server so bad? It is not the worst thing in the world. However, it does introduce dependencies that prevent your code from being tested in isolation. One of the defining features of a unit test -- versus an integration test – is that a unit test tests code in isolation. Another problem with launching a web server when performing unit tests is that launching a web server can be slow. If you cannot execute your unit tests quickly, you are less likely to execute your unit tests each and every time you make a code change. You are much more likely to fall into the pit of failure. Launching a browser when performing a JavaScript unit test has all of the same disadvantages as launching a web server when performing an ASP.NET unit test. Instead of testing a unit of JavaScript code in isolation, you are testing JavaScript code within the context of a particular browser. Using the frameworks listed above for integration tests makes perfect sense. However, I want to consider a different approach for creating unit tests for JavaScript code. Using Server-Side JavaScript for JavaScript Unit Tests A completely different approach to executing JavaScript unit tests is to perform the tests outside of any browser. If you really want to test JavaScript then you should test JavaScript and leave the browser out of the testing process. There are several ways that you can execute JavaScript on the server outside the context of any browser: Rhino – Rhino is an implementation of JavaScript written in Java. The Rhino project is maintained by the Mozilla project. Learn more about Rhino at http://www.mozilla.org/rhino/ V8 – V8 is the open-source Google JavaScript engine written in C++. This is the JavaScript engine used by the Chrome web browser. You can download V8 and embed it in your project by visiting http://code.google.com/p/v8/ JScript – JScript is the JavaScript Script Engine used by Internet Explorer (up to but not including Internet Explorer 9), Windows Script Host, and Active Server Pages. Internet Explorer is still the most popular web browser. Therefore, I decided to focus on using the JScript Script Engine to execute JavaScript unit tests. Using the Microsoft Script Control There are two basic ways that you can pass JavaScript to the JScript Script Engine and execute the code: use the Microsoft Windows Script Interfaces or use the Microsoft Script Control. The difficult and proper way to execute JavaScript using the JScript Script Engine is to use the Microsoft Windows Script Interfaces. You can learn more about the Script Interfaces by visiting http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/t9d4xf28(VS.85).aspx The main disadvantage of using the Script Interfaces is that they are difficult to use from .NET. There is a great series of articles on using the Script Interfaces from C# located at http://www.drdobbs.com/184406028. I picked the easier alternative and used the Microsoft Script Control. The Microsoft Script Control is an ActiveX control that provides a higher level abstraction over the Window Script Interfaces. You can download the Microsoft Script Control from here: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?FamilyID=d7e31492-2595-49e6-8c02-1426fec693ac After you download the Microsoft Script Control, you need to add a reference to it to your project. Select the Visual Studio menu option Project, Add Reference to open the Add Reference dialog. Select the COM tab and add the Microsoft Script Control 1.0. Using the Script Control is easy. You call the Script Control AddCode() method to add JavaScript code to the Script Engine. Next, you call the Script Control Run() method to run a particular JavaScript function. The reference documentation for the Microsoft Script Control is located at the MSDN website: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa227633%28v=vs.60%29.aspx Creating the JavaScript Code to Test To keep things simple, let’s imagine that you want to test the following JavaScript function named addNumbers() which simply adds two numbers together: MvcApplication1\Scripts\Math.js function addNumbers(a, b) { return 5; } Notice that the addNumbers() method always returns the value 5. Right-now, it will not pass a good unit test. Create this file and save it in your project with the name Math.js in your MVC project’s Scripts folder (Save the file in your actual MVC application and not your MVC test application). Creating the JavaScript Test Helper Class To make it easier to use the Microsoft Script Control in unit tests, we can create a helper class. This class contains two methods: LoadFile() – Loads a JavaScript file. Use this method to load the JavaScript file being tested or the JavaScript file containing the unit tests. ExecuteTest() – Executes the JavaScript code. Use this method to execute a JavaScript unit test. Here’s the code for the JavaScriptTestHelper class: JavaScriptTestHelper.cs   using System; using System.IO; using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting; using MSScriptControl; namespace MvcApplication1.Tests { public class JavaScriptTestHelper : IDisposable { private ScriptControl _sc; private TestContext _context; /// <summary> /// You need to use this helper with Unit Tests and not /// Basic Unit Tests because you need a Test Context /// </summary> /// <param name="testContext">Unit Test Test Context</param> public JavaScriptTestHelper(TestContext testContext) { if (testContext == null) { throw new ArgumentNullException("TestContext"); } _context = testContext; _sc = new ScriptControl(); _sc.Language = "JScript"; _sc.AllowUI = false; } /// <summary> /// Load the contents of a JavaScript file into the /// Script Engine. /// </summary> /// <param name="path">Path to JavaScript file</param> public void LoadFile(string path) { var fileContents = File.ReadAllText(path); _sc.AddCode(fileContents); } /// <summary> /// Pass the path of the test that you want to execute. /// </summary> /// <param name="testMethodName">JavaScript function name</param> public void ExecuteTest(string testMethodName) { dynamic result = null; try { result = _sc.Run(testMethodName, new object[] { }); } catch { var error = ((IScriptControl)_sc).Error; if (error != null) { var description = error.Description; var line = error.Line; var column = error.Column; var text = error.Text; var source = error.Source; if (_context != null) { var details = String.Format("{0} \r\nLine: {1} Column: {2}", source, line, column); _context.WriteLine(details); } } throw new