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  • JMS Step 6 - How to Set Up an AQ JMS (Advanced Queueing JMS) for SOA Purposes

    - by John-Brown.Evans
    JMS Step 6 - How to Set Up an AQ JMS (Advanced Queueing JMS) for SOA Purposes .jblist{list-style-type:disc;margin:0;padding:0;padding-left:0pt;margin-left:36pt} ol{margin:0;padding:0} .c17_6{vertical-align:top;width:468pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt} .c5_6{vertical-align:top;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:0pt 5pt 0pt 5pt} .c6_6{vertical-align:top;width:156pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt} .c15_6{background-color:#ffffff} .c10_6{color:#1155cc;text-decoration:underline} .c1_6{text-align:center;direction:ltr} .c0_6{line-height:1.0;direction:ltr} .c16_6{color:#666666;font-size:12pt} .c18_6{color:inherit;text-decoration:inherit} .c8_6{background-color:#f3f3f3} .c2_6{direction:ltr} .c14_6{font-size:8pt} .c11_6{font-size:10pt} .c7_6{font-weight:bold} .c12_6{height:0pt} .c3_6{height:11pt} .c13_6{border-collapse:collapse} .c4_6{font-family:"Courier New"} .c9_6{font-style:italic} .title{padding-top:24pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#000000;font-size:36pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:bold;padding-bottom:6pt} .subtitle{padding-top:18pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666666;font-style:italic;font-size:24pt;font-family:"Georgia";padding-bottom:4pt} li{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial"} p{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;margin:0;font-family:"Arial"} h1{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:24pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h2{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:18pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h3{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:14pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h4{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:12pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h5{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:11pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h6{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} This post continues the series of JMS articles which demonstrate how to use JMS queues in a SOA context. The previous posts were: JMS Step 1 - How to Create a Simple JMS Queue in Weblogic Server 11g JMS Step 2 - Using the QueueSend.java Sample Program to Send a Message to a JMS Queue JMS Step 3 - Using the QueueReceive.java Sample Program to Read a Message from a JMS Queue JMS Step 4 - How to Create an 11g BPEL Process Which Writes a Message Based on an XML Schema to a JMS Queue JMS Step 5 - How to Create an 11g BPEL Process Which Reads a Message Based on an XML Schema from a JMS Queue This example leads you through the creation of an Oracle database Advanced Queue and the related WebLogic server objects in order to use AQ JMS in connection with a SOA composite. If you have not already done so, I recommend you look at the previous posts in this series, as they include steps which this example builds upon. The following examples will demonstrate how to write and read from the queue from a SOA process. 1. Recap and Prerequisites In the previous examples, we created a JMS Queue, a Connection Factory and a Connection Pool in the WebLogic Server Console. Then we wrote and deployed BPEL composites, which enqueued and dequeued a simple XML payload. AQ JMS allows you to interoperate with database Advanced Queueing via JMS in WebLogic server and therefore take advantage of database features, while maintaining compliance with the JMS architecture. AQ JMS uses the WebLogic JMS Foreign Server framework. A full description of this functionality can be found in the following Oracle documentation Oracle® Fusion Middleware Configuring and Managing JMS for Oracle WebLogic Server 11g Release 1 (10.3.6) Part Number E13738-06 7. Interoperating with Oracle AQ JMS http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E23943_01/web.1111/e13738/aq_jms.htm#CJACBCEJ For easier reference, this sample will use the same names for the objects as in the above document, except for the name of the database user, as it is possible that this user already exists in your database. We will create the following objects Database Objects Name Type AQJMSUSER Database User MyQueueTable Advanced Queue (AQ) Table UserQueue Advanced Queue WebLogic Server Objects Object Name Type JNDI Name aqjmsuserDataSource Data Source jdbc/aqjmsuserDataSource AqJmsModule JMS System Module AqJmsForeignServer JMS Foreign Server AqJmsForeignServerConnectionFactory JMS Foreign Server Connection Factory AqJmsForeignServerConnectionFactory AqJmsForeignDestination AQ JMS Foreign Destination queue/USERQUEUE eis/aqjms/UserQueue Connection Pool eis/aqjms/UserQueue 2. Create a Database User and Advanced Queue The following steps can be executed in the database client of your choice, e.g. JDeveloper or SQL Developer. The examples below use SQL*Plus. Log in to the database as a DBA user, for example SYSTEM or SYS. Create the AQJMSUSER user and grant privileges to enable the user to create AQ objects. Create Database User and Grant AQ Privileges sqlplus system/password as SYSDBA GRANT connect, resource TO aqjmsuser IDENTIFIED BY aqjmsuser; GRANT aq_user_role TO aqjmsuser; GRANT execute ON sys.dbms_aqadm TO aqjmsuser; GRANT execute ON sys.dbms_aq TO aqjmsuser; GRANT execute ON sys.dbms_aqin TO aqjmsuser; GRANT execute ON sys.dbms_aqjms TO aqjmsuser; Create the Queue Table and Advanced Queue and Start the AQ The following commands are executed as the aqjmsuser database user. Create the Queue Table connect aqjmsuser/aqjmsuser; BEGIN dbms_aqadm.create_queue_table ( queue_table = 'myQueueTable', queue_payload_type = 'sys.aq$_jms_text_message', multiple_consumers = false ); END; / Create the AQ BEGIN dbms_aqadm.create_queue ( queue_name = 'userQueue', queue_table = 'myQueueTable' ); END; / Start the AQ BEGIN dbms_aqadm.start_queue ( queue_name = 'userQueue'); END; / The above commands can be executed in a single PL/SQL block, but are shown as separate blocks in this example for ease of reference. You can verify the queue by executing the SQL command SELECT object_name, object_type FROM user_objects; which should display the following objects: OBJECT_NAME OBJECT_TYPE ------------------------------ ------------------- SYS_C0056513 INDEX SYS_LOB0000170822C00041$$ LOB SYS_LOB0000170822C00040$$ LOB SYS_LOB0000170822C00037$$ LOB AQ$_MYQUEUETABLE_T INDEX AQ$_MYQUEUETABLE_I INDEX AQ$_MYQUEUETABLE_E QUEUE AQ$_MYQUEUETABLE_F VIEW AQ$MYQUEUETABLE VIEW MYQUEUETABLE TABLE USERQUEUE QUEUE Similarly, you can view the objects in JDeveloper via a Database Connection to the AQJMSUSER. 3. Configure WebLogic Server and Add JMS Objects All these steps are executed from the WebLogic Server Administration Console. Log in as the webLogic user. Configure a WebLogic Data Source The data source is required for the database connection to the AQ created above. Navigate to domain > Services > Data Sources and press New then Generic Data Source. Use the values:Name: aqjmsuserDataSource JNDI Name: jdbc/aqjmsuserDataSource Database type: Oracle Database Driver: *Oracle’ Driver (Thin XA) for Instance connections; Versions:9.0.1 and later Connection Properties: Enter the connection information to the database containing the AQ created above and enter aqjmsuser for the User Name and Password. Press Test Configuration to verify the connection details and press Next. Target the data source to the soa server. The data source will be displayed in the list. It is a good idea to test the data source at this stage. Click on aqjmsuserDataSource, select Monitoring > Testing > soa_server1 and press Test Data Source. The result is displayed at the top of the page. Configure a JMS System Module The JMS system module is required to host the JMS foreign server for AQ resources. Navigate to Services > Messaging > JMS Modules and select New. Use the values: Name: AqJmsModule (Leave Descriptor File Name and Location in Domain empty.) Target: soa_server1 Click Finish. The other resources will be created in separate steps. The module will be displayed in the list.   Configure a JMS Foreign Server A foreign server is required in order to reference a 3rd-party JMS provider, in this case the database AQ, within a local WebLogic server JNDI tree. Navigate to Services > Messaging > JMS Modules and select (click on) AqJmsModule to configure it. Under Summary of Resources, select New then Foreign Server. Name: AqJmsForeignServer Targets: The foreign server is targeted automatically to soa_server1, based on the JMS module’s target. Press Finish to create the foreign server. The foreign server resource will be listed in the Summary of Resources for the AqJmsModule, but needs additional configuration steps. Click on AqJmsForeignServer and select Configuration > General to complete the configuration: JNDI Initial Context Factory: oracle.jms.AQjmsInitialContextFactory JNDI Connection URL: <empty> JNDI Properties Credential:<empty> Confirm JNDI Properties Credential: <empty> JNDI Properties: datasource=jdbc/aqjmsuserDataSource This is an important property. It is the JNDI name of the data source created above, which points to the AQ schema in the database and must be entered as a name=value pair, as in this example, e.g. datasource=jdbc/aqjmsuserDataSource, including the “datasource=” property name. Default Targeting Enabled: Leave this value checked. Press Save to save the configuration. At this point it is a good idea to verify that the data source was written correctly to the config file. In a terminal window, navigate to $MIDDLEWARE_HOME/user_projects/domains/soa_domain/config/jms  and open the file aqjmsmodule-jms.xml . The foreign server configuration should contain the datasource name-value pair, as follows:   <foreign-server name="AqJmsForeignServer">         <default-targeting-enabled>true</default-targeting-enabled>         <initial-context-factory>oracle.jms.AQjmsInitialContextFactory</initial-context-factory>         <jndi-property>           <key> datasource </key>           <value> jdbc/aqjmsuserDataSource </value>         </jndi-property>   </foreign-server> </weblogic-jms> Configure a JMS Foreign Server Connection Factory When creating the foreign server connection factory, you enter local and remote JNDI names. The name of the connection factory itself and the local JNDI name are arbitrary, but the remote JNDI name must match a specific format, depending on the type of queue or topic to be accessed in the database. This is very important and if the incorrect value is used, the connection to the queue will not be established and the error messages you get will not immediately reflect the cause of the error. The formats required (Remote JNDI names for AQ JMS Connection Factories) are described in the section Configure AQ Destinations  of the Oracle® Fusion Middleware Configuring and Managing JMS for Oracle WebLogic Server document mentioned earlier. In this example, the remote JNDI name used is   XAQueueConnectionFactory  because it matches the AQ and data source created earlier, i.e. thin with AQ. Navigate to JMS Modules > AqJmsModule > AqJmsForeignServer > Connection Factories then New.Name: AqJmsForeignServerConnectionFactory Local JNDI Name: AqJmsForeignServerConnectionFactory Note: this local JNDI name is the JNDI name which your client application, e.g. a later BPEL process, will use to access this connection factory. Remote JNDI Name: XAQueueConnectionFactory Press OK to save the configuration. Configure an AQ JMS Foreign Server Destination A foreign server destination maps the JNDI name on the foreign JNDI provider to the respective local JNDI name, allowing the foreign JNDI name to be accessed via the local server. As with the foreign server connection factory, the local JNDI name is arbitrary (but must be unique), but the remote JNDI name must conform to a specific format defined in the section Configure AQ Destinations  of the Oracle® Fusion Middleware Configuring and Managing JMS for Oracle WebLogic Server document mentioned earlier. In our example, the remote JNDI name is Queues/USERQUEUE , because it references a queue (as opposed to a topic) with the name USERQUEUE. We will name the local JNDI name queue/USERQUEUE, which is a little confusing (note the missing “s” in “queue), but conforms better to the JNDI nomenclature in our SOA server and also allows us to differentiate between the local and remote names for demonstration purposes. Navigate to JMS Modules > AqJmsModule > AqJmsForeignServer > Destinations and select New.Name: AqJmsForeignDestination Local JNDI Name: queue/USERQUEUE Remote JNDI Name:Queues/USERQUEUE After saving the foreign destination configuration, this completes the JMS part of the configuration. We still need to configure the JMS adapter in order to be able to access the queue from a BPEL processt. 4. Create a JMS Adapter Connection Pool in Weblogic Server Create the Connection Pool Access to the AQ JMS queue from a BPEL or other SOA process in our example is done via a JMS adapter. To enable this, the JmsAdapter in WebLogic server needs to be configured to have a connection pool which points to the local connection factory JNDI name which was created earlier. Navigate to Deployments > Next and select (click on) the JmsAdapter. Select Configuration > Outbound Connection Pools and New. Check the radio button for oracle.tip.adapter.jms.IJmsConnectionFactory and press Next. JNDI Name: eis/aqjms/UserQueue Press Finish Expand oracle.tip.adapter.jms.IJmsConnectionFactory and click on eis/aqjms/UserQueue to configure it. The ConnectionFactoryLocation must point to the foreign server’s local connection factory name created earlier. In our example, this is AqJmsForeignServerConnectionFactory . As a reminder, this connection factory is located under JMS Modules > AqJmsModule > AqJmsForeignServer > Connection Factories and the value needed here is under Local JNDI Name. Enter AqJmsForeignServerConnectionFactory  into the Property Value field for ConnectionFactoryLocation. You must then press Return/Enter then Save for the value to be accepted. If your WebLogic server is running in Development mode, you should see the message that the changes have been activated and the deployment plan successfully updated. If not, then you will manually need to activate the changes in the WebLogic server console.Although the changes have been activated, the JmsAdapter needs to be redeployed in order for the changes to become effective. This should be confirmed by the message Remember to update your deployment to reflect the new plan when you are finished with your changes. Redeploy the JmsAdapter Navigate back to the Deployments screen, either by selecting it in the left-hand navigation tree or by selecting the “Summary of Deployments” link in the breadcrumbs list at the top of the screen. Then select the checkbox next to JmsAdapter and press the Update button. On the Update Application Assistant page, select “Redeploy this application using the following deployment files” and press Finish. After a few seconds you should get the message that the selected deployments were updated. The JMS adapter configuration is complete and it can now be used to access the AQ JMS queue. You can verify that the JNDI name was created correctly, by navigating to Environment > Servers > soa_server1 and View JNDI Tree. Then scroll down in the JNDI Tree Structure to eis and select aqjms. This concludes the sample. In the following post, I will show you how to create a BPEL process which sends a message to this advanced queue via JMS. Best regards John-Brown Evans Oracle Technology Proactive Support Delivery

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  • JMS Step 1 - How to Create a Simple JMS Queue in Weblogic Server 11g

    - by John-Brown.Evans
    JMS Step 1 - How to Create a Simple JMS Queue in Weblogic Server 11g ol{margin:0;padding:0} .c5{vertical-align:top;width:156pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:0pt 2pt 0pt 2pt} .c7{list-style-type:disc;margin:0;padding:0} .c4{background-color:#ffffff} .c14{color:#1155cc;text-decoration:underline} .c6{height:11pt;text-align:center} .c13{color:inherit;text-decoration:inherit} .c3{padding-left:0pt;margin-left:36pt} .c0{border-collapse:collapse} .c12{text-align:center} .c1{direction:ltr} .c8{background-color:#f3f3f3} .c2{line-height:1.0} .c11{font-style:italic} .c10{height:11pt} .c9{font-weight:bold} .title{padding-top:24pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#000000;font-size:36pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:bold;padding-bottom:6pt}.subtitle{padding-top:18pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666666;font-style:italic;font-size:24pt;font-family:"Georgia";padding-bottom:4pt} li{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial"} p{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;margin:0;font-family:"Arial"} h1{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666;font-size:18pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal;padding-bottom:0pt} h2{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666;font-size:14pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal;padding-bottom:0pt} h3{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666;font-size:12pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal;padding-bottom:0pt} h4{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666;font-style:italic;font-size:11pt;font-family:"Arial";padding-bottom:0pt} h5{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal;padding-bottom:0pt} h6{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666;font-style:italic;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial";padding-bottom:0pt} This example shows the steps to create a simple JMS queue in WebLogic Server 11g for testing purposes. For example, to use with the two sample programs QueueSend.java and QueueReceive.java which will be shown in later examples. Additional, detailed information on JMS can be found in the following Oracle documentation: Oracle® Fusion Middleware Configuring and Managing JMS for Oracle WebLogic Server 11g Release 1 (10.3.6) Part Number E13738-06 http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E23943_01/web.1111/e13738/toc.htm 1. Introduction and Definitions A JMS queue in Weblogic Server is associated with a number of additional resources: JMS Server A JMS server acts as a management container for resources within JMS modules. Some of its responsibilities include the maintenance of persistence and state of messages and subscribers. A JMS server is required in order to create a JMS module. JMS Module A JMS module is a definition which contains JMS resources such as queues and topics. A JMS module is required in order to create a JMS queue. Subdeployment JMS modules are targeted to one or more WLS instances or a cluster. Resources within a JMS module, such as queues and topics are also targeted to a JMS server or WLS server instances. A subdeployment is a grouping of targets. It is also known as advanced targeting. Connection Factory A connection factory is a resource that enables JMS clients to create connections to JMS destinations. JMS Queue A JMS queue (as opposed to a JMS topic) is a point-to-point destination type. A message is written to a specific queue or received from a specific queue. The objects used in this example are: Object Name Type JNDI Name TestJMSServer JMS Server TestJMSModule JMS Module TestSubDeployment Subdeployment TestConnectionFactory Connection Factory jms/TestConnectionFactory TestJMSQueue JMS Queue jms/TestJMSQueue 2. Configuration Steps The following steps are done in the WebLogic Server Console, beginning with the left-hand navigation menu. 2.1 Create a JMS Server Services > Messaging > JMS Servers Select New Name: TestJMSServer Persistent Store: (none) Target: soa_server1  (or choose an available server) Finish The JMS server should now be visible in the list with Health OK. 2.2 Create a JMS Module Services > Messaging > JMS Modules Select New Name: TestJMSModule Leave the other options empty Targets: soa_server1  (or choose the same one as the JMS server)Press Next Leave “Would you like to add resources to this JMS system module” unchecked and  press Finish . 2.3 Create a SubDeployment A subdeployment is not necessary for the JMS queue to work, but it allows you to easily target subcomponents of the JMS module to a single target or group of targets. We will use the subdeployment in this example to target the following connection factory and JMS queue to the JMS server we created earlier. Services > Messaging > JMS Modules Select TestJMSModule Select the Subdeployments  tab and New Subdeployment Name: TestSubdeployment Press Next Here you can select the target(s) for the subdeployment. You can choose either Servers (i.e. WebLogic managed servers, such as the soa_server1) or JMS Servers such as the JMS Server created earlier. As the purpose of our subdeployment in this example is to target a specific JMS server, we will choose the JMS Server option. Select the TestJMSServer created earlier Press Finish 2.4  Create a Connection Factory Services > Messaging > JMS Modules Select TestJMSModule  and press New Select Connection Factory  and Next Name: TestConnectionFactory JNDI Name: jms/TestConnectionFactory Leave the other values at default On the Targets page, select the Advanced Targeting  button and select TestSubdeployment Press Finish The connection factory should be listed on the following page with TestSubdeployment and TestJMSServer as the target. 2.5 Create a JMS Queue Services > Messaging > JMS Modules Select TestJMSModule  and press New Select Queue and Next Name: TestJMSQueueJNDI Name: jms/TestJMSQueueTemplate: NonePress Next Subdeployments: TestSubdeployment Finish The TestJMSQueue should be listed on the following page with TestSubdeployment and TestJMSServer. Confirm the resources for the TestJMSModule. Using the Domain Structure tree, navigate to soa_domain > Services > Messaging > JMS Modules then select TestJMSModule You should see the following resources The JMS queue is now complete and can be accessed using the JNDI names jms/TestConnectionFactory andjms/TestJMSQueue. In the following blog post in this series, I will show you how to write a message to this queue, using the WebLogic sample Java program QueueSend.java.

