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  • Thoughts on the new JavaFX by Jim Connors

    - by Jacob Lehrbaum
    First, a brief editorial if I may.  The upcoming JavaFX 2.0 platform has been getting overwhelmingly positive reaction from the community so far.  While the public sentiment seems to be cautiously optimistic, I've heard nothing but positive reactions from everyone that I've spoken to about the platform.   In fact, many of the early adopters of JavaFX have told us directly that they are very encouraged about the direction the platform is taking.One such early adopter is Oracle's own Jim Connors.  As his day job, Jim is a principal sales consultant (basically an engineer that supports Oracle's sales efforts) in the New York area.  However, Jim also co-wrote a book with Jim Clarke and Eric Bruno on JavaFX and has spoken and conducted training sessions at events like the New York Java Developer Day, the Java Road Trip, and other events.In his thoughtful editorial, Jim discusses some of the reasons why he believes the new directions Oracle is taking JavaFX make sense, including:Better developer toolsLower barriers to adoption -> better accessibility to existing Java developersImproved performanceMore flexibility (ability to use other dynamic languages, etc)To read more about Jim's thoughts on the new JavaFX, check out his blog.  Or if you want to learn more about the JavaFX platform, pick up a copy of his book.  And if you still want to use JavaFX Script, you can check out Project Visage

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  • Java Champion Jim Weaver on JavaFX

    - by Janice J. Heiss
    Hardly anyone knows more about JavaFX than Java Champion and Oracle’s JavaFX Evangelist, Jim Weaver, who will be leading two Hands on Labs on aspects of JavaFX at this year’s JavaOne: HOL11265 – “Playing to the Strengths of JavaFX and HTML5” (With Jeff Klamer - App Designer, Jeff Klamer Design) Wednesday, Oct 3, 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM - Hilton San Francisco - Franciscan A/B/C/D HOL3058 – “Custom JavaFX Controls” (With Gerrit Grunwald, Senior Software Engineer, Canoo Engineering AG; Bob Larsen, Consultant, Larsen Consulting; and Peter Vašenda, Software Engineer, Oracle) Tuesday, Oct 2, 12:30 PM - 2:30 PM - Hilton San Francisco - Franciscan A/B/C/D I caught up with Jim at JavaOne to ask him for a current snapshot of JavaFX. “In my opinion,” observed Weaver, “the most important thing happening with JavaFX is the ongoing improvement to rich-client Java application deployment. For example, JavaFX packaging tools now provide built-in support for self-contained application packages. A package may optionally contain the Java Runtime, and be distributed with a native installer (e.g., a DMG or EXE). This makes it easy for users to install JavaFX apps on their client machines, perhaps obtaining the apps from the Mac App Store, for example. Igor Nekrestyanov and Nancy Hildebrandt have written a comprehensive guide to JavaFX application deployment, the following section of which covers Self-Contained Application Packaging: http://docs.oracle.com/javafx/2/deployment/self-contained-packaging.htm#BCGIBBCI.“Igor also wrote a blog post titled, "7u10: JavaFX Packaging Tools Update," that covers improvements introduced so far in Java SE 7 update 10. Here's the URL to the blog post:https://blogs.oracle.com/talkingjavadeployment/entry/packaging_improvements_in_jdk_7”I asked about how the strengths of JavaFX and HTML5 interact and reinforce each other. “They interact and reinforce each other very well. I was about to be amazed at your insight in asking that question, but then recalled that one of my JavaOne sessions is a Hands-on Lab titled ‘Playing to the Strengths of JavaFX and HTML5.’ In that session, we'll cover the JavaFX and HTML5 WebView control, the strengths of each technology, and the various ways that Java and contents of the WebView can interact.”And what is he looking forward to at JavaOne? “I'm personally looking forward to some excellent sessions, and connecting with colleagues and friends that I haven't seen in a while!” Jim Weaver is another good reason to feel good about JavaOne.

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  • Technical Computing Initiative, Jim Gray and a Virtual Framed Letter on my Wall

    Today Microsoft announced their Technical Computing Initiative, a program to help scientists and engineers take advantage of the latest breakthroughs in parallel computing, bandwidth increases, and technologies that will make doing scientific research akin to using spreadsheets (as opposed to writing really complex custom code).  This is actually the culmination of work that the late Jim Gray, formerly a technical fellow at Microsoft, was working on. I didn't really know Jim, and frankly only...Did you know that DotNetSlackers also publishes .net articles written by top known .net Authors? We already have over 80 articles in several categories including Silverlight. Take a look: here.

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  • Get to Know a Candidate (5 of 25): Jim Carlson–Grassroots Party

    - by Brian Lanham
    DISCLAIMER: This is not a post about “Romney” or “Obama”. This is not a post for whom I am voting. Information sourced for Wikipedia. Carlson is an American businessman and the Grassroots Party nominee. Carlson is the owner of Last Place on Earth, a head shop located in Duluth, Minnesota. In September 2011, the shop was raided by police for selling bath salts and synthetic marijuana. After the raid, Carlson filed a lawsuit to strike down Minnesota's ban on the substances. His suit was dismissed by the court in November 2011. The Grassroots Party was created in the 1980s to oppose drug prohibition.  The party shares many of the the political leftist values of the Green Party but with a greater emphasis on marijuana/hemp legalization issues.  The permanent platform of the Grassroots Party is the Bill of Rights. Individual candidate's positions on issues vary from Libertarian to Green. All Grassroots candidates would end marijuana/hemp prohibition and re-legalize Cannabis for all its uses. Learn more about Jim Carlson and Grassroots Party on Wikipedia.