AssertFailedException(error.Description); } } public void Dispose() { _sc = null; } } }     Notice that the JavaScriptTestHelper class requires a Test Context to be instantiated. For this reason, you can use the JavaScriptTestHelper only with a Visual Studio Unit Test and not a Basic Unit Test (These are two different types of Visual Studio project items). Add the JavaScriptTestHelper file to your MVC test application (for example, MvcApplication1.Tests). Creating the JavaScript Unit Test Next, we need to create the JavaScript unit test function that we will use to test the addNumbers() function. Create a folder in your MVC test project named JavaScriptTests and add the following JavaScript file to this folder: MvcApplication1.Tests\JavaScriptTests\MathTest.js /// <reference path="JavaScriptUnitTestFramework.js"/> function testAddNumbers() { // Act var result = addNumbers(1, 3); // Assert assert.areEqual(4, result, "addNumbers did not return right value!"); }   The testAddNumbers() function takes advantage of another JavaScript library named JavaScriptUnitTestFramework.js. This library contains all of the code necessary to make assertions. Add the following JavaScriptnitTestFramework.js to the same folder as the MathTest.js file: MvcApplication1.Tests\JavaScriptTests\JavaScriptUnitTestFramework.js var assert = { areEqual: function (expected, actual, message) { if (expected !== actual) { throw new Error("Expected value " + expected + " is not equal to " + actual + ". " + message); } } }; There is only one type of assertion supported by this file: the areEqual() assertion. Most likely, you would want to add additional types of assertions to this file to make it easier to write your JavaScript unit tests. Deploying the JavaScript Test Files This step is non-intuitive. When you use Visual Studio to run unit tests, Visual Studio creates a new folder and executes a copy of the files in your project. After you run your unit tests, your Visual Studio Solution will contain a new folder named TestResults that includes a subfolder for each test run. You need to configure Visual Studio to deploy your JavaScript files to the test run folder or Visual Studio won’t be able to find your JavaScript files when you execute your unit tests. You will get an error that looks something like this when you attempt to execute your unit tests: You can configure Visual Studio to deploy your JavaScript files by adding a Test Settings file to your Visual Studio Solution. It is important to understand that you need to add this file to your Visual Studio Solution and not a particular Visual Studio project. Right-click your Solution in the Solution Explorer window and select the menu option Add, New Item. Select the Test Settings item and click the Add button. After you create a Test Settings file for your solution, you can indicate that you want a particular folder to be deployed whenever you perform a test run. Select the menu option Test, Edit Test Settings to edit your test configuration file. Select the Deployment tab and select your MVC test project’s JavaScriptTest folder to deploy. Click the Apply button and the Close button to save the changes and close the dialog. Creating the Visual Studio Unit Test The very last step is to create the Visual Studio unit test (the MS Test unit test). Add a new unit test to your MVC test project by selecting the menu option Add New Item and selecting the Unit Test project item (Do not select the Basic Unit Test project item): The difference between a Basic Unit Test and a Unit Test is that a Unit Test includes a Test Context. We need this Test Context to use the JavaScriptTestHelper class that we created earlier. Enter the following test method for the new unit test: [TestMethod] public void TestAddNumbers() { var jsHelper = new JavaScriptTestHelper(this.TestContext); // Load JavaScript files jsHelper.LoadFile("JavaScriptUnitTestFramework.js"); jsHelper.LoadFile(@"..\..\..\MvcApplication1\Scripts\Math.js"); jsHelper.LoadFile("MathTest.js"); // Execute JavaScript Test jsHelper.ExecuteTest("testAddNumbers"); } This code uses the JavaScriptTestHelper to load three files: JavaScripUnitTestFramework.js – Contains the assert functions. Math.js – Contains the addNumbers() function from your MVC application which is being tested. MathTest.js – Contains the JavaScript unit test function. Next, the test method calls the JavaScriptTestHelper ExecuteTest() method to execute the testAddNumbers() JavaScript function. Running the Visual Studio JavaScript Unit Test After you complete all of the steps described above, you can execute the JavaScript unit test just like any other unit test. You can use the keyboard combination CTRL-R, CTRL-A to run all of the tests in the current Visual Studio Solution. Alternatively, you can use the buttons in the Visual Studio toolbar to run the tests: (Unfortunately, the Run All Impacted Tests button won’t work correctly because Visual Studio won’t detect that your JavaScript code has changed. Therefore, you should use either the Run Tests in Current Context or Run All Tests in Solution options instead.) The results of running the JavaScript tests appear side-by-side with the results of running the server tests in the Test Results window. For example, if you Run All Tests in Solution then you will get the following results: Notice that the TestAddNumbers() JavaScript test has failed. That is good because our addNumbers() function is hard-coded to always return the value 5. If you double-click the failing JavaScript test, you can view additional details such as the JavaScript error message and the line number of the JavaScript code that failed: Summary The goal of this blog entry was to explain an approach to creating JavaScript unit tests that can be easily integrated with Visual Studio and Visual Studio ALM. I described how you can use the Microsoft Script Control to execute JavaScript on the server. By taking advantage of the Microsoft Script Control, we were able to execute our JavaScript unit tests side-by-side with all of our other unit tests and view the results in the standard Visual Studio Test Results window. You can download the code discussed in this blog entry from here: http://StephenWalther.com/downloads/Blog/JavaScriptUnitTesting/JavaScriptUnitTests.zip Before running this code, you need to first install the Microsoft Script Control which you can download from here: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?FamilyID=d7e31492-2595-49e6-8c02-1426fec693ac