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  • JMS Step 4 - How to Create an 11g BPEL Process Which Writes a Message Based on an XML Schema to a JMS Queue

    - by John-Brown.Evans
    JMS Step 4 - How to Create an 11g BPEL Process Which Writes a Message Based on an XML Schema to a JMS Queue ol{margin:0;padding:0} .c11_4{vertical-align:top;width:129.8pt;border-style:solid;background-color:#f3f3f3;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt} .c9_4{vertical-align:top;width:207pt;border-style:solid;background-color:#f3f3f3;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt}.c14{vertical-align:top;width:207pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt} .c17_4{vertical-align:top;width:129.8pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt} .c7_4{vertical-align:top;width:130pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:0pt 5pt 0pt 5pt} .c19_4{vertical-align:top;width:468pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt} .c22_4{background-color:#ffffff} .c20_4{list-style-type:disc;margin:0;padding:0} .c6_4{font-size:8pt;font-family:"Courier New"} .c24_4{color:inherit;text-decoration:inherit} .c23_4{color:#1155cc;text-decoration:underline} .c0_4{height:11pt;direction:ltr} .c10_4{font-size:10pt;font-family:"Courier New"} .c3_4{padding-left:0pt;margin-left:36pt} .c18_4{font-size:8pt} .c8_4{text-align:center} .c12_4{background-color:#ffff00} .c2_4{font-weight:bold} .c21_4{background-color:#00ff00} .c4_4{line-height:1.0} .c1_4{direction:ltr} .c15_4{background-color:#f3f3f3} .c13_4{font-family:"Courier New"} .c5_4{font-style:italic} .c16_4{border-collapse:collapse} .title{padding-top:24pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#000000;font-size:36pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:bold;padding-bottom:6pt} .subtitle{padding-top:18pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666666;font-style:italic;font-size:24pt;font-family:"Georgia";padding-bottom:4pt} li{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial"} p{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;margin:0;font-family:"Arial"} h1{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:18pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal;padding-bottom:0pt} h2{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:18pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:bold;padding-bottom:0pt} h3{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:14pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal;padding-bottom:0pt} h4{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-style:italic;font-size:11pt;font-family:"Arial";padding-bottom:0pt} h5{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal;padding-bottom:0pt} h6{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-style:italic;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial";padding-bottom:0pt} This post continues the series of JMS articles which demonstrate how to use JMS queues in a SOA context. The previous posts were: JMS Step 1 - How to Create a Simple JMS Queue in Weblogic Server 11g JMS Step 2 - Using the QueueSend.java Sample Program to Send a Message to a JMS Queue JMS Step 3 - Using the QueueReceive.java Sample Program to Read a Message from a JMS Queue In this example we will create a BPEL process which will write (enqueue) a message to a JMS queue using a JMS adapter. The JMS adapter will enqueue the full XML payload to the queue. This sample will use the following WebLogic Server objects. The first two, the Connection Factory and JMS Queue, were created as part of the first blog post in this series, JMS Step 1 - How to Create a Simple JMS Queue in Weblogic Server 11g. If you haven't created those objects yet, please see that post for details on how to do so. The Connection Pool will be created as part of this example. Object Name Type JNDI Name TestConnectionFactory Connection Factory jms/TestConnectionFactory TestJMSQueue JMS Queue jms/TestJMSQueue eis/wls/TestQueue Connection Pool eis/wls/TestQueue 1. Verify Connection Factory and JMS Queue As mentioned above, this example uses a WLS Connection Factory called TestConnectionFactory and a JMS queue TestJMSQueue. As these are prerequisites for this example, let us verify they exist. Log in to the WebLogic Server Administration Console. Select Services > JMS Modules > TestJMSModule You should see the following objects: If not, or if the TestJMSModule is missing, please see the abovementioned article and create these objects before continuing. 2. Create a JMS Adapter Connection Pool in WebLogic Server The BPEL process we are about to create uses a JMS adapter to write to the JMS queue. The JMS adapter is deployed to the WebLogic server and needs to be configured to include a connection pool which references the connection factory associated with the JMS queue. In the WebLogic Server Console Go to Deployments > Next and select (click on) the JmsAdapter Select Configuration > Outbound Connection Pools and expand oracle.tip.adapter.jms.IJmsConnectionFactory. This will display the list of connections configured for this adapter. For example, eis/aqjms/Queue, eis/aqjms/Topic etc. These JNDI names are actually quite confusing. We are expecting to configure a connection pool here, but the names refer to queues and topics. One would expect these to be called *ConnectionPool or *_CF or similar, but to conform to this nomenclature, we will call our entry eis/wls/TestQueue . This JNDI name is also the name we will use later, when creating a BPEL process to access this JMS queue! Select New, check the oracle.tip.adapter.jms.IJmsConnectionFactory check box and Next. Enter JNDI Name: eis/wls/TestQueue for the connection instance, then press Finish. Expand oracle.tip.adapter.jms.IJmsConnectionFactory again and select (click on) eis/wls/TestQueue The ConnectionFactoryLocation must point to the JNDI name of the connection factory associated with the JMS queue you will be writing to. In our example, this is the connection factory called TestConnectionFactory, with the JNDI name jms/TestConnectionFactory.( As a reminder, this connection factory is contained in the JMS Module called TestJMSModule, under Services > Messaging > JMS Modules > TestJMSModule which we verified at the beginning of this document. )Enter jms/TestConnectionFactory  into the Property Value field for Connection Factory Location. After entering it, you must press Return/Enter then Save for the value to be accepted. If your WebLogic server is running in Development mode, you should see the message that the changes have been activated and the deployment plan successfully updated. If not, then you will manually need to activate the changes in the WebLogic server console. Although the changes have been activated, the JmsAdapter needs to be redeployed in order for the changes to become effective. This should be confirmed by the message Remember to update your deployment to reflect the new plan when you are finished with your changes as can be seen in the following screen shot: The next step is to redeploy the JmsAdapter.Navigate back to the Deployments screen, either by selecting it in the left-hand navigation tree or by selecting the “Summary of Deployments” link in the breadcrumbs list at the top of the screen. Then select the checkbox next to JmsAdapter and press the Update button On the Update Application Assistant page, select “Redeploy this application using the following deployment files” and press Finish. After a few seconds you should get the message that the selected deployments were updated. The JMS adapter configuration is complete and it can now be used to access the JMS queue. To summarize: we have created a JMS adapter connection pool connector with the JNDI name jms/TestConnectionFactory. This is the JNDI name to be accessed by a process such as a BPEL process, when using the JMS adapter to access the previously created JMS queue with the JNDI name jms/TestJMSQueue. In the following step, we will set up a BPEL process to use this JMS adapter to write to the JMS queue. 3. Create a BPEL Composite with a JMS Adapter Partner Link This step requires that you have a valid Application Server Connection defined in JDeveloper, pointing to the application server on which you created the JMS Queue and Connection Factory. You can create this connection in JDeveloper under the Application Server Navigator. Give it any name and be sure to test the connection before completing it. This sample will use the connection name jbevans-lx-PS5, as that is the name of the connection pointing to my SOA PS5 installation. When using a JMS adapter from within a BPEL process, there are various configuration options, such as the operation type (consume message, produce message etc.), delivery mode and message type. One of these options is the choice of the format of the JMS message payload. This can be structured around an existing XSD, in which case the full XML element and tags are passed, or it can be opaque, meaning that the payload is sent as-is to the JMS adapter. In the case of an XSD-based message, the payload can simply be copied to the input variable of the JMS adapter. In the case of an opaque message, the JMS adapter’s input variable is of type base64binary. So the payload needs to be converted to base64 binary first. I will go into this in more detail in a later blog entry. This sample will pass a simple message to the adapter, based on the following simple XSD file, which consists of a single string element: stringPayload.xsd <?xml version="1.0" encoding="windows-1252" ?> <xsd:schema xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns="http://www.example.org" targetNamespace="http://www.example.org" elementFormDefault="qualified" <xsd:element name="exampleElement" type="xsd:string"> </xsd:element> </xsd:schema> The following steps are all executed in JDeveloper. The SOA project will be created inside a JDeveloper Application. If you do not already have an application to contain the project, you can create a new one via File > New > General > Generic Application. Give the application any name, for example JMSTests and, when prompted for a project name and type, call the project JmsAdapterWriteWithXsd and select SOA as the project technology type. If you already have an application, continue below. Create a SOA Project Create a new project and choose SOA Tier > SOA Project as its type. Name it JmsAdapterWriteSchema. When prompted for the composite type, choose Composite With BPEL Process. When prompted for the BPEL Process, name it JmsAdapterWriteSchema too and choose Synchronous BPEL Process as the template. This will create a composite with a BPEL process and an exposed SOAP service. Double-click the BPEL process to open and begin editing it. You should see a simple BPEL process with a Receive and Reply activity. As we created a default process without an XML schema, the input and output variables are simple strings. Create an XSD File An XSD file is required later to define the message format to be passed to the JMS adapter. In this step, we create a simple XSD file, containing a string variable and add it to the project. First select the xsd item in the left-hand navigation tree to ensure that the XSD file is created under that item. Select File > New > General > XML and choose XML Schema. Call it stringPayload.xsd and when the editor opens, select the Source view. then replace the contents with the contents of the stringPayload.xsd example above and save the file. You should see it under the xsd item in the navigation tree. Create a JMS Adapter Partner Link We will create the JMS adapter as a service at the composite level. If it is not already open, double-click the composite.xml file in the navigator to open it. From the Component Palette, drag a JMS adapter over onto the right-hand swim lane, under External References. This will start the JMS Adapter Configuration Wizard. Use the following entries: Service Name: JmsAdapterWrite Oracle Enterprise Messaging Service (OEMS): Oracle Weblogic JMS AppServer Connection: Use an existing application server connection pointing to the WebLogic server on which the above JMS queue and connection factory were created. You can use the “+” button to create a connection directly from the wizard, if you do not already have one. This example uses a connection called jbevans-lx-PS5. Adapter Interface > Interface: Define from operation and schema (specified later) Operation Type: Produce Message Operation Name: Produce_message Destination Name: Press the Browse button, select Destination Type: Queues, then press Search. Wait for the list to populate, then select the entry for TestJMSQueue , which is the queue created earlier. JNDI Name: The JNDI name to use for the JMS connection. This is probably the most important step in this exercise and the most common source of error. This is the JNDI name of the JMS adapter’s connection pool created in the WebLogic Server and which points to the connection factory. JDeveloper does not verify the value entered here. If you enter a wrong value, the JMS adapter won’t find the queue and you will get an error message at runtime, which is very difficult to trace. In our example, this is the value eis/wls/TestQueue . (See the earlier step on how to create a JMS Adapter Connection Pool in WebLogic Server for details.) MessagesURL: We will use the XSD file we created earlier, stringPayload.xsd to define the message format for the JMS adapter. Press the magnifying glass icon to search for schema files. Expand Project Schema Files > stringPayload.xsd and select exampleElement: string. Press Next and Finish, which will complete the JMS Adapter configuration. Wire the BPEL Component to the JMS Adapter In this step, we link the BPEL process/component to the JMS adapter. From the composite.xml editor, drag the right-arrow icon from the BPEL process to the JMS adapter’s in-arrow. This completes the steps at the composite level. 4. Complete the BPEL Process Design Invoke the JMS Adapter Open the BPEL component by double-clicking it in the design view of the composite.xml, or open it from the project navigator by selecting the JmsAdapterWriteSchema.bpel file. This will display the BPEL process in the design view. You should see the JmsAdapterWrite partner link under one of the two swim lanes. We want it in the right-hand swim lane. If JDeveloper displays it in the left-hand lane, right-click it and choose Display > Move To Opposite Swim Lane. An Invoke activity is required in order to invoke the JMS adapter. Drag an Invoke activity between the Receive and Reply activities. Drag the right-hand arrow from the Invoke activity to the JMS adapter partner link. This will open the Invoke editor. The correct default values are entered automatically and are fine for our purposes. We only need to define the input variable to use for the JMS adapter. By pressing the green “+” symbol, a variable of the correct type can be auto-generated, for example with the name Invoke1_Produce_Message_InputVariable. Press OK after creating the variable. ( For some reason, while I was testing this, the JMS Adapter moved back to the left-hand swim lane again after this step. There is no harm in leaving it there, but I find it easier to follow if it is in the right-hand lane, because I kind-of think of the message coming in on the left and being routed through the right. But you can follow your personal preference here.) Assign Variables Drag an Assign activity between the Receive and Invoke activities. We will simply copy the input variable to the JMS adapter and, for completion, so the process has an output to print, again to the process’s output variable. Double-click the Assign activity and create two Copy rules: for the first, drag Variables > inputVariable > payload > client:process > client:input_string to Invoke1_Produce_Message_InputVariable > body > ns2:exampleElement for the second, drag the same input variable to outputVariable > payload > client:processResponse > client:result This will create two copy rules, similar to the following: Press OK. This completes the BPEL and Composite design. 5. Compile and Deploy the Composite We won’t go into too much detail on how to compile and deploy. In JDeveloper, compile the process by pressing the Make or Rebuild icons or by right-clicking the project name in the navigator and selecting Make... or Rebuild... If the compilation is successful, deploy it to the SOA server connection defined earlier. (Right-click the project name in the navigator, select Deploy to Application Server, choose the application server connection, choose the partition on the server (usually default) and press Finish. You should see the message ---- Deployment finished. ---- in the Deployment frame, if the deployment was successful. 6. Test the Composite This is the exciting part. Open two tabs in your browser and log in to the WebLogic Administration Console in one tab and the Enterprise Manager 11g Fusion Middleware Control (EM) for your SOA installation in the other. We will use the Console to monitor the messages being written to the queue and the EM to execute the composite. In the Console, go to Services > Messaging > JMS Modules > TestJMSModule > TestJMSQueue > Monitoring. Note the number of messages under Messages Current. In the EM, go to SOA > soa-infra (soa_server1) > default (or wherever you deployed your composite to) and click on JmsAdapterWriteSchema [1.0], then press the Test button. Under Input Arguments, enter any string into the text input field for the payload, for example Test Message then press Test Web Service. If the instance is successful you should see the same text in the Response message, “Test Message”. In the Console, refresh the Monitoring screen to confirm a new message has been written to the queue. Check the checkbox and press Show Messages. Click on the newest message and view its contents. They should include the full XML of the entered payload. 7. Troubleshooting If you get an exception similar to the following at runtime ... BINDING.JCA-12510 JCA Resource Adapter location error. Unable to locate the JCA Resource Adapter via .jca binding file element The JCA Binding Component is unable to startup the Resource Adapter specified in the element: location='eis/wls/QueueTest'. The reason for this is most likely that either 1) the Resource Adapters RAR file has not been deployed successfully to the WebLogic Application server or 2) the '' element in weblogic-ra.xml has not been set to eis/wls/QueueTest. In the last case you will have to add a new WebLogic JCA connection factory (deploy a RAR). Please correct this and then restart the Application Server at oracle.integration.platform.blocks.adapter.fw.AdapterBindingException. createJndiLookupException(AdapterBindingException.java:130) at oracle.integration.platform.blocks.adapter.fw.jca.cci. JCAConnectionManager$JCAConnectionPool.createJCAConnectionFactory (JCAConnectionManager.java:1387) at oracle.integration.platform.blocks.adapter.fw.jca.cci. JCAConnectionManager$JCAConnectionPool.newPoolObject (JCAConnectionManager.java:1285) ... then this is very likely due to an incorrect JNDI name entered for the JMS Connection in the JMS Adapter Wizard. Recheck those steps. The error message prints the name of the JNDI name used. In this example, it was incorrectly entered as eis/wls/QueueTest instead of eis/wls/TestQueue. This concludes this example. Best regards John-Brown Evans Oracle Technology Proactive Support Delivery

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  • JMS Step 7 - How to Write to an AQ JMS (Advanced Queueing JMS) Queue from a BPEL Process