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  • Content Catalog for Oracle OpenWorld is Ready

    - by Rick Ramsey
    American Major League Baseball Umpire Jim Joyce made one of the worst calls in baseball history when he ruled Jason Donald safe at First in Wednesday's game between the Detroit Lions and the Cleveland Indians. The New York Times tells the story well. It was the 9th inning. There were two outs. And Detroit Tiger's pitcher Armando Galarraga had pitched a perfect game. Instead of becoming the 21st pitcher in Major League Baseball history to pitch a perfect game, Galarraga became the 10th pitcher in Major League Baseball history to ever lose a perfect game with two outs in the ninth inning. More insight from the New York Times here. You can avoid a similar mistake and its attendant death treats, hate mail, and self-loathing by studying the Content Catalog just released for Oracle Open World, Java One, and Oracle Develop conferences being held in San Francisco September 19-23. The Content Catalog displays all the available content related to the event, the venue, and the stream or track you're interested in. Additional filters are available to narrow down your results even more. It's simple to use and a big help. Give it a try. It'll spare you the fate of Jim Joyce. - Rick

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  • The 2010 JavaOne Java EE 6 Panel: Where We Are and Where We're Going

    - by janice.heiss(at)oracle.com
    An informative article, based on a 2010 JavaOne (San Francisco, California) panel session, surveys a variety of expert perspectives on Java EE 6.The panel, moderated by Oracle's Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine, consisted of:* Adam Bien, Consultant Author/ Speaker, adam-bien.com* Emmanuel Bernard, Principal Software Engineer, JBoss by Red Hat,* David Blevins, Senior Software Engineer, and co-founder of the OpenEJB project and a     founder of Apache Geronimo* Roberto Chinnici, Technical Staff Consulting Member, Oracle* Jim Knutson, Java EE Architect, IBM* Reza Rahman, Lead Engineer, Caucho Technology, Inc.,* Krasimir Semerdzhiev, Development Architect, SAP Labs BulgariaThe panel addressed such topics as Platform and API Adoption, Contexts and Dependency Injection (CDI), Java EE vs. Spring, the impact of Java EE 6 on tooling and testing, Java EE.next, along with a variety of audience questions. Read the entire article for the whole picture.

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  • curlftpfs mount disagrees with the fstab

    - by KayakJim
    I am working with curlftpfs to mount a remote FTP directory locally in Kubuntu 12.04 64-bit. I have the following entry in my /etc/fstab: curlftpfs#ftp_user:[email protected]_server /mnt/nimh fuse ro,noexec,nosuid,nodev,noauto,user,allow_other,uid=1000,gid=1000 0 0 I have created the directory in /mnt with the following: |-> ll /mnt total 4.0K drwxrwxr-x 2 jim fuse 4.0K Jan 6 09:56 nimh/ My user does belong to the fuse group as well: uid=1000(jim) gid=1000(jim) groups=1000(jim),27(sudo),105(fuse) I am able to mount manually without issue but then the /mnt changes to: |-> mount /mnt/nimh |-> ll /mnt total 0 drwxr-xr-x 1 jim jim 1.0K Dec 31 1969 nimh/ However when I attempt to umount /mnt/nimh I receive: umount: /mnt/nimh mount disagrees with the fstab My /etc/mtab looks like: curlftpfs#ftp://ftp_user:[email protected]_server/ /mnt/nimh fuse ro,noexec,nosuid,nodev,allow_other,user=jim 0 0 I am able to umount the filesystem without issue if I sudo. Any idea what I'm missing in order to be able to unmount without having to use sudo?

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  • 2 Birds, 1 Stone: Enabling M2M and Mobility in Healthcare

    - by Eric Jensen
    Jim Connors has created a video showcase of a comprehensive healthcare solution, connecting a mobile application directly to an embedded patient monitoring system. In the demo, Jim illustrates how you can easily build solutions on top of the Java embedded platform, using Oracle products like Berkeley DB and Database Mobile Server. Jim is running Apache Tomcat on an embedded device, using Berkeley DB as the data store. BDB is transparently linked to an Oracle Database backend using  Database Mobile Server. Information protection is important in healthcare, so it is worth pointing out that these products offer strong data encryption, for storage as well as transit. In his video, Jim does a great job of demystifying M2M. What's compelling about this demo is that uses a solution architecture that enterprise developers are already comfortable and familiar with: a Java apps server with a database backend. The additional pieces used to embed this solution are Oracle Berkeley DB and Database Mobile Server. It functions transparently, from the perspective of Java apps developers. This means that organizations who understand Java apps (basically everyone) can use this technology to develop embedded M2M products. The potential uses for this technology in healthcare alone are immense; any device that measures and records some aspect of the patient could be linked, securely and directly, to the medical records database. Breathing, circulation, other vitals, sensory perception, blood tests, x-rats or CAT scans. The list goes on and on. In this demo case, it's a testament to the power of the Java embedded platform that they are able to easily interface the device, called a Pulse Oximeter, with the web application. If Jim had stopped there, it would've been a cool demo. But he didn't; he actually saved the most awesome part for the end! At 9:52 Jim drops a bombshell: He's also created an Android app, something a doctor would use to view patient health data from his mobile device. The mobile app is seamlessly integrated into the rest of the system, using the device agent from Oracle's Database Mobile Server. In doing so, Jim has really showcased the full power of this solution: the ability to build M2M solutions that integrate seamlessly with mobile applications. In closing, I want to point out that this is not a hypothetical demo using beta or even v1.0 products. Everything in Jim's demo is available today. What's more, every product shown is mature, and already in production at many customer sites, albeit not in the innovative combination Jim has come up with. If your customers are in the market for these type of solutions (and they almost certainly are) I encourage you to download the components and try it out yourself! All the Oracle products showcased in this video are available for evaluation download via Oracle Technology Network.

