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  • How do *you* track and document routine maintenance?

    - by Zak
    What software or system do you guys out on server fault use to remind you to do routine maintenance? How do you checklist and log the various items you are supposed to check? Do you have an internal process document? Do you have cron mail you every week with reminders to check system logs? Also, do you work on a team to do system maintenance, and if so, how do you coordinate who will do what maintenance? If you use a bug/issue tracking system to enter tasks, do you have a cron job enter recurring tasks?

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  • How to Change and Manually Start and Stop Automatic Maintenance in Windows 8

    - by Lori Kaufman
    Windows 8 has a new feature that allows you to automatically run scheduled daily maintenance on your computer. These maintenance tasks run in the background and include security updating and scanning, Windows software updates, disk defragmentation, system diagnostics, among other tasks. We’ve previously shown you how to automate maintenance in Windows 7, Vista, and XP. Windows 8 maintenance is automatic by default and the performance and energy efficiency has been improved over Windows 7. The program for Windows 8 automatic maintenance is called MSchedExe.exe and it is located in the C:\Windows\System32 directory. We will show you how you can change the automatic maintenance settings in Windows 8 and how you can start and stop the maintenance manually. NOTE: It seems that you cannot turn off the automatic maintenance in Windows 8. You can only change the settings and start and stop it manually. Can Dust Actually Damage My Computer? What To Do If You Get a Virus on Your Computer Why Enabling “Do Not Track” Doesn’t Stop You From Being Tracked

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  • htaccess code for maintenance page redirect

    - by Force Flow
    I set up a maintenance page that I could enable through an htaccess file. The html file is located in a folder called "maintenance". The html file has some images in it. However, visitors to the page see no images, even though I added a line to allow them. If I try to visit an image in the browser directly, it redirects to the maintenance.htm page. Am I missing something? # Redirects visitors to maintenance page except for specific IP addresses # uncomment lines when redirecting visitors to maintenance page; comment when done. # Also see the section on "redirects visitors from maintenance page to homepage" # #RewriteCond %{REMOTE_ADDR} !^127.0.0.1$ #RewriteCond %{REMOTE_ADDR} !^111.111.111.111$ RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !/maintenance/maintenance\.htm$ [NC] RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !\.(jpg|jpeg|png|gif|css|ico)$ [NC] RewriteRule ^(.*)$ /maintenance/maintenance.htm [R=302,L] # # end redirects visitors to maintenance page # Redirects visitors from maintenance page to homepage # comment lines when redirecting visitors to maintenance page; uncomment when done # #Redirect 301 /maintenance/maintenance.htm / # # end redirects visitors from maintenance page to homepage

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  • looking for a clean way of how to bring down a ftp server for maintenance

    - by harald
    hello, i'm currently thinking of a clean way of how to bring an ftp server down for maintenance. i wonder, if anybody out there could give me some hints of how to solve this: i don't want to interrupt any current uploads, but want to block any new connects / uploads and wait, till uploads have finished, before taking down the ftp server is there a way of dynamically prevent user-logins and show a message eg.: "ftp currently down for maintenance" when a user tries to log in? are my thoughts on this very uncommon or how do others handle this -- i feel, that just halting ftp server and killing any current uploads is not the right way for this ... i use proftpd (with SQL backend) btw, maybe there are some specific solutions for this -- or are there any generic tools to achieve this? many thanks!

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  • Becoming a "maintenance developer"

    - by anon
    So I've kind of been getting angry about the current position I'm in, and I'd love to get other developers' input on this. I've been at my current place of employment for about 11 months now. When I began, I was working on all new features. I basically worked on an entire new web project for the first 5-6 months I was here. After this, I was moved to more of a service oriented role (which was still great, all new stuff for me), and I was in this role for about the past 5-6 months. Here's where the problem comes in. Basically, a couple of days ago I was made the support/maintenance guy. Now, we have an IT support team, so I'm not talking that kind of support, I'm talking more of a second level support guy (when the guys on the surface can't really get to the root of the issue), coupled with working on maintenance issues that have been lingering in the backlog for a while. To me, a developer with about 3 years of experience, this is kind of disheartening. With the type of work place this is, I wouldn't be surprised if these support issues take up most of my days, and I barely make it to working on maintenance issues. Also, most of these support issues aren't even related to code, they are more or less just knowing the system architecture, working with making sure services are running/getting started properly, handling/fixing bad data, etc. I'm a developer, so this part sucks. Also, even when I do have time to work maintenance, these are basically just bug fixes/improving bad code, so this sucks as well, however at least it's related to coding. Am I wrong for getting angry here? I don't want to really complain about it, but to be honest, I wasn't spoken to about this or anything, I was kind of just sent an e-mail letting me know I'm the guy for this type of thing, and that was that. The entire team took a few minutes to give me their "that sucks" talk, because they know how annoying it is to be on support for the type of work we do, so I know I'm not the only guy that knows it's not that great of an opportunity. I'm just kind of on the fence about how to move forward. Obviously I'm just going to continue working for the time being, no point making a bad impression on anybody, but I'd like to know how you guys would approach this situation, or how you think I should be feeling about it/how you guys would feel. Thanks guys.

