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  • Does "Debug" invalidate ASP.Net MVC OutputCache?

    - by William Edmondson
    I have images stored in a database and am serving them from an MVC controller as "FileResult". If I run the MVC application from Visual Studio 2008 in debug mode and set a break point inside the controller method the debugger intercepts the call on every page refresh regardless of my "OutputCache" settings. Does the VS debugger invalidate the OutputCache or is there something else going on here? [OutputCache(Duration = 86400, VaryByParam = "id")] public FileResult Index(string id) { byte[] image; int imageId; int.TryParse(id, out imageId); using (var ctx = new EPEntities()) { var imageObj = (from images in ctx.Images where images.ID == imageId select images).FirstOrDefault(); image = imageObj.Image; } return new FileContentResult(image, "image/gif"); }

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  • ASP.NET MVC The new ActionLink with MvcHtmlString and request URL generated

    - by mare
    This piece of code used to work in MVC 1 but it does not since I upgraded to MVC 2: <%=Html.ActionLink(Resources.Localize.Routes_WidgetsCreate, "Create" + "?modal=true", "Widget", null, new { rel = "shadowbox;height=600;width=700", title = Resources.Localize.Routes_WidgetsCreate })%> I am aware it has something to do with the way ActionLink encodes things, so the result that comes out is something like this: "http://localhost:53704/Widget/Create%3fmodal%3dtrue" The problem is, when clicked, the Shadowbox modal opens up and inside, where the request View should be rendered is this exception: Server Error in '/' Application. A potentially dangerous Request.Path value was detected from the client (?). What can I do to get past that? Do you recommend another way of sending params to the view besides in QueryString (in this case I need "modal" because in the view I select CSS styles based on whether we are rendering modal or not)?

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  • MVC architectural question - Where should payment processing go?

    - by Keltex
    This question is related to my ASP.NET MVC 2 development, but it could apply to any MVC environment and a question of where the logic should go. So let's say I have a controller that takes an online payment such as a shopping cart application. And I have the method that accepts the customers' credit card information: public class CartController : Controller CartRepository cartRepository = new CartRepository() [HttpPost] public ActionResult Payment(PaymentViewModel rec) { if(!ModelState.IsValid) { return View(rec); } // process payment here return RedirectToAction("Receipt"); } At the comment process payment here should the payment processing be handled: In the controller? By the repository? Someplace else?

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  • MVC 2 Conversion Disrupts the parameters passed to my Stored Procedure

    - by user54197
    I have a few textboxes that are not required. If the user enters nothing it is passed as 'null' in MVC 2. It was passed as '""' in MVC 1. What changes can I make to accomodate for this? public string Name { get; set; } public string Offer{ get; set; } public string AutoID { get; set; } using (SqlConnection connect = new SqlConnection(connections)) { SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand("Info_Add", connect); command.Parameters.Add("autoID", SqlDbType.BigInt).Direction = ParameterDirection.Output; command.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("name", Name)); //Offer now returns a null value, which cannot be passed command.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("offer", Offer)); command.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure; connect.Open(); command.ExecuteNonQuery(); AutoID = command.Parameters["autoID"].Value.ToString(); }

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  • How do I maintain scroll position in MVC?

    - by Eric Brown
    Im working on a project in MVC and have enjoyed learning about it. There are a few growing pains but once you figure them out it's not bad. One thing that is really simple in the WebForms world is maintaining the scroll position on a page. All you do is set the MaintainScrollPositionOnPostback property to true. However, in MVC, Im not using postbacks so this will not work for me. What is the standard way of handling this? Edit: Ajax is acceptable, but I was also wondering how you would do it without AJAX.

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  • ASP MVC 2 : Custom display of a required form element based on ModelMetaData

    - by Nigel
    I have an MVC 2 application that utilises forms. The required fields within the form are set using attributes that update the model metadata. The form fields are created using the MVC HtmlHelper method : Html.EditorFor. This works fine so far as validation is concerned, but it seems that by default the required fields are not displayed to the user (for example by appending a * to the control). If I wanted to provide some custom means of displaying this fact to the user (lets immagine I want to change the background colour of the edit control for example), where is the best place to do it. Would I need to create a custom html helper to replace EditorFor? I tried but it seemed difficult to gain access to the metadata for the correct property. I already have a custom ModelMetaDataProvider so there is no problem adding it there if that is the correct place.

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  • View artifacts leaking into the model of MVC

    - by Jono
    In an ASP.NET MVC application (which has very little chance of having its view technology ported to something non-HTML, but whose functional requirements evolve weekly,) how much HTML should ideally be allowed to be directly represented in the Model? I might come across as a design bigot for this, but I regard it as bad practice to allow any view constructs to "leak" into the model in an MVC application (and vice versa). For example, a Model that represents an item you're about to purchase should know nothing about the HTML check box that says "add giftwrap/message", nor should it know about any HTML drop down lists for payment card types. Conversely the View shouldn't be doing work like figuring out button text by translating keys into values (by looking in resource files.)

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  • asp.mvc model design

    - by Radu D
    Hi, I am pretty new to MVC and I am looking for a way to design my models. I have the MVC web site project and another class library that takes care of data access and constructing the business objects. If I have in that assembly a class named Project that is a business object and I need to display all projects in a view ... should I make another model class Project? In this case the classes will be identical. Do I gain something from doing a new model class? I don't like having in views references to objects from another dll ... but i don't like duplicating the code neither. Did you encounter the same problem?

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  • ASP.NET MVC: post-redirect-get pattern, with only two overloaded action methods

    - by Rafi
    Is it possible to implement post-redirect-get pattern, with two overloaded action methods(One for GET action and the other for POST action) in ASP.NET MVC. In all of the MVC post-redirect-get pattern samples, I have seen three different action methods for the post-redirect-get process, each having different names. Is this really required? For Eg:(Does the code shown below, follows Post-Redirect-Get pattern?) public class SalaryTransferController : Controller { // // GET: /SalaryTransfer/ [HttpGet] public ActionResult Index(int id) { SalaryTransferIndexViewModel vm = new SalaryTransferIndexViewModel(id) { SelectedDivision = DivisionEnum.Contracting }; //Do some processing here return View(vm); } // // POST: /SalaryTransfer/ [HttpPost] public ActionResult Index(SalaryTransferIndexViewModel vm) { bool validationsuccess = false; //validate if (validationsuccess) return RedirectToAction("Index", new {id=1234 }); else return View(vm); } } Thank you for your responses.

