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  • How can I display an ASP.NET MVC html part from one application in another

    - by Frank Sessions
    We have several asp.net MVC apps in the following setup SecurityApp (root application - handles forms auth for SSO and has a profile edit page) Application1 (virtual directory) Application2 (virtual directory) Application3 (virtual directory) so that domain.com points to SecurityApp and domain.com/Application1 etc point to their associated virtual directories. All of our Single Sign On (SSO) is working properly using forms authentication. Based on the users permissions when logging in a menu that lists their available applications and a logout link will be generated and saved in the cache - this menu displays fine whenever the user is in the SecurityApp (editing their profile) but we cannot figure out how to get the Applications in the virtual directories to display the same application menu. We have tried: 1) Using JSONP to do an request that will return the html for the menu. The ajax call returns the HTML with the html; however, because User.IsAuthenticated is false the menu comes back empty. 2) We created a user control and include it along with the dll's for the SecurityApp project and this works; however, we dont want to have to include all the dlls for the SecurityApp project in every application that we create (along with all the app settings in the web.config) We would like this to be as simple as possible to implement so that anyone creating a new app can add the menu to their application in as few steps as possible... Any ideas? To Clarify - we are using ASP.NET MVC 1.0 since these apps are in production and we do not have the okay to go to ASP.NET MVC 2.0 (unfortunately)

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  • Button Onclick event (which is in codbehind) doesn't get triggered in MVC 2

    - by rksprst
    I had an MVC 1.0 web application that was in VS 2008; I just upgraded the project to VS 2010 which automatically upgraded MVC to 2.0. I have a bunch of viewpages have codebehind files that were manually added. The project worked fine before the upgrade, but now the onclick even't don't get triggered. I.e. I have an asp:button with an onclick event that points to a method in the codebehind. When you click the button, the onclick event doesn't get triggered. In fact, when you look at the Page variable, IsPostBack is false. This is really bizarre and I'm wondering if anyone know what happened and how to fix it. I'm thinking it has something to do with the changes in MVC 2.0; but I'm not sure. Any help is really appreciated, I've been trying to figure this out for a while. (deleting the codebehinds and moving that to the controller is not really an option since there is so many pages, moving back to vs 2008 is a last resort as I want to make use of some of the VS 2010 features like performance testing.)

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  • Why have or haven't you moved to ASP.NET MVC yet?

    - by Jason
    I find myself on the edge of trying out ASP.NET MVC but there is still "something" holding me back. Are you still waiting to try it, and if so, why? If you finally decided to use it, what helped you get over your hesitation? I'm not worried about it from a technical point of view; I know the pros and cons of web forms vs MVC. My concerns are more on the practical side. Will Microsoft continue to support ASP.NET MVC if they don't reach some critical threshold of developers/customers using it? Are customers willing to try ASP.NET MVC? Have you had to convince a customer to use it? How did that go? Are there major sites using ASP.NET MVC (besides SO)? Could you provide links if you have them? Did you try ASP.NET MVC and found yourself regretting it? If so, what do you regret? If you have any other concerns preventing you from using MVC.NET, what are they? If you had concerns but felt they were addressed and now use MVC.NET, could you list them as well? Thanks

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  • ASP.NET MVC Case Studies

    - by shiju
     The below are the some of the case studies of ASP.NET MVC Jwaala - Online Banking Solution Benefits after ASP.NET MVC Replaces Ruby on Rails, Linux http://www.microsoft.com/casestudies/Case_Study_Detail.aspx?casestudyid=4000006675 Stack Overflow - Developers See Faster Web Coding, Better Performance with Model-View-Controller http://www.microsoft.com/casestudies/Case_Study_Detail.aspx?casestudyid=4000006676 Kelley Blue Book - Pioneer Provider of Vehicle-Pricing Information Uses Technology to Expand Reach http://www.microsoft.com/casestudies/Case_Study_Detail.aspx?casestudyid=4000006272 

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  • ASP.NET MVC 4: Short syntax for script and style bundling

    - by DigiMortal
    ASP.NET MVC 4 introduces new methods for style and scripts bundling. I found something brilliant there I want to introduce you. In this posting I will show you how easy it is to include whole folder with stylesheets or JavaScripts to your page. I’m using ASP.NET MVC 4 Internet Site template for this example. When we open layout pages located in shared views folder we can see something like this in layout file header: <link href="@System.Web.Optimization.BundleTable.Bundles.ResolveBundleUrl("~/Content/css")" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />    <link href="@System.Web.Optimization.BundleTable.Bundles.ResolveBundleUrl("~/Content/themes/base/css")" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />    <script src="@System.Web.Optimization.BundleTable.Bundles.ResolveBundleUrl("~/Scripts/js")"></script> Let’s take the last line and modify it so it looks like this: <script src="/Scripts/js"></script> After saving the layout page let’s run browser and see what is coming in over network. As you can see the request to folder ended up with result code 200 which means that request was successful. 327.2KB was received and it is not mark-up size for error page or directory index. Here is the body of response: I scrolled down to point where one script ends and another one starts when I made the screenshot above. All scripts delivered with ASP.NET MVC project templates start with this green note. So now we can be sure that the request to scripts folder ended up with bundled script and not with something else. Conclusion Script and styles bundling uses currently by default long syntax where bundling is done through Bundling class. We can still avoid those long lines and use extremely short syntax for script and styles bundling – we just write usual script or link tag and give folder URL as source. ASP.NET MVC 4 is smart enough to combine styles or scripts when request like this comes in.