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  • LDoms and Maintenance Mode

    - by Owen Allen
     I got a few questions about how maintenance mode works with LDoms. "I have a Control Domain that I need to do maintenance on. What does being put in maintenance mode actually do for a Control Domain?" Maintenance mode is what you use when you're going to be shutting a system down, or otherwise tinkering with it, and you don't want Ops Center to generate incidents and notification of incidents. Maintenance mode stops new incidents from being generated, but it doesn't stop polling, or monitoring, the system and it doesn't prevent alerts. "What does maintenance mode do with the guests on a Control Domain?" If you have auto recovery set and the Control Domain is a member of a server pool of eligible systems, putting the Control Domain in maintenance mode automatically migrates guests to an available Control Domain.  When a Control Domain is in maintenance mode, it is not eligible to receive guests and the placement policies for guest creation and for automatic recovery won't select this server as a possible destination. If there isn't a server pool or there aren't any eligible systems in the pool, the guests are shut down. You can select a logical domain from the Assets section to view the Dashboard for the virtual machine and the Automatic Recovery status, either Enabled or Disabled. To change the status, click the action in the Actions pane. "If I have to do maintenance on a system and I do not want to initiate auto-recovery, what do I have to do so that I can manually bring down the Control Domain (and all its Guest domains)?" Use the Disable Automatic Recovery action. "If I put a Control Domain into maintenance mode, does that also put the OS into maintenance mode?" No, just the Control Domain server. You have to put the OS into maintenance mode separately. "Also, is there an easy way to see what assets are in maintenance mode? Can we put assets into, or take them out of, maintenance mode on some sort of group level?" You can create a user-defined group that will automatically include assets in maintenance mode. The docs here explain how to set up these groups. You'll use a group rule that looks like this:

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  • How to set only specific nginx server block into maintenance mode programmatically

    - by Ville Mattila
    I am looking for a solution to automate one of our application's deployment process. In the beginning of deployment, I would like to programmatically set the specified server into maintenance mode and finally after the deployment has been completed, remove the maintenance mode flag from the nginx server. By maintenance mode, I mean that nginx should response with HTTP Response Code 503 to all the requests (with possible custom page). I know how to set the server block to respond with 503 code (see http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/custom-nginx-maintenance-page-with-http503/) but the question is about how to do this programmatically and most efficiently. Two options have came to my mind: Option 1: At the beginning of the deployment process, write a maintenance file into document root and conditionally check an existence of the maintenance file in nginx server config: server { if (-f $document_root/in_maintenance_mode) { return 503; } } This method contains certain overhead as the file existence is checked for each request. Is it possible to check the file existence only when loading the nginx config? Option 2: Deployment script replaces the whole nginx server configuration file with a maintenance version and swaps it back in the end of the deployment. If this method is used, I am concerned about possible other automation processes like puppet that may be override the maintenance configuration file.

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  • Best Practice for Software Maintenance Console

    - by Ben-G
    I am looking for a list of must-have maintenance/administration features/components/services for enterprise applications. I know following common components: Configuration Cockpit (shows current configuration mistakes/issues) Load-Analysis (shows the current load on different system components) Vitality measures Log File Access System Restart Capability Backup/Restore Capability Are there any widely accepted services/features which are included in any software with a focus on reliablity and maintainability?