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  • JavaScript: this

    - by bdukes
    JavaScript is a language steeped in juxtaposition.  It was made to “look like Java,” yet is dynamic and classless.  From this origin, we get the new operator and the this keyword.  You are probably used to this referring to the current instance of a class, so what could it mean in a language without classes? In JavaScript, this refers to the object off of which a function is referenced when it is invoked (unless it is invoked via call or apply). What this means is that this is not bound to your function, and can change depending on how your function is invoked. It also means that this changes when declaring a function inside another function (i.e. each function has its own this), such as when writing a callback. Let's see some of this in action: var obj = { count: 0, increment: function () { this.count += 1; }, logAfterTimeout = function () { setTimeout(function () { console.log(this.count); }, 1); } }; obj.increment(); console.log(obj.count); // 1 var increment = obj.increment; window.count = 'global count value: '; increment(); console.log(obj.count); // 1 console.log(window.count); // global count value: 1 var newObj = {count:50}; increment.call(newObj); console.log(newObj.count); // 51 obj.logAfterTimeout();// global count value: 1 obj.logAfterTimeout = function () { var proxiedFunction = $.proxy(function () { console.log(this.count); }, this); setTimeout(proxiedFunction, 1); }; obj.logAfterTimeout(); // 1 obj.logAfterTimeout = function () { var that = this; setTimeout(function () { console.log(that.count); }, 1); }; obj.logAfterTimeout(); // 1 The last couple of examples here demonstrate some methods for making sure you get the values you expect.  The first time logAfterTimeout is redefined, we use jQuery.proxy to create a new function which has its this permanently set to the passed in value (in this case, the current this).  The second time logAfterTimeout is redefined, we save the value of this in a variable (named that in this case, also often named self) and use the new variable in place of this. Now, all of this is to clarify what’s going on when you use this.  However, it’s pretty easy to avoid using this altogether in your code (especially in the way I’ve demonstrated above).  Instead of using this.count all over the place, it would have been much easier if I’d made count a variable instead of a property, and then I wouldn’t have to use this to refer to it.  var obj = (function () { var count = 0; return { increment: function () { count += 1; }, logAfterTimeout = function () { setTimeout(function () { console.log(count); }, 1); }, getCount: function () { return count; } }; }()); If you’re writing your code in this way, the main place you’ll run into issues with this is when handling DOM events (where this is the element on which the event occurred).  In that case, just be careful when using a callback within that event handler, that you’re not expecting this to still refer to the element (and use proxy or that/self if you need to refer to it). Finally, as demonstrated in the example, you can use call or apply on a function to set its this value.  This isn’t often needed, but you may also want to know that you can use apply to pass in an array of arguments to a function (e.g. console.log.apply(console, [1, 2, 3, 4])).

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  • Find the item index in jCarouselLite

    - by stanley
    Hi all, I use jCarouselLite for scrolling text, I use and as the content for scrolling, I need to trigger a javascript event when it reaches at the end of the content(). I need to change the scroll content when it finishes scrolling previous content. I tried adding a call back function but it does'nt work. This is my code: $("#scrollDiv").jCarouselLite({ vertical: true, visible:3, hoverPause:true, scroll:3, auto:1, itemLastInCallback:changeItem, speed:5000 }); Certification Alerts-CertifyAssign cert_test_11 - cert_test_22_sub - sub_test_22 cert_adhoc - cert_adhoc_11 - stype1 Certification Alerts-CertifyReminder sales process001 - sub sales cert 2 - sales cert

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  • Microsoft TypeScript : A Typed Superset of JavaScript

    - by shiju
    JavaScript is gradually becoming a ubiquitous programming language for the web, and the popularity of JavaScript is increasing day by day. Earlier, JavaScript was just a language for browser. But now, we can write JavaScript apps for browser, server and mobile. With the advent of Node.js, you can build scalable, high performance apps on the server with JavaScript. But many developers, especially developers who are working with static type languages, are hating the JavaScript language due to the lack of structuring and the maintainability problems of JavaScript. Microsoft TypeScript is trying to solve some problems of JavaScript when we are building scalable JavaScript apps. Microsoft TypeScript TypeScript is Microsoft's solution for writing scalable JavaScript programs with the help of Static Types, Interfaces, Modules and Classes along with greater tooling support. TypeScript is a typed superset of JavaScript that compiles to plain JavaScript. This would be more productive for developers who are coming from static type languages. You can write scalable JavaScript  apps in TypeScript with more productive and more maintainable manner, and later you can compiles to plain JavaScript which will be run on any browser and any OS. TypeScript will work with browser based JavaScript apps and JavaScript apps that following CommonJS specification. You can use TypeScript for building HTML 5 apps, Node.JS apps, WinRT apps. TypeScript is providing better tooling support with Visual Studio, Sublime Text, Vi, Emacs. Microsoft has open sourced its TypeScript languages on CodePlex at http://typescript.codeplex.com/    Install TypeScript You can install TypeScript compiler as a Node.js package via the NPM or you can install as a Visual Studio 2012 plug-in which will enable you better tooling support within the Visual Studio IDE. Since TypeScript is distributed as a Node.JS package, and it can be installed on other OS such as Linux and MacOS. The following command will install TypeScript compiler via an npm package for node.js npm install –g typescript TypeScript provides a Visual Studio 2012 plug-in as MSI file which will install TypeScript and also provides great tooling support within the Visual Studio, that lets the developers to write TypeScript apps with greater productivity and better maintainability. You can download the Visual Studio plug-in from here Building JavaScript  apps with TypeScript You can write typed version of JavaScript programs with TypeScript and then compiles it to plain JavaScript code. The beauty of the TypeScript is that it is already JavaScript and normal JavaScript programs are valid TypeScript programs, which means that you can write normal  JavaScript code and can use typed version of JavaScript whenever you want. TypeScript files are using extension .ts and this will be compiled using a compiler named tsc. The following is a sample program written in  TypeScript greeter.ts 1: class Greeter { 2: greeting: string; 3: constructor (message: string) { 4: this.greeting = message; 5: } 6: greet() { 7: return "Hello, " + this.greeting; 8: } 9: } 10:   11: var greeter = new Greeter("world"); 12:   13: var button = document.createElement('button') 14: button.innerText = "Say Hello" 15: button.onclick = function() { 16: alert(greeter.greet()) 17: } 18:   19: document.body.appendChild(button) .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; } The above program is compiling with the TypeScript compiler as shown in the below picture The TypeScript compiler will generate a JavaScript file after compiling the TypeScript program. If your TypeScript programs having any reference to other TypeScript files, it will automatically generate JavaScript files for the each referenced files. The following code block shows the compiled version of plain JavaScript  for the above greeter.ts greeter.js 1: var Greeter = (function () { 2: function Greeter(message) { 3: this.greeting = message; 4: } 5: Greeter.prototype.greet = function () { 6: return "Hello, " + this.greeting; 7: }; 8: return Greeter; 9: })(); 10: var greeter = new Greeter("world"); 11: var button = document.createElement('button'); 12: button.innerText = "Say Hello"; 13: button.onclick = function () { 14: alert(greeter.greet()); 15: }; 16: document.body.appendChild(button); .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; } Tooling Support with Visual Studio TypeScript is providing a plug-in for Visual Studio which will provide an excellent support for writing TypeScript  programs within the Visual Studio. The following screen shot shows the Visual Studio template for TypeScript apps   The following are the few screen shots of Visual Studio IDE for TypeScript apps. Summary TypeScript is Microsoft's solution for writing scalable JavaScript apps which will solve lot of problems involved in larger JavaScript apps. I hope that this solution will attract lot of developers who are really looking for writing maintainable structured code in JavaScript, without losing any productivity. TypeScript lets developers to write JavaScript apps with the help of Static Types, Interfaces, Modules and Classes and also providing better productivity. I am a passionate developer on Node.JS and would definitely try to use TypeScript for building Node.JS apps on the Windows Azure cloud. I am really excited about to writing Node.JS apps by using TypeScript, from my favorite development IDE Visual Studio. You can follow me on twitter at @shijucv