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  • MVC 2 Beta DefaultControllerFactory with Areas

    - by stoto
    Why default factory WON'T return full name of the controllers (with namespaces)? I'm using Service Locator and autofac. using System.Web.Mvc; using Microsoft.Practices.ServiceLocation; namespace Application.Core.MVC { public override IController CreateController(System.Web.Routing.RequestContext requestContext, string **controllerName**) { return ServiceLocator.Current.GetInstance<IController>(controllerName); } } I had two home controllers (one under area Blog) http://localhost/Home http://localhost/Blog/Home controllerName return only "Home" without full qualified name for both in above code. This creates a problem when I try to regiser controllers' names for dependency injection. Here is how I register controllers right now according to this situation. Even this brings up the pages without exception. But When I access http://localhost/Home, both controllers invoked regardlessly. foreach (var tp in currentAssemblyControllersTypes) builder.Register(tp).FactoryScoped().Named(tp.Name.Replace("Controller", "")); Anyone can help?Thanks.

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  • Introducing the MVC Music Store - MVC 2 Sample Application and Tutorial

    A couple weeks ago we did a soft release of a new ASP.NET MVC 2 Tutorial and Sample Application Ive been working on over the past few months, the MVC Music Store. The source code and an 80 page tutorial are available on CodePlex. Im also working on a video tutorial series for the ASP.NET website which will walk through building the application. After that, its time to talk about a feature length film and a worldwide MVC Music Store On Ice tour, but the plans arent completely set just yet. ...Did you know that DotNetSlackers also publishes .net articles written by top known .net Authors? We already have over 80 articles in several categories including Silverlight. Take a look: here.

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  • ASP.NET MVC AND TOOLBOX

    - by imran_ku07
       Introduction :           ASP.NET MVC popularity is not hidden from the today's world of web applications. One of the great thing in ASP.NET is the separation of concerns, in which presentation views are separate from the business or modal layer. In these views ASP.NET MVC provides some very good controls which generate commonly used HTML markup fragments using a shorter syntax. These presentation views are familiar to web forms developers. But a pain for developers to use these controls is that they need to type these helpers controls every time when they need to use a control, because they are more familiar to drag and drop controls from ToolBox. So in this article i will use a cool feature of Visual Studio that allows you to add these controls in ToolBox once and then, when needed, just drag and drop controls from ToolBox, very similar like in web forms.   Description :            Visual Studio ToolBox is rich enough that allows you to store code and HTML snippets in ToolBox. All you need is select the HTML Helper and then simply drag and drop into Toolbox. Repeat this Procedure for every HTML Helper in ASP.NET MVC.             When you need to use a HTML Helper, you can drag and drop it from ToolBox and become happy with drag and drop programming. Summary :              In this article you see that how Visual Studio helps you to drag and drop HTML snippets from Design view to toolbox. This is one of the coolest features in Visual Studio.

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  • ASP.NET MVC Framework

    - by Aamir Hasan
     MVC is a design pattern. A reusable "recipe" for constructing your application. Generally, you don't want your user interface code and data access code to be mixed together, it makes changing either one more difficult. By placing data access code into a "Model" object and user interface code into a "View" object, you can use a "Controller" object to act as a go-between, sending messages/calling methods on the view object when the data changes and vice versa. Model-view-controller (MVC) is an architectural pattern used in software engineering. In complex computer applications that present a large amount of data to the user, a developer often wishes to separate data (model) and user interface (view) concerns, so that changes to the user interface will not affect data handling, and that the data can be reorganized without changing the user interface. The model-view-controller solves this problem by decoupling data access and business logic from data presentation and user interaction, by introducing an intermediate component: the controller.Model:    The domain-specific representation of the information that the application operates. Domain logic adds meaning to raw data (e.g., calculating whether today is the user's birthday, or the totals, taxes, and shipping charges for shopping cart items).    Many applications use a persistent storage mechanism (such as a database) to store data. MVC does not specifically mention the data access layer because it is understood to be underneath or encapsulated by the Model.View:    Renders the model into a form suitable for interaction, typically a user interface element. Multiple views can exist for a single model for different purposes.Controller:    Processes and responds to events, typically user actions, and may invoke changes on the model.    

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  • Who can change the View in MVC?

    - by Luke
    I'm working on a thick client graph displaying and manipulation application. I'm trying to apply the MVC pattern to our 3D visualization component. Here is what I have for the Model, View, and Controller: Model - The graph and it's metadata. This includes vertices, edges, and the attributes of each. It does not contain position information, icons, colors, or anything display related. View - This would commonly be called a scene graph. It includes the 3D display information, texture information, color information, and anything else that is related specifically to the visualization of the model. Controller - The controller takes the view and displays it in a Window using OpenGL (but it could potentially be any 3D graphics package). The application has various "layouts" that change the position of the vertices in the display. For instance, one layout may arrange the vertices in a circle. Is it common for these layouts to access and change the view directly? Should they go through the Controller to access the View? If they go through the Controller, should they just ask for direct access to the View or should each change go through the controller? I realize this is a bit different from the standard MVC example where there a finite number of Views. In this case, the View can change in an infinite number of ways. Perhaps I'm shattering some basic principle of MVC here. Thanks in advance!

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  • Question about modeling with MVC (the pattern, not the MS stuff / non web)

    - by paul
    I'm working on an application in which I'm looking to employ the MVC pattern, but I've come up against a design decision point I could use some help with. My application is going to deal with the design of state-machines. Currently the MVC model holds information about the machine's states, inputs, outputs, etc. The view is going to show a diagram for the machine, graphically allowing the user to add new states, establish transitions, and put the states in a pleasing arrangement, among other things. I would like to store part of the diagram's state (e.g. the x and y state positions) when the machine information is stored for later retrieval, and am wondering how best to go about structuring the model(s?) for this. It seems like this UI information is more closely related to the view than to the state-machine model, so I was thinking that a secondary model might be in order, but I am reluctant to pursue this route because of the added complexity. Adding this information to the current model doesn't seem the right way to go about it either. This is the my first time using the MVC pattern so I'm still figuring things out. Any input would be appreciated.