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  • Interesting SQL Sorting Issue

    - by rofly
    It's crunch time, deadline for my most recent contract is coming in two days and almost everything is complete and working fine (knock on wood) except for one issue. In one of my stored procedures, I'm needing to return a result set as follows. group_id | name A101 | Craig A102 | Craig Z101 | Craig Z102 | Craig A101 | Jim A102 | Jim Z101 | Jim Z102 | Jim B101 | Andy B102 | Andy Z101 | Andy Z102 | Andy The names need to be sorted by the first character of the group id and also include the Z101/Z102 entries. By sorting strictly by the group id, I get a result set as follows: A101 | Craig A102 | Craig A101 | Jim A102 | Jim B101 | Andy B102 | Andy Z101 | Andy Z102 | Andy Z101 | Jim Z102 | Jim I really can't think of a solution that doesn't involve me making a cursor and bloating the stored procedure up more than it already is. I'm sure a great mind out there has an elegant solution and I'm eager to see what the community can come up with. Thanks a ton in advance.

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  • Configuration problems with django and mod_wsgi

    - by Jimbo
    Hi, I've got problems on getting django to work on apache 2.2 with mod_wsgi. Django is installed and mod_wsgi too. I can even see a 404 page when accessing the path and I can login to django admin. But if I want to install the tagging module I get the following error: Traceback (most recent call last): File "setup.py", line 49, in <module> version_tuple = __import__('tagging').VERSION File "/home/jim/django-tagging/tagging/__init__.py", line 3, in <module> from tagging.managers import ModelTaggedItemManager, TagDescriptor File "/home/jim/django-tagging/tagging/managers.py", line 5, in <module> from django.contrib.contenttypes.models import ContentType File "/usr/lib/python2.5/site-packages/django/contrib/contenttypes/models.py", line 1, in <module> from django.db import models File "/usr/lib/python2.5/site-packages/django/db/__init__.py", line 10, in <module> if not settings.DATABASE_ENGINE: File "/usr/lib/python2.5/site-packages/django/utils/functional.py", line 269, in __getattr__ self._setup() File "/usr/lib/python2.5/site-packages/django/conf/__init__.py", line 40, in _setup self._wrapped = Settings(settings_module) File "/usr/lib/python2.5/site-packages/django/conf/__init__.py", line 75, in __init__ raise ImportError, "Could not import settings '%s' (Is it on sys.path? Does it have syntax errors?): %s" % (self.SETTINGS_MODULE, e) ImportError: Could not import settings 'mysite.settings' (Is it on sys.path? Does it have syntax errors?): No module named mysite.settings My httpd.conf: Alias /media/ /home/jim/django/mysite/media/ <Directory /home/jim/django/mysite/media> Order deny,allow Allow from all </Directory> Alias /admin/media/ "/usr/lib/python2.5/site-packages/django/contrib/admin/media/" <Directory "/usr/lib/python2.5/site-packages/django/contrib/admin/media/"> Order allow,deny Allow from all </Directory> WSGIScriptAlias /dj /home/jim/django/mysite/apache/django.wsgi <Directory /home/jim/django/mysite/apache> Order deny,allow Allow from all </Directory> My django.wsgi: import sys, os sys.path.append('/home/jim/django') sys.path.append('/home/jim/django/mysite') os.chdir('/home/jim/django/mysite') os.environ['DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE'] = 'mysite.settings' import django.core.handlers.wsgi application = django.core.handlers.wsgi.WSGIHandler() I try to get this to work since a few days and have read several blogs and answers here on so but nothing worked.

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  • How to create generic class which takes 3 types.

    - by scope-creep
    I'm trying to make a generic class that takes 3 types, either a simple string, IList or a IList. public class OntologyStore { } public sealed class jim<T> where T:new() { IList<string> X = null; IList<OntologyStore> X1 = null; public bob() { if (typeof(T) == typeof(String)) { X = new List<string>(); } if (typeof(T) == typeof(OntologyStore)) { X1 = new List<OntologyStore>(); } } } I can easily create, which you would expect to work, jim<OntologyStore> x1=new jim<jim<OntologyStore>() as you would expect, but when I put in jim<string> x2=new jim<string>() the compiler reports the string is non abtract type, which you would expect. Is it possible to create a generic class, which can instantiate as a class which holds string, or a IList or an IList?

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  • How LINQ to Object statements work