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  • What useful things could a javaScript library provide?

    - by Delan Azabani
    In many of my answers I repeatedly urge users not to use JavaScript libraries like jQuery. I even wrote a blog post about the problems that using a library create. Some of these problems include holding back native standards development, keeping users comfortably using IE, and abstracting the developer from real JavaScript. If a site doesn't require IE as part of its audience, then how are libraries useful? The other popular browsers share extremely similar implementations and work well with things like JavaScript 1.6 arrays and AJAX. This is not a troll question, I'm truly wondering what they're useful for.

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  • send different object value to different funtions

    - by user295189
    I have the code below. I want to send the value of value1 n.value1s = new Array(); n.value1sIDs = new Array(); n.value1sNames = new Array(); n.value1sColors = new Array(); n.descriptions = new Array(); to pg.loadLinkedvalue1s(n); and for value2 to pg.loadLinkedvalue2s(n); Howd I do that in javascript without haveing to rewrite the complete function please see the code below if(n.id == "row"){ n.rs = n.parentElement; if(n.rs.multiSelect == 0){ n.selected = 1; this.selectedRows = [ n ]; if(this.lastClicked && this.lastClicked != n){ selectionChanged = 1; this.lastClicked.selected = 0; this.lastClicked.style.color = "000099"; this.lastClicked.style.backgroundColor = ""; } } else { n.selected = n.selected ? 0 : 1; this.getSelectedRows(); } this.lastClicked = n; n.value1s = new Array(); n.value1sIDs = new Array(); n.value1sNames = new Array(); n.value1sColors = new Array(); n.descriptions = new Array(); n.value2s = new Array(); n.value2IDs = new Array(); n.value2Names = new Array(); n.value2Colors = new Array(); n.value2SortOrders = new Array(); n.value2Descriptions = new Array(); var value1s = myOfficeFunction.DOMArray(n.all.value1s.all.value1); var value2s = myOfficeFunction.DOMArray(n.all.value1s.all.value2); for(var i=0,j=0,k=1;i<vaue1s.length;i++){ n.sortOrders[j] = k++; n.vaue1s[j] = vaue1s[i].v; n.vaue1IDs[j] = vaue1s[i].i; n.vaue1Colors[j] = vaue1s[i].c; alert(n.vaue1Colors[j]); var vals = vaue1s[i].innerText.split(String.fromCharCode(127)); n.cptSortOrders[j] = k++; n.value2s[j] = value2s[i].v; n.value2IDs[j] = value2s[i].i; n.value2Colors[j] = value2s[i].c; var value2Vals = value2s[i].innerText.split(String.fromCharCode(127)); if(vals.length == 2){ alert(n.vaue1Colors[j]); n.vaue1Names[j] = vals[0]; n.descriptions[j++] = vals[1]; } if(value2Vals.length == 2){ n.value2Names[j] = cptVals[0]; alert(n.value2Names[j]); n.cptDescriptions[j++] = cptVals[1]; alert(n.cptDescriptions[j++]); } } //want to run this with value1 only pg.loadLinkedvalue1s(n); // want to run this with value2 only pg.loadLinkedvalue2s(n); }

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  • Writing a Javascript library that is code-completion and code-inspection friendly

    - by Vivin Paliath
    I recently made my own Javascript library and I initially used the following pattern: var myLibrary = (function () { var someProp = "..."; function someFunc() { ... } function someFunc2() { ... } return { func: someFunc, fun2: someFunc2, prop: someProp; } }()); The problem with this is that I can't really use code completion because the IDE doesn't know about the properties that the function literal is returning (I'm using IntelliJ IDEA 9 by the way). I've looked at jQuery code and tried to do this: (function(window, undefined) { var myLibrary = (function () { var someProp = "..."; function someFunc() { ... } function someFunc2() { ... } return { func: someFunc, fun2: someFunc2, prop: someProp; } }()); window.myLibrary = myLibrary; }(window)); I tried this, but now I have a different problem. The IDE doesn't really pick up on myLibrary either. The way I'm solving the problem now is this way: var myLibrary = { func: function() { }, func2: function() { }, prop: "" }; myLibrary = (function () { var someProp = "..."; function someFunc() { ... } function someFunc2() { ... } return { func: someFunc, fun2: someFunc2, prop: someProp; } }()); But that seems kinda clunky, and I can't exactly figure out how jQuery is doing it. Another question I have is how to handle functions with arbitrary numbers of parameters. For example, jQuery.bind can take 2 or 3 parameters, and the IDE doesn't seem to complain. I tried to do the same thing with my library, where a function could take 0 arguments or 1 argument. However, the IDE complains and warns that the correct number of parameters aren't being sent in. How do I handle this?

