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  • RAID5 over LVM on Ubuntu Server 12.04.3

    - by April Ethereal
    I'm trying to create a RAID5 software array using LVM. I use VirtualBox as I'm only learning how LVM works. So I've created 4 virtual SCSI drives and then did the following: pvcreate /dev/sd[b-e] vgcreate /dev/sd[b-e] raid5_vg lvcreate --type raid5 -i 3 -L 1G -n raid_lv raid5_vg However, I get an error after the last command: WARNING: Unrecognised segment type raid5 Using default stripesize 64.00 KiB Rounding size (256 extents) up to stripe boundary size (258 extents) Cannot update volume group raid5_vg with unknown segments in it! So it looks like raid5 is not a valid segment type. "lvm segtypes" also doesn't contain 'raid5' entry: [email protected]:~# lvm segtypes striped zero error free snapshot mirror So my question is - how could I create RAID5 logical volume using LVM only? It seems that it is possible, I saw a few references (not for Ubuntu, unfortunately) for RedHat and Gentoo systems. I don't want to use mdadm for now, until I find out that it is mandatory. Some info about my system is below: [email protected]:~# uname -a Linux ubuntu-lvm 3.8.0I use Ubuntu Server 12.04.3 (i686)-29-generic #42~precise1-Ubuntu SMP Wed Aug 14 15:31:16 UTC 2013 i686 i686 i386 GNU/Linux [email protected]:~# dpkg -l | grep lvm ii lvm2 2.02.66-4ubuntu7.3 The Linux Logical Volume Manager Thanks.

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  • Fixing unbootable installation on LVM root from Desktop LiveCD

    - by intuited
    I just did an installation from the 10.10 Desktop LiveCD, making the root volume an LVM LV. Apparently this is not supported; I managed it by taking these steps before starting the GUI installer app: installing the lvm2 package on the running system creating an LVM-type partition on the system hard drive creating a physical volume, a volume group and a root LV using the LVM tools. I also created a second LV for /var; this I don't think is relevant. creating a filesystem (ext4) on each of the two LVs. After taking these steps, the GUI installer offered the two LVs as installation targets; I gladly accepted, also putting /boot on a primary partition separate from the LVM partition. Installation seemed to go smoothly, and I've verified that both the root and var volumes do contain acceptable-looking directory structures. However, booting fails; if I understood correctly what happened, I was dropped into a busybox running in the initrd filesystem. Although I haven't worked through the entirety of the grub2 docs yet, it looks like the entry that tries to boot my new system is correct: menuentry 'Ubuntu, with Linux 2.6.35-22-generic' --class ubuntu --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os { recordfail insmod part_msdos insmod ext2 set root='(hd0,msdos3)' search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set $UUID_OF_BOOT_FILESYSTEM linux /vmlinuz-2.6.35-22-generic root=/dev/mapper/$LVM_VOLUME_GROUP-root ro quiet splash initrd /initrd.img-2.6.35-22-generic } Note that $VARS are replaced in the actual grub.cfg with their corresponding values. I rebooted back into the livecd and have unpacked the initrd image into a temp directory. It looks like the initrd image lacks LVM functionality. For example, if I'm reading /usr/share/initramfs-tools/hooks/lvm2 (installed with lvm2 on the livecd-booted system, not present on the installed one) correctly, an lvm executable should be situated in /sbin; that is not the case. What's the best way to remedy this situation? I realize that it would be easier to just use the alternate install CD, which apparently supports LVM, but I don't want to wait for it to download and then have to reinstall.

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  • Setting up lvm with HDD and SSD

    - by stonegrizzly
    My current hard drive is just about full and rather than just toss it and get a new one (since it works fine), I want to get a new drive and set them both up using lvm. While I'm at it, I also want to get an SSD to install the OS and applications on. This is my plan: Put / on the SSD (one partition) Put /tmp on a ram disk Put /var on a partition on my new drive Put /home on the rest of the new drive and my current drive using lvm. My goals are: Speed up boot time and application launch Minimize unnecessary writes to the SSD Never have to worry about which disk/partition to store my files on. I want the OS & lvm to take care of that Does this make sense? I'm fairly experienced with Ubuntu but I've never dealt with lvm before.

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  • Unix LVM: how to resize root lvm

    - by Hussein Sabbagh
    I took over a virtual server at work after a co-worker left. He, however, setup the server incorrectly at multiple stages and im cleaning them up as I run into them... Currently I realized that the file system is broken in half onto 2 logical volumes both at 50gb. One is mounted as the root directory and the other as the /home directory. Saddly, the server has taken up 46gb of the root lv and i need to expand it. I have already shrunk and remounted the home lv. I resized the root lv, but I can't figure out how to unmount the root directory while the computer is on. Obviously this needs to be done before I can finalize the expansion, but I don't know how. I'd appreciate any help or pointing in the right direction. Thanks in advance. PS this is on a CentOS server.

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  • No root file system - Alternate CD + LVM

    - by Carlos
    I am trying to install 11.10 as dual boot with Windows 7. I have all partitioned well as you can see here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/7111180385/ I burned the Alternate CD ISO to a CD. Boot from it and followed instructions to Partitioning. There, I configured the LVM partitions as follows: Volume Group ubuntu-vg - Uses Physical Volume /dev/sda7 380GB - Provides Logical Volume home-lv 60GB - Provides Logical Volume root-lv 60GB - Provides Logical Volume swap-lv 6GB That is all I want (note that my /boot is outside of LVM) Then when I say that all is Ok and to write it to disk and continue with the installation, I get the following error. !! Partition Disks No root file system No root file system is defined Please correct this from the partitioning menu. What should I fix and how? I tried issuing the "Revert changes to partitions", but nothing happens. It seems that the LVM configuration has already been written to the CD. HELP!!

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  • Need to know best way to utilize LVM to backup Ubuntu

    - by William Leininger
    So I've had issues with Windows which forced me to install and learn Ubuntu as I'm fed up with MSFT. So now I need to know the most efficient/best way to image Ubuntu so that if I messed something up in one point in time I could always come back to the healthy point in time. During the install I saw an option for LVM and read what it is though I don't know how to utilize it to prevent a situation where I have to reinstall everything. Help? Note: I found on the right hand side of this Ask A Question area an area titled Similar Questions giving me Setting up LVM Snapshot as a backup/restore point in ubuntu This is pretty in depth and a bit complex, though completely doable, is it possible to just use LVM out of the box after a complete HDD wipe and normal Ubuntu install? :Fingers crossed and rabbits foot in hand:

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  • LVM volumes don't appear in Nautilus since upgrading to 11.10

    - by andrea rota
    up to Ubuntu 11.04 all my LVM volumes used to show up in the sidebar of Nautilus as devices available to be mounted, alongside software RAID volumes. after upgrading to 11.10 last week, i can only see software RAID volumes (i can mount/umount them) but i can't find a way to make Nautilus show LVM volumes (on both my main desktop systems). i guess this must be a change in gio/gvfs but i can't find any settings for this - anyone has experienced this issue upon upgrading to Gnome 3.0/3.2 and has figured out how to make LVM volumes appear in Nautilus' sidebar? i can mount the volumes manually ok from the command line. none of them is in /etc/fstab.