    - by rajbk
    This post goes into detail as to now LINQ statements work when querying a collection of objects. This topic assumes you have an understanding of how generics, delegates, implicitly typed variables, lambda expressions, object/collection initializers, extension methods and the yield statement work. I would also recommend you read my previous two posts: Using Delegates in C# Part 1 Using Delegates in C# Part 2 We will start by writing some methods to filter a collection of data. Assume we have an Employee class like so: 1: public class Employee { 2: public int ID { get; set;} 3: public string FirstName { get; set;} 4: public string LastName {get; set;} 5: public string Country { get; set; } 6: } and a collection of employees like so: 1: var employees = new List<Employee> { 2: new Employee { ID = 1, FirstName = "John", LastName = "Wright", Country = "USA" }, 3: new Employee { ID = 2, FirstName = "Jim", LastName = "Ashlock", Country = "UK" }, 4: new Employee { ID = 3, FirstName = "Jane", LastName = "Jackson", Country = "CHE" }, 5: new Employee { ID = 4, FirstName = "Jill", LastName = "Anderson", Country = "AUS" }, 6: }; Filtering We wish to  find all employees that have an even ID. We could start off by writing a method that takes in a list of employees and returns a filtered list of employees with an even ID. 1: static List<Employee> GetEmployeesWithEvenID(List<Employee> employees) { 2: var filteredEmployees = new List<Employee>(); 3: foreach (Employee emp in employees) { 4: if (emp.ID % 2 == 0) { 5: filteredEmployees.Add(emp); 6: } 7: } 8: return filteredEmployees; 9: } The method can be rewritten to return an IEnumerable<Employee> using the yield return keyword. 1: static IEnumerable<Employee> GetEmployeesWithEvenID(IEnumerable<Employee> employees) { 2: foreach (Employee emp in employees) { 3: if (emp.ID % 2 == 0) { 4: yield return emp; 5: } 6: } 7: } We put these together in a console application. 1: using System; 2: using System.Collections.Generic; 3: //No System.Linq 4:  5: public class Program 6: { 7: [STAThread] 8: static void Main(string[] args) 9: { 10: var employees = new List<Employee> { 11: new Employee { ID = 1, FirstName = "John", LastName = "Wright", Country = "USA" }, 12: new Employee { ID = 2, FirstName = "Jim", LastName = "Ashlock", Country = "UK" }, 13: new Employee { ID = 3, FirstName = "Jane", LastName = "Jackson", Country = "CHE" }, 14: new Employee { ID = 4, FirstName = "Jill", LastName = "Anderson", Country = "AUS" }, 15: }; 16: var filteredEmployees = GetEmployeesWithEvenID(employees); 17:  18: foreach (Employee emp in filteredEmployees) { 19: Console.WriteLine("ID {0} First_Name {1} Last_Name {2} Country {3}", 20: emp.ID, emp.FirstName, emp.LastName, emp.Country); 21: } 22:  23: Console.ReadLine(); 24: } 25: 26: static IEnumerable<Employee> GetEmployeesWithEvenID(IEnumerable<Employee> employees) { 27: foreach (Employee emp in employees) { 28: if (emp.ID % 2 == 0) { 29: yield return emp; 30: } 31: } 32: } 33: } 34:  35: public class Employee { 36: public int ID { get; set;} 37: public string FirstName { get; set;} 38: public string LastName {get; set;} 39: public string Country { get; set; } 40: } Output: ID 2 First_Name Jim Last_Name Ashlock Country UK ID 4 First_Name Jill Last_Name Anderson Country AUS Our filtering method is too specific. Let us change it so that it is capable of doing different types of filtering and lets give our method the name Where ;-) We will add another parameter to our Where method. This additional parameter will be a delegate with the following declaration. public delegate bool Filter(Employee emp); The idea is that the delegate parameter in our Where method will point to a method that contains the logic to do our filtering thereby freeing our Where method from any dependency. The method is shown below: 1: static IEnumerable<Employee> Where(IEnumerable<Employee> employees, Filter filter) { 2: foreach (Employee emp in employees) { 3: if (filter(emp)) { 4: yield return emp; 5: } 6: } 7: } Making the change to our app, we create a new instance of the Filter delegate on line 14 with a target set to the method EmployeeHasEvenId. Running the code will produce the same output. 1: public delegate bool Filter(Employee emp); 2:  3: public class Program 4: { 5: [STAThread] 6: static void Main(string[] args) 7: { 8: var employees = new List<Employee> { 9: new Employee { ID = 1, FirstName = "John", LastName = "Wright", Country = "USA" }, 10: new Employee { ID = 2, FirstName = "Jim", LastName = "Ashlock", Country = "UK" }, 11: new Employee { ID = 3, FirstName = "Jane", LastName = "Jackson", Country = "CHE" }, 12: new Employee { ID = 4, FirstName = "Jill", LastName = "Anderson", Country = "AUS" } 13: }; 14: var filterDelegate = new Filter(EmployeeHasEvenId); 15: var filteredEmployees = Where(employees, filterDelegate); 16:  17: foreach (Employee emp in filteredEmployees) { 18: Console.WriteLine("ID {0} First_Name {1} Last_Name {2} Country {3}", 19: emp.ID, emp.FirstName, emp.LastName, emp.Country); 20: } 21: Console.ReadLine(); 22: } 23: 24: static bool EmployeeHasEvenId(Employee emp) { 25: return emp.ID % 2 == 0; 26: } 27: 28: static IEnumerable<Employee> Where(IEnumerable<Employee> employees, Filter filter) { 29: foreach (Employee emp in employees) { 30: if (filter(emp)) { 31: yield return emp; 32: } 33: } 34: } 35: } 36:  37: public class Employee { 38: public int ID { get; set;} 39: public string FirstName { get; set;} 40: public string LastName {get; set;} 41: public string Country { get; set; } 42: } Lets use lambda expressions to inline the contents of the EmployeeHasEvenId method in place of the method. The next code snippet shows this change (see line 15).  For brevity, the Employee class declaration has been skipped. 1: public delegate bool Filter(Employee emp); 2:  3: public class Program 4: { 5: [STAThread] 6: static void Main(string[] args) 7: { 8: var employees = new List<Employee> { 9: new Employee { ID = 1, FirstName = "John", LastName = "Wright", Country = "USA" }, 10: new Employee { ID = 2, FirstName = "Jim", LastName = "Ashlock", Country = "UK" }, 11: new Employee { ID = 3, FirstName = "Jane", LastName = "Jackson", Country = "CHE" }, 12: new Employee { ID = 4, FirstName = "Jill", LastName = "Anderson", Country = "AUS" } 13: }; 14: var filterDelegate = new Filter(EmployeeHasEvenId); 15: var filteredEmployees = Where(employees, emp => emp.ID % 2 == 0); 16:  17: foreach (Employee emp in filteredEmployees) { 18: Console.WriteLine("ID {0} First_Name {1} Last_Name {2} Country {3}", 19: emp.ID, emp.FirstName, emp.LastName, emp.Country); 20: } 21: Console.ReadLine(); 22: } 23: 24: static bool EmployeeHasEvenId(Employee emp) { 25: return emp.ID % 2 == 0; 26: } 27: 28: static IEnumerable<Employee> Where(IEnumerable<Employee> employees, Filter filter) { 29: foreach (Employee emp in employees) { 30: if (filter(emp)) { 31: yield return emp; 32: } 33: } 34: } 35: } 36:  The output displays the same two employees.  