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  • JavaScript - Settting property on Object in Image load function, property not set once outside funct

    - by Sunday Ironfoot
    Sometimes JavaScript doesn't make sense to me, consider the following code that generates a photo mosaic based on x/y tiles. I'm trying to set a .Done property to true once each Mosaic image has been downloaded, but it's always false for some reason, what am I doing wrong? var tileData = []; function generate() { var image = new Image(); image.onload = function() { // Build up the 'tileData' array with tile objects from this Image for (var i = 0; i < tileData.length; i++) { var tile = tileData[i]; var tileImage = new Image(); tileImage.onload = function() { // Do something with this tile Image tile.Done = true; }; tileImage.src = tile.ImageUrl; } }; image.src = 'Penguins.jpg'; tryDisplayMosaic(); } function tryDisplayMosaic() { setTimeout(function() { for (var i = 0; i < tileData.length; i++) { var tile = tileData[i]; if (!tile.Done) { tryDisplayMosaic(); return; } } // If we get here then all the tiles have been downloaded alert('All images downloaded'); }, 2000); } Now for some reason the .Done property on the tile object is always false, even though it is explicitly being set to true inside tileImage.onload = function(). And I can ensure you that this function DOES get called because I've placed an alert() call inside it. Right now it's just stuck inside an infinite loop calling tryDisplayMosaic() constantly. Also if I place a loop just before tryDisplayMosaic() is called, and in that loop I set .Done = true, then .Done property is true and alert('All images downloaded'); will get called.

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  • JavaScript Browser Hacks

    Recently during one of my client side scripting classes, I was trying to show my students some basic examples of JavaScript as an introduction to the language.  My first basic example was to show an alert box using JavaScript via the address bar. The student’s reaction to my browser hack example really caught me off guard in a good way. After programming with a language for close to 10 years you start to lose the "Awe Cool!" effect that new learners of a language experience when writing code. New learns of JavaScript are the reason why I created this post. Please enjoy. Note: Place JavaScript in to address bar and then press the enter key. Example 1: JavaScript Alert box displaying My name: John Doe Javascript:alert('My name: \n John Doe') ; Example 2: JavaScript alert box displaying name entered by user. javascript:alert('My name: \n ' + prompt('Enter Name','Name')) ; Example 3: JavaScript alert box displaying name entered by user, and then displays the length of the name. javascript:var name= prompt('Enter Name','Name'); alert('My name: \n ' + name); alert(name.length); If you notice, the address bar will execute JavaScript on the current page loaded in the browser using the Document Object Model (DOM). Additionally, the address bar will allow multiple lines to be executed sequentially even though all of the code is contained within one line due to the fact that the JavaScript interpreter uses the “;” to indicate where a line of ends and a new one begins. After doing a little more research on the topic of JavaScript Browser Hacks I found a few other cool JavaScript hacks which I will list below. Example 4: Make any webpage editableSource: http://www.openjason.com/2008/09/02/browser-hack-make-any-web-page-editable/ javascript:document.body.contentEditable='true'; document.designMode='on'; void 0; Example 5: CHINESE DRAGON DANCING Source: http://nzeyi.wordpress.com/2009/06/01/dwrajaxjavascript-hacks-the-secrets-of-javascript-in-the-adress-bar/ javascript:R=0;x1=0.1;y1=0.05;x2=0.25;y2=0.24;x3=1.6; y3=0.24;x4=300;y4=200;x5=300;y5=200;DI=document.links; DIL=DI.length;A=function(){for(i=0;i-DIL;i++){DI[i].style. position='absolute';DI[i].style.left=Math.sin(R*x1+i*x2+x3)*x4+ x5;DI[i].style.top=Math.cos(R*y1+i*y2+y3)*y4+y5}R++;}; setInterval('A()',5);void(0); Example 6: Reveal content stored in password protected fields javascript:(function(){var s,F,j,f,i; s = “”; F = document.forms; for(j=0; j Example 7: Force user to close browser windowSource: http://forums.digitalpoint.com/showthread.php?t=767053 javascript:while(1){alert('Restart your brower to close this box!')} Learn more about JavaScript Browser Hacks.

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  • javascript csv validation

    - by Hulk
    How to check for comma separated values in a text box and raise an alert if not found. And there is should be characters in it like A,B,C,D function validate() { //validate text box; } <input type="text" id="val" >A,B,C,D</input> <input type="button" id="save" onclick="validate()"> Thanks.

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  • call the id in javascript

    - by user295189
    I have a span like this <span id="selectedTests" class="emrFG"> <span id="lblSelectedTests" class="emrHDR" style="top:3;left:6;font-size:8pt;">Selections</span> <span class="emrHDR" style="top:3;left:190;font-size:8pt;">Tests</span> <div id="recordSet" style="top:19;height:112;width:444;"></div> </span> The span shows some rows of data and I want to call those rows individually by using document.all method. How would I do that?

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  • Has Javascript developed beyond what it was originally designed to do?