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  • Preseeding Ubuntu partman recipe using LVM and RAID

    - by Swav
    I'm trying to preseed Ubuntu 12.04 server installation and created a recipe that would create RAID 1 on 2 drives and then partition that using LVM. Unfortunately partman complains when creating LVM volumes saying there no partitions in recipe that could be used with LVM (in console it complains about unusable recipe). The layout I'm after is RAID 1 on sdb and sdc (installing from USB stick so it takes sda) and then use LVM to create boot, root and swap. The odd thing is that if I change the mount point of boot_lv to home the recipe works fine (apart from mounting in wrong place), but when mounting at /boot it fails I know I could use separate /boot primary partition, but can anybody tell me why it fails. Recipe and relevant options below. ## Partitioning using RAID d-i partman-auto/disk string /dev/sdb /dev/sdc d-i partman-auto/method string raid d-i partman-lvm/device_remove_lvm boolean true d-i partman-md/device_remove_md boolean true #d-i partman-lvm/confirm boolean true d-i partman-auto-lvm/new_vg_name string main_vg d-i partman-auto/expert_recipe string \ multiraid :: \ 100 512 -1 raid \ $lvmignore{ } \ $primary{ } \ method{ raid } \ . \ 256 512 256 ext3 \ $defaultignore{ } \ $lvmok{ } \ method{ format } \ format{ } \ use_filesystem{ } \ filesystem{ ext3 } \ mountpoint{ /boot } \ lv_name{ boot_lv } \ . \ 2000 5000 -1 ext4 \ $defaultignore{ } \ $lvmok{ } \ method{ format } \ format{ } \ use_filesystem{ } \ filesystem{ ext4 } \ mountpoint{ / } \ lv_name{ root_lv } \ . \ 64 512 300% linux-swap \ $defaultignore{ } \ $lvmok{ } \ method{ swap } \ format{ } \ lv_name{ swap_lv } \ . d-i partman-auto-raid/recipe string \ 1 2 0 lvm - \ /dev/sdb1#/dev/sdc1 \ . d-i mdadm/boot_degraded boolean true #d-i partman-md/confirm boolean true #d-i partman-partitioning/confirm_write_new_label boolean true #d-i partman/choose_partition select Finish partitioning and write changes to disk #d-i partman/confirm boolean true #d-i partman-md/confirm_nooverwrite boolean true #d-i partman/confirm_nooverwrite boolean true EDIT: After a bit of googling I found below snippet of code from partman-auto-lvm, but I still don't understand why would they prevent that setup if it's possible to do manually and booting from boot partition on LVM is possible. # Make sure a boot partition isn't marked as lvmok if echo "$scheme" | grep lvmok | grep -q "[[:space:]]/boot[[:space:]]"; then bail_out unusable_recipe fi

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  • Restore data from overwritten LVM

    - by Matthias Bayer
    I lost all of my data (8 TB) which I collected over the past few years yesterday because I made some seriuos mistakes during the remounting of my LVM. I run a XenServer5.6 installation with additional 4 harddisks for data storage. An LVM over those 4 HDDs was used to store all of my data. Yesterday, I reinstalled XenServer and wanted to mount my old Harddrives and add the LVM. I run xe sr-create [...] for all disks (/dev/sdb .. /dev/sde), but that was totally wrong. This command deletes the old LVM on the disks and created an new, empty lvm on every single disk with no partitions. No i got 4 empty harddrives :( Is it possible to recover some data from that lost LVM volumes? I have no clue how to do it because i deleted all informations about the old LVM. Is there a way to access the files insed that old lvm directly?

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  • Proper way to remove an active / inactive LVM snapshot

    - by user2622247
    I have created a sample ruby script file for removing extra LVM snapshots from the system. For removing LVM snapshot, we are using lvremove command. This command is working fine and we can remove snapshots from the system. # sudo lvremove /dev/ops/dbbackup lvremove -- do you really want to remove "/dev/ops/dbbackup"? [y/n]: y Sometimes while removing snapshots we are getting following errors. Unable to deactivate open rootfs_12.10_20140812_00-cow (252:8) Failed to resume rootfs_12.10_20140812_00. libdevmapper exiting with 7 device(s) still suspended. The system gets frozen. We cannot fire any command or can not perform any action on it. After restarting the system, it is functioning fine. We can perform all the operations even we can delete that snapshot also. I searched about it I found these threads https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=659762 and https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=674682 Solution from this thread is after getting the error but I have to avoid this type of error. I have a question, Is there any better way removing LVM snapshots? So that we can avoid this type of error. If anyone needs more info feel free to ask me.

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  • Accessing host LVM partition from Windows XP through Virt.manager 0.8.5 / Qemu / KVM

    - by Nico de Smidt
    Hi, requested use case is having a Windows XP SP3 guest running in 64bit Ubuntu. (Linux pcs 2.6.35-22-server #35-Ubuntu SMP Sat Oct 16 22:02:33 UTC 2010 x86_64 GNU/Linux) I want this guest to access an LVM LV on the Ubuntu disk. I've setup the following LVM config: --- Logical volume --- LV Name /dev/storage/sdc1 VG Name storage LV UUID Zg5IMC-OlqB-prL5-fgg4-3A9A-OgKP-oZ0QkJ LV Write Access read/write LV Status available # open 0 LV Size 1.01 GiB Current LE 259 Segments 1 Allocation inherit Read ahead sectors auto - currently set to 256 Block device 251:3 -- 1) I've setup a storage pool for /dev/storage 2) I've mkfs.vfat /dev/storage/sdc1 3) and made a virtual IDE disk in the virt-manager setup for the guest. Target device: IDE Disk 2 Source path: /dev/storage/sdc1 -- Now when running XP (guest) Windows sees a new disk in Disk Manager and want's to install a partition on it, since it believes the drive is empty. After formatting from within Windows I can put data on the new disk volume. -- Back in Ubuntu however I cannot access this this any more since it created a partition within an LVM Logical Volume. Running fdisk -l shows the following: [email protected]:/media# fdisk -l /dev/storage/sdc1 Disk /dev/storage/sdc1: 1086 MB, 1086324736 bytes 32 heads, 63 sectors/track, 1052 cylinders Units = cylinders of 2016 * 512 = 1032192 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes Disk identifier: 0x8d72e4f4 Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/storage/sdc1p1 1 1050 1058368+ c W95 FAT32 (LBA) -- which seems fine to me, but when trying to mount /dev/storage/sdc1p1 I get the following error: mount /dev/storage/sdc1p1 /media/xp mount: special device /dev/storage/sdc1p1 does not exist which makes sense since in lvdisplay sdc1p1 does not exist Main question: I want to mount the vfat partition in both Ubuntu and XP What am I missing here????? regards, and thanks for your consideration. Nico

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  • How to run multiple distros using lvm

    - by Mark
    I've seen quite a few posts around about running multiple distros but not sure they apply to using LVM (and without Windows). I'm using a machine that's about 3 years old. Setup: Intel Core i7 2.8GHz 8GB Ram 1TB SATA HDD At this point, I'd like to install 12.10 and Mint 14, leaving the option open to install additional distros down the road. I could be way off, but I'm thinking about creating at least 2 primary /boot partitions (1 for 12.10 and 1 for Mint) and another partition for LVM leaving room for additional /boot partitions. Then creating a VG and separate LVs for Ubuntu 12.10 and Linux Mint 14. I understand I can share partitions between the 2 installs, but I'm only using this for testing and I have tons of space to play with. LVM seemed logical considering I may want to install and test additional distros. I guess I could share the /swap partition across the board without problems, right? I'm unclear about GRUB2. How do I handle the bootloader situation? Install 12.10 and get it running then make changes to grub.cfg after installing Mint? And do I not install GRUB for Mint or do I install it in a different location? Any guidance would be appreciated.