Our Where method is too restricted since it works with a collection of Employees only. Lets change it so that it works with any IEnumerable<T>. In addition, you may recall from my previous post,  that .NET 3.5 comes with a lot of predefined delegates including public delegate TResult Func<T, TResult>(T arg); We will get rid of our Filter delegate and use the one above instead. We apply these two changes to our code. 1: public class Program 2: { 3: [STAThread] 4: static void Main(string[] args) 5: { 6: var employees = new List<Employee> { 7: new Employee { ID = 1, FirstName = "John", LastName = "Wright", Country = "USA" }, 8: new Employee { ID = 2, FirstName = "Jim", LastName = "Ashlock", Country = "UK" }, 9: new Employee { ID = 3, FirstName = "Jane", LastName = "Jackson", Country = "CHE" }, 10: new Employee { ID = 4, FirstName = "Jill", LastName = "Anderson", Country = "AUS" } 11: }; 12:  13: var filteredEmployees = Where(employees, emp => emp.ID % 2 == 0); 14:  15: foreach (Employee emp in filteredEmployees) { 16: Console.WriteLine("ID {0} First_Name {1} Last_Name {2} Country {3}", 17: emp.ID, emp.FirstName, emp.LastName, emp.Country); 18: } 19: Console.ReadLine(); 20: } 21: 22: static IEnumerable<T> Where<T>(IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, bool> filter) { 23: foreach (var x in source) { 24: if (filter(x)) { 25: yield return x; 26: } 27: } 28: } 29: } We have successfully implemented a way to filter any IEnumerable<T> based on a  filter criteria. Projection Now lets enumerate on the items in the IEnumerable<Employee> we got from the Where method and copy them into a new IEnumerable<EmployeeFormatted>. The EmployeeFormatted class will only have a FullName and ID property. 1: public class EmployeeFormatted { 2: public int ID { get; set; } 3: public string FullName {get; set;} 4: } We could “project” our existing IEnumerable<Employee> into a new collection of IEnumerable<EmployeeFormatted> with the help of a new method. We will call this method Select ;-) 1: static IEnumerable<EmployeeFormatted> Select(IEnumerable<Employee> employees) { 2: foreach (var emp in employees) { 3: yield return new EmployeeFormatted { 4: ID = emp.ID, 5: FullName = emp.LastName + ", " + emp.FirstName 6: }; 7: } 8: } The changes are applied to our app. 1: public class Program 2: { 3: [STAThread] 4: static void Main(string[] args) 5: { 6: var employees = new List<Employee> { 7: new Employee { ID = 1, FirstName = "John", LastName = "Wright", Country = "USA" }, 8: new Employee { ID = 2, FirstName = "Jim", LastName = "Ashlock", Country = "UK" }, 9: new Employee { ID = 3, FirstName = "Jane", LastName = "Jackson", Country = "CHE" }, 10: new Employee { ID = 4, FirstName = "Jill", LastName = "Anderson", Country = "AUS" } 11: }; 12:  13: var filteredEmployees = Where(employees, emp => emp.ID % 2 == 0); 14: var formattedEmployees = Select(filteredEmployees); 15:  16: foreach (EmployeeFormatted emp in formattedEmployees) { 17: Console.WriteLine("ID {0} Full_Name {1}", 18: emp.ID, emp.FullName); 19: } 20: Console.ReadLine(); 21: } 22:  23: static IEnumerable<T> Where<T>(IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, bool> filter) { 24: foreach (var x in source) { 25: if (filter(x)) { 26: yield return x; 27: } 28: } 29: } 30: 31: static IEnumerable<EmployeeFormatted> Select(IEnumerable<Employee> employees) { 32: foreach (var emp in employees) { 33: yield return new EmployeeFormatted { 34: ID = emp.ID, 35: FullName = emp.LastName + ", " + emp.FirstName 36: }; 37: } 38: } 39: } 40:  41: public class Employee { 42: public int ID { get; set;} 43: public string FirstName { get; set;} 44: public string LastName {get; set;} 45: public string Country { get; set; } 46: } 47:  48: public class EmployeeFormatted { 49: public int ID { get; set; } 50: public string FullName {get; set;} 51: } Output: ID 2 Full_Name Ashlock, Jim ID 4 Full_Name Anderson, Jill We have successfully selected employees who have an even ID and then shaped our data with the help of the Select method so that the final result is an IEnumerable<EmployeeFormatted>.  Lets make our Select method more generic so that the user is given the freedom to shape what the output would look like. We can do this, like before, with lambda expressions. Our Select method is changed to accept a delegate as shown below. TSource will be the type of data that comes in and TResult will be the type the user chooses (shape of data) as returned from the selector delegate. 1:  2: static IEnumerable<TResult> Select<TSource, TResult>(IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TResult> selector) { 3: foreach (var x in source) { 4: yield return selector(x); 5: } 6: } We see the new changes to our app. On line 15, we use lambda expression to specify the shape of the data. In this case the shape will be of type EmployeeFormatted. 1:  2: public class Program 3: { 4: [STAThread] 5: static void Main(string[] args) 6: { 7: var employees = new List<Employee> { 8: new Employee { ID = 1, FirstName = "John", LastName = "Wright", Country = "USA" }, 9: new Employee { ID = 2, FirstName = "Jim", LastName = "Ashlock", Country = "UK" }, 10: new Employee { ID = 3, FirstName = "Jane", LastName = "Jackson", Country = "CHE" }, 11: new Employee { ID = 4, FirstName = "Jill", LastName = "Anderson", Country = "AUS" } 12: }; 13:  14: var filteredEmployees = Where(employees, emp => emp.ID % 2 == 0); 15: var formattedEmployees = Select(filteredEmployees, (emp) => 16: new EmployeeFormatted { 17: ID = emp.ID, 18: FullName = emp.LastName + ", " + emp.FirstName 19: }); 20:  21: foreach (EmployeeFormatted emp in formattedEmployees) { 22: Console.WriteLine("ID {0} Full_Name {1}", 23: emp.ID, emp.FullName); 24: } 25: Console.ReadLine(); 26: } 27: 28: static IEnumerable<T> Where<T>(IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, bool> filter) { 29: foreach (var x in source) { 30: if (filter(x)) { 31: yield return x; 32: } 33: } 34: } 35: 36: static IEnumerable<TResult> Select<TSource, TResult>(IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TResult> selector) { 37: foreach (var x in source) { 38: yield return selector(x); 39: } 40: } 41: } The code outputs the same result as before. On line 14 we filter our data and on line 15 we project our data. What if we wanted to be more expressive and concise? We could combine both line 14 and 15 into one line as shown below. Assuming you had to perform several operations like this on our collection, you would end up with some very unreadable code! 1: var formattedEmployees = Select(Where(employees, emp => emp.ID % 2 == 0), (emp) => 2: new EmployeeFormatted { 3: ID = emp.ID, 4: FullName = emp.LastName + ", " + emp.FirstName 5: }); A cleaner way to write this would be to give the appearance that the Select and Where methods were part of the IEnumerable<T>. This is exactly what extension methods give us. Extension methods have to be defined in a static class. Let us make the Select and Where extension methods on IEnumerable<T> 1: public static class MyExtensionMethods { 2: static IEnumerable<T> Where<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, bool> filter) { 3: foreach (var x in source) { 4: if (filter(x)) { 5: yield return x; 6: } 7: } 8: } 9: 10: static IEnumerable<TResult> Select<TSource, TResult>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TResult> selector) { 11: foreach (var x in source) { 12: yield return selector(x); 13: } 14: } 15: } The creation of the extension method makes the syntax much cleaner as shown below. We can write as many extension methods as we want and keep on chaining them using this technique. 