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  • October Update to Rules-Driven Maintenance

    - by merrillaldrich
    Happy Fall! It’s a beautiful October here in Minneapolis / Saint Paul. In preparation for my home town SQL Saturday this weekend, as well as the PASS Summit, I offer an update to the Rules-Driven Maintenance code I originally published back in August 2012 . It’s hard to believe this thing is now more than two years old – it’s been an incredible help as the number of databases and instance my team manages has grown. One enhancement with this update is the ability to set overrides for both Index and...(read more)

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  • Ubuntu boots up maintenance shell?

    - by Andrew
    Any time I try to start up my computer it goes to a screen titled GNU GRUB version 1.99-12ubuntu5 I can then choose from 5 different options. If I try to just boot Ubuntu, with Linux 3.0.0-20-generic it then goes to a screen saying: mountall: /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6: version 'GLIBC_2.14' not found (required by /lib/libply.so.2) General error mounting filesystems. A maintenance shell will now be started. CONTROL-D will terminate this shell and reboot the system. [email protected]:~# Control-D just brings me back to the first screen. And nothing works in recovery mode. How can I fix this?

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  • Cost of maintenance depending on paradigms

    - by Anto
    Is there any data on which paradigms allow for code which is easier/cheaper to maintain? Certainly, independantly of the chosen paradigm, good design is cheaper to maintain than bad, but there should probably be major differences coming only from the paradigm choice. Unstructured programming, for instance, generates very messy code (spaghetti code) which is expensive to maintain. In object oriented programming, implementation details are hidden and thus it should be pretty cheap to change those. In functional programming, there are no side effects, thus there is lesser risk of introducing bugs during maintainance, which should be cheaper. Is there any data on which paradigms are the most cost-efficient when coming down to maintenance? If no such data exists, what is your take on the question?

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  • GIS-based data visualization and maintenance tool

    - by Dave Jarvis
    Background Looking to leverage an existing GIS system for exploring organizational data. Architecture The following figure represents a high-level overview of the system's desired features: The most basic usage would be as follows: The user visits a web site. The system presents a map (having regions, cities, and buildings). The user drills-down on the map to a particular building. The system provides a basic CRUD interface. The user can view and modify information about personnel (e.g., their assigned teams), equipment (e.g., network appliances), applications, and the building itself (e.g., contact and phone numbers). Ideally, all the components should be open-source (or otherwise free). Problem This must be a small project that needs a quick (but functional) prototype, mostly to confirm whether or not such a system would be useful in the long term. Questions What software components would you use to quickly develop a working prototype? What open-source solutions already exist, if any? Ideas Here is what I am thinking: PostGIS - Define the regions, cities, and sites Google Maps - Display an interactive, clickable map geoJSON - Protocol between PostGIS and Google Maps Seam - CRUD interface Custom Development For example, this would entail: Installation and configuration Configure SSH for remote logins Subversion (or git) PostgreSQL PostGIS Java Tomcat Seam JasperReports Enter GIS information into PostGIS Aggregate data sources into PostgreSQL database Develop starting page for map interface Develop clickable Google Maps interface Develop summary reports Develop CRUD interface using Seam for data maintenance Surely something like this already exists? Thank you!

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  • An Oracle Event for Your Facility & Equipment Maintenance Staff

    - by Mark Rosenberg
    The 7th Annual Oracle Maintenance Summit will occur February 4 – 6, 2013 at the Hyatt Regency San Francisco. This year, the Maintenance Summit will be one of the major pillars of a larger Oracle Value Chain Summit. What makes this event different from the other events hosted by Oracle and the PeopleSoft Community’s various user groups is that it is specifically meant to provide a venue for the facility and equipment maintenance community to talk about all things related to maintenanceMaintenance Planners, Maintenance Schedulers, Vice Presidents and Directors of Physical Plant, Operations Managers, Craft Supervisors, IT management, and IT analysts typically attend this event and find it to be a very valuable experience. The Maintenance pillar will provide the same atmosphere and opportunity to hear from PeopleSoft Maintenance Management customers, Oracle Product Strategy, and partners, as in past years.  For more information, you can access the registration website for the Value Chain Summit. For existing PeopleSoft Maintenance Management customers…if you are interested in participating in the PeopleSoft Maintenance Management Focus Group in which Oracle discusses product roadmap topics with the community of customers who have licensed the PeopleSoft Maintenance Management application, please contact [email protected], [email protected], or [email protected] The Focus Group will meet on February 7th, and attendance is by invitation only.We look forward to seeing you in San Francisco! P.S.  The Early Bird registration fee is $195. Register before December 31 to take advantage of this introductory low price, as the registration fee will go up to $295 after that date.