    - by Elliot Bonneville
    I've been talking with a friend about the purpose of Javascript, when and how it should be used, etc. He quoted that: JavaScript was designed to add interactivity to HTML pages [...] JavaScript gives HTML designers a programming tool HTML authors are normally not programmers, but JavaScript is a scripting language with a very simple syntax! Almost anyone can put small "snippets" of code into their HTML pages JavaScript can react to events A JavaScript can be set to execute when something happens, like when a page has finished loading or when a user clicks on an HTML element JavaScript can read and write HTML elements A JavaScript can read and change the content of an HTML element JavaScript can be used to validate data A JavaScript can be used to validate form data before it is submitted to a server. This saves the server from extra processing JavaScript can be used to detect the visitor's browser - A JavaScript can be used to detect the visitor's browser, and - depending on the browser - load another page specifically designed for that browser. JavaScript can be used to create cookies - A JavaScript can be used to store and retrieve information on the visitor's computer. However, it seems like Javascript's getting used to do a lot more than these days. My friend also advocates against using Javascript's OOP functionality, claiming that "you shouldn't be processing data, merely validating." Is Javascript really limited to validating data and making flashy graphics on a web page? He goes on to claim "you shouldn't be attempting to access databases through javascript" and also says " in general you don't want to be doing your heavy lifting in javascript". I can't say I agree with his opinion, but I'd like to get some more input on this. So, my question: Has Javascript evolved from the definition above to something more powerful, has the way we use it changed, or am I just plain wrong? While I realize this is a subjective question, I can't find any more information on it, so a few links would be good, if nothing else. I'm not looking for a debate, just an answer.

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  • Is there a javascript library that contains a rich set of very high level commonly used functions?

    - by bobo
    I find that many high level functions are missing in most well-known javascript libraries such as jquery, YUI...etc. Taking string manipulation as an example, startsWith, endsWith, contains, lTrim, rTrim, trim, isNullOrEmpty...etc. These function are actually very common ones. I would like to know if there exists a javascript library/ plugin of a javascript library that fills these gaps (including but not limited to string manipulation)? It would be great if the library does not override the prototype.

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  • How do I convert some ugly inline javascript into a function?

    - by Taylor
    I've got a form with various inputs that by default have no value. When a user changes one or more of the inputs all values including the blank ones are used in the URL GET string when submitted. So to clean it up I've got some javascript that removes the inputs before submission. It works well enough but I was wondering how to put this in a js function or tidy it up. Seems a bit messy to have it all clumped in to an onclick. Plus i'm going to be adding more so there will be quite a few. Here's the relevant code. There are 3 seperate lines for 3 seperate inputs. The first part of the line has a value that refers to the inputs ID ("mf","cf","bf","pf") and the second part of the line refers to the parent div ("dmf","dcf", etc). The first part is an example of the input structure... echo "<div id='dmf'><select id='mf' name='mFilter'>"; This part is the submit and js... echo "<input type='submit' value='Apply' onclick='javascript: if (document.getElementById(\"mf\").value==\"\") { document.getElementById(\"dmf\").innerHTML=\"\"; } if (document.getElementById(\"cf\").value==\"\") { document.getElementById(\"dcf\").innerHTML=\"\"; } if (document.getElementById(\"bf\").value==\"\") { document.getElementById(\"dbf\").innerHTML=\"\"; } if (document.getElementById(\"pf\").value==\"\") { document.getElementById(\"dpf\").innerHTML=\"\"; } ' />"; I have pretty much zero javascript knowledge so help turning this in to a neater function or similar would be much appreciated.

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  • Pluralsight Meet the Author Podcast on Structuring JavaScript Code

