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  • Weekly technology meeting?

    - by Mag20
    I am thinking of introducing weekly technology meeting where programmers working on the same project can discuss things like: current status of the project on technical side technology backlog. Things that we may have skipped because of deadlines but now coming back to bite us. technology constraints that are limiting developers from being productive new and emerging technologies that may apply to the project Basically looking at the project from programmer's perspective, not the business side. - What would be some good guidelines for a meeting like this? How long should the meeting last? Is weekly too often? Should we time-limit each topic? What kinda of topics are good for a meeting like this and which ones are bad? Is 10 people too many? ...

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  • What management/development practices do you change when a team of 1-3 developers grows to 10+?

    - by Mag20
    My team built a website for a client several years ago. The site taffic has been growing very quickly and our client has been asking us to grow our team to fill their maintenance and feature request needs. We started with a small number of developers, and our team has grown - now we're in the double digits. What management/development changes are the most beneficial when team grows from small "garage-size" team to 10+ developers?

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  • How do you keep cool when production system goes down?

    - by Mag20
    This has happened to most of us... You come to work one day. Everything seems normal: the sun is shining, birds are chirping, but you notice a couple of weird things on your way to work like deja vu with cat in matrix. You get into office, there are a lot of phones ringing, but could be that they are just doing a new sales promotion. You settle in, when you notice a dark cloud hovering over you. It takes you a couple of moments, but you recognize the cloud is your boss. Usually he checks on you every morning with his "Soooo Peeeeter, how about those TCP/IP reports?" routine, but today he forgot everything about common manners and rudely invaded your personal space. No "Good Morning", just some drooling, grunts and curses. He reminds you a bit of neanderthal who is trying to get away from cyber tooth tiger, fear and panic all compressed in a tight ball. You try to decipher the new language that he created since yesterday and you start understanding that something bad happened overnight - production system went down. Now, your system is usually used by clients during regular working hours from 9-5, but for whatever reason you didn't get any alerts on your beeper (for people under 30 - beeper was like a mobile phone that could only ring and tell you who beeped you). Need to remember to charge it next time. So it is 8:45am, the system MUST be up at 9am. Every 10 seconds, your boss lets out yet another curse which communicates to you that another customer is having problems getting into the system. Also several account managers are now hovering over your boss trying to make him understand how clients are REALLY REALLY suffering. Everyone is depending on you to get the system up ASAP and at the same time hinder your progress by constantly distracting you. How do you keep cool in a situation like this?

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  • How to explain to non-technical person why the task will take much longer then they think?

    - by Mag20
    Almost every developer has to answer questions from business side like: Why is going to take 2 days to add this simple contact form? When developer estimates this task, they may divide it into steps: make some changes to Database optimize DB changes for speed add front end HTML write server side code add validation add client side javascript use unit tests make sure SEO is setup is working implement email confirmation refactor and optimize the code for speed ... These maybe hard to explain to non-technical person, who basically sees the whole task as just putting together some HTML and creating a table to store the data. To them it could be 2 hours MAX. So is there a better way to explain why the estimate is high to non-developer?

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  • Best sites to find good .NET Developers

    - by Mag20
    I am looking for good sites to post a position for a .NET developer. I already tried: Craig's list got about 10 resumes, but most couldn't answer our technical questions StackOverflow Careers no responses What sites did you have success with finding good developers? UPDATE 1: Wanted to provide some more information: My company is in NJ. We are a small startup. Less then 10 people. Monster, Dice, CareerBuilder all charge like $500 a month per posting. Seems a bit much. Also only Dice is specifically targeting technical positions. With monster and career builder I am a bit worried about having to go through hundreds of resumes that don't apply.

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  • Moving all UI logic to Client Side?

    - by Mag20
    Our team originally consisted of mostly server side developers with minimum expertise in Javascript. In ASP.NET we used to write a lot of UI logic in code-behind or more recently through controllers in MVC. A little while ago 2 high level client side developers joined our team. They can do in HTMl/CSS/Javascript pretty much anything that we could previously do with server-side code and server-side web controls: Show/hide controls Do validation Control AJAX refreshing So I started to think that maybe it would be more efficient to just create a high level API around our business logic, kinda like Amazon Fulfillment API: http://docs.amazonwebservices.com/fws/latest/APIReference/, so that client side developers would fully take over the UI, while server side developers would only concentrate on business logic. So for ordering system you would have a high level API like: OrderService.asmx CreateOrderResponse CreateOrder(CreateOrderRequest) AddOrderItem AddPayment - SubmitPayment - GetOrderByID FindOrdersByCriteria ... There would be JSON/REST access to API, so it would be easy to consume from client-side UI. We could use this API for both internal UI development and also for 3-rd parties to create their own applications. With advances in Javascript and availability of good client side developers, is it a good time to get rid of code-behind/controllers and just concentrate on developing high level APIs (ala Amazon) that client side developers can consume?

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