    - by John-Brown.Evans
    JMS Step 7 - How to Write to an AQ JMS (Advanced Queueing JMS) Queue from a BPEL Process ol{margin:0;padding:0} .jblist{list-style-type:disc;margin:0;padding:0;padding-left:0pt;margin-left:36pt} .c4_7{vertical-align:top;width:468pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt} .c3_7{vertical-align:top;width:234pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:0pt 5pt 0pt 5pt} .c6_7{vertical-align:top;width:156pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt} .c16_7{background-color:#ffffff;padding:0pt 0pt 0pt 0pt} .c0_7{height:11pt;direction:ltr} .c9_7{color:#1155cc;text-decoration:underline} .c17_7{color:inherit;text-decoration:inherit} .c5_7{direction:ltr} .c18_7{background-color:#ffff00} .c2_7{background-color:#f3f3f3} .c14_7{height:0pt} .c8_7{text-indent:36pt} .c11_7{text-align:center} .c7_7{font-style:italic} .c1_7{font-family:"Courier New"} .c13_7{line-height:1.0} .c15_7{border-collapse:collapse} .c12_7{font-weight:bold} .c10_7{font-size:8pt} .title{padding-top:24pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#000000;font-size:36pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:bold;padding-bottom:6pt} .subtitle{padding-top:18pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666666;font-style:italic;font-size:24pt;font-family:"Georgia";padding-bottom:4pt} li{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial"} p{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;margin:0;font-family:"Arial"} h1{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:24pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h2{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:18pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h3{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:14pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h4{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:12pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h5{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:11pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h6{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} This post continues the series of JMS articles which demonstrate how to use JMS queues in a SOA context. The previous posts were: JMS Step 1 - How to Create a Simple JMS Queue in Weblogic Server 11g JMS Step 2 - Using the QueueSend.java Sample Program to Send a Message to a JMS Queue JMS Step 3 - Using the QueueReceive.java Sample Program to Read a Message from a JMS Queue JMS Step 4 - How to Create an 11g BPEL Process Which Writes a Message Based on an XML Schema to a JMS Queue JMS Step 5 - How to Create an 11g BPEL Process Which Reads a Message Based on an XML Schema from a JMS Queue JMS Step 6 - How to Set Up an AQ JMS (Advanced Queueing JMS) for SOA Purposes This example demonstrates how to write a simple message to an Oracle AQ via the the WebLogic AQ JMS functionality from a BPEL process and a JMS adapter. If you have not yet reviewed the previous posts, please do so first, especially the JMS Step 6 post, as this one references objects created there. 1. Recap and Prerequisites In the previous example, we created an Oracle Advanced Queue (AQ) and some related JMS objects in WebLogic Server to be able to access it via JMS. Here are the objects which were created and their names and JNDI names: Database Objects Name Type AQJMSUSER Database User MyQueueTable Advanced Queue (AQ) Table UserQueue Advanced Queue WebLogic Server Objects Object Name Type JNDI Name aqjmsuserDataSource Data Source jdbc/aqjmsuserDataSource AqJmsModule JMS System Module AqJmsForeignServer JMS Foreign Server AqJmsForeignServerConnectionFactory JMS Foreign Server Connection Factory AqJmsForeignServerConnectionFactory AqJmsForeignDestination AQ JMS Foreign Destination queue/USERQUEUE eis/aqjms/UserQueue Connection Pool eis/aqjms/UserQueue 2 . Create a BPEL Composite with a JMS Adapter Partner Link This step requires that you have a valid Application Server Connection defined in JDeveloper, pointing to the application server on which you created the JMS Queue and Connection Factory. You can create this connection in JDeveloper under the Application Server Navigator. Give it any name and be sure to test the connection before completing it. This sample will write a simple XML message to the AQ JMS queue via the JMS adapter, based on the following XSD file, which consists of a single string element: stringPayload.xsd <?xml version="1.0" encoding="windows-1252" ?> <xsd:schema xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"                xmlns="http://www.example.org"                targetNamespace="http://www.example.org"                elementFormDefault="qualified">  <xsd:element name="exampleElement" type="xsd:string">  </xsd:element> </xsd:schema> The following steps are all executed in JDeveloper. The SOA project will be created inside a JDeveloper Application. If you do not already have an application to contain the project, you can create a new one via File > New > General > Generic Application. Give the application any name, for example JMSTests and, when prompted for a project name and type, call the project   JmsAdapterWriteAqJms  and select SOA as the project technology type. If you already have an application, continue below. Create a SOA Project Create a new project and select SOA Tier > SOA Project as its type. Name it JmsAdapterWriteAqJms . When prompted for the composite type, choose Composite With BPEL Process. When prompted for the BPEL Process, name it JmsAdapterWriteAqJms too and choose Synchronous BPEL Process as the template. This will create a composite with a BPEL process and an exposed SOAP service. Double-click the BPEL process to open and begin editing it. You should see a simple BPEL process with a Receive and Reply activity. As we created a default process without an XML schema, the input and output variables are simple strings. Create an XSD File An XSD file is required later to define the message format to be passed to the JMS adapter. In this step, we create a simple XSD file, containing a string variable and add it to the project. First select the xsd item in the left-hand navigation tree to ensure that the XSD file is created under that item. Select File > New > General > XML and choose XML Schema. Call it stringPayload.xsd  and when the editor opens, select the Source view. then replace the contents with the contents of the stringPayload.xsd example above and save the file. You should see it under the XSD item in the navigation tree. Create a JMS Adapter Partner Link We will create the JMS adapter as a service at the composite level. If it is not already open, double-click the composite.xml file in the navigator to open it. From the Component Palette, drag a JMS adapter over onto the right-hand swim lane, under External References. This will start the JMS Adapter Configuration Wizard. Use the following entries: Service Name: JmsAdapterWrite Oracle Enterprise Messaging Service (OEMS): Oracle Advanced Queueing AppServer Connection: Use an existing application server connection pointing to the WebLogic server on which the connection factory created earlier is located. You can use the “+” button to create a connection directly from the wizard, if you do not already have one. Adapter Interface > Interface: Define from operation and schema (specified later) Operation Type: Produce Message Operation Name: Produce_message Produce Operation Parameters Destination Name: Wait for the list to populate. (Only foreign servers are listed here, because Oracle Advanced Queuing was selected earlier, in step 3) .         Select the foreign server destination created earlier, AqJmsForeignDestination (queue) . This will automatically populate the Destination Name field with the name of the foreign destination, queue/USERQUEUE . JNDI Name: The JNDI name to use for the JMS connection. This is the JNDI name of the connection pool created in the WebLogic Server.JDeveloper does not verify the value entered here. If you enter a wrong value, the JMS adapter won’t find the queue and you will get an error message at runtime. In our example, this is the value eis/aqjms/UserQueue Messages URL: We will use the XSD file we created earlier, stringPayload.xsd to define the message format for the JMS adapter. Press the magnifying glass icon to search for schema files. Expand Project Schema Files > stringPayload.xsd and select exampleElement : string . Press Next and Finish, which will complete the JMS Adapter configuration. Wire the BPEL Component to the JMS Adapter In this step, we link the BPEL process/component to the JMS adapter. From the composite.xml editor, drag the right-arrow icon from the BPEL process to the JMS adapter’s in-arrow.   This completes the steps at the composite level. 3. Complete the BPEL Process Design Invoke the JMS Adapter Open the BPEL component by double-clicking it in the design view of the composite.xml. This will display the BPEL process in the design view. You should see the JmsAdapterWrite partner link under one of the two swim lanes. We want it in the right-hand swim lane. If JDeveloper displays it in the left-hand lane, right-click it and choose Display > Move To Opposite Swim Lane. An Invoke activity is required in order to invoke the JMS adapter. Drag an Invoke activity between the Receive and Reply activities. Drag the right-hand arrow from the Invoke activity to the JMS adapter partner link. This will open the Invoke editor. The correct default values are entered automatically and are fine for our purposes. We only need to define the input variable to use for the JMS adapter. By pressing the green “+” symbol, a variable of the correct type can be auto-generated, for example with the name Invoke1_Produce_Message_InputVariable. Press OK after creating the variable. Assign Variables Drag an Assign activity between the Receive and Invoke activities. We will simply copy the input variable to the JMS adapter and, for completion, so the process has an output to print, again to the process’s output variable. Double-click the Assign activity and create two Copy rules: for the first, drag Variables > inputVariable > payload > client:process > client:input_string to Invoke1_Produce_Message_InputVariable > body > ns2:exampleElement for the second, drag the same input variable to outputVariable > payload > client:processResponse > client:result This will create two copy rules, similar to the following: Press OK. This completes the BPEL and Composite design. 4. Compile and Deploy the Composite Compile the process by pressing the Make or Rebuild icons or by right-clicking the project name in the navigator and selecting Make... or Rebuild... If the compilation is successful, deploy it to the SOA server connection defined earlier. (Right-click the project name in the navigator, select Deploy to Application Server, choose the application server connection, choose the partition on the server (usually default) and press Finish. You should see the message ----  Deployment finished.  ---- in the Deployment frame, if the deployment was successful. 5. Test the Composite Execute a Test Instance In a browser, log in to the Enterprise Manager 11g Fusion Middleware Control (EM) for your SOA installation. Navigate to SOA > soa-infra (soa_server1) > default (or wherever you deployed your composite) and click on  JmsAdapterWriteAqJms [1.0] , then press the Test button. Enter any string into the text input field, for example “Test message from JmsAdapterWriteAqJms” then press Test Web Service. If the instance is successful, you should see the same text you entered in the Response payload frame. Monitor the Advanced Queue The test message will be written to the advanced queue created at the top of this sample. To confirm it, log in to the database as AQJMSUSER and query the MYQUEUETABLE database table. For example, from a shell window with SQL*Plus sqlplus aqjmsuser/aqjmsuser SQL> SELECT user_data FROM myqueuetable; which will display the message contents, for example Similarly, you can use the JDeveloper Database Navigator to view the contents. Use a database connection to the AQJMSUSER and in the navigator, expand Queues Tables and select MYQUEUETABLE. Select the Data tab and scroll to the USER_DATA column to view its contents. This concludes this example. The following post will be the last one in this series. In it, we will learn how to read the message we just wrote using a BPEL process and AQ JMS. Best regards John-Brown Evans Oracle Technology Proactive Support Delivery

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  • Extended JMS Support

    - by ACShorten
    In a previous post I discussed the real time JMS integration we added in FW4.1 and also as patches for FW2.2. There are some additional aspects of this integration I did not mention which may be of interest: JMS Topic Support - In the post I concentrated on talking about JMS Queue support but failed to mention that the MDB and outgoing real time JMS also supports JMS Topics. JMS Queues are typically used for point to point decoupled integration and JMS Topics are used for hub integration that uses Publish and Subscribe. JMS Selector Support - By default the MDB will process every message from a JMS resource (Queue or Topic). If you want to alter this behaviour to selectively filter JMS messages then you can use JMS Selectors to specify the conditions for the MDB to selectively process JMS messages based upon conditions. JMS Selectors allow filters to be specified on elements in the JMS Header and JMS Message Properties using SQL like syntax. Note: JMS Selectors do not support filters on the body elements. JMS Header Support - It is possible to place custom information in the JMS Header and JMS Message Properties for outgoing messages (so that other applications can use JMS selectors if necessary as well). This is only available when installing Patches 11888040 (FW4.1) and 11850795 (FW2.2). These facilities coupled with the JMS facilities described in the previous posts gives the product integration capabilities in JMS which can be used with configuration rather than coding. Of course, the JMS facility I have described can also be used in conjunction with SOA Suite to provide greater levels of traceability and management.

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  • JMS Step 5 - How to Create an 11g BPEL Process Which Reads a Message Based on an XML Schema from a JMS Queue