    - by dwahlin
    I had the opportunity to talk with Fritz Onion from Pluralsight about one of my recent courses titled Structuring JavaScript Code for one of their Meet the Author podcasts. We talked about why JavaScript patterns are important for building more re-useable and maintainable apps, pros and cons of different patterns, and how to go about picking a pattern as a project is started. The course provides a solid walk-through of converting what I call “Function Spaghetti Code” into more modular code that’s easier to maintain, more re-useable, and less susceptible to naming conflicts. Patterns covered in the course include the Prototype Pattern, Revealing Module Pattern, and Revealing Prototype Pattern along with several other tips and techniques that can be used. Meet the Author:  Dan Wahlin on Structuring JavaScript Code   The transcript from the podcast is shown below: [Fritz]  Hello, this is Fritz Onion with another Pluralsight author interview. Today we’re talking with Dan Wahlin about his new course, Structuring JavaScript Code. Hi, Dan, it’s good to have you with us today. [Dan]  Thanks for having me, Fritz. [Fritz]  So, Dan, your new course, which came out in December of 2011 called Structuring JavaScript Code, goes into several patterns of usage in JavaScript as well as ways of organizing your code and what struck me about it was all the different techniques you described for encapsulating your code. I was wondering if you could give us just a little insight into what your motivation was for creating this course and sort of why you decided to write it and record it. [Dan]  Sure. So, I got started with JavaScript back in the mid 90s. In fact, back in the days when browsers that most people haven’t heard of were out and we had JavaScript but it wasn’t great. I was on a project in the late 90s that was heavy, heavy JavaScript and we pretty much did what I call in the course function spaghetti code where you just have function after function, there’s no rhyme or reason to how those functions are structured, they just kind of flow and it’s a little bit hard to do maintenance on it, you really don’t get a lot of reuse as far as from an object perspective. And so coming from an object-oriented background in JAVA and C#, I wanted to put something together that highlighted kind of the new way if you will of writing JavaScript because most people start out just writing functions and there’s nothing with that, it works, but it’s definitely not a real reusable solution. So the course is really all about how to move from just kind of function after function after function to the world of more encapsulated code and more reusable and hopefully better maintenance in the process. [Fritz]  So I am sure a lot of people have had similar experiences with their JavaScript code and will be looking forward to seeing what types of patterns you’ve put forth. Now, a couple I noticed in your course one is you start off with the prototype pattern. Do you want to describe sort of what problem that solves and how you go about using it within JavaScript? [Dan]  Sure. So, the patterns that are covered such as the prototype pattern and the revealing module pattern just as two examples, you know, show these kind of three things that I harp on throughout the course of encapsulation, better maintenance, reuse, those types of things. The prototype pattern specifically though has a couple kind of pros over some of the other patterns and that is the ability to extend your code without touching source code and what I mean by that is let’s say you’re writing a library that you know either other teammates or other people just out there on the Internet in general are going to be using. With the prototype pattern, you can actually write your code in such a way that we’re leveraging the JavaScript property and by doing that now you can extend my code that I wrote without touching my source code script or you can even override my code and perform some new functionality. Again, without touching my code.  And so you get kind of the benefit of the almost like inheritance or overriding in object oriented languages with this prototype pattern and it makes it kind of attractive that way definitely from a maintenance standpoint because, you know, you don’t want to modify a script I wrote because I might roll out version 2 and now you’d have to track where you change things and it gets a little tricky. So with this you just override those pieces or extend them and get that functionality and that’s kind of some of the benefits that that pattern offers out of the box. [Fritz]  And then the revealing module pattern, how does that differ from the prototype pattern and what problem does that solve differently? [Dan]  Yeah, so the prototype pattern and there’s another one that’s kind of really closely lined with revealing module pattern called the revealing prototype pattern and it also uses the prototype key word but it’s very similar to the one you just asked about the revealing module pattern. [Fritz]  Okay. [Dan]  This is a really popular one out there. In fact, we did a project for Microsoft that was very, very heavy JavaScript. It was an HMTL5 jQuery type app and we use this pattern for most of the structure if you will for the JavaScript code and what it does in a nutshell is allows you to get that encapsulation so you have really a single function wrapper that wraps all your other child functions but it gives you the ability to do public versus private members and this is kind of a sort of debate out there on the web. Some people feel that all JavaScript code should just be directly accessible and others kind of like to be able to hide their, truly their private stuff and a lot of people do that. You just put an underscore in front of your field or your variable name or your function name and that kind of is the defacto way to say hey, this is private. With the revealing module pattern you can do the equivalent of what objective oriented languages do and actually have private members that you literally can’t get to as an external consumer of the JavaScript code and then you can expose only those members that you want to be public. Now, you don’t get the benefit though of the prototype feature, which is I can’t easily extend the revealing module pattern type code if you don’t like something I’m doing, chances are you’re probably going to have to tweak my code to fix that because we’re not leveraging prototyping but in situations where you’re writing apps that are very specific to a given target app, you know, it’s not a library, it’s not going to be used in other apps all over the place, it’s a pattern I actually like a lot, it’s very simple to get going and then if you do like that public/private feature, it’s available to you. [Fritz]  Yeah, that’s interesting. So it’s almost, you can either go private by convention just by using a standard naming convention or you can actually enforce it by using the prototype pattern. [Dan]  Yeah, that’s exactly right. [Fritz]  So one of the things that I know I run across in JavaScript and I’m curious to get your take on is we do have all these different techniques of encapsulation and each one is really quite different when you’re using closures versus simply, you know, referencing member variables and adding them to your objects that the syntax changes with each pattern and the usage changes. So what would you recommend for people starting out in a brand new JavaScript project? Should they all sort of decide beforehand on what patterns they’re going to stick to or do you change it based on what part of the library you’re working on? I know that’s one of the points of confusion in this space. [Dan]  Yeah, it’s a great question. In fact, I just had a company ask me about that. So which one do I pick and, of course, there’s not one answer fits all. [Fritz]  Right. [Dan]  So it really depends what you just said is absolutely in my opinion correct, which is I think as a, especially if you’re on a team or even if you’re just an individual a team of one, you should go through and pick out which pattern for this particular project you think is best. Now if it were me, here’s kind of the way I think of it. If I were writing a let’s say base library that several web apps are going to use or even one, but I know that there’s going to be some pieces that I’m not really sure on right now as I’m writing I and I know people might want to hook in that and have some better extension points, then I would look at either the prototype pattern or the revealing prototype. Now, really just a real quick summation between the two the revealing prototype also gives you that public/private stuff like the revealing module pattern does whereas the prototype pattern does not but both of the prototype patterns do give you the benefit of that extension or that hook capability. So, if I were writing a library that I need people to override things or I’m not even sure what I need them to override, I want them to have that option, I’d probably pick a prototype, one of the prototype patterns. If I’m writing some code that is very unique to the app and it’s kind of a one off for this app which is what I think a lot of people are kind of in that mode as writing custom apps for customers, then my personal preference is the revealing module pattern you could always go with the module pattern as well which is very close but I think the revealing module patterns a little bit cleaner and we go through that in the course and explain kind of the syntax there and the differences. [Fritz]  Great, that makes a lot of sense. [Fritz]  I appreciate you taking the time, Dan, and I hope everyone takes a chance to look at your course and sort of make these decisions for themselves in their next JavaScript project. Dan’s course is, Structuring JavaScript Code and it’s available now in the Pluralsight Library. So, thank you very much, Dan. [Dan]  Thanks for having me again.