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  • How to specify an area name in an action link?

    - by Jeremy
    I have a shared master page which I am using from 2 different areas in my mvc 2 app. The master page has an action link which currently specifies the controller and action, but of course the link doesn't work if I'm in the wrong area. I see no overload for actionlink that takes an area parameter, is it possible to do?

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  • NoSQL with RavenDB and ASP.NET MVC - Part 1

    - by shiju
     A while back, I have blogged NoSQL with MongoDB, NoRM and ASP.NET MVC Part 1 and Part 2 on how to use MongoDB with an ASP.NET MVC application. The NoSQL movement is getting big attention and RavenDB is the latest addition to the NoSQL and document database world. RavenDB is an Open Source (with a commercial option) document database for the .NET/Windows platform developed  by Ayende Rahien.  Raven stores schema-less JSON documents, allow you to define indexes using Linq queries and focus on low latency and high performance. RavenDB is .NET focused document database which comes with a fully functional .NET client API  and supports LINQ. RavenDB comes with two components, a server and a client API. RavenDB is a REST based system, so you can write your own HTTP cleint API. As a .NET developer, RavenDB is becoming my favorite document database. Unlike other document databases, RavenDB is supports transactions using System.Transactions. Also it's supports both embedded and server mode of database. You can access RavenDB site at http://ravendb.netA demo App with ASP.NET MVCLet's create a simple demo app with RavenDB and ASP.NET MVC. To work with RavenDB, do the following steps. Go to http://ravendb.net/download and download the latest build.Unzip the downloaded file.Go to the /Server directory and run the RavenDB.exe. This will start the RavenDB server listening on localhost:8080You can change the port of RavenDB  by modifying the "Raven/Port" appSetting value in the RavenDB.exe.config file.When running the RavenDB, it will automatically create a database in the /Data directory. You can change the directory name data by modifying "Raven/DataDirt" appSetting value in the RavenDB.exe.config file.RavenDB provides a browser based admin tool. When the Raven server is running, You can be access the browser based admin tool and view and edit documents and index using your browser admin tool. The web admin tool available at http://localhost:8080The below is the some screen shots of web admin tool     Working with ASP.NET MVC  To working with RavenDB in our demo ASP.NET MVC application, do the following steps Step 1 - Add reference to Raven Cleint API In our ASP.NET MVC application, Add a reference to the Raven.Client.Lightweight.dll from the Client directory. Step 2 - Create DocumentStoreThe document store would be created once per application. Let's create a DocumentStore on application start-up in the Global.asax.cs. documentStore = new DocumentStore { Url = "http://localhost:8080/" }; documentStore.Initialise(); The above code will create a Raven DB document store and will be listening the server locahost at port 8080    Step 3 - Create DocumentSession on BeginRequest   Let's create a DocumentSession on BeginRequest event in the Global.asax.cs. We are using the document session for every unit of work. In our demo app, every HTTP request would be a single Unit of Work (UoW). BeginRequest += (sender, args) =>   HttpContext.Current.Items[RavenSessionKey] = documentStore.OpenSession(); Step 4 - Destroy the DocumentSession on EndRequest  EndRequest += (o, eventArgs) => {     var disposable = HttpContext.Current.Items[RavenSessionKey] as IDisposable;     if (disposable != null)         disposable.Dispose(); };  At the end of HTTP request, we are destroying the DocumentSession  object.The below  code block shown all the code in the Global.asax.cs  private const string RavenSessionKey = "RavenMVC.Session"; private static DocumentStore documentStore;   protected void Application_Start() { //Create a DocumentStore in Application_Start //DocumentStore should be created once per application and stored as a singleton. documentStore = new DocumentStore { Url = "http://localhost:8080/" }; documentStore.Initialise(); AreaRegistration.RegisterAllAreas(); RegisterRoutes(RouteTable.Routes); //DI using Unity 2.0 ConfigureUnity(); }   public MvcApplication() { //Create a DocumentSession on BeginRequest   //create a document session for every unit of work BeginRequest += (sender, args) =>     HttpContext.Current.Items[RavenSessionKey] = documentStore.OpenSession(); //Destroy the DocumentSession on EndRequest EndRequest += (o, eventArgs) => { var disposable = HttpContext.Current.Items[RavenSessionKey] as IDisposable; if (disposable != null) disposable.Dispose(); }; }   //Getting the current DocumentSession public static IDocumentSession CurrentSession {   get { return (IDocumentSession)HttpContext.Current.Items[RavenSessionKey]; } }  We have setup all necessary code in the Global.asax.cs for working with RavenDB. For our demo app, Let’s write a domain class  public class Category {       public string Id { get; set; }       [Required(ErrorMessage = "Name Required")]     [StringLength(25, ErrorMessage = "Must be less than 25 characters")]     public string Name { get; set;}     public string Description { get; set; }   } We have created simple domain entity Category. Let's create repository class for performing CRUD operations against our domain entity Category.  public interface ICategoryRepository {     Category Load(string id);     IEnumerable<Category> GetCategories();     void Save(Category category);     void Delete(string id);       }    public class CategoryRepository : ICategoryRepository {     private IDocumentSession session;     public CategoryRepository()     {             session = MvcApplication.CurrentSession;     }     //Load category based on Id     public Category Load(string id)     {         return session.Load<Category>(id);     }     //Get all categories     public IEnumerable<Category> GetCategories()     {         var categories= session.LuceneQuery<Category>()                 .WaitForNonStaleResults()             .ToArray();         return categories;       }     //Insert/Update category     public void Save(Category category)     {         if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(category.Id))         {             //insert new record             session.Store(category);         }         else         {             //edit record             var categoryToEdit = Load(category.Id);             categoryToEdit.Name = category.Name;             categoryToEdit.Description = category.Description;         }         //save the document session         session.SaveChanges();     }     //delete a category     public void Delete(string id)     {         var category = Load(id);         session.Delete<Category>(category);         session.SaveChanges();     }        } For every CRUD operations, we are taking the current document session object from HttpContext object. session = MvcApplication.CurrentSession; We are calling the static method CurrentSession from the Global.asax.cs public static IDocumentSession CurrentSession {     get { return (IDocumentSession)HttpContext.Current.Items[RavenSessionKey]; } }  Retrieve Entities  The Load method get the single Category object based on the Id. RavenDB is working based on the REST principles and the Id would be like categories/1. The Id would be created by automatically when a new object is inserted to the document store. The REST uri categories/1 represents a single category object with Id representation of 1.   public Category Load(string id) {    return session.Load<Category>(id); } The GetCategories method returns all the categories calling the session.LuceneQuery method. RavenDB is using a lucen query syntax for querying. I will explain more details about querying and indexing in my future posts.   public IEnumerable<Category> GetCategories() {     var categories= session.LuceneQuery<Category>()             .WaitForNonStaleResults()         .ToArray();     return categories;   } Insert/Update entityFor insert/Update a Category entity, we have created Save method in repository class. If  the Id property of Category is null, we call Store method of Documentsession for insert a new record. For editing a existing record, we load the Category object and assign the values to the loaded Category object. The session.SaveChanges() will save the changes to document store.  //Insert/Update category public void Save(Category category) {     if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(category.Id))     {         //insert new record         session.Store(category);     }     else     {         //edit record         var categoryToEdit = Load(category.Id);         categoryToEdit.Name = category.Name;         categoryToEdit.Description = category.Description;     }     //save the document session     session.SaveChanges(); }  Delete Entity  In the Delete method, we call the document session's delete method and call the SaveChanges method to reflect changes in the document store.  public void Delete(string id) {     var category = Load(id);     session.Delete<Category>(category);     session.SaveChanges(); }  Let’s create ASP.NET MVC controller and controller actions for handling CRUD operations for the domain class Category  public class CategoryController : Controller { private ICategoryRepository categoyRepository; //DI enabled constructor public CategoryController(ICategoryRepository categoyRepository) {     this.categoyRepository = categoyRepository; } public ActionResult Index() {         var categories = categoyRepository.GetCategories();     if (categories == null)         return RedirectToAction("Create");     return View(categories); }   [HttpGet] public ActionResult Edit(string id) {     var category = categoyRepository.Load(id);         return View("Save",category); } // GET: /Category/Create [HttpGet] public ActionResult Create() {     var category = new Category();     return View("Save", category); } [HttpPost] public ActionResult Save(Category category) {     if (!ModelState.IsValid)     {         return View("Save", category);     }           categoyRepository.Save(category);         return RedirectToAction("Index");     }        [HttpPost] public ActionResult Delete(string id) {     categoyRepository.Delete(id);     var categories = categoyRepository.GetCategories();     return PartialView("CategoryList", categories);      }        }  RavenDB is an awesome document database and I hope that it will be the winner in .NET space of document database world.  The source code of demo application available at http://ravenmvc.codeplex.com/