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  • How should I perform database maintenance on a 24x7 system

    - by solublefish
    I'm a software developer who inherited a part-time DBA role. I'm responsible for an application backed by a small, high-volume 24x7 database on SQL Server 2008. While there's other stuff in the DB, the critical piece is a 50GB, 7.5M row table that serves 100K requests/sec during peak load, and about half that at "night". This is 99%+ read traffic, but the writes are constant, and required. I need to be able to perform periodic maintenance without a maintenance window. Say an index rebuild, a job to purge old data, Windows Update, or hardware upgrade. Most of the advice I've seen is along the lines of "MAKE a maintenance window." While I appreciate the sentiment, I hope there's another way. If it will solve this problem, I do have the ability to purchase new hardware or modify the database, the clients (a set of web services servers), and much of the application code (ADO.NET + ASP.NET). I've been thinking along the lines of using the warm spare (or a 3rd server) to do the maintenance, and then "swap" it into production. 1 Synchronize the spare by restoring backups, including a current transaction log. 2 Perform the maintenance tasks. 3 Reconfigure clients to connect to the spare server. Existing connections are finished within a minute or so. 4 The spare server is now the production server. The problem remaining is that the new production server is now out of date by however long it took to perform maintenance. Is there some way that the original production server can be made to queue up changes and merge them to the spare between steps 2 and 3? Any other ideas?

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  • The Work Order Printing Challenge

    - by celine.beck
    One of the biggest concerns we've heard from maintenance practitioners is the ability to print and batch print work order details along with its accompanying attachments. Indeed, maintenance workers traditionally rely on work order packets to complete their job. A standard work order packet can include a variety of information like equipment documentation, operating instructions, checklists, end-of-task feedback forms and the likes. Now, the problem is that most Asset Lifecycle Management applications do not provide a simple and efficient solution for process printing with document attachments. Work order forms can be easily printed but attachments are usually left out of the printing process. This sounds like a minor problem, but when you are processing high volume of work orders on a regular basis, this inconvenience can result in important inefficiencies. In order to print work order and its related attachments, maintenance personnel need to print the work order details and then go back to the work order and open each individual attachment using the proper authoring application to view and print each document. The printed output is collated into a work order packet. The AutoVue Document Print Service products that were just released in April 2010 aim at helping organizations address the work order printing challenge. Customers and partners can leverage the AutoVue Document Print Services to build a complete printing solution that complements their existing print server solution with AutoVue's document- and platform-agnostic document print services. The idea is to leverage AutoVue's printing services to invoke printing either programmatically or manually directly from within the work order management application, and efficiently process the printing of complete work order packets, including all types of attachments, from office files to more advanced engineering documents like 2D CAD drawings. Oracle partners like MIPRO Consulting, specialists in PeopleSoft implementations, have already expressed interest in the AutoVue Document Print Service products for their ability to offer print services to the PeopleSoft ALM suite, so that customers are able to print packages of documents for maintenance personnel. For more information on the subject, please consult MIPRO Consulting's article entitled Unsung Value: Primavera and AutoVue Integration into PeopleSoft posted on their blog. The blog post entitled Introducing AutoVue Document Print Service provides additional information on how the solution works. We would also love to hear what your thoughts are on the topic, so please do not hesitate to post your comments/feedback on our blog. Related Articles: Introducing AutoVue Document Print Service Print Any Document Type with AutoVue Document Print Services

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  • data maintenance/migrations in image based sytems

    - by User
    Web applications usually have a database. The code and the database work hand in hand together. Therefore Frameworks like Ruby on Rails and Django create migration files Sure there are also servers written in Self or Smalltalk or other image-based systems that face the same problem: Code is not written on the server but in a separate image of the programmer. How do these systems deal with a changing schema, changing classes/prototypes. Which way do the migrations go? Example: What is the process of a new attribute going from programmer's idea to the server code and all objects? I found the Gemstone/S manual chapter 8 but it does not really talk about the process of shipping code to the server.

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  • What incidentals do server maintenance people/devs need?