1: var formattedEmployees = employees 2: .Where(emp => emp.ID % 2 == 0) 3: .Select (emp => new EmployeeFormatted { ID = emp.ID, FullName = emp.LastName + ", " + emp.FirstName }); Making these changes and running our code produces the same result. 1: using System; 2: using System.Collections.Generic; 3:  4: public class Program 5: { 6: [STAThread] 7: static void Main(string[] args) 8: { 9: var employees = new List<Employee> { 10: new Employee { ID = 1, FirstName = "John", LastName = "Wright", Country = "USA" }, 11: new Employee { ID = 2, FirstName = "Jim", LastName = "Ashlock", Country = "UK" }, 12: new Employee { ID = 3, FirstName = "Jane", LastName = "Jackson", Country = "CHE" }, 13: new Employee { ID = 4, FirstName = "Jill", LastName = "Anderson", Country = "AUS" } 14: }; 15:  16: var formattedEmployees = employees 17: .Where(emp => emp.ID % 2 == 0) 18: .Select (emp => 19: new EmployeeFormatted { 20: ID = emp.ID, 21: FullName = emp.LastName + ", " + emp.FirstName 22: } 23: ); 24:  25: foreach (EmployeeFormatted emp in formattedEmployees) { 26: Console.WriteLine("ID {0} Full_Name {1}", 27: emp.ID, emp.FullName); 28: } 29: Console.ReadLine(); 30: } 31: } 32:  33: public static class MyExtensionMethods { 34: static IEnumerable<T> Where<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, bool> filter) { 35: foreach (var x in source) { 36: if (filter(x)) { 37: yield return x; 38: } 39: } 40: } 41: 42: static IEnumerable<TResult> Select<TSource, TResult>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TResult> selector) { 43: foreach (var x in source) { 44: yield return selector(x); 45: } 46: } 47: } 48:  49: public class Employee { 50: public int ID { get; set;} 51: public string FirstName { get; set;} 52: public string LastName {get; set;} 53: public string Country { get; set; } 54: } 55:  56: public class EmployeeFormatted { 57: public int ID { get; set; } 58: public string FullName {get; set;} 59: } Let’s change our code to return a collection of anonymous types and get rid of the EmployeeFormatted type. We see that the code produces the same output. 1: using System; 2: using System.Collections.Generic; 3:  4: public class Program 5: { 6: [STAThread] 7: static void Main(string[] args) 8: { 9: var employees = new List<Employee> { 10: new Employee { ID = 1, FirstName = "John", LastName = "Wright", Country = "USA" }, 11: new Employee { ID = 2, FirstName = "Jim", LastName = "Ashlock", Country = "UK" }, 12: new Employee { ID = 3, FirstName = "Jane", LastName = "Jackson", Country = "CHE" }, 13: new Employee { ID = 4, FirstName = "Jill", LastName = "Anderson", Country = "AUS" } 14: }; 15:  16: var formattedEmployees = employees 17: .Where(emp => emp.ID % 2 == 0) 18: .Select (emp => 19: new { 20: ID = emp.ID, 21: FullName = emp.LastName + ", " + emp.FirstName 22: } 23: ); 24:  25: foreach (var emp in formattedEmployees) { 26: Console.WriteLine("ID {0} Full_Name {1}", 27: emp.ID, emp.FullName); 28: } 29: Console.ReadLine(); 30: } 31: } 32:  33: public static class MyExtensionMethods { 34: public static IEnumerable<T> Where<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, bool> filter) { 35: foreach (var x in source) { 36: if (filter(x)) { 37: yield return x; 38: } 39: } 40: } 41: 42: public static IEnumerable<TResult> Select<TSource, TResult>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TResult> selector) { 43: foreach (var x in source) { 44: yield return selector(x); 45: } 46: } 47: } 48:  49: public class Employee { 50: public int ID { get; set;} 51: public string FirstName { get; set;} 52: public string LastName {get; set;} 53: public string Country { get; set; } 54: } To be more expressive, C# allows us to write our extension method calls as a query expression. Line 16 can be rewritten a query expression like so: 1: var formattedEmployees = from emp in employees 2: where emp.ID % 2 == 0 3: select new { 4: ID = emp.ID, 5: FullName = emp.LastName + ", " + emp.FirstName 6: }; When the compiler encounters an expression like the above, it simply rewrites it as calls to our extension methods.  So far we have been using our extension methods. The System.Linq namespace contains several extension methods for objects that implement the IEnumerable<T>. You can see a listing of these methods in the Enumerable class in the System.Linq namespace. Let’s get rid of our extension methods (which I purposefully wrote to be of the same signature as the ones in the Enumerable class) and use the ones provided in the Enumerable class. Our final code is shown below: 1: using System; 2: using System.Collections.Generic; 3: using System.Linq; //Added 4:  5: public class Program 6: { 7: [STAThread] 8: static void Main(string[] args) 9: { 10: var employees = new List<Employee> { 11: new Employee { ID = 1, FirstName = "John", LastName = "Wright", Country = "USA" }, 12: new Employee { ID = 2, FirstName = "Jim", LastName = "Ashlock", Country = "UK" }, 13: new Employee { ID = 3, FirstName = "Jane", LastName = "Jackson", Country = "CHE" }, 14: new Employee { ID = 4, FirstName = "Jill", LastName = "Anderson", Country = "AUS" } 15: }; 16:  17: var formattedEmployees = from emp in employees 18: where emp.ID % 2 == 0 19: select new { 20: ID = emp.ID, 21: FullName = emp.LastName + ", " + emp.FirstName 22: }; 23:  24: foreach (var emp in formattedEmployees) { 25: Console.WriteLine("ID {0} Full_Name {1}", 26: emp.ID, emp.FullName); 27: } 28: Console.ReadLine(); 29: } 30: } 31:  32: public class Employee { 33: public int ID { get; set;} 34: public string FirstName { get; set;} 35: public string LastName {get; set;} 36: public string Country { get; set; } 37: } 38:  39: public class EmployeeFormatted { 40: public int ID { get; set; } 41: public string FullName {get; set;} 42: } This post has shown you a basic overview of LINQ to Objects work by showning you how an expression is converted to a sequence of calls to extension methods when working directly with objects. It gets more interesting when working with LINQ to SQL where an expression tree is constructed – an in memory data representation of the expression. The C# compiler compiles these expressions into code that builds an expression tree at runtime. The provider can then traverse the expression tree and generate the appropriate SQL query. You can read more about expression trees in this MSDN article.