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  • MvcExtensions – Bootstrapping

    - by kazimanzurrashid
    When you create a new ASP.NET MVC application you will find that the global.asax contains the following lines: namespace MvcApplication1 { // Note: For instructions on enabling IIS6 or IIS7 classic mode, // visit http://go.microsoft.com/?LinkId=9394801 public class MvcApplication : System.Web.HttpApplication { public static void RegisterRoutes(RouteCollection routes) { routes.IgnoreRoute("{resource}.axd/{*pathInfo}"); routes.MapRoute( "Default", // Route name "{controller}/{action}/{id}", // URL with parameters new { controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = UrlParameter.Optional } // Parameter defaults ); } protected void Application_Start() { AreaRegistration.RegisterAllAreas(); RegisterRoutes(RouteTable.Routes); } } } As the application grows, there are quite a lot of plumbing code gets into the global.asax which quickly becomes a design smell. Lets take a quick look at the code of one of the open source project that I recently visited: public static void RegisterRoutes(RouteCollection routes) { routes.IgnoreRoute("{resource}.axd/{*pathInfo}"); routes.MapRoute("Default","{controller}/{action}/{id}", new { controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = "" }); } protected override void OnApplicationStarted() { Error += OnError; EndRequest += OnEndRequest; var settings = new SparkSettings() .AddNamespace("System") .AddNamespace("System.Collections.Generic") .AddNamespace("System.Web.Mvc") .AddNamespace("System.Web.Mvc.Html") .AddNamespace("MvcContrib.FluentHtml") .AddNamespace("********") .AddNamespace("********.Web") .SetPageBaseType("ApplicationViewPage") .SetAutomaticEncoding(true); #if DEBUG settings.SetDebug(true); #endif var viewFactory = new SparkViewFactory(settings); ViewEngines.Engines.Add(viewFactory); #if !DEBUG PrecompileViews(viewFactory); #endif RegisterAllControllersIn("********.Web"); log4net.Config.XmlConfigurator.Configure(); RegisterRoutes(RouteTable.Routes); Factory.Load(new Components.WebDependencies()); ModelBinders.Binders.DefaultBinder = new Binders.GenericBinderResolver(Factory.TryGet<IModelBinder>); ValidatorConfiguration.Initialize("********"); HtmlValidationExtensions.Initialize(ValidatorConfiguration.Rules); } private void OnEndRequest(object sender, System.EventArgs e) { if (((HttpApplication)sender).Context.Handler is MvcHandler) { CreateKernel().Get<ISessionSource>().Close(); } } private void OnError(object sender, System.EventArgs e) { CreateKernel().Get<ISessionSource>().Close(); } protected override IKernel CreateKernel() { return Factory.Kernel; } private static void PrecompileViews(SparkViewFactory viewFactory) { var batch = new SparkBatchDescriptor(); batch.For<HomeController>().For<ManageController>(); viewFactory.Precompile(batch); } As you can see there are quite a few of things going on in the above code, Registering the ViewEngine, Compiling the Views, Registering the Routes/Controllers/Model Binders, Settings up Logger, Validations and as you can imagine the more it becomes complex the more things will get added in the application start. One of the goal of the MVCExtensions is to reduce the above design smell. Instead of writing all the plumbing code in the application start, it contains BootstrapperTask to register individual services. Out of the box, it contains BootstrapperTask to register Controllers, Controller Factory, Action Invoker, Action Filters, Model Binders, Model Metadata/Validation Providers, ValueProvideraFactory, ViewEngines etc and it is intelligent enough to automatically detect the above types and register into the ASP.NET MVC Framework. Other than the built-in tasks you can create your own custom task which will be automatically executed when the application starts. When the BootstrapperTasks are in action you will find the global.asax pretty much clean like the following: public class MvcApplication : UnityMvcApplication { public void ErrorLog_Filtering(object sender, ExceptionFilterEventArgs e) { Check.Argument.IsNotNull(e, "e"); HttpException exception = e.Exception.GetBaseException() as HttpException; if ((exception != null) && (exception.GetHttpCode() == (int)HttpStatusCode.NotFound)) { e.Dismiss(); } } } The above code is taken from my another open source project Shrinkr, as you can see the global.asax is longer cluttered with any plumbing code. One special thing you have noticed that it is inherited from the UnityMvcApplication rather than regular HttpApplication. There are separate version of this class for each IoC Container like NinjectMvcApplication, StructureMapMvcApplication etc. Other than executing the built-in tasks, the Shrinkr also has few custom tasks which gets executed when the application starts. For example, when the application starts, we want to ensure that the default users (which is specified in the web.config) are created. The following is the custom task that is used to create those default users: public class CreateDefaultUsers : BootstrapperTask { protected override TaskContinuation ExecuteCore(IServiceLocator serviceLocator) { IUserRepository userRepository = serviceLocator.GetInstance<IUserRepository>(); IUnitOfWork unitOfWork = serviceLocator.GetInstance<IUnitOfWork>(); IEnumerable<User> users = serviceLocator.GetInstance<Settings>().DefaultUsers; bool shouldCommit = false; foreach (User user in users) { if (userRepository.GetByName(user.Name) == null) { user.AllowApiAccess(ApiSetting.InfiniteLimit); userRepository.Add(user); shouldCommit = true; } } if (shouldCommit) { unitOfWork.Commit(); } return TaskContinuation.Continue; } } There are several other Tasks in the Shrinkr that we are also using which you will find in that project. To create a custom bootstrapping task you have create a new class which either implements the IBootstrapperTask interface or inherits from the abstract BootstrapperTask class, I would recommend to start with the BootstrapperTask as it already has the required code that you have to write in case if you choose the IBootstrapperTask interface. As you can see in the above code we are overriding the ExecuteCore to create the default users, the MVCExtensions is responsible for populating the  ServiceLocator prior calling this method and in this method we are using the service locator to get the dependencies that are required to create the users (I will cover the custom dependencies registration in the next post). Once the users are created, we are returning a special enum, TaskContinuation as the return value, the TaskContinuation can have three values Continue (default), Skip and Break. The reason behind of having this enum is, in some  special cases you might want to skip the next task in the chain or break the complete chain depending upon the currently running task, in those cases you will use the other two values instead of the Continue. The last thing I want to cover in the bootstrapping task is the Order. By default all the built-in tasks as well as newly created task order is set to the DefaultOrder(a static property), in some special cases you might want to execute it before/after all the other tasks, in those cases you will assign the Order in the Task constructor. For Example, in Shrinkr, we want to run few background services when the all the tasks are executed, so we assigned the order as DefaultOrder + 1. Here is the code of that Task: public class ConfigureBackgroundServices : BootstrapperTask { private IEnumerable<IBackgroundService> backgroundServices; public ConfigureBackgroundServices() { Order = DefaultOrder + 1; } protected override TaskContinuation ExecuteCore(IServiceLocator serviceLocator) { backgroundServices = serviceLocator.GetAllInstances<IBackgroundService>().ToList(); backgroundServices.Each(service => service.Start()); return TaskContinuation.Continue; } protected override void DisposeCore() { backgroundServices.Each(service => service.Stop()); } } That’s it for today, in the next post I will cover the custom service registration, so stay tuned.

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  • Developing web apps using ASP.NET MVC 3, Razor and EF Code First - Part 1