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  • Unable to mount an LVM Hard-drive after upgrade

    - by Bruce Staples
    I imagine this is a basic gotcha ... but I can't see it. I have a system with 2(physical) harddrives. The boot system (/dev/sda) was running 10.04 & the second drive (/dev/sdb) was just a mounted filesystem. I did a clean load of Ubuntu 12.04 overwriting /dev/sda (not an upgrade) & now cannot mount the second drive. so I do not know what to enter it into the fstab ... I had expected to use: /dev/sdb /tera ext4 defaults 0 2 But even manual mounting fails (I also have tried various "-t" options on the off chance!) sudo mount -t ext4 /dev/sdb1 /tera mount: wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on /dev/sdb1, missing codepage or helper program, or other error In some cases useful info is found in syslog - try dmesg | tail or so Output from disk queries indicate that it is a Linux LVM & a healthy disk still. sudo lshw -C disk *-disk:0 description: ATA Disk product: WDC WD5000AACS-0 vendor: Western Digital physical id: 0 bus info: [email protected]:0.0.0 logical name: /dev/sda version: 01.0 serial: WD-WCASU1401098 size: 465GiB (500GB) capabilities: partitioned partitioned:dos configuration: ansiversion=5 signature=00015a55 *-disk:1 description: ATA Disk product: WDC WD10EADS-00L vendor: Western Digital physical id: 1 bus info: [email protected]:0.0.0 logical name: /dev/sdb version: 01.0 serial: WD-WCAU47836304 size: 931GiB (1TB) capabilities: partitioned partitioned:dos configuration: ansiversion=5 sudo fdisk -l Disk /dev/sda: 500.1 GB, 500106780160 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 60801 cylinders, total 976771055 sectors Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes Disk identifier: 0x00015a55 Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/sda1 * 2048 972580863 486289408 83 Linux /dev/sda2 972582910 976769023 2093057 5 Extended /dev/sda5 972582912 976769023 2093056 82 Linux swap / Solaris Disk /dev/sdb: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders, total 1953525168 sectors Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes Disk identifier: 0x00000000 Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/sdb1 1 1953525167 976762583+ 8e Linux LVM LVM doesn't appear to be an option for mount or fstab. ... and here's a Smart data Screenshot from Disk Utility.

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  • Issues with LVM partition size in Server 13.04

    - by Michael
    I am new to ubuntu and a little confused about how hard drive partitions and LVM works. I remember setting up Ubuntu server 13.04 and telling to to use 1TB of a 3TB server. Well I have maxed that out with blu-ray rips and want the rest of the drive for space. On log-in it says: System load: 2.24 Processes: 179 Usage of /: 88.7% of 912.89GB Users logged in: 0 Memory usage: 6% IP address for p5p1: 192.168.0.100 Swap usage: 0% => / is using 88.7% of 912.89GB lvdisplay outputs: --- Logical volume --- LV Path /dev/DeathStar-vg/root LV Name root VG Name DeathStar-vg LV Write Access read/write LV Creation host, time DeathStar, 2013-05-18 22:21:11 -0400 LV Status available # open 1 LV Size 2.70 TiB Current LE 707789 Segments 2 Allocation inherit Read ahead sectors auto - currently set to 256 Block device 252:0 --- Logical volume --- LV Path /dev/DeathStar-vg/swap_1 LV Name swap_1 VG Name DeathStar-vg LV Write Access read/write LV Creation host, time DeathStar, 2013-05-18 22:21:11 -0400 LV Status available # open 2 LV Size 3.75 GiB Current LE 959 Segments 1 Allocation inherit Read ahead sectors auto - currently set to 256 Block device 252:1 vgdisplay outputs: VG Name DeathStar-vg System ID Format lvm2 Metadata Areas 1 Metadata Sequence No 4 VG Access read/write VG Status resizable MAX LV 0 Cur LV 2 Open LV 2 Max PV 0 Cur PV 1 Act PV 1 VG Size 2.73 TiB PE Size 4.00 MiB Total PE 715335 Alloc PE / Size 708748 / 2.70 TiB Free PE / Size 6587 / 25.73 GiB df outputs: Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on /dev/mapper/DeathStar--vg-root 957238932 848972636 59634696 94% / none 4 0 4 0% /sys/fs/cgroup udev 1864716 4 1864712 1% /dev tmpfs 374968 1060 373908 1% /run none 5120 4 5116 1% /run/lock none 1874824 148 1874676 1% /run/shm none 102400 24 102376 1% /run/user /dev/sda2 234153 56477 165184 26% /boot And fdisk /dev/sda -l outputs: Disk /dev/sda: 3000.6 GB, 3000592982016 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 364801 cylinders, total 5860533168 sectors Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes Disk identifier: 0x00000000 Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/sda1 1 4294967295 2147483647+ ee GPT Partition 1 does not start on physical sector boundary. I just don't know what to make of all this and am not sure how I can make it use all 2.73TBs. Thanks in advance for any help. EDIT-- Yes I did make changes to the LVM Config, but it didnt do anything. As requested, output of parted -l /dev/sda Model: ATA WDC WD30EFRX-68A (scsi) Disk /dev/sda: 3001GB Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/4096B Partition Table: gpt Number Start End Size File system Name Flags 1 1049kB 2097kB 1049kB bios_grub 2 2097kB 258MB 256MB ext2 3 258MB 3001GB 3000GB lvm Model: ATA WDC WD30EFRX-68A (scsi) Disk /dev/sdb: 3001GB Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/4096B Partition Table: msdos Number Start End Size Type File system Flags Model: Linux device-mapper (linear) (dm) Disk /dev/mapper/DeathStar--vg-swap_1: 4022MB Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/4096B Partition Table: loop Number Start End Size File system Flags 1 0.00B 4022MB 4022MB linux-swap(v1) Model: Linux device-mapper (linear) (dm) Disk /dev/mapper/DeathStar--vg-root: 2969GB Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/4096B Partition Table: loop Number Start End Size File system Flags 1 0.00B 2969GB 2969GB ext4

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  • Unable to boot 12.04 server: no LVM activated and impossible to mount /

    - by baronKarza
    I'm stuck in the Busy Box shell after upgrading from Ubuntu server 11.10 to Ubuntu server 12.04 64 bit. During the booting phase the system hangs while mounting root filesystem. My system is so configured: /dev/sda1 -- /boot /dev/mapper/vg-lv_root /dev/mapper/vg-lv_var /dev/mapper/vg-lv_tmp When the boot process fails and I'm forwarded to the busybox shell, if I type vgchange -ay I can mount my volumes and all it's OK. But it does not enable LVM automatically so that it is impossible to mount root, var, and tmp. I tried to start with a Knoppix, chroot, reinstall (aptitude) both kernel and lvm2 as suggested by this tread "Fixing unbootable installation on LVM root from Desktop LiveCD": nothing changed. I can't figure out what is the problem. Any suggestion is welcome. Thanks in advance.

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  • disk space worngly displayed after installing LVM disk

    - by Ubuntuser
    I installed ubuntu server using LVM partitioning on a 1 TB hard disk. However, after installation, i can only see 10 Gig space here is the fidsk output ` # fdisk -l Disk /dev/sda: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes Disk identifier: 0x00041507 Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/sda1 * 1 10 71680 83 Linux Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary. /dev/sda2 10 121602 976689152 8e Linux LVM Disk /dev/dm-0: 10.7 GB, 10737418240 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 1305 cylinders Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes Disk identifier: 0x00000000 Disk /dev/dm-0 doesn't contain a valid partition table Disk /dev/dm-1: 2147 MB, 2147483648 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 261 cylinders Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes Disk identifier: 0x00000000 Disk /dev/dm-1 doesn't contain a valid partition table You have new mail in /var/mail/root and df -h output df -h Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on /dev/mapper/system-root 9.9G 6.6G 2.8G 71% / devtmpfs 1.9G 232K 1.9G 1% /dev tmpfs 1.9G 4.0K 1.9G 1% /dev/shm /dev/sda1 68M 22M 43M 34% /boot tmpfs 6.0G 0 6.0G 0% /var/spool/asterisk/monitor You have new mail in /var/mail/root ` any way to increase this space without reisntalling?