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  • Tough Decisions

    - by Johnm
    There was once a thriving business that employed two Database Administrators, Sam and Jim. Both DBAs were certified, educated and highly talented in their skill sets. During lunch breaks these two DBAs were often found together discussing best practices, troubleshooting techniques and the latest release notes for the upcoming version of SQL Server. They genuinely loved what they did. The maintenance of the first database was the responsibility of Sam. He was the architect of this server's setup and he was very meticulous in its configuration. He regularly monitored the health of the database, validated backup files and regularly adhered to the best practices that were advocated by well respected professionals. He was very proud of the fact that there was never a database that he managed that lost data or performed poorly. The maintenance of the second database was the responsibility of Jim. He too was the architect of this server's setup. At the time that he built this server, his understanding of the finer details of configuration were not as clear as they are today. The server was build on a shoestring budget and with very little time for testing and implementation. Jim often monitored the health of the database; but in more of a reactionary mode due to user complaints of slowness or failed transactions. Deadlocks abounded and the backup files were never validated. One day, the announcement was made that revealed that the business had hit financially hard times. Budgets were being cut, limitation on spending was implemented and the reduction in full-time staff was required. Since having two DBAs was regarded a luxury by many, this meant that either Sam or Jim were about to find themselves out of a job. Sam and Jim's boss, Frank, was faced with a very tough decision. Sam's performance was flawless. His techniques and practices were perfection. The databases he managed were reliable and efficient. His solutions are "by the book". When given a task it is certain that, while it may take a little longer, it will be done right the first time. Jim's techniques and practices were not perfect; but effective and responsive. He made mistakes regularly; but he shows that he learns from them and they often result in innovative solutions. When given a task it is certain that, while the results may require some tweaking, it will be done on time and under budget. You are Frank's best friend. He approaches you and presents this scenario. He must layoff one of his valued DBAs the very next morning. Frank asks you: "All else being equal, who would you let go? and Why?" Another pertinent question is raised: "Regardless of good times or bad, if you had to choose, which DBA would you want on your team when tough challenges arise?" Your response is. (This is where you enter a comment below)

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  • SQLUniversity Professional Development Week: Learning To Fly

    - by andyleonard
    Introduction Clem and Jim Bob were out hunting the other day in the woods south of Farmville. As they crossed a ridge, they came upon a big ol' Momma Bear and her cub. The larger bear immediately started towards them. Jim Bob took off running as fast as he could. He stopped when he realized Clem wasn't with him. And when he saw Clem reaching into his pack, Jim Bob was incredulous: "Hurry Clem! That bar's comin' fast! You need to out run 'er!" Clem kicked off his boots and pulled running shoes out...(read more)

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  • Finding all IP ranges blelonging to a specific ISP

    - by Jim Jim
    I'm having an issue with a certain individual who keeps scraping my site in an aggressive manner; wasting bandwidth and CPU resources. I've already implemented a system which tails my web server access logs, adds each new IP to a database, keeps track of the number of requests made from that IP, and then, if the same IP goes over a certain threshold of requests within a certain time period, it's blocked via iptables. It may sound elaborate, but as far as I know, there exists no pre-made solution designed to limit a certain IP to a certain amount of bandwidth/requests. This works fine for most crawlers, but an extremely persistent individual is getting a new IP from his/her ISP pool each time they're blocked. I would like to block the ISP entirely, but don't know how to go about it. Doing a whois on a few sample IPs, I can see that they all share the same "netname", "mnt-by", and "origin/AS". Is there a way I can query the ARIN/RIPE database for all subnets using the same mnt-by/AS/netname? If not, how else could I go about getting every IP belonging to this ISP? Thanks.