    - by John-Brown.Evans
    JMS Step 5 - How to Create an 11g BPEL Process Which Reads a Message Based on an XML Schema from a JMS Queue .jblist{list-style-type:disc;margin:0;padding:0;padding-left:0pt;margin-left:36pt} ol{margin:0;padding:0} .c12_5{vertical-align:top;width:468pt;border-style:solid;background-color:#f3f3f3;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt} .c8_5{vertical-align:top;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 0pt 5pt} .c10_5{vertical-align:top;width:207pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt} .c14_5{vertical-align:top;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:0pt 5pt 0pt 5pt} .c21_5{background-color:#ffffff} .c18_5{color:#1155cc;text-decoration:underline} .c16_5{color:#666666;font-size:12pt} .c5_5{background-color:#f3f3f3;font-weight:bold} .c19_5{color:inherit;text-decoration:inherit} .c3_5{height:11pt;text-align:center} .c11_5{font-weight:bold} .c20_5{background-color:#00ff00} .c6_5{font-style:italic} .c4_5{height:11pt} .c17_5{background-color:#ffff00} .c0_5{direction:ltr} .c7_5{font-family:"Courier New"} .c2_5{border-collapse:collapse} .c1_5{line-height:1.0} .c13_5{background-color:#f3f3f3} .c15_5{height:0pt} .c9_5{text-align:center} .title{padding-top:24pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#000000;font-size:36pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:bold;padding-bottom:6pt} .subtitle{padding-top:18pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666666;font-style:italic;font-size:24pt;font-family:"Georgia";padding-bottom:4pt} li{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial"} p{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;margin:0;font-family:"Arial"} h1{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:24pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h2{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:18pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h3{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:14pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h4{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:12pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h5{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:11pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h6{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} Welcome to another post in the series of blogs which demonstrates how to use JMS queues in a SOA context. The previous posts were: JMS Step 1 - How to Create a Simple JMS Queue in Weblogic Server 11g JMS Step 2 - Using the QueueSend.java Sample Program to Send a Message to a JMS Queue JMS Step 3 - Using the QueueReceive.java Sample Program to Read a Message from a JMS Queue JMS Step 4 - How to Create an 11g BPEL Process Which Writes a Message Based on an XML Schema to a JMS Queue Today we will create a BPEL process which will read (dequeue) the message from the JMS queue, which we enqueued in the last example. The JMS adapter will dequeue the full XML payload from the queue. 1. Recap and Prerequisites In the previous examples, we created a JMS Queue, a Connection Factory and a Connection Pool in the WebLogic Server Console. Then we designed and deployed a BPEL composite, which took a simple XML payload and enqueued it to the JMS queue. In this example, we will read that same message from the queue, using a JMS adapter and a BPEL process. As many of the configuration steps required to read from that queue were done in the previous samples, this one will concentrate on the new steps. A summary of the required objects is listed below. To find out how to create them please see the previous samples. They also include instructions on how to verify the objects are set up correctly. WebLogic Server Objects Object Name Type JNDI Name TestConnectionFactory Connection Factory jms/TestConnectionFactory TestJMSQueue JMS Queue jms/TestJMSQueue eis/wls/TestQueue Connection Pool eis/wls/TestQueue Schema XSD File The following XSD file is used for the message format. It was created in the previous example and will be copied to the new process. stringPayload.xsd <?xml version="1.0" encoding="windows-1252" ?> <xsd:schema xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"                 xmlns="http://www.example.org"                 targetNamespace="http://www.example.org"                 elementFormDefault="qualified">   <xsd:element name="exampleElement" type="xsd:string">   </xsd:element> </xsd:schema> JMS Message After executing the previous samples, the following XML message should be in the JMS queue located at jms/TestJMSQueue: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?><exampleElement xmlns="http://www.example.org">Test Message</exampleElement> JDeveloper Connection You will need a valid Application Server Connection in JDeveloper pointing to the SOA server which the process will be deployed to. 2. Create a BPEL Composite with a JMS Adapter Partner Link In the previous example, we created a composite in JDeveloper called JmsAdapterWriteSchema. In this one, we will create a new composite called JmsAdapterReadSchema. There are probably many ways of incorporating a JMS adapter into a SOA composite for incoming messages. One way is design the process in such a way that the adapter polls for new messages and when it dequeues one, initiates a SOA or BPEL instance. This is possibly the most common use case. Other use cases include mid-flow adapters, which are activated from within the BPEL process. In this example we will use a polling adapter, because it is the most simple to set up and demonstrate. But it has one disadvantage as a demonstrative model. When a polling adapter is active, it will dequeue all messages as soon as they reach the queue. This makes it difficult to monitor messages we are writing to the queue, because they will disappear from the queue as soon as they have been enqueued. To work around this, we will shut down the composite after deploying it and restart it as required. (Another solution for this would be to pause the consumption for the queue and resume consumption again if needed. This can be done in the WLS console JMS-Modules -> queue -> Control -> Consumption -> Pause/Resume.) We will model the composite as a one-way incoming process. Usually, a BPEL process will do something useful with the message after receiving it, such as passing it to a database or file adapter, a human workflow or external web service. But we only want to demonstrate how to dequeue a JMS message using BPEL and a JMS adapter, so we won’t complicate the design with further activities. However, we do want to be able to verify that we have read the message correctly, so the BPEL process will include a small piece of embedded java code, which will print the message to standard output, so we can view it in the SOA server’s log file. Alternatively, you can view the instance in the Enterprise Manager and verify the message. The following steps are all executed in JDeveloper. Create the project in the same JDeveloper application used for the previous examples or create a new one. Create a SOA Project Create a new project and choose SOA Tier > SOA Project as its type. Name it JmsAdapterReadSchema. When prompted for the composite type, choose Empty Composite. Create a JMS Adapter Partner Link In the composite editor, drag a JMS adapter over from the Component Palette to the left-hand swim lane, under Exposed Services. This will start the JMS Adapter Configuration Wizard. Use the following entries: Service Name: JmsAdapterRead Oracle Enterprise Messaging Service (OEMS): Oracle WebLogic JMS AppServer Connection: Use an application server connection pointing to the WebLogic server on which the JMS queue and connection factory mentioned under Prerequisites above are located. Adapter Interface > Interface: Define from operation and schema (specified later) Operation Type: Consume Message Operation Name: Consume_message Consume Operation Parameters Destination Name: Press the Browse button, select Destination Type: Queues, then press Search. Wait for the list to populate, then select the entry for TestJMSQueue , which is the queue created in a previous example. JNDI Name: The JNDI name to use for the JMS connection. As in the previous example, this is probably the most common source of error. This is the JNDI name of the JMS adapter’s connection pool created in the WebLogic Server and which points to the connection factory. JDeveloper does not verify the value entered here. If you enter a wrong value, the JMS adapter won’t find the queue and you will get an error message at runtime, which is very difficult to trace. In our example, this is the value eis/wls/TestQueue . (See the earlier step on how to create a JMS Adapter Connection Pool in WebLogic Server for details.) Messages/Message SchemaURL: We will use the XSD file created during the previous example, in the JmsAdapterWriteSchema project to define the format for the incoming message payload and, at the same time, demonstrate how to import an existing XSD file into a JDeveloper project. Press the magnifying glass icon to search for schema files. In the Type Chooser, press the Import Schema File button. Select the magnifying glass next to URL to search for schema files. Navigate to the location of the JmsAdapterWriteSchema project > xsd and select the stringPayload.xsd file. Check the “Copy to Project” checkbox, press OK and confirm the following Localize Files popup. Now that the XSD file has been copied to the local project, it can be selected from the project’s schema files. Expand Project Schema Files > stringPayload.xsd and select exampleElement: string . Press Next and Finish, which will complete the JMS Adapter configuration.Save the project. Create a BPEL Component Drag a BPEL Process from the Component Palette (Service Components) to the Components section of the composite designer. Name it JmsAdapterReadSchema and select Template: Define Service Later and press OK. Wire the JMS Adapter to the BPEL Component Now wire the JMS adapter to the BPEL process, by dragging the arrow from the adapter to the BPEL process. A Transaction Properties popup will be displayed. Set the delivery mode to async.persist. This completes the steps at the composite level. 3 . Complete the BPEL Process Design Invoke the BPEL Flow via the JMS Adapter Open the BPEL component by double-clicking it in the design view of the composite.xml, or open it from the project navigator by selecting the JmsAdapterReadSchema.bpel file. This will display the BPEL process in the design view. You should see the JmsAdapterRead partner link in the left-hand swim lane. Drag a Receive activity onto the BPEL flow diagram, then drag a wire (left-hand yellow arrow) from it to the JMS adapter. This will open the Receive activity editor. Auto-generate the variable by pressing the green “+” button and check the “Create Instance” checkbox. This will result in a BPEL instance being created when a new JMS message is received. At this point it would actually be OK to compile and deploy the composite and it would pick up any messages from the JMS queue. In fact, you can do that to test it, if you like. But it is very rudimentary and would not be doing anything useful with the message. Also, you could only verify the actual message payload by looking at the instance’s flow in the Enterprise Manager. There are various other possibilities; we could pass the message to another web service, write it to a file using a file adapter or to a database via a database adapter etc. But these will all introduce unnecessary complications to our sample. So, to keep it simple, we will add a small piece of Java code to the BPEL process which will write the payload to standard output. This will be written to the server’s log file, which will be easy to monitor. Add a Java Embedding Activity First get the full name of the process’s input variable, as this will be needed for the Java code. Go to the Structure pane and expand Variables > Process > Variables. Then expand the input variable, for example, "Receive1_Consume_Message_InputVariable > body > ns2:exampleElement”, and note variable’s name and path, if they are different from this one. Drag a Java Embedding activity from the Component Palette (Oracle Extensions) to the BPEL flow, after the Receive activity, then open it to edit. Delete the example code and replace it with the following, replacing the variable parts with those in your sample, if necessary.: System.out.println("JmsAdapterReadSchema process picked up a message"); oracle.xml.parser.v2.XMLElement inputPayload =    (oracle.xml.parser.v2.XMLElement)getVariableData(                           "Receive1_Consume_Message_InputVariable",                           "body",                           "/ns2:exampleElement");   String inputString = inputPayload.getFirstChild().getNodeValue(); System.out.println("Input String is " + inputPayload.getFirstChild().getNodeValue()); Tip. If you are not sure of the exact syntax of the input variable, create an Assign activity in the BPEL process and copy the variable to another, temporary one. Then check the syntax created by the BPEL designer. This completes the BPEL process design in JDeveloper. Save, compile and deploy the process to the SOA server. 3. Test the Composite Shut Down the JmsAdapterReadSchema Composite After deploying the JmsAdapterReadSchema composite to the SOA server it is automatically activated. If there are already any messages in the queue, the adapter will begin polling them. To ease the testing process, we will deactivate the process first Log in to the Enterprise Manager (Fusion Middleware Control) and navigate to SOA > soa-infra (soa_server1) > default (or wherever you deployed your composite to) and click on JmsAdapterReadSchema [1.0] . Press the Shut Down button to disable the composite and confirm the following popup. Monitor Messages in the JMS Queue In a separate browser window, log in to the WebLogic Server Console and navigate to Services > Messaging > JMS Modules > TestJMSModule > TestJMSQueue > Monitoring. This is the location of the JMS queue we created in an earlier sample (see the prerequisites section of this sample). Check whether there are any messages already in the queue. If so, you can dequeue them using the QueueReceive Java program created in an earlier sample. This will ensure that the queue is empty and doesn’t contain any messages in the wrong format, which would cause the JmsAdapterReadSchema to fail. Send a Test Message In the Enterprise Manager, navigate to the JmsAdapterWriteSchema created earlier, press Test and send a test message, for example “Message from JmsAdapterWriteSchema”. Confirm that the message was written correctly to the queue by verifying it via the queue monitor in the WLS Console. Monitor the SOA Server’s Output A program deployed on the SOA server will write its standard output to the terminal window in which the server was started, unless this has been redirected to somewhere else, for example to a file. If it has not been redirected, go to the terminal session in which the server was started, otherwise open and monitor the file to which it was redirected. Re-Enable the JmsAdapterReadSchema Composite In the Enterprise Manager, navigate to the JmsAdapterReadSchema composite again and press Start Up to re-enable it. This should cause the JMS adapter to dequeue the test message and the following output should be written to the server’s standard output: JmsAdapterReadSchema process picked up a message. Input String is Message from JmsAdapterWriteSchema Note that you can also monitor the payload received by the process, by navigating to the the JmsAdapterReadSchema’s Instances tab in the Enterprise Manager. Then select the latest instance and view the flow of the BPEL component. The Receive activity will contain and display the dequeued message too. 4 . Troubleshooting This sample demonstrates how to dequeue an XML JMS message using a BPEL process and no additional functionality. For example, it doesn’t contain any error handling. Therefore, any errors in the payload will result in exceptions being written to the log file or standard output. If you get any errors related to the payload, such as Message handle error ... ORABPEL-09500 ... XPath expression failed to execute. An error occurs while processing the XPath expression; the expression is /ns2:exampleElement. ... etc. check that the variable used in the Java embedding part of the process was entered correctly. Possibly follow the tip mentioned in previous section. If this doesn’t help, you can delete the Java embedding part and simply verify the message via the flow diagram in the Enterprise Manager. Or use a different method, such as writing it to a file via a file adapter. This concludes this example. In the next post, we will begin with an AQ JMS example, which uses JMS to write to an Advanced Queue stored in the database. Best regards John-Brown Evans Oracle Technology Proactive Support Delivery

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  • JMS have javax.jms.InvalidDestinationException when client stop working

    - by Tran
    I use JMS for sending requests from a client to a server. My client sends a request to the server. While the server is working with my request, my client stops (network problem) before the server finishes. When the server is finished, it'll return to the client, but the server can't see the client which sent the request to server, at which point, the server will return an exception in log file. The exception is : javax.jms.InvalidDestinationException: Cannot publish to a deleted Destination: temp-queue://ID:PC0092-49463-1344231871819-0:0:9 [^] My question is: what do I need to do in this case? Can I catch or disable this exception? And how can I do it? (Sorry, If my english is not good.)

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  • JMS Step 3 - Using the QueueReceive.java Sample Program to Read a Message from a JMS Queue

    - by John-Brown.Evans
    JMS Step 3 - Using the QueueReceive.java Sample Program to Read a Message from a JMS Queue ol{margin:0;padding:0} .c18_3{vertical-align:top;width:487.3pt;border-style:solid;background-color:#f3f3f3;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:0pt 5pt 0pt 5pt} .c20_3{vertical-align:top;width:487.3pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#ffffff;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt} .c19_3{background-color:#ffffff} .c17_3{list-style-type:circle;margin:0;padding:0} .c12_3{list-style-type:disc;margin:0;padding:0} .c6_3{font-style:italic;font-weight:bold} .c10_3{color:inherit;text-decoration:inherit} .c1_3{font-size:10pt;font-family:"Courier New"} .c2_3{line-height:1.0;direction:ltr} .c9_3{padding-left:0pt;margin-left:72pt} .c15_3{padding-left:0pt;margin-left:36pt} .c3_3{color:#1155cc;text-decoration:underline} .c5_3{height:11pt} .c14_3{border-collapse:collapse} .c7_3{font-family:"Courier New"} .c0_3{background-color:#ffff00} .c16_3{font-size:18pt} .c8_3{font-weight:bold} .c11_3{font-size:24pt} .c13_3{font-style:italic} .c4_3{direction:ltr} .title{padding-top:24pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#000000;font-size:36pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:bold;padding-bottom:6pt}.subtitle{padding-top:18pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666666;font-style:italic;font-size:24pt;font-family:"Georgia";padding-bottom:4pt} li{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial"} p{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;margin:0;font-family:"Arial"} h1{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:24pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h2{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:18pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h3{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:14pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h4{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:12pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h5{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:11pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h6{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} This post continues the series of JMS articles which demonstrate how to use JMS queues in a SOA context. In the first post, JMS Step 1 - How to Create a Simple JMS Queue in Weblogic Server 11g we looked at how to create a JMS queue and its dependent objects in WebLogic Server. In the previous post, JMS Step 2 - Using the QueueSend.java Sample Program to Send a Message to a JMS Queue I showed how to write a message to that JMS queue using the QueueSend.java sample program. In this article, we will use a similar sample, the QueueReceive.java program to read the message from that queue. Please review the previous posts if you have not already done so, as they contain prerequisites for executing the sample in this article. 1. Source code The following java code will be used to read the message(s) from the JMS queue. As with the previous example, it is based on a sample program shipped with the WebLogic Server installation. The sample is not installed by default, but needs to be installed manually using the WebLogic Server Custom Installation option, together with many, other useful samples. You can either copy-paste the following code into your editor, or install all the samples. The knowledge base article in My Oracle Support: How To Install WebLogic Server and JMS Samples in WLS 10.3.x (Doc ID 1499719.1) describes how to install the samples. QueueReceive.java package examples.jms.queue; import java.util.Hashtable; import javax.jms.*; import javax.naming.Context; import javax.naming.InitialContext; import javax.naming.NamingException; /** * This example shows how to establish a connection to * and receive messages from a JMS queue. The classes in this * package operate on the same JMS queue. Run the classes together to * witness messages being sent and received, and to browse the queue * for messages. This class is used to receive and remove messages * from the queue. * * @author Copyright (c) 1999-2005 by BEA Systems, Inc. All Rights Reserved. */ public class QueueReceive implements MessageListener { // Defines the JNDI context factory. public final static String JNDI_FACTORY="weblogic.jndi.WLInitialContextFactory"; // Defines the JMS connection factory for the queue. public final static String JMS_FACTORY="jms/TestConnectionFactory"; // Defines the queue. public final static String QUEUE="jms/TestJMSQueue"; private QueueConnectionFactory qconFactory; private QueueConnection qcon; private QueueSession qsession; private QueueReceiver qreceiver; private Queue queue; private boolean quit = false; /** * Message listener interface. * @param msg message */ public void onMessage(Message msg) { try { String msgText; if (msg instanceof TextMessage) { msgText = ((TextMessage)msg).getText(); } else { msgText = msg.toString(); } System.out.println("Message Received: "+ msgText ); if (msgText.equalsIgnoreCase("quit")) { synchronized(this) { quit = true; this.notifyAll(); // Notify main thread to quit } } } catch (JMSException jmse) { System.err.println("An exception occurred: "+jmse.getMessage()); } } /** * Creates all the necessary objects for receiving * messages from a JMS queue. * * @param ctx JNDI initial context * @param queueName name of queue * @exception NamingException if operation cannot be performed * @exception JMSException if JMS fails to initialize due to internal error */ public void init(Context ctx, String queueName) throws NamingException, JMSException { qconFactory = (QueueConnectionFactory) ctx.lookup(JMS_FACTORY); qcon = qconFactory.createQueueConnection(); qsession = qcon.createQueueSession(false, Session.AUTO_ACKNOWLEDGE); queue = (Queue) ctx.lookup(queueName); qreceiver = qsession.createReceiver(queue); qreceiver.setMessageListener(this); qcon.start(); } /** * Closes JMS objects. * @exception JMSException if JMS fails to close objects due to internal error */ public void close()throws JMSException { qreceiver.close(); qsession.close(); qcon.close(); } /** * main() method. * * @param args WebLogic Server URL * @exception Exception if execution fails */ public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception { if (args.length != 1) { System.out.println("Usage: java examples.jms.queue.QueueReceive WebLogicURL"); return; } InitialContext ic = getInitialContext(args[0]); QueueReceive qr = new QueueReceive(); qr.init(ic, QUEUE); System.out.println( "JMS Ready To Receive Messages (To quit, send a \"quit\" message)."); // Wait until a "quit" message has been received. synchronized(qr) { while (! qr.quit) { try { qr.wait(); } catch (InterruptedException ie) {} } } qr.close(); } private static InitialContext getInitialContext(String url) throws NamingException { Hashtable env = new Hashtable(); env.put(Context.INITIAL_CONTEXT_FACTORY, JNDI_FACTORY); env.put(Context.PROVIDER_URL, url); return new InitialContext(env); } } 2. How to Use This Class 2.1 From the file system on Linux This section describes how to use the class from the file system of a WebLogic Server installation. Log in to a machine with a WebLogic Server installation and create a directory to contain the source and code matching the package name, e.g. span$HOME/examples/jms/queue. Copy the above QueueReceive.java file to this directory. Set the CLASSPATH and environment to match the WebLogic server environment. Go to $MIDDLEWARE_HOME/user_projects/domains/base_domain/bin  and execute . ./setDomainEnv.sh Collect the following information required to run the script: The JNDI name of the JMS queue to use In the WebLogic server console > Services > Messaging > JMS Modules > Module name, (e.g. TestJMSModule) > JMS queue name, (e.g. TestJMSQueue) select the queue and note its JNDI name, e.g. jms/TestJMSQueue The JNDI name of the connection factory to use to connect to the queue Follow the same path as above to get the connection factory for the above queue, e.g. TestConnectionFactory and its JNDI name e.g. jms/TestConnectionFactory The URL and port of the WebLogic server running the above queue Check the JMS server for the above queue and the managed server it is targeted to, for example soa_server1. Now find the port this managed server is listening on, by looking at its entry under Environment > Servers in the WLS console, e.g. 8001 The URL for the server to be passed to the QueueReceive program will therefore be t3://host.domain:8001 e.g. t3://jbevans-lx.de.oracle.com:8001 Edit Queue Receive .java and enter the above queue name and connection factory respectively under ... public final static String JMS_FACTORY="jms/TestConnectionFactory"; ... public final static String QUEUE="jms/TestJMSQueue"; ... Compile Queue Receive .java using javac Queue Receive .java Go to the source’s top-level directory and execute it using java examples.jms.queue.Queue Receive   t3://jbevans-lx.de.oracle.com:8001 This will print a message that it is ready to receive messages or to send a “quit” message to end. The program will read all messages in the queue and print them to the standard output until it receives a message with the payload “quit”. 2.2 From JDeveloper The steps from JDeveloper are the same as those used for the previous program QueueSend.java, which is used to send a message to the queue. So we won't repeat them here. Please see the previous blog post at JMS Step 2 - Using the QueueSend.java Sample Program to Send a Message to a JMS Queue and apply the same steps in that example to the QueueReceive.java program. This concludes the example. In the following post we will create a BPEL process which writes a message based on an XML schema to the queue.