    - by shiju
    In this post, I will demonstrate web application development using ASP. NET MVC 3, Razor and EF code First. This post will also cover Dependency Injection using Unity 2.0 and generic Repository and Unit of Work for EF Code First. The following frameworks will be used for this step by step tutorial. ASP.NET MVC 3 EF Code First CTP 5 Unity 2.0 Define Domain Model Let’s create domain model for our simple web application Category class public class Category {     public int CategoryId { get; set; }     [Required(ErrorMessage = "Name Required")]     [StringLength(25, ErrorMessage = "Must be less than 25 characters")]     public string Name { get; set;}     public string Description { get; set; }     public virtual ICollection<Expense> Expenses { get; set; } }   Expense class public class Expense {             public int ExpenseId { get; set; }            public string  Transaction { get; set; }     public DateTime Date { get; set; }     public double Amount { get; set; }     public int CategoryId { get; set; }     public virtual Category Category { get; set; } } We have two domain entities - Category and Expense. A single category contains a list of expense transactions and every expense transaction should have a Category. In this post, we will be focusing on CRUD operations for the entity Category and will be working on the Expense entity with a View Model object in the later post. And the source code for this application will be refactored over time. The above entities are very simple POCO (Plain Old CLR Object) classes and the entity Category is decorated with validation attributes in the System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations namespace. Now we want to use these entities for defining model objects for the Entity Framework 4. Using the Code First approach of Entity Framework, we can first define the entities by simply writing POCO classes without any coupling with any API or database library. This approach lets you focus on domain model which will enable Domain-Driven Development for applications. EF code first support is currently enabled with a separate API that is runs on top of the Entity Framework 4. EF Code First is reached CTP 5 when I am writing this article. Creating Context Class for Entity Framework We have created our domain model and let’s create a class in order to working with Entity Framework Code First. For this, you have to download EF Code First CTP 5 and add reference to the assembly EntitFramework.dll. You can also use NuGet to download add reference to EEF Code First.    public class MyFinanceContext : DbContext {     public MyFinanceContext() : base("MyFinance") { }     public DbSet<Category> Categories { get; set; }     public DbSet<Expense> Expenses { get; set; }         }   The above class MyFinanceContext is derived from DbContext that can connect your model classes to a database. The MyFinanceContext class is mapping our Category and Expense class into database tables Categories and Expenses using DbSet<TEntity> where TEntity is any POCO class. When we are running the application at first time, it will automatically create the database. EF code-first look for a connection string in web.config or app.config that has the same name as the dbcontext class. If it is not find any connection string with the convention, it will automatically create database in local SQL Express database by default and the name of the database will be same name as the dbcontext class. You can also define the name of database in constructor of the the dbcontext class. Unlike NHibernate, we don’t have to use any XML based mapping files or Fluent interface for mapping between our model and database. The model classes of Code First are working on the basis of conventions and we can also use a fluent API to refine our model. The convention for primary key is ‘Id’ or ‘<class name>Id’.  If primary key properties are detected with type ‘int’, ‘long’ or ‘short’, they will automatically registered as identity columns in the database by default. Primary key detection is not case sensitive. We can define our model classes with validation attributes in the System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations namespace and it automatically enforces validation rules when a model object is updated or saved. Generic Repository for EF Code First We have created model classes and dbcontext class. Now we have to create generic repository pattern for data persistence with EF code first. If you don’t know about the repository pattern, checkout Martin Fowler’s article on Repository Let’s create a generic repository to working with DbContext and DbSet generics. public interface IRepository<T> where T : class     {         void Add(T entity);         void Delete(T entity);         T GetById(long Id);         IEnumerable<T> All();     }   RepositoryBasse – Generic Repository class public abstract class RepositoryBase<T> where T : class { private MyFinanceContext database; private readonly IDbSet<T> dbset; protected RepositoryBase(IDatabaseFactory databaseFactory) {     DatabaseFactory = databaseFactory;     dbset = Database.Set<T>(); }   protected IDatabaseFactory DatabaseFactory {     get; private set; }   protected MyFinanceContext Database {     get { return database ?? (database = DatabaseFactory.Get()); } } public virtual void Add(T entity) {     dbset.Add(entity);            }        public virtual void Delete(T entity) {     dbset.Remove(entity); }   public virtual T GetById(long id) {     return dbset.Find(id); }   public virtual IEnumerable<T> All() {     return dbset.ToList(); } }   DatabaseFactory class public class DatabaseFactory : Disposable, IDatabaseFactory {     private MyFinanceContext database;     public MyFinanceContext Get()     {         return database ?? (database = new MyFinanceContext());     }     protected override void DisposeCore()     {         if (database != null)             database.Dispose();     } } Unit of Work If you are new to Unit of Work pattern, checkout Fowler’s article on Unit of Work . According to Martin Fowler, the Unit of Work pattern "maintains a list of objects affected by a business transaction and coordinates the writing out of changes and the resolution of concurrency problems." Let’s create a class for handling Unit of Work   public interface IUnitOfWork {     void Commit(); }   UniOfWork class public class UnitOfWork : IUnitOfWork {     private readonly IDatabaseFactory databaseFactory;     private MyFinanceContext dataContext;       public UnitOfWork(IDatabaseFactory databaseFactory)     {         this.databaseFactory = databaseFactory;     }       protected MyFinanceContext DataContext     {         get { return dataContext ?? (dataContext = databaseFactory.Get()); }     }       public void Commit()     {         DataContext.Commit();     } }   The Commit method of the UnitOfWork will call the commit method of MyFinanceContext class and it will execute the SaveChanges method of DbContext class.   Repository class for Category In this post, we will be focusing on the persistence against Category entity and will working on other entities in later post. Let’s create a repository for handling CRUD operations for Category using derive from a generic Repository RepositoryBase<T>.   public class CategoryRepository: RepositoryBase<Category>, ICategoryRepository     {     public CategoryRepository(IDatabaseFactory databaseFactory)         : base(databaseFactory)         {         }                } public interface ICategoryRepository : IRepository<Category> { } If we need additional methods than generic repository for the Category, we can define in the CategoryRepository. Dependency Injection using Unity 2.0 If you are new to Inversion of Control/ Dependency Injection or Unity, please have a look on my articles at http://weblogs.asp.net/shijuvarghese/archive/tags/IoC/default.aspx. I want to create a custom lifetime manager for Unity to store container in the current HttpContext.   