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  • "Never hide" Unity launcher via CCSM & gconf doesn't work

    - by Jim Holman
    All: I am running Unity 3D and I want to set my launcher to never hide. I first ran ccsm, and set "Hide Launcher" to "Never". I rebooted then logged back in and it was still auto-hiding. I then ran gconf-editor, I navigated to /apps/compiz-1/plugins/unityshell/screen0/options and then set launcher_hide_mode to 0. I again rebooted and logged back in. The launcher is still auto-hiding. Checking gconf-editor, launcher_hide_mode is set to 0, but this setting isn't active however. What can I do to get the launcher to Never hide? Thanks, Jim

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  • Relative XPath node selection with C# XmlDocument

    - by lox
    Imagine the following XML document: <root> <person_data> <person> <name>John</name> <age>35</age> </person> <person> <name>Jim</name> <age>50</age> </person> </person_data> <locations> <location> <name>John</name> <country>USA</country> </location> <location> <name>Jim</name> <country>Japan</country> </location> </locations> </root> I then select the person node for Jim: XmlNode personNode = doc.SelectSingleNode("//person[name = 'Jim']"); And now from this node with a single XPath select I would like to retrieve Jim's location node. Something like: XmlNode locationNode = personNode.SelectSingleNode("//location[name = {reference to personNode}/name]"); Since I am selecting based on the personNode it would be handy if I could reference it in the select. Is this possible?.. is the connection there? Sure I could put in a few extra lines of code and put the name into a variable and use this in the XPath string but that is not what I am asking.

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  • Project Nashorn Slides & Talks

    - by $utils.escapeXML($entry.author)
    At the Eclipse Demo Camp in Hamburg last week I got asked about resources on Project Nashorn. So, I compiled a quick list:slides from Jim Laskey's JavaOne 2011 talk titled "The Future of JavaScript in the JDK".slides from Bernard Traversat's JavaOne 2011 talk titled "HTLM5 and Java: The Facts and the Myths".slides and video from Jim Laskey's JVM Language Simmit talk titled "Adventures in JSR 292 (Nashorn)".

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  • FREE Online Azure Workshop includes a **FREE Azure Account**

    - by Jim Duffy
    My friend and all around good guy, Microsoft Developer Evangelist for the Carolinas, Brian Hitney, along with fellow Microsofties Jim O’Neil and John McClelland will be presenting a FREE Windows Azure online workshop tomorrow, Tuesday, May 4th from 7pm-9pm. What? You can’t make it Tuesday evening? Not to worry. This webcast will be repeated again a number of times over the next month or so. Taken from Brian’s blog post about it: “Elevate your skills with Windows Azure in this hands-on workshop! In this event we’ll guide you through the process of building and deploying a large scale Azure application. Forget about “hello world”! In less than two hours we’ll build and deploy a real cloud app that leverages the Azure data center and helps make a difference in the world. Yes, in addition to building an application that will leave you with a rock-solid understanding of the Azure platform, the solution you deploy will contribute back to Stanford’s [email protected] distributed computing project. There’s no cost to you to participate in this session; each attendee will receive a temporary, self-expiring, full-access account to work with Azure for a period of 2-weeks.” Did you catch that last sentence??  “each attendee will receive a temporary, self-expiring, full-access account to work with Azure for a period of 2-weeks.” A FREE, full-access, Windows Azure account to experiment and learn with? Now we’re talking. For more information check out Brian’s blog post or head here. Have a day. :-|

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  • hdmi AC-3 audio broke after upgrading from 11.10 to 12.04.3

    - by Jim LastName
    I just updated my MythBuntu 11.10 to 12.04.3. Now, when I try to play 5.1 content (ripped DVD), my TV (and receiver) plays a "chattering" sound. I check my receiver and the digital dolby light isn't on--it's in PCM mode. So, either the audio is getting sent as AC-3, but the TV and receiver think it's PCM or the AC-3 audio got converted to multichannel PCM and they can't handle it. My setup: hdmi cable from htpc to TV. TV has an s/pdif output to my receiver. I know TV sends AC-3 audio out correctly because I see digital dolby light come on when I view a digital TV channel and PCM come on when I view an old analog channel. I can connect s/pdif from my htpc to my receiver and the digital dolby light comes on and it can decode the audio just fine. It's just not sending it right over hdmi. Now for some hints to the issue: I noticed in MythTV audio setup when I select alsa:hdmi.... the description only lists 2 channel PCM audio capability. speaker-test -Dhdmi:PCH -c6 errors about a bad channel count (only -c2 works). Finally, I tried vlc and it does the same chattering sound. These all make me think this isn't a MythTV issue, it's something lower than that. I think the best way to troubleshoot this is to start at the drivers and check each layer, one at a time all the way to alsa. I just don't know what the layers are and how to do it. So, I need to find some audio troubleshooting guide to assist me. Or, if one doesn't exist, I'd appreciate some steps. Thanks much, Jim

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  • Save Remote SSL Certificate via Linux Command Line

    - by Jim
    Can you think of any linux command-line method for saving the certificate presented by a HTTPS server? Something along the lines of having curl/wget/openssl make a SSL connection and save the cert rather than the HTTP response content. The gui equivalent to what I'm looking for would be to browse to the HTTPS site, double-click on the browser "secure site" icon, and export the cert. Except the goal here is to do it non-interactively. Thanks, Jim

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  • SSRS 2005 Copy reports, data model, etc.

    - by Jim
    Anyone know how I can copy the user reports (and model) someone has created to point at another database (same schema). I don't really want to recreate the data model becuase (a) it's really complicated and (b) the previous developer added lots of friendly column names. Thanks in advance, Jim

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