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  • JMS Step 2 - Using the QueueSend.java Sample Program to Send a Message to a JMS Queue

    - by John-Brown.Evans
    JMS Step 2 - Using the QueueSend.java Sample Program to Send a Message to a JMS Queue .c21_2{vertical-align:top;width:487.3pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt} .c15_2{vertical-align:top;width:487.3pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#ffffff;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt} .c0_2{padding-left:0pt;direction:ltr;margin-left:36pt} .c20_2{list-style-type:circle;margin:0;padding:0} .c10_2{list-style-type:disc;margin:0;padding:0} .c6_2{background-color:#ffffff} .c17_2{padding-left:0pt;margin-left:72pt} .c3_2{line-height:1.0;direction:ltr} .c1_2{font-size:10pt;font-family:"Courier New"} .c16_2{color:#1155cc;text-decoration:underline} .c13_2{color:inherit;text-decoration:inherit} .c7_2{background-color:#ffff00} .c9_2{border-collapse:collapse} .c2_2{font-family:"Courier New"} .c18_2{font-size:18pt} .c5_2{font-weight:bold} .c19_2{color:#ff0000} .c12_2{background-color:#f3f3f3;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;} .c14_2{font-size:24pt} .c8_2{direction:ltr;background-color:#ffffff} .c11_2{font-style:italic} .c4_2{height:11pt} .title{padding-top:24pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#000000;font-size:36pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:bold;padding-bottom:6pt}.subtitle{padding-top:18pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666666;font-style:italic;font-size:24pt;font-family:"Georgia";padding-bottom:4pt} li{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial"} p{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;margin:0;font-family:"Arial"} h1{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:24pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal;padding-bottom:0pt} h2{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:18pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal;padding-bottom:0pt} h3{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:14pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal;padding-bottom:0pt} h4{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:12pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal;padding-bottom:0pt} h5{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:11pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal;padding-bottom:0pt} h6{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal;padding-bottom:0pt} This post is the second in a series of JMS articles which demonstrate how to use JMS queues in a SOA context. In the previous post JMS Step 1 - How to Create a Simple JMS Queue in Weblogic Server 11g I showed you how to create a JMS queue and its dependent objects in WebLogic Server. In this article, we will use a sample program to write a message to that queue. Please review the previous post if you have not created those objects yet, as they will be required later in this example. The previous post also includes useful background information and links to the Oracle documentation for addional research. The following post in this series will show how to read the message from the queue again. 1. Source code The following java code will be used to write a message to the JMS queue. It is based on a sample program provided with the WebLogic Server installation. The sample is not installed by default, but needs to be installed manually using the WebLogic Server Custom Installation option, together with many, other useful samples. You can either copy-paste the following code into your editor, or install all the samples. The knowledge base article in My Oracle Support: How To Install WebLogic Server and JMS Samples in WLS 10.3.x (Doc ID 1499719.1) describes how to install the samples. QueueSend.java package examples.jms.queue; import java.io.BufferedReader; import java.io.IOException; import java.io.InputStreamReader; import java.util.Hashtable; import javax.jms.*; import javax.naming.Context; import javax.naming.InitialContext; import javax.naming.NamingException; /** This example shows how to establish a connection * and send messages to the JMS queue. The classes in this * package operate on the same JMS queue. Run the classes together to * witness messages being sent and received, and to browse the queue * for messages. The class is used to send messages to the queue. * * @author Copyright (c) 1999-2005 by BEA Systems, Inc. All Rights Reserved. */ public class QueueSend { // Defines the JNDI context factory. public final static String JNDI_FACTORY="weblogic.jndi.WLInitialContextFactory"; // Defines the JMS context factory. public final static String JMS_FACTORY="jms/TestConnectionFactory"; // Defines the queue. public final static String QUEUE="jms/TestJMSQueue"; private QueueConnectionFactory qconFactory; private QueueConnection qcon; private QueueSession qsession; private QueueSender qsender; private Queue queue; private TextMessage msg; /** * Creates all the necessary objects for sending * messages to a JMS queue. * * @param ctx JNDI initial context * @param queueName name of queue * @exception NamingException if operation cannot be performed * @exception JMSException if JMS fails to initialize due to internal error */ public void init(Context ctx, String queueName) throws NamingException, JMSException { qconFactory = (QueueConnectionFactory) ctx.lookup(JMS_FACTORY); qcon = qconFactory.createQueueConnection(); qsession = qcon.createQueueSession(false, Session.AUTO_ACKNOWLEDGE); queue = (Queue) ctx.lookup(queueName); qsender = qsession.createSender(queue); msg = qsession.createTextMessage(); qcon.start(); } /** * Sends a message to a JMS queue. * * @param message message to be sent * @exception JMSException if JMS fails to send message due to internal error */ public void send(String message) throws JMSException { msg.setText(message); qsender.send(msg); } /** * Closes JMS objects. * @exception JMSException if JMS fails to close objects due to internal error */ public void close() throws JMSException { qsender.close(); qsession.close(); qcon.close(); } /** main() method. * * @param args WebLogic Server URL * @exception Exception if operation fails */ public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception { if (args.length != 1) { System.out.println("Usage: java examples.jms.queue.QueueSend WebLogicURL"); return; } InitialContext ic = getInitialContext(args[0]); QueueSend qs = new QueueSend(); qs.init(ic, QUEUE); readAndSend(qs); qs.close(); } private static void readAndSend(QueueSend qs) throws IOException, JMSException { BufferedReader msgStream = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in)); String line=null; boolean quitNow = false; do { System.out.print("Enter message (\"quit\" to quit): \n"); line = msgStream.readLine(); if (line != null && line.trim().length() != 0) { qs.send(line); System.out.println("JMS Message Sent: "+line+"\n"); quitNow = line.equalsIgnoreCase("quit"); } } while (! quitNow); } private static InitialContext getInitialContext(String url) throws NamingException { Hashtable env = new Hashtable(); env.put(Context.INITIAL_CONTEXT_FACTORY, JNDI_FACTORY); env.put(Context.PROVIDER_URL, url); return new InitialContext(env); } } 2. How to Use This Class 2.1 From the file system on UNIX/Linux Log in to a machine with a WebLogic installation and create a directory to contain the source and code matching the package name, e.g. $HOME/examples/jms/queue. Copy the above QueueSend.java file to this directory. Set the CLASSPATH and environment to match the WebLogic server environment. Go to $MIDDLEWARE_HOME/user_projects/domains/base_domain/bin  and execute . ./setDomainEnv.sh Collect the following information required to run the script: The JNDI name of a JMS queue to use In the Weblogic server console > Services > Messaging > JMS Modules > (Module name, e.g. TestJMSModule) > (JMS queue name, e.g. TestJMSQueue)Select the queue and note its JNDI name, e.g. jms/TestJMSQueue The JNDI name of a connection factory to connect to the queue Follow the same path as above to get the connection factory for the above queue, e.g. TestConnectionFactory and its JNDI namee.g. jms/TestConnectionFactory The URL and port of the WebLogic server running the above queue Check the JMS server for the above queue and the managed server it is targeted to, for example soa_server1. Now find the port this managed server is listening on, by looking at its entry under Environment > Servers in the WLS console, e.g. 8001 The URL for the server to be given to the QueueSend program in this example will therefore be t3://host.domain:8001 e.g. t3://jbevans-lx.de.oracle.com:8001 Edit QueueSend.java and enter the above queue name and connection factory respectively under ...public final static String  JMS_FACTORY=" jms/TestConnectionFactory "; ... public final static String QUEUE=" jms/TestJMSQueue "; ... Compile QueueSend.java using javac QueueSend.java Go to the source’s top-level directory and execute it using java examples.jms.queue.QueueSend t3://jbevans-lx.de.oracle.com:8001 This will prompt for a text input or “quit” to end. In the WLS console, go to the queue and select Monitoring to confirm that a new message was written to the queue. 2.2 From JDeveloper Create a new application in JDeveloper, called, for example JMSTests. When prompted for a project name, enter QueueSend and select Java as the technology Default Package = examples.jms.queue (but you can enter anything here as you will overwrite it in the code later). Leave the other values at their defaults. Press Finish Create a new Java class called QueueSend and use the default values This will create a file called QueueSend.java. Open QueueSend.java, if it is not already open and replace all its contents with the QueueSend java code listed above Some lines might have warnings due to unfound objects. These are due to missing libraries in the JDeveloper project. Add the following libraries to the JDeveloper project: right-click the QueueSend  project in the navigation menu and select Libraries and Classpath , then Add JAR/Directory  Go to the folder containing the JDeveloper installation and find/choose the file javax.jms_1.1.1.jar , e.g. at D:\oracle\jdev11116\modules\javax.jms_1.1.1.jar Do the same for the weblogic.jar file located, for example in D:\oracle\jdev11116\wlserver_10.3\server\lib\weblogic.jar Now you should be able to compile the project, for example by selecting the Make or Rebuild icons   If you try to execute the project, you will get a usage message, as it requires a parameter pointing to the WLS installation containing the JMS queue, for example t3://jbevans-lx.de.oracle.com:8001 . You can automatically pass this parameter to the program from JDeveloper by editing the project’s Run/Debug/Profile. Select the project properties, select Run/Debug/Profile and edit the Default run configuration and add the connection parameter to the Program Arguments field If you execute it again, you will see that it has passed the parameter to the start command If you get a ClassNotFoundException for the class weblogic.jndi.WLInitialContextFactory , then check that the weblogic.jar file was correctly added to the project in one of the earlier steps above. Set the values of JMS_FACTORY and QUEUE the same way as described above in the description of how to use this from a Linux file system, i.e. ...public final static String  JMS_FACTORY=" jms/TestConnectionFactory "; ... public final static String QUEUE=" jms/TestJMSQueue "; ... You need to make one more change to the project. If you execute it now, it will prompt for the payload for the JMS message, but you won’t be able to enter it by default in JDeveloper. You need to enable program input for the project first. Select the project’s properties, then Tool Settings, then check the Allow Program Input checkbox at the bottom and Save. Now when you execute the project, you will get a text entry field at the bottom into which you can enter the payload. You can enter multiple messages until you enter “quit”, which will cause the program to stop. The following screen shot shows the TestJMSQueue’s Monitoring page, after a message was sent to the queue: This concludes the sample. In the following post I will show you how to read the message from the queue again.

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  • JMS Adapter Step 0 : Configuring the WLS-JMS resources

    - by [email protected]
    Before getting started with the JMS Adapter, we must configure the connection factories/JMS queues on the WLS admin console. In particular, we will be required to follow these stepsCreate a connection factory. In our case, we will create a "XA Connection Factory". This step is mandatory if you need your JMS queues to participate in a global transaction. Create the WLS JMS QueuesCreating the connection factory:1) Login to the WLS Admin console. On my setup, the url looks like "http://localhost:7001/console".2) Select Services -> Messaging -> JMS Modules -> SOAJMSModule as shown below. We can also create a new JMS Module, but, I took the easier way out by selecting the SOAJMSModule. 3) Click on "New" as shown in order to create the Connection factory.4) Select "Connection Factory" radio button and click "Next".5) Enter the Connection Factory properties as shown and click on "Finish".6) Target the connection factory to your managed server and click on "Finish". 7) Now, go back and select the Connection Factory that you've just created (see Step 2 above) . Click on "Transactions" and enable XA and click on "Save".

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  • Weblogic JMS System Error

    - by Jeune
    We're getting a JMS error which we don't have a lot to go with: org.springframework.jms.UncategorizedJmsException: Uncategorized exception occured during JMS processing; nested exception is weblogic.jms.common.JMSException:[JMSClientExceptions:055039] A system error has occurred. The error is java.lang.NullPointerException; nested exception is java.lang.NullPointerException at com.pg.ecom.jms.service.ProducerServices.SendMessageSync(ProducerServices.java:131) at com.pg.ecom.jms.service.ProducerServices.SendMessageSync(ProducerServices.java:115) at com.pg.ecom.jms.producer.FormsCRRProducer.sendMessage(FormsCRRProducer.java:56) at com.pg.ecom.cpgt.processruleagent.managerbean.forms.GenerateFormsManagerBean.useNewGetTemplateData(GenerateFormsManagerBean.java:522) at com.pg.ecom.cpgt.processruleagent.managerbean.forms.GenerateFormsManagerBean.doService(GenerateFormsManagerBean.java:114) at com.pg.ecom.fw.processcontainer.AbstractManagerBean.doServiceWrapper(AbstractManagerBean.java:175) at com.pg.ecom.fw.processcontainer.AbstractManagerBean.doServiceRequest(AbstractManagerBean.java:151) at com.pg.ecom.fw.processcontainer.AbstractServlet.doManagerBeanServiceAndPresentation(AbstractServlet.java:1911) at com.pg.ecom.cpgt.processunit.servlet.CportalParamServlet.doService(CportalParamServlet.java:107) at com.pg.ecom.fw.processcontainer.AbstractServlet.service(AbstractServlet.java:983) at javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet.service(HttpServlet.java:856) at weblogic.servlet.internal.StubSecurityHelper$ServletServiceAction.run(StubSecurityHelper.java:227) at weblogic.servlet.internal.StubSecurityHelper.invokeServlet(StubSecurityHelper.java:125) at weblogic.servlet.internal.ServletStubImpl.execute(ServletStubImpl.java:283) at weblogic.servlet.internal.TailFilter.doFilter(TailFilter.java:26) at weblogic.servlet.internal.FilterChainImpl.doFilter(FilterChainImpl.java:42) at com.pg.ecom.cpgt.processunit.filter.UploadMultipartFilter.doFilter(UploadMultipartFilter.java:28) at weblogic.servlet.internal.FilterChainImpl.doFilter(FilterChainImpl.java:42) at weblogic.servlet.internal.WebAppServletContext$ServletInvocationAction.run(WebAppServletContext.java:3229) at weblogic.security.acl.internal.AuthenticatedSubject.doAs(AuthenticatedSubject.java:321) at weblogic.security.service.SecurityManager.runAs(SecurityManager.java:121) at weblogic.servlet.internal.WebAppServletContext.securedExecute(WebAppServletContext.java:2002) at weblogic.servlet.internal.WebAppServletContext.execute(WebAppServletContext.java:1908) at weblogic.servlet.internal.ServletRequestImpl.run(ServletRequestImpl.java:1362) at weblogic.work.ExecuteThread.execute(ExecuteThread.java:209) at weblogic.work.ExecuteThread.run(ExecuteThread.java:181) The only lead I have is line 127 in the code which is indicated by this error: Caused by: weblogic.jms.common.JMSException: [JMSClientExceptions:055039]A system error has occurred. The error is java.lang.Nul lPointerException at weblogic.jms.client.JMSSession.handleException(JMSSession.java:2853) at weblogic.jms.client.JMSConsumer.receive(JMSConsumer.java:629) at weblogic.jms.client.JMSConsumer.receive(JMSConsumer.java:488) at weblogic.jms.client.WLConsumerImpl.receive(WLConsumerImpl.java:155) at org.springframework.jms.core.JmsTemplate.doReceive(JmsTemplate.java:734) at org.springframework.jms.core.JmsTemplate.doReceive(JmsTemplate.java:706) at org.springframework.jms.core.JmsTemplate$9.doInJms(JmsTemplate.java:681) at org.springframework.jms.core.JmsTemplate.execute(JmsTemplate.java:447) at org.springframework.jms.core.JmsTemplate.receiveSelected(JmsTemplate.java:679) at org.springframework.jms.core.JmsTemplate.receiveSelectedAndConvert(JmsTemplate.java:784) at com.pg.ecom.jms.service.ProducerServices.SendMessageSync(ProducerServices.java:127) ... 25 more This is line 127: try { Thread.yield(); //line 127 below status=(StatusMessageBean)getJmsTemplate.receiveSelectedAndConvert(statusDestination, "JMSCorrelationID='"+ producerMsg.getProcessID() +"'"); Thread.yield(); } catch (Exception e) { Thread.yield(); loggingInterface.doErrorLogging(e.fillInStackTrace()); } According to the BEA documentation, we should contact BEA about error 055039 but I would like to try asking here first before bringing this to them? Some more errors: Caused by: java.lang.NullPointerException at weblogic.jms.common.JMSVariableBinder$JMSCorrelationIDVariable.get(JMSVariableBinder.java:127) at weblogic.utils.expressions.Expression.evaluateExpr(Expression.java:271) at weblogic.utils.expressions.Expression.evaluateExpr(Expression.java:298) at weblogic.utils.expressions.Expression.evaluateBoolean(Expression.java:209) at weblogic.utils.expressions.Expression.evaluate(Expression.java:167) at weblogic.jms.common.JMSSQLFilter$Exp.evaluate(JMSSQLFilter.java:304) at weblogic.messaging.common.SQLFilter.match(SQLFilter.java:158) at weblogic.messaging.kernel.internal.MessageList.findNextVisible(MessageList.java:274) at weblogic.messaging.kernel.internal.QueueImpl.nextFromIteratorOrGroup(QueueImpl.java:441) at weblogic.messaging.kernel.internal.QueueImpl.nextMatchFromIteratorOrGroup(QueueImpl.java:350) at weblogic.messaging.kernel.internal.QueueImpl.get(QueueImpl.java:233) at weblogic.messaging.kernel.internal.QueueImpl.addReader(QueueImpl.java:1069) at weblogic.messaging.kernel.internal.ReceiveRequestImpl.start(ReceiveRequestImpl.java:178) at weblogic.messaging.kernel.internal.ReceiveRequestImpl.<init>(ReceiveRequestImpl.java:86) at weblogic.messaging.kernel.internal.QueueImpl.receive(QueueImpl.java:820) at weblogic.jms.backend.BEConsumerImpl.blockingReceiveStart(BEConsumerImpl.java:1172) at weblogic.jms.backend.BEConsumerImpl.receive(BEConsumerImpl.java:1383) at weblogic.jms.backend.BEConsumerImpl.invoke(BEConsumerImpl.java:1088) at weblogic.messaging.dispatcher.Request.wrappedFiniteStateMachine(Request.java:759) at weblogic.messaging.dispatcher.DispatcherImpl.dispatchAsyncInternal(DispatcherImpl.java:129) at weblogic.messaging.dispatcher.DispatcherImpl.dispatchAsync(DispatcherImpl.java:112) at weblogic.messaging.dispatcher.Request.dispatchAsync(Request.java:1046) at weblogic.jms.dispatcher.Request.dispatchAsync(Request.java:72) at weblogic.jms.frontend.FEConsumer.receive(FEConsumer.java:557) at weblogic.jms.frontend.FEConsumer.invoke(FEConsumer.java:806) at weblogic.messaging.dispatcher.Request.wrappedFiniteStateMachine(Request.java:759) at weblogic.messaging.dispatcher.DispatcherServerRef.invoke(DispatcherServerRef.java:276) at weblogic.messaging.dispatcher.DispatcherServerRef.handleRequest(DispatcherServerRef.java:141) at weblogic.messaging.dispatcher.DispatcherServerRef.access$000(DispatcherServerRef.java:36) at weblogic.messaging.dispatcher.DispatcherServerRef$2.run(DispatcherServerRef.java:112) ... 2 more Any ideas?