public class HttpContextLifetimeManager<T> : LifetimeManager, IDisposable {     public override object GetValue()     {         return HttpContext.Current.Items[typeof(T).AssemblyQualifiedName];     }     public override void RemoveValue()     {         HttpContext.Current.Items.Remove(typeof(T).AssemblyQualifiedName);     }     public override void SetValue(object newValue)     {         HttpContext.Current.Items[typeof(T).AssemblyQualifiedName] = newValue;     }     public void Dispose()     {         RemoveValue();     } }   Let’s create controller factory for Unity in the ASP.NET MVC 3 application. public class UnityControllerFactory : DefaultControllerFactory { IUnityContainer container; public UnityControllerFactory(IUnityContainer container) {     this.container = container; } protected override IController GetControllerInstance(RequestContext reqContext, Type controllerType) {     IController controller;     if (controllerType == null)         throw new HttpException(                 404, String.Format(                     "The controller for path '{0}' could not be found" +     "or it does not implement IController.",                 reqContext.HttpContext.Request.Path));       if (!typeof(IController).IsAssignableFrom(controllerType))         throw new ArgumentException(                 string.Format(                     "Type requested is not a controller: {0}",                     controllerType.Name),                     "controllerType");     try     {         controller= container.Resolve(controllerType) as IController;     }     catch (Exception ex)     {         throw new InvalidOperationException(String.Format(                                 "Error resolving controller {0}",                                 controllerType.Name), ex);     }     return controller; }   }   Configure contract and concrete types in Unity Let’s configure our contract and concrete types in Unity for resolving our dependencies.   private void ConfigureUnity() {     //Create UnityContainer               IUnityContainer container = new UnityContainer()                 .RegisterType<IDatabaseFactory, DatabaseFactory>(new HttpContextLifetimeManager<IDatabaseFactory>())     .RegisterType<IUnitOfWork, UnitOfWork>(new HttpContextLifetimeManager<IUnitOfWork>())     .RegisterType<ICategoryRepository, CategoryRepository>(new HttpContextLifetimeManager<ICategoryRepository>());                 //Set container for Controller Factory                ControllerBuilder.Current.SetControllerFactory(             new UnityControllerFactory(container)); }   In the above ConfigureUnity method, we are registering our types onto Unity container with custom lifetime manager HttpContextLifetimeManager. Let’s call ConfigureUnity method in the Global.asax.cs for set controller factory for Unity and configuring the types with Unity.   protected void Application_Start() {     AreaRegistration.RegisterAllAreas();     RegisterGlobalFilters(GlobalFilters.Filters);     RegisterRoutes(RouteTable.Routes);     ConfigureUnity(); }   Developing web application using ASP.NET MVC 3 We have created our domain model for our web application and also have created repositories and configured dependencies with Unity container. Now we have to create controller classes and views for doing CRUD operations against the Category entity. Let’s create controller class for Category Category Controller   public class CategoryController : Controller {     private readonly ICategoryRepository categoryRepository;     private readonly IUnitOfWork unitOfWork;           public CategoryController(ICategoryRepository categoryRepository, IUnitOfWork unitOfWork)     {         this.categoryRepository = categoryRepository;         this.unitOfWork = unitOfWork;     }       public ActionResult Index()     {         var categories = categoryRepository.All();         return View(categories);     }     [HttpGet]     public ActionResult Edit(int id)     {         var category = categoryRepository.GetById(id);         return View(category);     }       [HttpPost]     public ActionResult Edit(int id, FormCollection collection)     {         var category = categoryRepository.GetById(id);         if (TryUpdateModel(category))         {             unitOfWork.Commit();             return RedirectToAction("Index");         }         else return View(category);                 }       [HttpGet]     public ActionResult Create()     {         var category = new Category();         return View(category);     }           [HttpPost]     public ActionResult Create(Category category)     {         if (!ModelState.IsValid)         {             return View("Create", category);         }                     categoryRepository.Add(category);         unitOfWork.Commit();         return RedirectToAction("Index");     }       [HttpPost]     public ActionResult Delete(int  id)     {         var category = categoryRepository.GetById(id);         categoryRepository.Delete(category);         unitOfWork.Commit();         var categories = categoryRepository.All();         return PartialView("CategoryList", categories);       }        }   Creating Views in Razor Now we are going to create views in Razor for our ASP.NET MVC 3 application.  Let’s create a partial view CategoryList.cshtml for listing category information and providing link for Edit and Delete operations. CategoryList.cshtml @using MyFinance.Helpers; @using MyFinance.Domain; @model IEnumerable<Category>      <table>         <tr>         <th>Actions</th>         <th>Name</th>          <th>Description</th>         </tr>     @foreach (var item in Model) {             <tr>             <td>                 @Html.ActionLink("Edit", "Edit",new { id = item.CategoryId })                 @Ajax.ActionLink("Delete", "Delete", new { id = item.CategoryId }, new AjaxOptions { Confirm = "Delete Expense?", HttpMethod = "Post", UpdateTargetId = "divCategoryList" })                           </td>             <td>                 @item.Name             </td>             <td>                 @item.Description             </td>         </tr>          }       </table>     <p>         @Html.ActionLink("Create New", "Create")     </p> The delete link is providing Ajax functionality using the Ajax.ActionLink. This will call an Ajax request for Delete action method in the CategoryCotroller class. In the Delete action method, it will return Partial View CategoryList after deleting the record. We are using CategoryList view for the Ajax functionality and also for Index view using for displaying list of category information. Let’s create Index view using partial view CategoryList  Index.chtml @model IEnumerable<MyFinance.Domain.Category> @{     ViewBag.Title = "Index"; }    <h2>Category List</h2>    <script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.unobtrusive-ajax.min.js")" type="text/javascript"></script>    <div id="divCategoryList">               @Html.Partial("CategoryList", Model) </div>   We can call the partial views using Html.Partial helper method. Now we are going to create View pages for insert and update functionality for the Category. Both view pages are sharing common user interface for entering the category information. So I want to create an EditorTemplate for the Category information. We have to create the EditorTemplate with the same name of entity object so that we can refer it on view pages using @Html.EditorFor(model => model) . So let’s create template with name Category. Let’s create view page for insert Category information   @model MyFinance.Domain.Category   @{     ViewBag.Title = "Save"; }   <h2>Create</h2>   <script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.validate.min.js")" type="text/javascript"></script> <script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.validate.unobtrusive.min.js")" type="text/javascript"></script>   @using (Html.BeginForm()) {     @Html.ValidationSummary(true)     <fieldset>         <legend>Category</legend>                @Html.EditorFor(model => model)               <p>             <input type="submit" value="Create" />         </p>     </fieldset> }   <div>     @Html.ActionLink("Back to List", "Index") </div> ViewStart file In Razor views, we can add a file named _viewstart.cshtml in the views directory  and this will be shared among the all views with in the Views directory. The below code in the _viewstart.cshtml, sets the Layout page for every Views in the Views folder.      @{     Layout = "~/Views/Shared/_Layout.cshtml"; }   Source Code You can download the source code from http://efmvc.codeplex.com/ . The source will be refactored on over time.   Summary In this post, we have created a simple web application using ASP.NET MVC 3 and EF Code First. We have discussed on technologies and practices such as ASP.NET MVC 3, Razor, EF Code First, Unity 2, generic Repository and Unit of Work. In my later posts, I will modify the application and will be discussed on more things. Stay tuned to my blog  for more posts on step by step application building.