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  • Is Error Recovery Control or TLER necessary for software RAID5 using LVM

    - by Vincent Davis
    I ave been told that for RAID configurations you don't what to use standard desktop drives because they when/if they enter a error recovery mode they might time out and get dropped from the raid. Is this true for LVM software RAID or this this a hardware RAID issue primarily?. We are running this server primarily as a backup server and would like to take advantage of the lower price of the desktop drives.

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  • How to resize a LVM partition?

    - by iiddaannyy
    I want to shrink my second (lvm) partition, so I can create a new partition in the freespace. I am using Live-CD to do so, because I know I can't resize/move this partition while it is in use. When I opened GParted in Live-CD, I realized that I could not resize the partition, because when I right-click it, the option "resize/move" is disabled. I tried to unmount it, to "lazy" unmount it (umount -l /dev/sda2) but it didn't work. A screenshot from GParted:

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  • how to multi-boot/upgrade linux from LVM-based partition

    - by kenny-bobby
    i currently have FC3 linux which installed itself on the hard disk using LVM partitioning, so it is basically all one big partition. i would like to try some other distributions and upgrade to something newer, but don't want to lose my current capabilities and data files, and i know nothing or less about LVM. Is it possible (and if so an example would be nice) to install a non-LVM-based distribution on the LVM disk and have multi-boot options? Or do i have to start over new and drop the LVM? My guess is that i should save my /home (data files and .rc files) on a backup device first, then somewhere/somehow create a new partion for installing another distribution. Any LVM experts out there that have tried anything like this--well i sure could use some pointers and advice...

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  • LVM / Device Mapper maps wrong device