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  • Announcing Upcoming SOA and JMS Introductory Blog Posts

    - by JuergenKress
    Beginning next week, SOA Proactive Support will begin posting a series of introductory blogs here on working with JMS in a SOA context. The posts will begin with how to set up JMS in WebLogic server, lead you through reading and writing to a JMS queue from the WLS Java samples, continue with how to access it from a SOA composite and, finally, describe how to set up and access AQ JMS (Advanced Queuing JMS) from a SOA/BPEL process. The posts will be of a tutorial nature and include step-by-step examples. Your questions and feedback are encouraged. The following topics are planned: How to Create a Simple JMS Queue in Weblogic Server 11g Using the QueueSend.java Sample Program to Send a Message to a JMS Queue Using the QueueReceive.java Sample Program to Read a Message from a JMS Queue How to Create an 11g BPEL Process Which Writes a Message Based on an XML Schema to a JMS Queue How to Create an 11g BPEL Process Which Reads a Message Based on an XML Schema from a JMS Queue How to Set Up an AQ JMS (Advanced Queueing JMS) for SOA Purposes How to Write to an AQ JMS Queue from a BPEL Process How to Read from an AQ JMS Queue from a BPEL Process Read the full article SOA & BPM Partner Community For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit  www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center. Blog Twitter LinkedIn Mix Forum Technorati Tags: SOA Community,Oracle SOA,Oracle BPM,Community,OPN,Jürgen Kress,SOA JMS,JMS,WebLogic

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  • Configure Oracle SOA JMSAdatper to Work with WLS JMS Topics

    - by fip
    The WebLogic JMS Topic are typically running in a WLS cluster. So as your SOA composites that receive these Topic messages. In some situation, the two clusters are the same while in others they are sepearate. The composites in SOA cluster are subscribers to the JMS Topic in WebLogic cluster. As nature of JMS Topic is meant to distribute the same copy of messages to all its subscribers, two questions arise immediately when it comes to load balancing the JMS Topic messages against the SOA composites: How to assure all of the SOA cluster members receive different messages instead of the same (duplicate) messages, even though the SOA cluster members are all subscribers to the Topic? How to make sure the messages are evenly distributed (load balanced) to SOA cluster members? Here we will walk through how to configure the JMS Topic, the JmsAdapter connection factory, as well as the composite so that the JMS Topic messages will be evenly distributed to same composite running off different SOA cluster nodes without causing duplication. 2. The typical configuration In this typical configuration, we achieve the load balancing of JMS Topic messages to JmsAdapters by configuring a partitioned distributed topic along with sharable subscriptions. You can reference the documentation for explanation of PDT. And this blog posting does a very good job to visually explain how this combination of configurations would message load balancing among clients of JMS Topics. Our job is to apply this configuration in the context of SOA JMS Adapters. To do so would involve the following steps: Step A. Configure JMS Topic to be UDD and PDT, at the WebLogic cluster that house the JMS Topic Step B. Configure JCA Connection Factory with proper ServerProperties at the SOA cluster Step C. Reference the JCA Connection Factory and define a durable subscriber name, at composite's JmsAdapter (or the *.jca file) Here are more details of each step: Step A. Configure JMS Topic to be UDD and PDT, You do this at the WebLogic cluster that house the JMS Topic. You can follow the instructions at Administration Console Online Help to create a Uniform Distributed Topic. If you use WebLogic Console, then at the same administration screen you can specify "Distribution Type" to be "Uniform", and the Forwarding policy to "Partitioned", which would make the JMS Topic Uniform Distributed Destination and a Partitioned Distributed Topic, respectively Step B: Configure ServerProperties of JCA Connection Factory You do this step at the SOA cluster. This step is to make the JmsAdapter that connect to the JMS Topic through this JCA Connection Factory as a certain type of "client". When you configure the JCA Connection Factory for the JmsAdapter, you define the list of properties in FactoryProperties field, in a semi colon separated list: ClientID=myClient;ClientIDPolicy=UNRESTRICTED;SubscriptionSharingPolicy=SHARABLE;TopicMessageDistributionAll=false You can refer to Chapter 8.4.10 Accessing Distributed Destinations (Queues and Topics) on the WebLogic Server JMS of the Adapter User Guide for the meaning of these properties. Please note: Except for ClientID, other properties such as the ClientIDPolicy=UNRESTRICTED, SubscriptionSharingPolicy=SHARABLE and TopicMessageDistributionAll=false are all default settings for the JmsAdapter's connection factory. Therefore you do NOT have to explicitly specify them explicitly. All you need to do is the specify the ClientID. The ClientID is different from the subscriber ID that we are to discuss in the later steps. To make it simple, you just need to remember you need to specify the client ID and make it unique per connection factory. Here is the example setting: Step C. Reference the JCA Connection Factory and define a durable subscriber name, at composite's JmsAdapter (or the *.jca file) In the following example, the value 'MySubscriberID-1' was given as the value of property 'DurableSubscriber': <adapter-config name="subscribe" adapter="JMS Adapter" wsdlLocation="subscribe.wsdl" xmlns="http://platform.integration.oracle/blocks/adapter/fw/metadata"> <connection-factory location="eis/wls/MyTestUDDTopic" UIJmsProvider="WLSJMS" UIConnectionName="ateam-hq24b"/> <endpoint-activation portType="Consume_Message_ptt" operation="Consume_Message"> <activation-spec className="oracle.tip.adapter.jms.inbound.JmsConsumeActivationSpec"> <property name="DurableSubscriber" value="MySubscriberID-1"/> <property name="PayloadType" value="TextMessage"/> <property name="UseMessageListener" value="false"/> <property name="DestinationName" value="jms/MyTestUDDTopic"/> </activation-spec> </endpoint-activation> </adapter-config> You can set the durable subscriber name either at composite's JmsAdapter wizard,or by directly editing the JmsAdapter's *.jca file within the Composite project. 2.The "atypical" configurations: For some systems, there may be restrictions that do not allow the afore mentioned "typical" configurations be applied. For examples, some deployments may be required to configure the JMS Topic to be Replicated Distributed Topic rather than Partition Distributed Topic. We would like to discuss those scenarios here: Configuration A: The JMS Topic is NOT PDT In this case, you need to define the message selector 'NOT JMS_WL_DDForwarded' in the adapter's *.jca file, to filter out those "replicated" messages. Configuration B. The ClientIDPolicy=RESTRICTED In this case, you need separate factories for different composites. More accurately, you need separate factories for different *.jca file of JmsAdapter. References: Managing Durable Subscription WebLogic JMS Partitioned Distributed Topics and Shared Subscriptions JMS Troubleshooting: Configuring JMS Message Logging: Advanced Programming with Distributed Destinations Using the JMS Destination Availability Helper API

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  • Announcing Upcoming SOA and JMS Introductory Blog Posts

    - by John-Brown.Evans
    Announcing Upcoming SOA and JMS Introductory Blog Posts Beginning next week, SOA Proactive Support will begin posting a series of introductory blogs here on working with JMS in a SOA context. The posts will begin with how to set up JMS in WebLogic server, lead you through reading and writing to a JMS queue from the WLS Java samples, continue with how to access it from a SOA composite and, finally, describe how to set up and access AQ JMS (Advanced Queuing JMS) from a SOA/BPEL process. The posts will be of a tutorial nature and include step-by-step examples. Your questions and feedback are encouraged. The following topics are planned: How to Create a Simple JMS Queue in Weblogic Server 11g Using the QueueSend.java Sample Program to Send a Message to a JMS Queue Using the QueueReceive.java Sample Program to Read a Message from a JMS Queue How to Create an 11g BPEL Process Which Writes a Message Based on an XML Schema to a JMS Queue How to Create an 11g BPEL Process Which Reads a Message Based on an XML Schema from a JMS Queue How to Set Up an AQ JMS (Advanced Queueing JMS) for SOA Purposes How to Write to an AQ JMS Queue from a BPEL Process How to Read from an AQ JMS Queue from a BPEL Process

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  • Injecting jms resource in servlet & best practice for MDB

    - by kislo_metal
    using ejb 3.1, servlet 3.0 (glassfish server v3) Scenario: I have MDB that listen to jms messages and give processing to some other session bean (Stateless). Servelet injecting jms resource. Question 1: Why servlet can`t inject jms resources when they use static declaration ? @Resource(mappedName = "jms/Tarturus") private static ConnectionFactory connectionFactory; @Resource(mappedName = "jms/StyxMDB") private static Queue queue; private Connection connection; and @PostConstruct public void postConstruct() { try { connection = connectionFactory.createConnection(); } catch (JMSException e) { e.printStackTrace(); } } @PreDestroy public void preDestroy() { try { connection.close(); } catch (JMSException e) { e.printStackTrace(); } } The error that I get is : [#|2010-05-03T15:18:17.118+0300|WARNING|glassfish3.0|javax.enterprise.system.container.web.com.sun.enterprise.web|_ThreadID=35;_ThreadName=Thread-1;|StandardWrapperValve[WorkerServlet]: PWC1382: Allocate exception for servlet WorkerServlet com.sun.enterprise.container.common.spi.util.InjectionException: Error creating managed object for class ua.co.rufous.server.services.WorkerServiceImpl at com.sun.enterprise.container.common.impl.util.InjectionManagerImpl.createManagedObject(InjectionManagerImpl.java:312) at com.sun.enterprise.web.WebContainer.createServletInstance(WebContainer.java:709) at com.sun.enterprise.web.WebModule.createServletInstance(WebModule.java:1937) at org.apache.catalina.core.StandardWrapper.loadServlet(StandardWrapper.java:1252) Caused by: com.sun.enterprise.container.common.spi.util.InjectionException: Exception attempting to inject Unresolved Message-Destination-Ref ua.co.rufous.server.services.WorkerServiceImpl/[email protected]@null into class ua.co.rufous.server.services.WorkerServiceImpl at com.sun.enterprise.container.common.impl.util.InjectionManagerImpl._inject(InjectionManagerImpl.java:614) at com.sun.enterprise.container.common.impl.util.InjectionManagerImpl.inject(InjectionManagerImpl.java:384) at com.sun.enterprise.container.common.impl.util.InjectionManagerImpl.injectInstance(InjectionManagerImpl.java:141) at com.sun.enterprise.container.common.impl.util.InjectionManagerImpl.injectInstance(InjectionManagerImpl.java:127) at com.sun.enterprise.container.common.impl.util.InjectionManagerImpl.createManagedObject(InjectionManagerImpl.java:306) ... 27 more Caused by: com.sun.enterprise.container.common.spi.util.InjectionException: Illegal use of static field private static javax.jms.Queue ua.co.rufous.server.services.WorkerServiceImpl.queue on class that only supports instance-based injection at com.sun.enterprise.container.common.impl.util.InjectionManagerImpl._inject(InjectionManagerImpl.java:532) ... 31 more |#] my MDB : /** * asadmin commands * asadmin create-jms-resource --restype javax.jms.ConnectionFactory jms/Tarturus * asadmin create-jms-resource --restype javax.jms.Queue jms/StyxMDB * asadmin list-jms-resources */ @MessageDriven(mappedName = "jms/StyxMDB", activationConfig = { @ActivationConfigProperty(propertyName = "connectionFactoryJndiName", propertyValue = "jms/Tarturus"), @ActivationConfigProperty(propertyName = "acknowledgeMode", propertyValue = "Auto-acknowledge"), @ActivationConfigProperty(propertyName = "destinationType", propertyValue = "javax.jms.Queue") }) public class StyxMDB implements MessageListener { @EJB private ActivationProcessingLocal aProcessing; public StyxMDB() { } public void onMessage(Message message) { try { TextMessage msg = (TextMessage) message; String hash = msg.getText(); GluttonyLogger.getInstance().writeInfoLog("geted jms message hash = " + hash); } catch (JMSException e) { } } } everything work good without static declaration: @Resource(mappedName = "jms/Tarturus") private ConnectionFactory connectionFactory; @Resource(mappedName = "jms/StyxMDB") private Queue queue; private Connection connection; Question 2: what is the best practice for working with MDB : processing full request in onMessage() or calling another bean(Stateless bean in my case) in onMessage() method that would process it. Processing including few calls to soap services, so the full processing time could be for a 3 seconds. Thank you.

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  • JMSContext, @JMSDestinationDefintion, DefaultJMSConnectionFactory with simplified JMS API: TOTD #213

    - by arungupta
    "What's New in JMS 2.0" Part 1 and Part 2 provide comprehensive introduction to new messaging features introduced in JMS 2.0. The biggest improvement in JMS 2.0 is introduction of the "new simplified API". This was explained in the Java EE 7 Launch Technical Keynote. You can watch a complete replay here. Sending and Receiving a JMS message using JMS 1.1 requires lot of boilerplate code, primarily because the API was designed 10+ years ago. Here is a code that shows how to send a message using JMS 1.1 API: @Statelesspublic class ClassicMessageSender { @Resource(lookup = "java:comp/DefaultJMSConnectionFactory") ConnectionFactory connectionFactory; @Resource(mappedName = "java:global/jms/myQueue") Queue demoQueue; public void sendMessage(String payload) { Connection connection = null; try { connection = connectionFactory.createConnection(); connection.start(); Session session = connection.createSession(false, Session.AUTO_ACKNOWLEDGE); MessageProducer messageProducer = session.createProducer(demoQueue); TextMessage textMessage = session.createTextMessage(payload); messageProducer.send(textMessage); } catch (JMSException ex) { ex.printStackTrace(); } finally { if (connection != null) { try { connection.close(); } catch (JMSException ex) { ex.printStackTrace(); } } } }} There are several issues with this code: A JMS ConnectionFactory needs to be created in a application server-specific way before this application can run. Application-specific destination needs to be created in an application server-specific way before this application can run. Several intermediate objects need to be created to honor the JMS 1.1 API, e.g. ConnectionFactory -> Connection -> Session -> MessageProducer -> TextMessage. Everything is a checked exception and so try/catch block must be specified. Connection need to be explicitly started and closed, and that bloats even the finally block. The new JMS 2.0 simplified API code looks like: @Statelesspublic class SimplifiedMessageSender { @Inject JMSContext context; @Resource(mappedName="java:global/jms/myQueue") Queue myQueue; public void sendMessage(String message) { context.createProducer().send(myQueue, message); }} The code is significantly improved from the previous version in the following ways: The JMSContext interface combines in a single object the functionality of both the Connection and the Session in the earlier JMS APIs.  You can obtain a JMSContext object by simply injecting it with the @Inject annotation.  No need to explicitly specify a ConnectionFactory. A default ConnectionFactory under the JNDI name of java:comp/DefaultJMSConnectionFactory is used if no explicit ConnectionFactory is specified. The destination can be easily created using newly introduced @JMSDestinationDefinition as: @JMSDestinationDefinition(name = "java:global/jms/myQueue",        interfaceName = "javax.jms.Queue") It can be specified on any Java EE component and the destination is created during deployment. JMSContext, Session, Connection, JMSProducer and JMSConsumer objects are now AutoCloseable. This means that these resources are automatically closed when they go out of scope. This also obviates the need to explicitly start the connection JMSException is now a runtime exception. Method chaining on JMSProducers allows to use builder patterns. No need to create separate Message object, you can specify the message body as an argument to the send() method instead. Want to try this code ? Download source code! Download Java EE 7 SDK and install. Start GlassFish: bin/asadmin start-domain Build the WAR (in the unzipped source code directory): mvn package Deploy the WAR: bin/asadmin deploy <source-code>/jms/target/jms-1.0-SNAPSHOT.war And access the application at http://localhost:8080/jms-1.0-SNAPSHOT/index.jsp to send and receive a message using classic and simplified API. A replay of JMS 2.0 session from Java EE 7 Launch Webinar provides complete details on what's new in this specification: Enjoy!