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  • Using two versions of the same assembly (system.web.mvc) at the same time

    - by Joel Abrahamsson
    I'm using a content management system whose admin interface uses MVC 1.0. I would like to build the public parts of the site using MVC 2. If I just reference System.Web.Mvc version 2 in my project the admin mode doesn't work as the reference to System.Web.Mvc.ViewPage created by the views in the admin interface is ambiguous: The type 'System.Web.Mvc.ViewPage' is ambiguous: it could come from assembly 'C:\Windows\assembly\GAC_MSIL\System.Web.Mvc\2.0.0.0__31bf3856ad364e35\System.Web.Mvc.dll' or from assembly 'C:\Windows\assembly\GAC_MSIL\System.Web.Mvc\1.0.0.0__31bf3856ad364e35\System.Web.Mvc.dll'. Please specify the assembly explicitly in the type name. I could easily work around this by using binding redirects to specify that MVC 2 should always be used. Unfortunately the content management systems admin mode isn't compatible with MVC 2. I'm not exactly sure why, but I start getting a bunch of null reference exceptions in some of it's actions when I try it and the developers of the CMS have confirmed that it isn't compatible with MVC 2 (yet). The admin interface which is accessed through domain.com/admin is not physically located in webroot/admin but in the program files folder on the server and domain.com/admin is instead routed there using a virtual path provider. Therefor, putting a separate web.config file in the admin folder to specify a different version of System.Web.Mvc for that part of the site isn't an option as that won't fly when using shared hosting. Can anyone see any solution to this problem? Perhaps it's possible to specify that for some assemblies a different version of a referenced assembly should be used?