    - by SeniorShizzle
    I'm trying to put together a thank-you package for clients who are server-side developers and in charge of their company's servers and databases. Since I've never been in that line of work before, I would like to know what it is like. Get inside your heads, for instance. My first thought was (don't hate me) a few patch cables. I don't know if you guys actually need these often or anything. What are some similar things that you like or need for your lives at work. Small incidentals less than $10 are preferred, like Coffee or a notebook, screwdrivers. Et cetera.

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  • What are the common maintenance tasks on ubuntu?

    - by DaNieL
    When i was using windows, i used to run defrags, ccleaner and revouninstaller once a month to keep the system and the registry clean. I know ubuntu (and all linux distro) has a different system structure and doesnt need defrags, but i've heard there are some mainenance tasks that help to keep the system clean (for example, sudo apt-get clean or sudo apt-get autoremove) How many of those commands/software (and please explain what they do and if they can compromise the system stability) do you know and use regularly?

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  • App_Offline.htm, taking site down for maintenance

    - by Vipin
    There is much simpler and graceful way to shut down a site while doing upgrade to avoid the problem of people accessing site in the middle of a content update.   Basically, if you place file with name 'app_offline.htm' with below contents in the root of a web application directory, ASP.NET will shut-down the application,  and stop processing any new incoming requests for that application.  ASP.NET will also then respond to all requests for dynamic pages in the application by sending back the content of the app_offline.htm file (for example: you might want to have a “site under construction” or “down for maintenance” message).   Then after upgrade, just rename/delete app_offline.htm file…and the site would be back to normal. Just remember that the size of the file should be greater than 512 bytes, doesn't matter even if you add some comments to it to push the byte size as long as it's of the size greater than 512 - it'll work fine.     <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd"><html http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" ><head>    <title>Maintenance Mode - Outage Message</title></head><body>    <h1>Maintenance Mode</h1>     <p>We're currently undergoing scheduled maintenance. We will come back very shortly.</p>     <p>Sorry for the inconvenience!</p>     <!--            Adding additional hidden content so that IE Friendly Errors don't prevent    this message from displaying (note: it will show a "friendly" 404    error if the content isn't of a certain size).        <h2>Site under maintenance...</h2>      <h2>Site under maintenance...</h2>      <h2>Site under maintenance...</h2>      <h2>Site under maintenance...</h2>      <h2>Site under maintenance...</h2>      <h2>Site under maintenance...</h2>      <h2>Site under maintenance...</h2>      <h2>Site under maintenance...</h2>         --></body></html>

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  • How to manage preventive maintenance planning for external IT support?

    - by code-gijoe
    I am a bit puzzled by the way to handle server upgrade planning for software we maintain on remote sites. This is my case: I work for a software company that has many external clients. We are trying to be more Agile in our development so we plan to release small improvements every quarter and we wish to keep our clients informed of maintenance schedules. Instead of having angry clients that believe there ROI of our support plan is low, we want to be more proactive. Lets say we have 100 machines to take care of, is there some tool to assist me in planing the maintenance with clients? Right now I get a call from a client that is unhappy requesting we upgrade them, that is when we go into panic mode and start making calls. That is when I need to check my calendar, coordinate with the other guys, call a few times, change the date again and again until everyone is happy. Can this be done better?

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  • Bringing in New Architecture During Maintenance on Legacy Systems

    - by Mike L.
    I have been tasked with adding some new features to a legacy ASP.NET MVC2 project. The codebase is a disaster and I want to write these new features with some thought behind the implementation and not just throw these new features into the mess. I would like to introduce things like dependency injection and the orchestrator pattern; just to the code that I am going to write. I don't have enough time to try to refactor the entire system. Is it OK to not be consistent with the rest of the codebase and add new features following different design principles? Should I not introduce new patterns and just get the features implemented? I feel like it might be confusing to the next person to see parts of the system using a design that other parts are not following.