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  • WebLogic Server JMS WLST Script – Who is Connected To My Server

    - by james.bayer
    Ever want to know who was connected to your WebLogic Server instance for troubleshooting?  An email exchange about this topic and JMS came up this week, and I’ve heard it come up once or twice before too.  Sometimes it’s interesting or helpful to know the list of JMS clients (IP Addresses, JMS Destinations, message counts) that are connected to a particular JMS server.  This can be helpful for troubleshooting.  Tom Barnes from the WebLogic Server JMS team provided some helpful advice: The JMS connection runtime mbean has “getHostAddress”, which returns the host address of the connecting client JVM as a string.  A connection runtime can contain session runtimes, which in turn can contain consumer runtimes.  The consumer runtime, in turn has a “getDestinationName” and “getMemberDestinationName”.  I think that this means you could write a WLST script, for example, to dump all consumers, their destinations, plus their parent session’s parent connection’s host addresses.    Note that the client runtime mbeans (connection, session, and consumer) won’t necessarily be hosted on the same JVM as a destination that’s in the same cluster (client messages route from their connection host to their ultimate destination in the same cluster). Writing the Script So armed with this information, I decided to take the challenge and see if I could write a WLST script to do this.  It’s always helpful to have the WebLogic Server MBean Reference handy for activities like this.  This one is focused on JMS Consumers and I only took a subset of the information available, but it could be modified easily to do Producers.  I haven’t tried this on a more complex environment, but it works in my simple sandbox case, so it should give you the general idea. # Better to use Secure Config File approach for login as shown here http://buttso.blogspot.com/2011/02/using-secure-config-files-with-weblogic.html connect('weblogic','welcome1','t3://localhost:7001')   # Navigate to the Server Runtime and get the Server Name serverRuntime() serverName = cmo.getName()   # Multiple JMS Servers could be hosted by a single WLS server cd('JMSRuntime/' + serverName + '.jms' ) jmsServers=cmo.getJMSServers()   # Find the list of all JMSServers for this server namesOfJMSServers = '' for jmsServer in jmsServers: namesOfJMSServers = jmsServer.getName() + ' '   # Count the number of connections jmsConnections=cmo.getConnections() print str(len(jmsConnections)) + ' JMS Connections found for ' + serverName + ' with JMSServers ' + namesOfJMSServers   # Recurse the MBean tree for each connection and pull out some information about consumers for jmsConnection in jmsConnections: try: print 'JMS Connection:' print ' Host Address = ' + jmsConnection.getHostAddress() print ' ClientID = ' + str( jmsConnection.getClientID() ) print ' Sessions Current = ' + str( jmsConnection.getSessionsCurrentCount() ) jmsSessions = jmsConnection.getSessions() for jmsSession in jmsSessions: jmsConsumers = jmsSession.getConsumers() for jmsConsumer in jmsConsumers: print ' Consumer:' print ' Name = ' + jmsConsumer.getName() print ' Messages Received = ' + str(jmsConsumer.getMessagesReceivedCount()) print ' Member Destination Name = ' + jmsConsumer.getMemberDestinationName() except: print 'Error retrieving JMS Consumer Information' dumpStack() # Cleanup disconnect() exit() Example Output I expect the output to look something like this and loop through all the connections, this is just the first one: 1 JMS Connections found for AdminServer with JMSServers myJMSServer JMS Connection:   Host Address = 127.0.0.1   ClientID = None   Sessions Current = 16    Consumer:      Name = consumer40      Messages Received = 1      Member Destination Name = myJMSModule!myQueue Notice that it has the IP Address of the client.  There are 16 Sessions open because I’m using an MDB, which defaults to 16 connections, so this matches what I expect.  Let’s see what the full output actually looks like: D:\Oracle\fmw11gr1ps3\user_projects\domains\offline_domain>java weblogic.WLST d:\temp\jms.py   Initializing WebLogic Scripting Tool (WLST) ...   Welcome to WebLogic Server Administration Scripting Shell   Type help() for help on available commands   Connecting to t3://localhost:7001 with userid weblogic ... Successfully connected to Admin Server 'AdminServer' that belongs to domain 'offline_domain'.   Warning: An insecure protocol was used to connect to the server. To ensure on-the-wire security, the SSL port or Admin port should be used instead.   Location changed to serverRuntime tree. This is a read-only tree with ServerRuntimeMBean as the root. For more help, use help(serverRuntime)   1 JMS Connections found for AdminServer with JMSServers myJMSServer JMS Connection: Host Address = 127.0.0.1 ClientID = None Sessions Current = 16 Consumer: Name = consumer40 Messages Received = 2 Member Destination Name = myJMSModule!myQueue Consumer: Name = consumer34 Messages Received = 2 Member Destination Name = myJMSModule!myQueue Consumer: Name = consumer37 Messages Received = 2 Member Destination Name = myJMSModule!myQueue Consumer: Name = consumer16 Messages Received = 2 Member Destination Name = myJMSModule!myQueue Consumer: Name = consumer46 Messages Received = 2 Member Destination Name = myJMSModule!myQueue Consumer: Name = consumer49 Messages Received = 2 Member Destination Name = myJMSModule!myQueue Consumer: Name = consumer43 Messages Received = 1 Member Destination Name = myJMSModule!myQueue Consumer: Name = consumer55 Messages Received = 1 Member Destination Name = myJMSModule!myQueue Consumer: Name = consumer25 Messages Received = 1 Member Destination Name = myJMSModule!myQueue Consumer: Name = consumer22 Messages Received = 1 Member Destination Name = myJMSModule!myQueue Consumer: Name = consumer19 Messages Received = 1 Member Destination Name = myJMSModule!myQueue Consumer: Name = consumer52 Messages Received = 1 Member Destination Name = myJMSModule!myQueue Consumer: Name = consumer31 Messages Received = 1 Member Destination Name = myJMSModule!myQueue Consumer: Name = consumer58 Messages Received = 1 Member Destination Name = myJMSModule!myQueue Consumer: Name = consumer28 Messages Received = 1 Member Destination Name = myJMSModule!myQueue Consumer: Name = consumer61 Messages Received = 1 Member Destination Name = myJMSModule!myQueue Disconnected from weblogic server: AdminServer     Exiting WebLogic Scripting Tool. Thanks to Tom Barnes for the hints and the inspiration to write this up. Image of telephone switchboard courtesy of http://www.JoeTourist.net/ JoeTourist InfoSystems

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  • Junit with Embedded Glassfish fails - JMS Resource Adapter should be EMBEDDED

    - by Hank
    I'm trying to test a session bean (NetBeans 6.8, Glassfish V3). Unfortunately, the embedded glassfish is unable to start properly, as it tries to connect to a remote JMS Provider (at localhost:7676): $ ant test ... [junit] Mar 23, 2010 12:13:51 PM com.sun.messaging.jms.ra.ResourceAdapter start [junit] INFO: MQJMSRA_RA1101: SJSMQ JMS Resource Adapter starting: REMOTE [junit] Mar 23, 2010 12:13:51 PM com.sun.messaging.jmq.jmsclient.ExceptionHandler throwConnectionException [junit] WARNING: [C4003]: Error occurred on connection creation [localhost:7676]. - cause: java.net.ConnectException: Connection refused The error is in itself correct, as no (other) JMS provider is running. I was expecting the embedded glassfish to start the JMS provider in EMBEDDED mode. My test uses javax.ejb.embeddable.EJBContainer : @BeforeClass public static void initContainer() throws Exception { ec = EJBContainer.createEJBContainer(); ctx = ec.getContext(); } When I start glassfish normally, it's fine: $ bin/asadmin get server.jms-service.type server.jms-service.type=EMBEDDED How can I get my junit tests to use an embedded glassfish with an EMBEDDED JMS Provider?

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  • JMS messaging implementation

    - by Gandalf StormCrow
    I've been struggling with this "simple" task for more expirienced people, I'm stuck for 2 days now need help. I've changed things arround like zillion times now, finally I stumbled upon this spring JMS tutorial. What I want to do, Send a message and receive it. I've been also reading this book chapter 8 on messaging. It really nicely explains 2 type of messaging and there is nice example for publish-and-subscribe type but now example for point-to-point messaging( this is the one I need). I'm able to send message to the queue on my own, but don't have a clue how to receive thats why I tried with this spring tutorial here is what I've got so far : SENDER : package quartz.spring.com.example; import java.util.HashMap; import java.util.Map; import javax.jms.ConnectionFactory; import javax.jms.JMSException; import javax.jms.Message; import javax.jms.Queue; import javax.jms.Session; import org.springframework.jms.core.MessageCreator; import org.springframework.jms.core.JmsTemplate; import org.springframework.jms.core.JmsTemplate102; import org.springframework.jms.core.MessagePostProcessor; public class JmsQueueSender { private JmsTemplate jmsTemplate; private Queue queue; public void setConnectionFactory(ConnectionFactory cf) { this.jmsTemplate = new JmsTemplate102(cf, false); } public void setQueue(Queue queue) { this.queue = queue; } public void simpleSend() { this.jmsTemplate.send(this.queue, new MessageCreator() { public Message createMessage(Session session) throws JMSException { return session.createTextMessage("hello queue world"); } }); } public void sendWithConversion() { Map map = new HashMap(); map.put("Name", "Mark"); map.put("Age", new Integer(47)); jmsTemplate.convertAndSend("testQueue", map, new MessagePostProcessor() { public Message postProcessMessage(Message message) throws JMSException { message.setIntProperty("AccountID", 1234); message.setJMSCorrelationID("123-00001"); return message; } }); } } RECEIVER : package quartz.spring.com.example; import javax.jms.JMSException; import javax.jms.Message; import javax.jms.MessageListener; import javax.jms.TextMessage; public class ExampleListener implements MessageListener { public void onMessage(Message message) { if (message instanceof TextMessage) { try { System.out.println(((TextMessage) message).getText()); } catch (JMSException ex) { throw new RuntimeException(ex); } } else { throw new IllegalArgumentException("Message must be of type TextMessage"); } } } applicationcontext.xml <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:jee="http://www.springframework.org/schema/jee" xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans-2.0.xsd http://www.springframework.org/schema/jee http://www.springframework.org/schema/jee/spring-jee-2.0.xsd"> <bean id="sender" class="quartz.spring.com.example.JmsQueueSender" init-method="sendWithConversion" /> <bean id="receiver" class="quartz.spring.com.example.ExampleListener" init-method="onMessage" /> </beans> Didn't really know that learning curve for this is so long, I mean the idea is very simple: Send message to the destination queue Receive message from the destination queue To receive messages, you do the following(so does book say): 1 Locate a ConnectionFactory, typically using JNDI. 2 Use the ConnectionFactory to create a Connection. 3 Use the Connection to create a Session. 4 Locate a Destination, typically using JNDI. 5 Use the Session to create a MessageConsumer for that Destination. Once you’ve done this, methods on the MessageConsumer enable you to either query the Destination for messages or to register for message notification. Can somebody please direct me towards right direction, is there a tutorial which explains in details how to receive message from the queue?I have the working send message code, didn't post it here because this post is too long as it is.

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  • JMS Topic vs Queue - Intent

    - by Sandeep Jindal
    I am trying to understand on the design requirements for using Queue, and could not find this question (with answer). My understanding: Queue means one-to-one. Thus it would be used in a special case (if not rare, very few cases) when a designer is sure that the message would be intended for only one consumer. But even in those cases, I may want to use Topic (just to be future safe). The only extra case I would have to do is to make (each) subscription durable. Or, I special situations, I would use bridging / dispatcher mechanism. Give above, I would always (or in most cases) want to publish to a topic. Subscriber can be either durable topic(s) or dispatched queue(s). Please let me know what I am missing here or I am missing the original intent?

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  • Use Glassfish JMS from remote client

    - by James
    Hi, I have glassfish installed on a server with a JMS ConnectionFactory set up jms/MyConnectionFactory with a resource type or javax.jms.ConnectionFactory. I now want to access this from a client application on my local machine for this I have the following: public static void main(String[] args) { try{ Properties env = new Properties(); env.setProperty("java.naming.factory.initial", "com.sun.enterprise.naming.SerialInitContextFactory"); env.setProperty("java.naming.factory.url.pkgs", "com.sun.enterprise.naming"); env.setProperty("java.naming.factory.state", "com.sun.corba.ee.impl.presentation.rmi.JNDIStateFactoryImpl"); env.setProperty("org.omg.CORBA.ORBInitialHost", "10.97.3.74"); env.setProperty("org.omg.CORBA.ORBInitialPort", "3700"); InitialContext initialContext = new InitialContext(env); ConnectionFactory connectionFactory = null; try { connectionFactory = (ConnectionFactory) initialContext.lookup("jms/MyConnectionFactory"); } catch (Exception e) { System.out.println("JNDI API lookup failed: " + e.toString()); e.printStackTrace(); System.exit(1); } }catch(Exception e){ e.printStackTrace(System.err); } } When I run my client I get the following output: INFO: Using com.sun.enterprise.transaction.jts.JavaEETransactionManagerJTSDelegate as the delegate {org.omg.CORBA.ORBInitialPort=3700, java.naming.factory.initial=com.sun.enterprise.naming.SerialInitContextFactory, org.omg.CORBA.ORBInitialHost=10.97.3.74, java.naming.factory.state=com.sun.corba.ee.impl.presentation.rmi.JNDIStateFactoryImpl, java.naming.factory.url.pkgs=com.sun.enterprise.naming} 19-Mar-2010 16:09:13 org.hibernate.validator.util.Version <clinit> INFO: Hibernate Validator bean-validator-3.0-JBoss-4.0.2 19-Mar-2010 16:09:13 org.hibernate.validator.engine.resolver.DefaultTraversableResolver detectJPA INFO: Instantiated an instance of org.hibernate.validator.engine.resolver.JPATraversableResolver. 19-Mar-2010 16:09:13 com.sun.messaging.jms.ra.ResourceAdapter start INFO: MQJMSRA_RA1101: SJSMQ JMS Resource Adapter starting: REMOTE 19-Mar-2010 16:09:13 com.sun.messaging.jms.ra.ResourceAdapter start INFO: MQJMSRA_RA1101: SJSMQ JMSRA Started:REMOTE 19-Mar-2010 16:09:13 com.sun.enterprise.naming.impl.SerialContext lookup SEVERE: enterprise_naming.serialctx_communication_exception 19-Mar-2010 16:09:13 com.sun.enterprise.naming.impl.SerialContext lookup SEVERE: java.lang.RuntimeException: com.sun.appserv.connectors.internal.api.ConnectorRuntimeException: This pool is not bound in JNDI : jms/MyConnectionFactory at com.sun.enterprise.resource.naming.ConnectorObjectFactory.getObjectInstance(ConnectorObjectFactory.java:159) at javax.naming.spi.NamingManager.getObjectInstance(NamingManager.java:304) at com.sun.enterprise.naming.impl.SerialContext.getObjectInstance(SerialContext.java:472) at com.sun.enterprise.naming.impl.SerialContext.lookup(SerialContext.java:437) at javax.naming.InitialContext.lookup(InitialContext.java:392) at simpleproducerclient.Main.main(Main.java:89) at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method) at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:39) at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:25) at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:597) at org.glassfish.appclient.client.acc.AppClientContainer.launch(AppClientContainer.java:424) at org.glassfish.appclient.client.AppClientFacade.main(AppClientFacade.java:134) Caused by: com.sun.appserv.connectors.internal.api.ConnectorRuntimeException: This pool is not bound in JNDI : jms/MyConnectionFactory at com.sun.enterprise.connectors.service.ConnectorConnectionPoolAdminServiceImpl.obtainManagedConnectionFactory(ConnectorConnectionPoolAdminServiceImpl.java:1017) at com.sun.enterprise.connectors.ConnectorRuntime.obtainManagedConnectionFactory(ConnectorRuntime.java:375) at com.sun.enterprise.resource.naming.ConnectorObjectFactory.getObjectInstance(ConnectorObjectFactory.java:124) ... 11 more Caused by: javax.naming.NamingException: Lookup failed for '__SYSTEM/pools/jms/MyConnectionFactory' in SerialContext targetHost=localhost,targetPort=3700,orb'sInitialHost=ithfdv01,orb'sInitialPort=3700 [Root exception is javax.naming.NameNotFoundException: pools] at com.sun.enterprise.naming.impl.SerialContext.lookup(SerialContext.java:442) at javax.naming.InitialContext.lookup(InitialContext.java:392) at com.sun.enterprise.connectors.service.ConnectorConnectionPoolAdminServiceImpl.getConnectorConnectionPool(ConnectorConnectionPoolAdminServiceImpl.java:804) at com.sun.enterprise.connectors.service.ConnectorConnectionPoolAdminServiceImpl.obtainManagedConnectionFactory(ConnectorConnectionPoolAdminServiceImpl.java:932) ... 13 more Caused by: javax.naming.NameNotFoundException: pools at com.sun.enterprise.naming.impl.TransientContext.resolveContext(TransientContext.java:252) at com.sun.enterprise.naming.impl.TransientContext.lookup(TransientContext.java:171) at com.sun.enterprise.naming.impl.TransientContext.lookup(TransientContext.java:172) at com.sun.enterprise.naming.impl.SerialContextProviderImpl.lookup(SerialContextProviderImpl.java:58) at com.sun.enterprise.naming.impl.RemoteSerialContextProviderImpl.lookup(RemoteSerialContextProviderImpl.java:89) at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method) at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:39) at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:25) at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:597) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.presentation.rmi.ReflectiveTie.dispatchToMethod(ReflectiveTie.java:146) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.presentation.rmi.ReflectiveTie._invoke(ReflectiveTie.java:176) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.protocol.CorbaServerRequestDispatcherImpl.dispatchToServant(CorbaServerRequestDispatcherImpl.java:682) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.protocol.CorbaServerRequestDispatcherImpl.dispatch(CorbaServerRequestDispatcherImpl.java:216) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.protocol.CorbaMessageMediatorImpl.handleRequestRequest(CorbaMessageMediatorImpl.java:1841) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.protocol.CorbaMessageMediatorImpl.handleRequest(CorbaMessageMediatorImpl.java:1695) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.protocol.CorbaMessageMediatorImpl.handleInput(CorbaMessageMediatorImpl.java:1078) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.protocol.giopmsgheaders.RequestMessage_1_2.callback(RequestMessage_1_2.java:221) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.protocol.CorbaMessageMediatorImpl.handleRequest(CorbaMessageMediatorImpl.java:797) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.protocol.CorbaMessageMediatorImpl.dispatch(CorbaMessageMediatorImpl.java:561) JNDI API lookup failed: javax.naming.CommunicationException: Communication exception for SerialContext targetHost=10.97.3.74,targetPort=3700,orb'sInitialHost=ithfdv01,orb'sInitialPort=3700 [Root exception is java.lang.RuntimeException: com.sun.appserv.connectors.internal.api.ConnectorRuntimeException: This pool is not bound in JNDI : jms/MyConnectionFactory] at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.protocol.CorbaMessageMediatorImpl.doWork(CorbaMessageMediatorImpl.java:2558) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.orbutil.threadpool.ThreadPoolImpl$WorkerThread.performWork(ThreadPoolImpl.java:492) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.orbutil.threadpool.ThreadPoolImpl$WorkerThread.run(ThreadPoolImpl.java:528) javax.naming.CommunicationException: Communication exception for SerialContext targetHost=10.97.3.74,targetPort=3700,orb'sInitialHost=ithfdv01,orb'sInitialPort=3700 [Root exception is java.lang.RuntimeException: com.sun.appserv.connectors.internal.api.ConnectorRuntimeException: This pool is not bound in JNDI : jms/MyConnectionFactory] at com.sun.enterprise.naming.impl.SerialContext.lookup(SerialContext.java:461) at javax.naming.InitialContext.lookup(InitialContext.java:392) at simpleproducerclient.Main.main(Main.java:89) at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method) at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:39) at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:25) at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:597) at org.glassfish.appclient.client.acc.AppClientContainer.launch(AppClientContainer.java:424) at org.glassfish.appclient.client.AppClientFacade.main(AppClientFacade.java:134) Caused by: java.lang.RuntimeException: com.sun.appserv.connectors.internal.api.ConnectorRuntimeException: This pool is not bound in JNDI : jms/MyConnectionFactory at com.sun.enterprise.resource.naming.ConnectorObjectFactory.getObjectInstance(ConnectorObjectFactory.java:159) at javax.naming.spi.NamingManager.getObjectInstance(NamingManager.java:304) at com.sun.enterprise.naming.impl.SerialContext.getObjectInstance(SerialContext.java:472) at com.sun.enterprise.naming.impl.SerialContext.lookup(SerialContext.java:437) ... 8 more Caused by: com.sun.appserv.connectors.internal.api.ConnectorRuntimeException: This pool is not bound in JNDI : jms/MyConnectionFactory at com.sun.enterprise.connectors.service.ConnectorConnectionPoolAdminServiceImpl.obtainManagedConnectionFactory(ConnectorConnectionPoolAdminServiceImpl.java:1017) at com.sun.enterprise.connectors.ConnectorRuntime.obtainManagedConnectionFactory(ConnectorRuntime.java:375) at com.sun.enterprise.resource.naming.ConnectorObjectFactory.getObjectInstance(ConnectorObjectFactory.java:124) ... 11 more Caused by: javax.naming.NamingException: Lookup failed for '__SYSTEM/pools/jms/MyConnectionFactory' in SerialContext targetHost=localhost,targetPort=3700,orb'sInitialHost=ithfdv01,orb'sInitialPort=3700 [Root exception is javax.naming.NameNotFoundException: pools] at com.sun.enterprise.naming.impl.SerialContext.lookup(SerialContext.java:442) at javax.naming.InitialContext.lookup(InitialContext.java:392) at com.sun.enterprise.connectors.service.ConnectorConnectionPoolAdminServiceImpl.getConnectorConnectionPool(ConnectorConnectionPoolAdminServiceImpl.java:804) at com.sun.enterprise.connectors.service.ConnectorConnectionPoolAdminServiceImpl.obtainManagedConnectionFactory(ConnectorConnectionPoolAdminServiceImpl.java:932) ... 13 more Caused by: javax.naming.NameNotFoundException: pools at com.sun.enterprise.naming.impl.TransientContext.resolveContext(TransientContext.java:252) at com.sun.enterprise.naming.impl.TransientContext.lookup(TransientContext.java:171) at com.sun.enterprise.naming.impl.TransientContext.lookup(TransientContext.java:172) at com.sun.enterprise.naming.impl.SerialContextProviderImpl.lookup(SerialContextProviderImpl.java:58) at com.sun.enterprise.naming.impl.RemoteSerialContextProviderImpl.lookup(RemoteSerialContextProviderImpl.java:89) at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method) at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:39) at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:25) at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:597) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.presentation.rmi.ReflectiveTie.dispatchToMethod(ReflectiveTie.java:146) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.presentation.rmi.ReflectiveTie._invoke(ReflectiveTie.java:176) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.protocol.CorbaServerRequestDispatcherImpl.dispatchToServant(CorbaServerRequestDispatcherImpl.java:682) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.protocol.CorbaServerRequestDispatcherImpl.dispatch(CorbaServerRequestDispatcherImpl.java:216) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.protocol.CorbaMessageMediatorImpl.handleRequestRequest(CorbaMessageMediatorImpl.java:1841) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.protocol.CorbaMessageMediatorImpl.handleRequest(CorbaMessageMediatorImpl.java:1695) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.protocol.CorbaMessageMediatorImpl.handleInput(CorbaMessageMediatorImpl.java:1078) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.protocol.giopmsgheaders.RequestMessage_1_2.callback(RequestMessage_1_2.java:221) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.protocol.CorbaMessageMediatorImpl.handleRequest(CorbaMessageMediatorImpl.java:797) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.protocol.CorbaMessageMediatorImpl.dispatch(CorbaMessageMediatorImpl.java:561) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.protocol.CorbaMessageMediatorImpl.doWork(CorbaMessageMediatorImpl.java:2558) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.orbutil.threadpool.ThreadPoolImpl$WorkerThread.performWork(ThreadPoolImpl.java:492) at com.sun.corba.ee.impl.orbutil.threadpool.ThreadPoolImpl$WorkerThread.run(ThreadPoolImpl.java:528) I have looked at a number of posts and have tried a number of things with no success. I can run the following commands on my server: ./asadmin list-jndi-entries UserTransaction: com.sun.enterprise.transaction.TransactionNamingProxy$UserTransactionProxy java:global: com.sun.enterprise.naming.impl.TransientContext jdbc: com.sun.enterprise.naming.impl.TransientContext ejb: com.sun.enterprise.naming.impl.TransientContext com.sun.enterprise.container.common.spi.util.InjectionManager: com.sun.enterprise.container.common.impl.util.InjectionManagerImpl jms: com.sun.enterprise.naming.impl.TransientContext Command list-jndi-entries executed successfully. ./asadmin list-jndi-entries --context jms MyTopic: org.glassfish.javaee.services.ResourceProxy MyConnectionFactory: org.glassfish.javaee.services.ResourceProxy MyQueue: org.glassfish.javaee.services.ResourceProxy Command list-jndi-entries executed successfully. Any help is greatly appreciated. Cheers, James