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  • ASP.NET MVC, Web API, Razor and Open Source

    - by ScottGu
    Microsoft has made the source code of ASP.NET MVC available under an open source license since the first V1 release. We’ve also integrated a number of great open source technologies into the product, and now ship jQuery, jQuery UI, jQuery Mobile, jQuery Validation, Modernizr.js, NuGet, Knockout.js and JSON.NET as part of it. I’m very excited to announce today that we will also release the source code for ASP.NET Web API and ASP.NET Web Pages (aka Razor) under an open source license (Apache 2.0), and that we will increase the development transparency of all three projects by hosting their code repositories on CodePlex (using the new Git support announced last week). Doing so will enable a more open development model where everyone in the community will be able to engage and provide feedback on code checkins, bug-fixes, new feature development, and build and test the products on a daily basis using the most up-to-date version of the source code and tests. We will also for the first time allow developers outside of Microsoft to submit patches and code contributions that the Microsoft development team will review for potential inclusion in the products. We announced a similar open development approach with the Windows Azure SDK last December, and have found it to be a great way to build an even tighter feedback loop with developers – and ultimately deliver even better products as a result. Very importantly - ASP.NET MVC, Web API and Razor will continue to be fully supported Microsoft products that ship both standalone as well as part of Visual Studio (the same as they do today). They will also continue to be staffed by the same Microsoft developers that build them today (in fact, we have more Microsoft developers working on the ASP.NET team now than ever before). Our goal with today’s announcement is to increase the feedback loop on the products even more, and allow us to deliver even better products.  We are really excited about the improvements this will bring. Learn More You can now browse, sync and build the source tree of ASP.NET MVC, Web API, and Razor on the http://aspnetwebstack.codeplex.com web-site.  The Git repository on the site is the live RC milestone development tree that the team has been working on the last several weeks, and the tree contains both the runtime sources + tests, and is buildable and testable by anyone.  Because the binaries produced are bin-deployable, this allows you to compile your own builds and try product updates out as soon as they are checked-in. You can also now contribute directly to the development of the products by reviewing and sending feedback on code checkins, submitting bugs and helping us verify fixes as they are checked in, suggesting and giving feedback on new features as they are implemented, as well as by submitting code fixes or code contributions of your own. Note that all code submissions will be rigorously reviewed and tested by the ASP.NET MVC Team, and only those that meet an extremely high bar for both quality and design/roadmap appropriateness will be merged into the source. Summary All of us on the team are really excited about today’s announcement – it has been something we’ve been working toward for many years.  The tighter feedback loop is going to enable us to build even better products, and take ASP.NET to the next level in terms of innovation and customer focus. Thanks, Scott P.S. In addition to blogging, I use Twitter to-do quick posts and share links. My Twitter handle is: @scottgu

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  • Reuse security code between WCF and MVC.NET

    - by mrjoltcola
    First the background: I jumped into MVC.NET from the Java MVC world, so my implementation below is possibly cheating, I don't know. I avoided fooling with a custom membership provider and I just implemented the base code needed to authenticate and load roles in my LogOn action. Typically I just need to check roles programatically, and have no use for all of the other membership features, so I didn't originally think I needed a full Membership provider. I have a successful WCF project with a custom authentication and authorization layer that I did at least write per the proper API. I implemented it with custom IPrincipal, UserNamePasswordValidator and IAuthorizationPolicy classes to load from an Oracle database. In my WCF services, I use declarative security: [PrincipalPermission(SecurityAction.Demand, Role="ADMIN")]. The question (on the ASP.NET/MCV.NET side): All my reading indicates I should implement a custom Membership/Roles provider, and use [Authorize(Roles="ADMIN")] on my controller actions. At this point, I don't have a true Membership provider, but I'm using the same User class that implements the IPrincipal interface that works with the WCF security. I plan to share common code between the WCF and ASP.NET modules. So my LogOn action is not using the FormsService (and I assume this is bad). I had commented it out, and just used my "UserService" to access the Oracle db. Note my "TODO" comment below. public ActionResult LogOn(LogOnModel model, string returnUrl) { log.Info("Login attempt by " + model.UserName); if (ModelState.IsValid) { User user = userService.findByUserName(model.UserName); // Commented original MemberShipService code, this is probably bad // if (MembershipService.ValidateUser(model.UserName, model.Password)) if (user != null && user.Authenticate(model.Password) == true) { log.Info("Login success by " + model.UserName); FormsService.SignIn(model.UserName, model.RememberMe); // TODO: Override with Custom identity / roles? user.AddRoles(userService.listRolesByUser(user)); // pull in roles from db if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(returnUrl)) return Redirect(returnUrl); else return RedirectToAction("Index", "Home"); } else { log.Info("Login failure by " + model.UserName); ModelState.AddModelError("", "The user name or password provided is incorrect."); } } // If we got this far, something failed, redisplay form return View(model); } So can I make the above work? Can I stick the IPrincipal (User) into the CurrentContext or HttpContext? Can I integrate the custom IPrincipal I've already created without writing a full Membership/Roles Provider? I currently stick the User object into the session and access it from all MVC.NET controllers with "CurrentUser" property which grabs it from the session on demand. But this doesn't work with the [Authorize] attribute; I assume that is because it knows nothing about my custom Principal in the session, and is instead using whatever FormsService.SignIn() produces. I also found that session timeouts screw up the login redirect, the user doesn't get forwarded, instead we get a null exception accessing User from the session, and I assume it is related to my "skipping steps" to get a quick implementation. Thanks.

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