    - by DaDaDom
    Hi, I run a LVM setup on a raid1 created by mdadm. md2 is based on sda6 (major:minor 8:6) and sdb6 (8:22). md2 is partition 9:2. The VG on top of md2 has 4 LVs, var, home, usr, tmp. First the problem: While booting it seems as if the device mapper takes the wrong partition for the mapping! Immediately after boot the information is like ~# dmsetup table systemlvm-home: 0 4194304 linear 8:22 384 systemlvm-home: 4194304 16777216 linear 8:22 69206400 systemlvm-home: 20971520 8388608 linear 8:22 119538048 systemlvm-home: 29360128 6291456 linear 8:22 243270016 systemlvm-tmp: 0 2097152 linear 8:22 41943424 systemlvm-usr: 0 10485760 linear 8:22 20971904 systemlvm-var: 0 10485760 linear 8:22 10486144 systemlvm-var: 10485760 6291456 linear 8:22 4194688 systemlvm-var: 16777216 4194304 linear 8:22 44040576 systemlvm-var: 20971520 10485760 linear 8:22 31457664 systemlvm-var: 31457280 20971520 linear 8:22 48234880 systemlvm-var: 52428800 33554432 linear 8:22 85983616 systemlvm-var: 85983232 115343360 linear 8:22 127926656 ~# cat /proc/mdstat Personalities : [raid1] md2 : active (auto-read-only) raid1 sda6[0] 151798080 blocks [2/1] [U_] md0 : active raid1 sda1[0] sdb1[1] 96256 blocks [2/2] [UU] md1 : active raid1 sda2[0] sdb2[1] 2931776 blocks [2/2] [UU] I have to manually "lvchange -an" all LVs, add /dev/sdb6 back to the raid and reactivate the LVs, then all is fine. But it prevents me from automounting the partitions and obviously leads to a bunch of other problems. If everything works fine, the information is like ~$ cat /proc/mdstat Personalities : [raid1] md2 : active raid1 sdb6[1] sda6[0] 151798080 blocks [2/2] [UU] ... ~# dmsetup table systemlvm-home: 0 4194304 linear 9:2 384 systemlvm-home: 4194304 16777216 linear 9:2 69206400 systemlvm-home: 20971520 8388608 linear 9:2 119538048 systemlvm-home: 29360128 6291456 linear 9:2 243270016 systemlvm-tmp: 0 2097152 linear 9:2 41943424 systemlvm-usr: 0 10485760 linear 9:2 20971904 systemlvm-var: 0 10485760 linear 9:2 10486144 systemlvm-var: 10485760 6291456 linear 9:2 4194688 systemlvm-var: 16777216 4194304 linear 9:2 44040576 systemlvm-var: 20971520 10485760 linear 9:2 31457664 systemlvm-var: 31457280 20971520 linear 9:2 48234880 systemlvm-var: 52428800 33554432 linear 9:2 85983616 systemlvm-var: 85983232 115343360 linear 9:2 127926656 I think that LVM for some reason just "takes" /dev/sdb6 which is then missing in the raid. I tried almost all options in the lvm.conf but none seems to work. Below is some more information, like config files. Does anyone have any idea about what is going on here and how to prevent that? If you need any additional information, please let me know Thanks in advance! Dominik The information (off a "repaired" system): ~# cat /etc/debian_version 5.0.4 ~# uname -a Linux kermit 2.6.26-2-686 #1 SMP Wed Feb 10 08:59:21 UTC 2010 i686 GNU/Linux ~# lvm version LVM version: 2.02.39 (2008-06-27) Library version: 1.02.27 (2008-06-25) Driver version: 4.13.0 ~# cat /etc/mdadm/mdadm.conf DEVICE partitions ARRAY /dev/md1 level=raid1 num-devices=2 metadata=00.90 UUID=11e9dc6c:1da99f3f:b3088ca6:c6fe60e9 ARRAY /dev/md0 level=raid1 num-devices=2 metadata=00.90 UUID=92ed1e4b:897361d3:070682b3:3baa4fa1 ARRAY /dev/md2 level=raid1 num-devices=2 metadata=00.90 UUID=601d4642:39dc80d7:96e8bbac:649924ba ~# mount /dev/md1 on / type ext3 (rw,errors=remount-ro) tmpfs on /lib/init/rw type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,mode=0755) proc on /proc type proc (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev) sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev) procbususb on /proc/bus/usb type usbfs (rw) udev on /dev type tmpfs (rw,mode=0755) tmpfs on /dev/shm type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev) devpts on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,noexec,nosuid,gid=5,mode=620) /dev/md0 on /boot type ext3 (rw) /dev/mapper/systemlvm-usr on /usr type reiserfs (rw) /dev/mapper/systemlvm-tmp on /tmp type reiserfs (rw) /dev/mapper/systemlvm-home on /home type reiserfs (rw) /dev/mapper/systemlvm-var on /var type reiserfs (rw) ~# grep -v ^$ /etc/lvm/lvm.conf | grep -v "#" devices { dir = "/dev" scan = [ "/dev" ] preferred_names = [ ] filter = [ "a|/dev/md.*|", "r/.*/" ] cache_dir = "/etc/lvm/cache" cache_file_prefix = "" write_cache_state = 1 sysfs_scan = 1 md_component_detection = 1 ignore_suspended_devices = 0 } log { verbose = 0 syslog = 1 overwrite = 0 level = 0 indent = 1 command_names = 0 prefix = " " } backup { backup = 1 backup_dir = "/etc/lvm/backup" archive = 1 archive_dir = "/etc/lvm/archive" retain_min = 10 retain_days = 30 } shell { history_size = 100 } global { umask = 077 test = 0 units = "h" activation = 1 proc = "/proc" locking_type = 1 fallback_to_clustered_locking = 1 fallback_to_local_locking = 1 locking_dir = "/lib/init/rw" } activation { missing_stripe_filler = "/dev/ioerror" reserved_stack = 256 reserved_memory = 8192 process_priority = -18 mirror_region_size = 512 readahead = "auto" mirror_log_fault_policy = "allocate" mirror_device_fault_policy = "remove" } :~# vgscan -vvv Processing: vgscan -vvv O_DIRECT will be used Setting global/locking_type to 1 File-based locking selected. Setting global/locking_dir to /lib/init/rw Locking /lib/init/rw/P_global WB Wiping cache of LVM-capable devices /dev/block/1:0: Added to device cache /dev/block/1:1: Added to device cache /dev/block/1:10: Added to device cache /dev/block/1:11: Added to device cache /dev/block/1:12: Added to device cache /dev/block/1:13: Added to device cache /dev/block/1:14: Added to device cache /dev/block/1:15: Added to device cache /dev/block/1:2: Added to device cache /dev/block/1:3: Added to device cache /dev/block/1:4: Added to device cache /dev/block/1:5: Added to device cache /dev/block/1:6: Added to device cache /dev/block/1:7: Added to device cache /dev/block/1:8: Added to device cache /dev/block/1:9: Added to device cache /dev/block/253:0: Added to device cache /dev/block/253:1: Added to device cache /dev/block/253:2: Added to device cache /dev/block/253:3: Added to device cache /dev/block/8:0: Added to device cache /dev/block/8:1: Added to device cache /dev/block/8:16: Added to device cache /dev/block/8:17: Added to device cache /dev/block/8:18: Added to device cache /dev/block/8:19: Added to device cache /dev/block/8:2: Added to device cache /dev/block/8:21: Added to device cache /dev/block/8:22: Added to device cache /dev/block/8:3: Added to device cache /dev/block/8:5: Added to device cache /dev/block/8:6: Added to device cache /dev/block/9:0: Already in device cache /dev/block/9:1: Already in device cache /dev/block/9:2: Already in device cache /dev/bsg/0:0:0:0: Not a block device /dev/bsg/1:0:0:0: Not a block device /dev/bus/usb/001/001: Not a block device [... many more "not a block device"] /dev/core: Not a block device /dev/cpu_dma_latency: Not a block device /dev/disk/by-id/ata-SAMSUNG_HD160JJ_S08HJ10L507895: Aliased to /dev/block/8:16 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/ata-SAMSUNG_HD160JJ_S08HJ10L507895-part1: Aliased to /dev/block/8:17 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/ata-SAMSUNG_HD160JJ_S08HJ10L507895-part2: Aliased to /dev/block/8:18 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/ata-SAMSUNG_HD160JJ_S08HJ10L507895-part3: Aliased to /dev/block/8:19 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/ata-SAMSUNG_HD160JJ_S08HJ10L507895-part5: Aliased to /dev/block/8:21 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/ata-SAMSUNG_HD160JJ_S08HJ10L507895-part6: Aliased to /dev/block/8:22 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/ata-SAMSUNG_HD160JJ_S08HJ10L526800: Aliased to /dev/block/8:0 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/ata-SAMSUNG_HD160JJ_S08HJ10L526800-part1: Aliased to /dev/block/8:1 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/ata-SAMSUNG_HD160JJ_S08HJ10L526800-part2: Aliased to /dev/block/8:2 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/ata-SAMSUNG_HD160JJ_S08HJ10L526800-part3: Aliased to /dev/block/8:3 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/ata-SAMSUNG_HD160JJ_S08HJ10L526800-part5: Aliased to /dev/block/8:5 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/ata-SAMSUNG_HD160JJ_S08HJ10L526800-part6: Aliased to /dev/block/8:6 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/dm-name-systemlvm-home: Aliased to /dev/block/253:2 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/dm-name-systemlvm-tmp: Aliased to /dev/block/253:3 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/dm-name-systemlvm-usr: Aliased to /dev/block/253:1 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/dm-name-systemlvm-var: Aliased to /dev/block/253:0 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/dm-uuid-LVM-rL8Oq2dA7oeRYeu1orJA7Ufnb1kjOyvr25N7CRZpUMzR18NfS6zeSeAVnVT98LuU: Aliased to /dev/block/253:0 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/dm-uuid-LVM-rL8Oq2dA7oeRYeu1orJA7Ufnb1kjOyvr3TpFXtLjYGEwn79IdXsSCZPl8AxmqbmQ: Aliased to /dev/block/253:1 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/dm-uuid-LVM-rL8Oq2dA7oeRYeu1orJA7Ufnb1kjOyvrc5MJ4KolevMjt85PPBrQuRTkXbx6NvTi: Aliased to /dev/block/253:3 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/dm-uuid-LVM-rL8Oq2dA7oeRYeu1orJA7Ufnb1kjOyvrYXrfdg5OSYDVkNeiQeQksgCI849Z2hx8: Aliased to /dev/block/253:2 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/md-uuid-11e9dc6c:1da99f3f:b3088ca6:c6fe60e9: Already in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/md-uuid-601d4642:39dc80d7:96e8bbac:649924ba: Already in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/md-uuid-92ed1e4b:897361d3:070682b3:3baa4fa1: Already in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/scsi-SATA_SAMSUNG_HD160JJS08HJ10L507895: Aliased to /dev/block/8:16 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/scsi-SATA_SAMSUNG_HD160JJS08HJ10L507895-part1: Aliased to /dev/block/8:17 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/scsi-SATA_SAMSUNG_HD160JJS08HJ10L507895-part2: Aliased to /dev/block/8:18 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/scsi-SATA_SAMSUNG_HD160JJS08HJ10L507895-part3: Aliased to /dev/block/8:19 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/scsi-SATA_SAMSUNG_HD160JJS08HJ10L507895-part5: Aliased to /dev/block/8:21 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/scsi-SATA_SAMSUNG_HD160JJS08HJ10L507895-part6: Aliased to /dev/block/8:22 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/scsi-SATA_SAMSUNG_HD160JJS08HJ10L526800: Aliased to /dev/block/8:0 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/scsi-SATA_SAMSUNG_HD160JJS08HJ10L526800-part1: Aliased to /dev/block/8:1 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/scsi-SATA_SAMSUNG_HD160JJS08HJ10L526800-part2: Aliased to /dev/block/8:2 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/scsi-SATA_SAMSUNG_HD160JJS08HJ10L526800-part3: Aliased to /dev/block/8:3 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/scsi-SATA_SAMSUNG_HD160JJS08HJ10L526800-part5: Aliased to /dev/block/8:5 in device cache /dev/disk/by-id/scsi-SATA_SAMSUNG_HD160JJS08HJ10L526800-part6: Aliased to /dev/block/8:6 in device cache /dev/disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:0f.0-scsi-0:0:0:0: Aliased to /dev/block/8:0 in device cache /dev/disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:0f.0-scsi-0:0:0:0-part1: Aliased to /dev/block/8:1 in device cache /dev/disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:0f.0-scsi-0:0:0:0-part2: Aliased to /dev/block/8:2 in device cache /dev/disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:0f.0-scsi-0:0:0:0-part3: Aliased to /dev/block/8:3 in device cache /dev/disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:0f.0-scsi-0:0:0:0-part5: Aliased to /dev/block/8:5 in device cache /dev/disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:0f.0-scsi-0:0:0:0-part6: Aliased to /dev/block/8:6 in device cache /dev/disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:0f.0-scsi-1:0:0:0: Aliased to /dev/block/8:16 in device cache /dev/disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:0f.0-scsi-1:0:0:0-part1: Aliased to /dev/block/8:17 in device cache /dev/disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:0f.0-scsi-1:0:0:0-part2: Aliased to /dev/block/8:18 in device cache /dev/disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:0f.0-scsi-1:0:0:0-part3: Aliased to /dev/block/8:19 in device cache /dev/disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:0f.0-scsi-1:0:0:0-part5: Aliased to /dev/block/8:21 in device cache /dev/disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:0f.0-scsi-1:0:0:0-part6: Aliased to /dev/block/8:22 in device cache /dev/disk/by-uuid/13c1262b-e06f-40ce-b088-ce410640a6dc: Aliased to /dev/block/253:3 in device cache /dev/disk/by-uuid/379f57b0-2e03-414c-808a-f76160617336: Aliased to /dev/block/253:2 in device cache /dev/disk/by-uuid/4fb2d6d3-bd51-48d3-95ee-8e404faf243d: Already in device cache /dev/disk/by-uuid/5c6728ec-82c1-49c0-93c5-f6dbd5c0d659: Aliased to /dev/block/8:5 in device cache /dev/disk/by-uuid/a13cdfcd-2191-4185-a727-ffefaf7a382e: Aliased to /dev/block/253:1 in device cache /dev/disk/by-uuid/e0d5893d-ff88-412f-b753-9e3e9af3242d: Aliased to /dev/block/8:21 in device cache /dev/disk/by-uuid/e79c9da6-8533-4e55-93ec-208876671edc: Aliased to /dev/block/253:0 in device cache /dev/disk/by-uuid/f3f176f5-12f7-4af8-952a-c6ac43a6e332: Already in device cache /dev/dm-0: Aliased to /dev/block/253:0 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/dm-1: Aliased to /dev/block/253:1 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/dm-2: Aliased to /dev/block/253:2 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/dm-3: Aliased to /dev/block/253:3 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/fd: Symbolic link to directory /dev/full: Not a block device /dev/hpet: Not a block device /dev/initctl: Not a block device /dev/input/by-path/platform-i8042-serio-0-event-kbd: Not a block device /dev/input/event0: Not a block device /dev/input/mice: Not a block device /dev/kmem: Not a block device /dev/kmsg: Not a block device /dev/log: Not a block device /dev/loop/0: Added to device cache /dev/MAKEDEV: Not a block device /dev/mapper/control: Not a block device /dev/mapper/systemlvm-home: Aliased to /dev/dm-2 in device cache /dev/mapper/systemlvm-tmp: Aliased to /dev/dm-3 in device cache /dev/mapper/systemlvm-usr: Aliased to /dev/dm-1 in device cache /dev/mapper/systemlvm-var: Aliased to /dev/dm-0 in device cache /dev/md0: Already in device cache /dev/md1: Already in device cache /dev/md2: Already in device cache /dev/mem: Not a block device /dev/net/tun: Not a block device /dev/network_latency: Not a block device /dev/network_throughput: Not a block device /dev/null: Not a block device /dev/port: Not a block device /dev/ppp: Not a block device /dev/psaux: Not a block device /dev/ptmx: Not a block device /dev/pts/0: Not a block device /dev/ram0: Aliased to /dev/block/1:0 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/ram1: Aliased to /dev/block/1:1 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/ram10: Aliased to /dev/block/1:10 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/ram11: Aliased to /dev/block/1:11 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/ram12: Aliased to /dev/block/1:12 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/ram13: Aliased to /dev/block/1:13 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/ram14: Aliased to /dev/block/1:14 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/ram15: Aliased to /dev/block/1:15 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/ram2: Aliased to /dev/block/1:2 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/ram3: Aliased to /dev/block/1:3 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/ram4: Aliased to /dev/block/1:4 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/ram5: Aliased to /dev/block/1:5 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/ram6: Aliased to /dev/block/1:6 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/ram7: Aliased to /dev/block/1:7 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/ram8: Aliased to /dev/block/1:8 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/ram9: Aliased to /dev/block/1:9 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/random: Not a block device /dev/root: Already in device cache /dev/rtc: Not a block device /dev/rtc0: Not a block device /dev/sda: Aliased to /dev/block/8:0 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/sda1: Aliased to /dev/block/8:1 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/sda2: Aliased to /dev/block/8:2 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/sda3: Aliased to /dev/block/8:3 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/sda5: Aliased to /dev/block/8:5 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/sda6: Aliased to /dev/block/8:6 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/sdb: Aliased to /dev/block/8:16 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/sdb1: Aliased to /dev/block/8:17 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/sdb2: Aliased to /dev/block/8:18 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/sdb3: Aliased to /dev/block/8:19 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/sdb5: Aliased to /dev/block/8:21 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/sdb6: Aliased to /dev/block/8:22 in device cache (preferred name) /dev/shm/network/ifstate: Not a block device /dev/snapshot: Not a block device /dev/sndstat: stat failed: Datei oder Verzeichnis nicht gefunden /dev/stderr: Not a block device /dev/stdin: Not a block device /dev/stdout: Not a block device /dev/systemlvm/home: Aliased to /dev/dm-2 in device cache /dev/systemlvm/tmp: Aliased to /dev/dm-3 in device cache /dev/systemlvm/usr: Aliased to /dev/dm-1 in device cache /dev/systemlvm/var: Aliased to /dev/dm-0 in device cache /dev/tty: Not a block device /dev/tty0: Not a block device [... many more "not a block device"] /dev/vcsa6: Not a block device /dev/xconsole: Not a block device /dev/zero: Not a block device Wiping internal VG cache lvmcache: initialised VG #orphans_lvm1 lvmcache: initialised VG #orphans_pool lvmcache: initialised VG #orphans_lvm2 Reading all physical volumes. This may take a while... Finding all volume groups /dev/ram0: Skipping (regex) /dev/loop/0: Skipping (sysfs) /dev/sda: Skipping (regex) Opened /dev/md0 RO /dev/md0: size is 192512 sectors Closed /dev/md0 /dev/md0: size is 192512 sectors Opened /dev/md0 RW O_DIRECT /dev/md0: block size is 1024 bytes Closed /dev/md0 Using /dev/md0 Opened /dev/md0 RW O_DIRECT /dev/md0: block size is 1024 bytes /dev/md0: No label detected Closed /dev/md0 /dev/dm-0: Skipping (regex) /dev/ram1: Skipping (regex) /dev/sda1: Skipping (regex) Opened /dev/md1 RO /dev/md1: size is 5863552 sectors Closed /dev/md1 /dev/md1: size is 5863552 sectors Opened /dev/md1 RW O_DIRECT /dev/md1: block size is 4096 bytes Closed /dev/md1 Using /dev/md1 Opened /dev/md1 RW O_DIRECT /dev/md1: block size is 4096 bytes /dev/md1: No label detected Closed /dev/md1 /dev/dm-1: Skipping (regex) /dev/ram2: Skipping (regex) /dev/sda2: Skipping (regex) Opened /dev/md2 RO /dev/md2: size is 303596160 sectors Closed /dev/md2 /dev/md2: size is 303596160 sectors Opened /dev/md2 RW O_DIRECT /dev/md2: block size is 4096 bytes Closed /dev/md2 Using /dev/md2 Opened /dev/md2 RW O_DIRECT /dev/md2: block size is 4096 bytes /dev/md2: lvm2 label detected lvmcache: /dev/md2: now in VG #orphans_lvm2 (#orphans_lvm2) /dev/md2: Found metadata at 39936 size 2632 (in area at 2048 size 194560) for systemlvm (rL8Oq2-dA7o-eRYe-u1or-JA7U-fnb1-kjOyvr) lvmcache: /dev/md2: now in VG systemlvm with 1 mdas lvmcache: /dev/md2: setting systemlvm VGID to rL8Oq2dA7oeRYeu1orJA7Ufnb1kjOyvr lvmcache: /dev/md2: VG systemlvm: Set creation host to rescue. Closed /dev/md2 /dev/dm-2: Skipping (regex) /dev/ram3: Skipping (regex) /dev/sda3: Skipping (regex) /dev/dm-3: Skipping (regex) /dev/ram4: Skipping (regex) /dev/ram5: Skipping (regex) /dev/sda5: Skipping (regex) /dev/ram6: Skipping (regex) /dev/sda6: Skipping (regex) /dev/ram7: Skipping (regex) /dev/ram8: Skipping (regex) /dev/ram9: Skipping (regex) /dev/ram10: Skipping (regex) /dev/ram11: Skipping (regex) /dev/ram12: Skipping (regex) /dev/ram13: Skipping (regex) /dev/ram14: Skipping (regex) /dev/ram15: Skipping (regex) /dev/sdb: Skipping (regex) /dev/sdb1: Skipping (regex) /dev/sdb2: Skipping (regex) /dev/sdb3: Skipping (regex) /dev/sdb5: Skipping (regex) /dev/sdb6: Skipping (regex) Locking /lib/init/rw/V_systemlvm RB Finding volume group "systemlvm" Opened /dev/md2 RW O_DIRECT /dev/md2: block size is 4096 bytes /dev/md2: lvm2 label detected lvmcache: /dev/md2: now in VG #orphans_lvm2 (#orphans_lvm2) with 1 mdas /dev/md2: Found metadata at 39936 size 2632 (in area at 2048 size 194560) for systemlvm (rL8Oq2-dA7o-eRYe-u1or-JA7U-fnb1-kjOyvr) lvmcache: /dev/md2: now in VG systemlvm with 1 mdas lvmcache: /dev/md2: setting systemlvm VGID to rL8Oq2dA7oeRYeu1orJA7Ufnb1kjOyvr lvmcache: /dev/md2: VG systemlvm: Set creation host to rescue. Using cached label for /dev/md2 Read systemlvm metadata (19) from /dev/md2 at 39936 size 2632 /dev/md2 0: 0 16: home(0:0) /dev/md2 1: 16 24: var(40:0) /dev/md2 2: 40 40: var(0:0) /dev/md2 3: 80 40: usr(0:0) /dev/md2 4: 120 40: var(80:0) /dev/md2 5: 160 8: tmp(0:0) /dev/md2 6: 168 16: var(64:0) /dev/md2 7: 184 80: var(120:0) /dev/md2 8: 264 64: home(16:0) /dev/md2 9: 328 128: var(200:0) /dev/md2 10: 456 32: home(80:0) /dev/md2 11: 488 440: var(328:0) /dev/md2 12: 928 24: home(112:0) /dev/md2 13: 952 206: NULL(0:0) Found volume group "systemlvm" using metadata type lvm2 Read volume group systemlvm from /etc/lvm/backup/systemlvm Unlocking /lib/init/rw/V_systemlvm Closed /dev/md2 Unlocking /lib/init/rw/P_global ~# vgdisplay --- Volume group --- VG Name systemlvm System ID Format lvm2 Metadata Areas 1 Metadata Sequence No 19 VG Access read/write VG Status resizable MAX LV 0 Cur LV 4 Open LV 4 Max PV 0 Cur PV 1 Act PV 1 VG Size 144,75 GB PE Size 128,00 MB Total PE 1158 Alloc PE / Size 952 / 119,00 GB Free PE / Size 206 / 25,75 GB VG UUID rL8Oq2-dA7o-eRYe-u1or-JA7U-fnb1-kjOyvr ~# pvdisplay --- Physical volume --- PV Name /dev/md2 VG Name systemlvm PV Size 144,77 GB / not usable 16,31 MB Allocatable yes PE Size (KByte) 131072 Total PE 1158 Free PE 206 Allocated PE 952 PV UUID ZSAzP5-iBvr-L7jy-wB8T-AiWz-0g3m-HLK66Y :~# lvdisplay --- Logical volume --- LV Name /dev/systemlvm/home VG Name systemlvm LV UUID YXrfdg-5OSY-DVkN-eiQe-Qksg-CI84-9Z2hx8 LV Write Access read/write LV Status available # open 2 LV Size 17,00 GB Current LE 136 Segments 4 Allocation inherit Read ahead sectors auto - currently set to 256 Block device 253:2 --- Logical volume --- LV Name /dev/systemlvm/var VG Name systemlvm LV UUID 25N7CR-ZpUM-zR18-NfS6-zeSe-AVnV-T98LuU LV Write Access read/write LV Status available # open 2 LV Size 96,00 GB Current LE 768 Segments 7 Allocation inherit Read ahead sectors auto - currently set to 256 Block device 253:0 --- Logical volume --- LV Name /dev/systemlvm/usr VG Name systemlvm LV UUID 3TpFXt-LjYG-Ewn7-9IdX-sSCZ-Pl8A-xmqbmQ LV Write Access read/write LV Status available # open 2 LV Size 5,00 GB Current LE 40 Segments 1 Allocation inherit Read ahead sectors auto - currently set to 256 Block device 253:1 --- Logical volume --- LV Name /dev/systemlvm/tmp VG Name systemlvm LV UUID c5MJ4K-olev-Mjt8-5PPB-rQuR-TkXb-x6NvTi LV Write Access read/write LV Status available # open 2 LV Size 1,00 GB Current LE 8 Segments 1 Allocation inherit Read ahead sectors auto - currently set to 256 Block device 253:3