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  • ASP.NET JavaScript Routing for ASP.NET MVC–Constraints

    - by zowens
    If you haven’t had a look at my previous post about ASP.NET routing, go ahead and check it out before you read this post: http://weblogs.asp.net/zowens/archive/2010/12/20/asp-net-mvc-javascript-routing.aspx And the code is here: https://github.com/zowens/ASP.NET-MVC-JavaScript-Routing   Anyways, this post is about routing constraints. A routing constraint is essentially a way for the routing engine to filter out route patterns based on the day from the URL. For example, if I have a route where all the parameters are required, I could use a constraint on the required parameters to say that the parameter is non-empty. Here’s what the constraint would look like: Notice that this is a class that inherits from IRouteConstraint, which is an interface provided by System.Web.Routing. The match method returns true if the value is a match (and can be further processed by the routing rules) or false if it does not match (and the route will be matched further along the route collection). Because routing constraints are so essential to the route matching process, it was important that they be part of my JavaScript routing engine. But the problem is that we need to somehow represent the constraint in JavaScript. I made a design decision early on that you MUST put this constraint into JavaScript to match a route. I didn’t want to have server interaction for the URL generation, like I’ve seen in so many applications. While this is easy to maintain, it causes maintenance issues in my opinion. So the way constraints work in JavaScript is that the constraint as an object type definition is set on the route manager. When a route is created, a new instance of the constraint is created with the specific parameter. In its current form the constraint function MUST return a function that takes the route data and will return true or false. You will see the NotEmpty constraint in a bit. Another piece to the puzzle is that you can have the JavaScript exist as a string in your application that is pulled in when the routing JavaScript code is generated. There is a simple interface, IJavaScriptAddition, that I have added that will be used to output custom JavaScript. Let’s put it all together. Here is the NotEmpty constraint. There’s a few things at work here. The constraint is called “notEmpty” in JavaScript. When you add the constraint to a parameter in your C# code, the route manager generator will look for the JsConstraint attribute to look for the name of the constraint type name and fallback to the class name. For example, if I didn’t apply the “JsConstraint” attribute, the constraint would be called “NotEmpty”. The JavaScript code essentially adds a function to the “constraintTypeDefs” object on the “notEmpty” property (this is how constraints are added to routes). The function returns another function that will be invoked with routing data. Here’s how you would use the NotEmpty constraint in C# and it will work with the JavaScript routing generator. The only catch to using route constraints currently is that the following is not supported: The constraint will work in C# but is not supported by my JavaScript routing engine. (I take pull requests so if you’d like this… go ahead and implement it).   I just wanted to take this post to explain a little bit about the background on constraints. I am looking at expanding the current functionality, but for now this is a good start. Thanks for all the support with the JavaScript router. Keep the feedback coming!

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  • Repeated calls with random Javascript append to the URL

    - by cjk
    I keep getting calls to my server where there is random Javascript appended on the end of lots of the calls, e.g.: /UI/Includes/JavaScript/).length)&&e.error( /UI/Includes/JavaScript/,C,!1),a.addEventListener( /UI/Includes/JavaScript/),l=b.createDocumentFragment(),m=b.documentElement,n=m.firstChild,o=b.createElement( /UI/Includes/JavaScript/&&a.getAttributeNode( /UI/Includes/JavaScript/&&a.firstChild.getAttribute( /UI/Includes/JavaScript/).replace(bd, /UI/Includes/JavaScript/)),a.getElementsByTagName( The user agent is always this: Mozilla/4.0+(compatible;+MSIE+6.0;+Windows+NT+5.1;+SV1;+.NET+CLR+2.0.50727) I have jQuery, Modernizr and other JS and originally thought that some browser was messing up it's JS calls, however this particular IP address hasn't requested any images so I'm wondering if it is some kind of attack. Is this a common occurence?

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  • What should be tested in Javascript?

    - by Nathan Hoad
    At work, we've just started on a heavily Javascript based application (actually using Coffeescript, but still), of which I've been implementing an automated test system using JsTestDriver and fabric. We've never written something with this much Javascript, so up until now we've never done any Javascript testing. I'm unsure what exactly we should be testing in our unit tests. We've written JQuery plugins for various things, so it's quite obvious that they should be verified for correctness as much as possible with JsTestDriver, but everyone else in my team seems to think that we should be testing the page level Javascript as well. I don't think we should be testing page level Javascript as unit tests, but instead using a system like Selenium to verify everything works as expected. My main reasoning for this is that at the moment, page level Javascript tests are guaranteed to fail through JsTestDriver, because they're trying to access elements on the DOM that can't possibly exist. So, what should be unit tested in Javascript?

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  • Why not use JavaScript but libraries instead?

    - by shareef
    I read this article Unobtrusive JavaScript with jQuery and I noticed these points in the slide page 11 some companies strip JavaScript at the firewall some run the NoScript Firefox extension to protect themselves from common XSS and CSRF attacks many mobile devices ignore JavaScript entirely screen readers do execute JavaScript but accessibility issues mean you may not want them to I did not understand the fourth point. What does it mean? I need your comment and responses on these points. Is not using JavaScript and switching to libraries like jQuery worth it?

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  • What is JavaScript, really?

    - by Lord Loh.
    All this started when I was looking for a way to test my webpage for JavaScript conformance like the W3C HTML Validator. I have not found one yet. So let me know if you know of any... I looked for the official JavaScript page and find ECMA Script. These people have standardized a scripting language (I do not feel like calling it JavaScript anymore!) and called it ECMA-262 (Wikipedia). Their latest work is Edition 5.1 JavaScript was developed my Mozilla Corporation and their last stable version is 1.8.5 (see this) which is based on the ECMA's edition 5.1 The Wikipedia page linked mentions dialects. Mozilla's JavaScript 1.8.5 is listed as a dialect along with JScript 9 (IE) and JavaScript (Chrome's V8[Wiki]) and a lot others. Am I to understand that JavaScript 1.8.5 is a derivative of the ECMA-262 and SpiderMonkey[Wiki] is an engine that runs it? And Chrome has its own dialect and V8 engine is the program that runs it? With all these dialects based off ECMA-262, what I can no longer understand is "What is JavaScript"? Are there any truly cross browser scripting languages? Do the various implementers come together to agree on the dialect cross compatibility? Is this effort ECMA?

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