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  • SQL Maintenance Cleanup Task 'Success' But not deleting files

    - by Seph
    I have a maintenance plan setup for a databases on a server. As part of the backup is a Maintenance Cleanup Task. SQL Version 2008 The task that 'succeeds' is setup as: Delete backup files Correct folder (same address as the backup task) File extension: bak (NOT .bak) Delete files older than: 20 Hour(s) I have other similar cleanup tasks that occur in the same maintenance plan which work fine. This plan has worked fine in the past, I just noticed that last night it reported 'success' and the rest of the plan continued, however the file from 2 days ago still remains. I have checked similar questions such as this question, and this is not the case as my maintenance task worked fine two days ago and for the past several weeks:

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  • SQL Maintenance Cleanup Task Working but Not Deleting

    - by Alex
    I have a Maintenance Plan that is suppose to go through the BACKUP folder and remove all .bak older than 5 days. When I run the job, it gives me a success message but older .bak files are still present. I've tried the step at the following question: SQL Maintenance Cleanup Task 'Success' But not deleting files Result is column IsDamaged = 0 I've verified with the following question and this is not my issue: Maintenance Cleanup Task(s) running 'successfully' but not deleting back up files. I've also tried deleting the Job and Maintenance Plan and recreating, but to no avail. Any ideas?

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  • Unable to back up SQL Server databases using a maintenance plan

    - by Diogo Lopes
    I am trying to create a maintenance plan that will run automatically and back up my SQL Server 2005 databases automatically. I create a new maintenance plan and add a "Back Up Database Task", select all User databases, and choose a path to back up to. IMAGE in http://www.freeimagehosting.net/uploads/16be7dce43.jpg [new user limitation] When I save and try to execute this plan, I get the following error message: =================================== Execution failed. See the maintenance plan and SQL Server Agent job history logs for details. =================================== Job 'Backup.Subplan_1' failed. (SqlManagerUI) I've checked the maintenance plan log, the agent log, and just about every log file I can find and there are no entries at all to help me figure out why this is failing. If I right-click on a specific database and select "Back Up", the task succeeds. I tried changing the plan to back up just that one database and it still failed. I've tried running the plan with both Windows authentication and SQL Server authentication with the sa account. I also tried specifically granting the SQL Server Agent user account full privileges on the backup folder, but it still failed. Thanks for any suggestions!

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  • More Maintenance Plan Weirdness

    - by AjarnMark
    I’m not a big fan of the built-in Maintenance Plan functionality in SQL Server.  I like the interface in SQL 2005 better than 2000 (it looks more like building an SSIS package) but it’s still a bit of a black box.  You don’t really know what commands are being run based on the selections you have made, and you can easily make some unwise choices without realizing it, such as shrinking your database on a regular basis.  I really prefer to know exactly what commands and with which options are being run on my servers. Recently I had another very strange thing happen with a Maintenance Plan, this time in SQL 2005, SP3.  I inherited this server and have done a bit of cleanup on it, but had not yet gotten around to replacing the Maintenance Plans with all my own scripts.  However, one of the maintenance plans which was just responsible for doing LOG backups was running more frequently than that system needed, and I thought I would just tweak the schedule a bit.  So I opened the Maintenance Plan and edited the properties of the Subplan, setting a new schedule, saved it and figured all was good to go.  But the next execution of the Scheduled Job that triggers the Maintenance Plan code failed with an error about the Owner of the job.  Specifically the error was, “Unable to determine if the owner (OldDomain\OldDBAUserID) of job MaintenancePlanName.Subplan has server access (reason: Could not obtain information about Windows NT group/user 'OldDomain\OldDBAUserID’..”  I was really confused because I had previously updated all of the jobs to have current accounts as the owners.  At first I thought it was just a fluke, but it happened on the next scheduled cycle so I investigated further and sure enough, that job had the old DBA’s account listed as the owner.  I fixed it and the job successfully ran to completion. Now, I don’t really like mysteries like that, so I did some more testing and verified that, sure enough, just editing the Subplan schedule and saving the Maintenance Job caused the Scheduled Job to be recreated with the old credentials.  I don’t know where it is getting those credentials, but I can only assume that it is the same as the original creator of the Maintenance Plan, and for some reason it insists on using that ID for the job owner.  I looked through the options in SSMA and could not find anything would let me easily set the value that I wanted it to use.  I suspect that if I did something like executing sp_changeobjectowner against the Maintenance Plan that it would use that new ID instead.  I’m sure that there is good reason that it works this way, but rather than mess around with it much more, I’m just going to spend my time rolling out my replacement scripts instead. Chalk this little hidden oddity up as yet one more reason I’m not a fan of Maintenance Plans.

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