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  • How to resize / enlarge / grow a non-LVM ext4 partition

    - by Mischa
    I have already searched the forums, but couldnt find a good suitable answer: I have an Ubuntu Server 10.04 as KVM Host and a guest system, that also runs 10.04. The host system uses LVM and there are three logical volumes, which are provided to the guest as virtual block devices - one for /, one for /home and one for swap. The guest had been partitioned without LVM. I have already enlarged the logical volume in the host system - the guest successfully sees the bigger virtual disk. However, this virtual disk contains one "good old" partition, which still has the old small size. The output of fdisk -l is [email protected]:/$ LC_ALL=en_US sudo fdisk -l Disk /dev/vda: 32.2 GB, 32212254720 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 3916 cylinders Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes Disk identifier: 0x000c8ce7 Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/vda1 * 1 3917 31455232 83 Linux Disk /dev/vdb: 2147 MB, 2147483648 bytes 244 heads, 47 sectors/track, 365 cylinders Units = cylinders of 11468 * 512 = 5871616 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes Disk identifier: 0x000f2bf7 Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/vdb1 1 366 2095104 82 Linux swap / Solaris Partition 1 has different physical/logical beginnings (non-Linux?): phys=(0, 32, 33) logical=(0, 43, 28) Partition 1 has different physical/logical endings: phys=(260, 243, 47) logical=(365, 136, 44) Disk /dev/vdc: 225.5 GB, 225485783040 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 27413 cylinders Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes Disk identifier: 0x00027f25 Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/vdc1 1 9138 73398272 83 Linux The output of parted print all is Model: Virtio Block Device (virtblk) Disk /dev/vda: 32.2GB Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B Partition Table: msdos Number Start End Size Type File system Flags 1 1049kB 32.2GB 32.2GB primary ext4 boot Model: Virtio Block Device (virtblk) Disk /dev/vdb: 2147MB Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B Partition Table: msdos Number Start End Size Type File system Flags 1 1049kB 2146MB 2145MB primary linux-swap(v1) Model: Virtio Block Device (virtblk) Disk /dev/vdc: 225GB Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B Partition Table: msdos Number Start End Size Type File system Flags 1 1049kB 75.2GB 75.2GB primary ext4 What I want to achieve is to simply grow or resize the partition /dev/vdc1 so that it uses the whole space provided by the virtual block device /dev/vdc. The problem is, that when I try to do that with parted, it complains: (parted) select /dev/vdc Using /dev/vdc (parted) print Model: Virtio Block Device (virtblk) Disk /dev/vdc: 225GB Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B Partition Table: msdos Number Start End Size Type File system Flags 1 1049kB 75.2GB 75.2GB primary ext4 (parted) resize 1 WARNING: you are attempting to use parted to operate on (resize) a file system. parted's file system manipulation code is not as robust as what you'll find in dedicated, file-system-specific packages like e2fsprogs. We recommend you use parted only to manipulate partition tables, whenever possible. Support for performing most operations on most types of file systems will be removed in an upcoming release. Start? [1049kB]? End? [75.2GB]? 224GB Error: File system has an incompatible feature enabled. Compatible features are has_journal, dir_index, filetype, sparse_super and large_file. Use tune2fs or debugfs to remove features. So what can I do? This is a headless production system. What is a safe way to grow this partition? I CAN unmount it, though - so this is not the problem.