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  • JMS MQ Connection closed in JSF 2 SessionBean

    - by veote
    I use Websphere Application Server 8 with MQ Series as Messaging Queue. When I open close the connection in sessionbean in a "postConstruct" method and I use it in another method then its closed. My Code is: import java.io.Serializable; import javax.annotation.PostConstruct; import javax.annotation.PreDestroy; import javax.annotation.Resource; import javax.faces.application.FacesMessage; import javax.faces.bean.ManagedBean; import javax.faces.bean.SessionScoped; import javax.faces.context.FacesContext; import javax.jms.JMSException; import javax.jms.Queue; import javax.jms.QueueConnection; import javax.jms.QueueConnectionFactory; import javax.jms.QueueSender; import javax.jms.QueueSession; import javax.jms.Session; import javax.jms.TextMessage; @ManagedBean @SessionScoped public class MQRequest implements Serializable { private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L; @Resource(name = "jms/wasmqtest/wasmqtest_QCF") private QueueConnectionFactory connectionFactory; @Resource(name = "jms/wasmqtest/Request_Q") private Queue requestQueue; private QueueConnection connection; private String text = ""; public void sendMessage() { System.out.println("Connection in sendMessage: \n" + connection); TextMessage msg; try { QueueSession queueSession = connection.createQueueSession(false, Session.AUTO_ACKNOWLEDGE); QueueSender sender = queueSession.createSender(requestQueue); msg = queueSession.createTextMessage(text); sender.send(msg); queueSession.close(); sender.close(); } catch (JMSException e) { // TODO Auto-generated catch block e.printStackTrace(); } text = ""; } @PostConstruct public void openConenction() { System.out.println("Open Connection"); try { connection = connectionFactory.createQueueConnection(); connection.start(); System.out.println("Connection in OpenConnectioN: \n" + connection); } catch (JMSException e) { e.printStackTrace(); } } @PreDestroy public void closeConnection() { try { System.out.println("Closing Connection"); connection.close(); } catch (JMSException e) { e.printStackTrace(); } } public void setText(String text) { this.text = text; } public String getText() { return text; } } In PostConstruct method the connection is initialized: [21.10.13 07:36:05:574 CEST] 00000025 SystemOut O Connection in OpenConnectioN: com.ibm.ejs.jms[email protected] managed connection = com.ibm.ejs.jms[email protected] physical connection = com.ibm.mq.jms[email protected] closed = false invalid = false restricted methods enabled = false open session handles = [] temporary queues = [] But in sendMessage() method it isnt and I get a ConnectionClosed Problem: [21.10.13 07:36:12:493 CEST] 00000025 SystemOut O Connection in sendMessage: com.ibm.ejs.jms[email protected] managed connection = null physical connection = null closed = true invalid = false restricted methods enabled = false open session handles = [] temporary queues = [] 21.10.13 07:36:12:461 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R 15 [WebContainer : 3] INFO org.apache.bval.jsr303.ConfigurationImpl - ignoreXmlConfiguration == true [21.10.13 07:36:12:601 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R javax.jms.IllegalStateException: Connection closed [21.10.13 07:36:12:601 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at com.ibm.ejs.jms.JMSConnectionHandle.checkOpen(JMSConnectionHandle.java:821) [21.10.13 07:36:12:601 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at com.ibm.ejs.jms.JMSQueueConnectionHandle.createQueueSession(JMSQueueConnectionHandle.java:206) [21.10.13 07:36:12:601 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at de.volkswagen.wasmqtest.queue.MQRequest.sendMessage(MQRequest.java:51) [21.10.13 07:36:12:601 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method) [21.10.13 07:36:12:601 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:60) [21.10.13 07:36:12:601 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:37) [21.10.13 07:36:12:602 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:611) [21.10.13 07:36:12:602 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at org.apache.el.parser.AstValue.invoke(AstValue.java:262) [21.10.13 07:36:12:602 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at org.apache.el.MethodExpressionImpl.invoke(MethodExpressionImpl.java:278) [21.10.13 07:36:12:602 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at org.apache.myfaces.view.facelets.el.TagMethodExpression.invoke(TagMethodExpression.java:83) [21.10.13 07:36:12:602 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at javax.faces.component._MethodExpressionToMethodBinding.invoke(_MethodExpressionToMethodBinding.java:88) [21.10.13 07:36:12:602 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at org.apache.myfaces.application.ActionListenerImpl.processAction(ActionListenerImpl.java:100) [21.10.13 07:36:12:602 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at javax.faces.component.UICommand.broadcast(UICommand.java:120) [21.10.13 07:36:12:602 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at javax.faces.component.UIViewRoot._broadcastAll(UIViewRoot.java:973) [21.10.13 07:36:12:602 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at javax.faces.component.UIViewRoot.broadcastEvents(UIViewRoot.java:275) [21.10.13 07:36:12:602 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at javax.faces.component.UIViewRoot._process(UIViewRoot.java:1285) [21.10.13 07:36:12:602 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at javax.faces.component.UIViewRoot.processApplication(UIViewRoot.java:711) [21.10.13 07:36:12:602 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at org.apache.myfaces.lifecycle.InvokeApplicationExecutor.execute(InvokeApplicationExecutor.java:34) [21.10.13 07:36:12:603 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at org.apache.myfaces.lifecycle.LifecycleImpl.executePhase(LifecycleImpl.java:171) [21.10.13 07:36:12:603 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at org.apache.myfaces.lifecycle.LifecycleImpl.execute(LifecycleImpl.java:118) [21.10.13 07:36:12:603 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at javax.faces.webapp.FacesServlet.service(FacesServlet.java:189) [21.10.13 07:36:12:603 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at com.ibm.ws.webcontainer.servlet.ServletWrapper.service(ServletWrapper.java:1147) [21.10.13 07:36:12:603 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at com.ibm.ws.webcontainer.servlet.ServletWrapper.handleRequest(ServletWrapper.java:722) [21.10.13 07:36:12:603 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at com.ibm.ws.webcontainer.servlet.ServletWrapper.handleRequest(ServletWrapper.java:449) [21.10.13 07:36:12:603 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at com.ibm.ws.webcontainer.servlet.ServletWrapperImpl.handleRequest(ServletWrapperImpl.java:178) [21.10.13 07:36:12:603 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at com.ibm.ws.webcontainer.filter.WebAppFilterManager.invokeFilters(WebAppFilterManager.java:1020) [21.10.13 07:36:12:603 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at com.ibm.ws.webcontainer.webapp.WebApp.handleRequest(WebApp.java:3703) [21.10.13 07:36:12:603 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at com.ibm.ws.webcontainer.webapp.WebGroup.handleRequest(WebGroup.java:304) [21.10.13 07:36:12:603 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at com.ibm.ws.webcontainer.WebContainer.handleRequest(WebContainer.java:953) [21.10.13 07:36:12:603 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at com.ibm.ws.webcontainer.WSWebContainer.handleRequest(WSWebContainer.java:1655) [21.10.13 07:36:12:603 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at com.ibm.ws.webcontainer.channel.WCChannelLink.ready(WCChannelLink.java:195) [21.10.13 07:36:12:604 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at com.ibm.ws.http.channel.inbound.impl.HttpInboundLink.handleDiscrimination(HttpInboundLink.java:452) [21.10.13 07:36:12:604 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at com.ibm.ws.http.channel.inbound.impl.HttpInboundLink.handleNewRequest(HttpInboundLink.java:511) [21.10.13 07:36:12:604 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at com.ibm.ws.http.channel.inbound.impl.HttpInboundLink.processRequest(HttpInboundLink.java:305) [21.10.13 07:36:12:604 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at com.ibm.ws.http.channel.inbound.impl.HttpICLReadCallback.complete(HttpICLReadCallback.java:83) [21.10.13 07:36:12:604 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at com.ibm.ws.tcp.channel.impl.AioReadCompletionListener.futureCompleted(AioReadCompletionListener.java:165) [21.10.13 07:36:12:604 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at com.ibm.io.async.AbstractAsyncFuture.invokeCallback(AbstractAsyncFuture.java:217) [21.10.13 07:36:12:604 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at com.ibm.io.async.AsyncChannelFuture.fireCompletionActions(AsyncChannelFuture.java:161) [21.10.13 07:36:12:604 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at com.ibm.io.async.AsyncFuture.completed(AsyncFuture.java:138) [21.10.13 07:36:12:604 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at com.ibm.io.async.ResultHandler.complete(ResultHandler.java:204) [21.10.13 07:36:12:604 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at com.ibm.io.async.ResultHandler.runEventProcessingLoop(ResultHandler.java:775) [21.10.13 07:36:12:604 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at com.ibm.io.async.ResultHandler$2.run(ResultHandler.java:905) [21.10.13 07:36:12:605 CEST] 00000025 SystemErr R at com.ibm.ws.util.ThreadPool$Worker.run(ThreadPool.java:1650) Do you have an idea why the connection is closed?

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  • Spring JMS MQJE001: Completion Code '2', Reason '2042'.

    - by john
    My setup is Spring 3 JMS, MVC + Websphere MQ + Websphere 7 <!-- this is the Message Driven POJO (MDP) --> <bean id="messageListener" class="com.SomeListener" /> <!-- and this is the message listener container --> <bean id="jmsContainer" class="org.springframework.jms.listener.DefaultMessageListenerContainer"> <property name="connectionFactory" ref="xxxCF" /> <property name="destination" ref="someQueue" /> <property name="messageListener" ref="messageListener" /> </bean> When I start up the server, the listener seems to start correctly since it receives the messages that are on the queue as I put them. However, once I run any simple controller/action that doesn't even have anything to do with JMS it gives me the message below over and over... DefaultMessag W org.springframework.jms.listener.DefaultMessageListenerContainer handleListenerSetupFailure Setup of JMS message listener invoker failed for destination 'queue:///ABCDEF.EFF.OUT?persistence=-1' - trying to recover. Cause: MQJMS2008: failed to open MQ queue ''.; nested exception is com.ibm.mq.MQException: MQJE001: Completion Code '2', Reason '2042'. DefaultMessag I org.springframework.jms.listener.DefaultMessageListenerContainer refreshConnectionUntilSuccessful Successfully refreshed JMS Connection ConnectionEve W J2CA0206W: A connection error occurred. To help determine the problem, enable the Diagnose Connection Usage option on the Connection Factory or Data Source. ConnectionEve A J2CA0056I: The Connection Manager received a fatal connection error from the Resource Adapter for resource [email protected] The exception is: javax.jms.JMSException: MQJMS2008: failed to open MQ queue ''. ConnectionEve W J2CA0206W: A connection error occurred. To help determine the problem, enable the Diagnose Connection Usage option on the Connection Factory or Data Source. ConnectionEve A J2CA0056I: The Connection Manager received a fatal connection error from the Resource Adapter for resource jms/XXXQCF. The exception is: javax.jms.JMSException: MQJMS2008: failed to open MQ queue ''. The original listener seems to be still running correctly...but I think the controller is somehow triggering off another connection? Does anyone know what I should check for or what might cause this issue? thanks

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  • JMS createQueue Trouble

    - by OneTimeResponse
    Hi I am having trouble using the createQueue in JMS. I can create a queue successfully but right after I try to do the following and it fails. Any ideas? Thanks. QueueSender mySender = mySession.createSender(myQueue); With the error: javax.jms.InvalidDestinationException: CWSIA0062E: Failed to create a MessageProducer for queue://Q2?busName=myBus2 at com.ibm.ws.sib.api.jms.impl.JmsMsgProducerImpl.<init>(JmsMsgProducerImpl.java:396) at com.ibm.ws.sib.api.jms.impl.JmsQueueSenderImpl.<init>(JmsQueueSenderImpl.java:60) at com.ibm.ws.sib.api.jms.impl.JmsQueueSessionImpl.instantiateProducer(JmsQueueSessionImpl.java:224) at com.ibm.ws.sib.api.jms.impl.JmsSessionImpl.createProducer(JmsSessionImpl.java:865) at com.ibm.ws.sib.api.jms.impl.JmsQueueSessionImpl.createSender(JmsQueueSessionImpl.java:147)

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