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  • Failed GRUB after 10.04 to 12.04 upgrade in system with LVM

    - by Vagelis L
    I am using Ubuntu Server as a SMB server at work and two days ago I have tried to upgrade it to 12.04. After reboot, I got this grub_xput missing grub rescue> and all attempts to start from this prompt failed (missing components, although grub directory is normally set as prefix). My system sits and boots on an LVM (soft raid-5). I have read almost all posts in many forums, tried grub rescue, boot-repair, ubuntu-secure-remix with boot-repair but without positive result. This is the log of my last (and best so far) attempt to fix this system. Any suggestions? Please help.

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  • LVM and cloning HDs

    - by jcea
    Using Linux, I have several backup levels. One of them is a periodical sector by sector copy (using dd) of my laptop harddisk to an external USB disk. Yes, I have other backups too, like remote rsync. This approach (the disk dd) is OK when cloning a HDD with no LVM volumes, since I can plug the external disk anytime and mount the partitions simply mounting /dev/sdb* instead of /dev/sda*. Trivial and handy. Today I moved ALL my harddisk (including the /boot) to LVM. Everything works fine. I will stress it for a couple of days, and then I will do a sector by sector copy to my external harddisk. Now I have a problem, I guess. If in the future I plug the external USB HDD to recover any file, the OS will detect a duplicate LVM configuration, with the same name and the same UUID. Even doing a vgrename (which LVM would be renamed, the internal HDD or the external HDD?), the cloned UUID will not change. Is there any command to change name and UUID? Ideally I would clone the HDD and then change the LVM group name and its UUID, but I don't know how to do it. Another related issue would be... In the past I have booted my laptop using the external disk, using the BIOS boot menu and changing GRUB entries manually to boot from /dev/sdb instead of /dev/sda. But now my current GRUB configuration boots directly from a LVM logical volume, something like: set root='(LVM-root)' in my grub.cfg. So... What is going to happen with duplicated volumes? Any suggestion? I guess I could repartition my external harddisk and change backup strategy from dd to rsync, but this disk has windows installed too, and I really would like to have a physical "real" copy.

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  • Migrating away from LVM

    - by Kye
    I have an Ubuntu home media server setup with 4.5TB split across a few hard-drives (1x3TB, 2x1TB) and I'm using LVM2 to manage the volumes. I have recently added a 60GB SSD to my server, and I wish to use it to house the 'root' partition of my server (which is currently under the LVM group). I don't want to simply add it to the LVM volume group, because (afaik) there's no way to ensure that the SSD will be used for the root filesystem. If I just throw it at the VG, it may be used to house my media, which would defeat the purpose of having the SSD in the first place. I feel that my only solution is to somehow remove my root partition from the LVM setup and copy it across to the SSD. My boot partition is, of course, not part of the LVM group. My disk setup is as follows: 60GB SSD: EMPTY. 1TB HDD: /boot, LVM space. 1TB HDD: LVM space. 3TB HHD: LVM space. I have a few logical volumes. my root (/), a 'media' volume for my media collection, a backup one for my network backups.etc. Does anyone have any advice as to how to go about this? My end goal is to have the 60GB SSD used for my boot and root partitions, with everything else on the 3TB/1TB/1TB hard-drives.

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  • Very poor read performance compared to write performance on md(raid1) / crypt(luks) / lvm

    - by Android5360
    I'm experiencing very poor read performance over raid1/crypt/lvm. In the same time, write speeds are about 2x+ faster on the same setup. On another raid1 setup on the same machine I get normal read speeds (maybe because I'm not using cryptsetup). OS related disks: sda + sdb. I have raid1 configuration with two disks, both are in place. I'm using LVM over the RAID. No encryption. Both disks are WD Green, 5400 rpm. IO test results on this raid1: dd if=/dev/zero of=/tmp/output.img3 bs=8k count=256k conv=fsync - 2147483648 bytes (2.1 GB) copied, 22.3392 s, 96.1 MB/s sync echo 3 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches dd if=/tmp/output.img3 of=/dev/null bs=8k - 2147483648 bytes (2.1 GB) copied, 15.9 s, 135 MB/s And here is the problematic setup (on the same machine). Currently I have only one sdc (WD Green, 5400rpm) configured in software raid1 + crypt (luks, serpent-xts-plain) + lvm. Tomorrow I will attach another disk (sdd) to complete this two-disk raid1 setup. IO tests results on this raid1: dd if=/dev/zero of=output.img3 bs=8k count=256k conv=fsync 2147483648 bytes (2.1 GB) copied, 17.7235 s, 121 MB/s sync echo 3 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches dd if=output.img3 of=/dev/null bs=8k 2147483648 bytes (2.1 GB) copied, 36.2454 s, 59.2 MB/s We can see that the read performance is very very bad (59MB/s compared to 135MB/s when using no encryption). Nothing is using the disks during benchmark. I can confirm this because I checked with iostat and dstat. Details on the hardware: disks: all are WD green, 5400rpm, 64mb cache. cpu: FX-8350 at stock speed ram: 4x4GB at 1066Mhz. Details on the software: OS: Debian Wheezy 7, amd64 mdadm: v3.2.5 - 18th May 2012 LVM version: 2.02.95(2) (2012-03-06) LVM Library version: 1.02.74 (2012-03-06) LVM Driver version: 4.22.0 cryptsetup: 1.4.3 Here is how I configured the slow raid1+crypt+lvm setup: parted /dev/sdc mklabel gpt type: ext4 start: 2048s end: -1 Now the raid, crypt and the lvm configuration: mdadm --create /dev/md1 --level=1 --raid-disks=2 missing /dev/sdc cryptsetup --cipher serpent-xts-plain luksFormat /dev/md1 cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/md1 md1_crypt vgcreate vg_sql /dev/mapper/md1_crypt lvcreate -l 100%VG vg_sql -n lv_sql mkfs.ext4 /dev/mapper/vg_sql-lv-sql mount /dev/mapper/vg_sql-lv_sql /sql So guys, can you help me identify the reason and fix it? It has to be something with the cryptsetup as there is no such read slowdown on the other setup (sda+sdb) where no encryption is present. But I have no idea what to do. Thanks!

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