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  • Long polling using Spring MVC 3.2M1

    - by Dangling Piyush
    I want to implement Long polling Using Spring 3.2 DeferredResult. I got only this tutorial available on internet Long Polling with Spring MVC. It's a good tutorial but I could not understand it fully because I am pretty new to Spring MVC. So if anyone could explain me how to use DeferredResult for implenting long polling efficiently (server-side code) I would be grateful. I have posted this question before on Stack Overflow but got zero response so I thought of reposting it here again.

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  • Help with MVC design pattern?

    - by user3681240
    I am trying to build a java program for user login but I am not sure if my MVC design is accurate. I have the following classes: LoginControl - servlet LoginBean - data holder java class with private variables getters and setters LoginDAO - concrete java class where I am running my SQL queries and doing rest of the logical work. Connection class - java class just to connect to the database view - jsp to display the results html - used for form Is this how you design a java program based on MVC design pattern? Please provide some suggestions?

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  • Should I migrate to MVC3?

    - by eestein
    Hi everyone. I have a MVC2 project, my question is: should I migrate to MVC3? Why? I'd like the opinion of some who already migrated, or at least used MVC3 and MVC2. Already read http://weblogs.asp.net/scottgu/archive/2011/01/13/announcing-release-of-asp-net-mvc-3-iis-express-sql-ce-4-web-farm-framework-orchard-webmatrix.aspx and I already know about the described tool for migrating: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/marcinon/archive/2011/01/13/mvc-3-project-upgrade-tool.aspx What I'd really appreciate is your valuable insight. Best regards.

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  • ASP.NET MVC 3: Layouts and Sections with Razor

    - by ScottGu
    This is another in a series of posts I’m doing that cover some of the new ASP.NET MVC 3 features: Introducing Razor (July 2nd) New @model keyword in Razor (Oct 19th) Layouts with Razor (Oct 22nd) Server-Side Comments with Razor (Nov 12th) Razor’s @: and <text> syntax (Dec 15th) Implicit and Explicit code nuggets with Razor (Dec 16th) Layouts and Sections with Razor (Today) In today’s post I’m going to go into more details about how Layout pages work with Razor.  In particular, I’m going to cover how you can have multiple, non-contiguous, replaceable “sections” within a layout file – and enable views based on layouts to optionally “fill in” these different sections at runtime.  The Razor syntax for doing this is clean and concise. I’ll also show how you can dynamically check at runtime whether a particular layout section has been defined, and how you can provide alternate content (or even an alternate layout) in the event that a section isn’t specified within a view template.  This provides a powerful and easy way to customize the UI of your site and make it clean and DRY from an implementation perspective. What are Layouts? You typically want to maintain a consistent look and feel across all of the pages within your web-site/application.  ASP.NET 2.0 introduced the concept of “master pages” which helps enable this when using .aspx based pages or templates.  Razor also supports this concept with a feature called “layouts” – which allow you to define a common site template, and then inherit its look and feel across all the views/pages on your site. I previously discussed the basics of how layout files work with Razor in my ASP.NET MVC 3: Layouts with Razor blog post.  Today’s post will go deeper and discuss how you can define multiple, non-contiguous, replaceable regions within a layout file that you can then optionally “fill in” at runtime. Site Layout Scenario Let’s look at how we can implement a common site layout scenario with ASP.NET MVC 3 and Razor.  Specifically, we’ll implement some site UI where we have a common header and footer on all of our pages.  We’ll also add a “sidebar” section to the right of our common site layout.  On some pages we’ll customize the SideBar to contain content specific to the page it is included on: And on other pages (that do not have custom sidebar content) we will fall back and provide some “default content” to the sidebar: We’ll use ASP.NET MVC 3 and Razor to enable this customization in a nice, clean way.  Below are some step-by-step tutorial instructions on how to build the above site with ASP.NET MVC 3 and Razor. Part 1: Create a New Project with a Layout for the “Body” section We’ll begin by using the “File->New Project” menu command within Visual Studio to create a new ASP.NET MVC 3 Project.  We’ll create the new project using the “Empty” template option: This will create a new project that has no default controllers in it: Creating a HomeController We will then right-click on the “Controllers” folder of our newly created project and choose the “Add->Controller” context menu command.  This will bring up the “Add Controller” dialog: We’ll name the new controller we create “HomeController”.  When we click the “Add” button Visual Studio will add a HomeController class to our project with a default “Index” action method that returns a view: We won’t need to write any Controller logic to implement this sample – so we’ll leave the default code as-is.  Creating a View Template Our next step will be to implement the view template associated with the HomeController’s Index action method.  To implement the view template, we will right-click within the “HomeController.Index()” method and select the “Add View” command to create a view template for our home page: This will bring up the “Add View” dialog within Visual Studio.  We do not need to change any of the default settings within the above dialog (the name of the template was auto-populated to Index because we invoked the “Add View” context menu command within the Index method).  When we click the “Add” Button within the dialog, a Razor-based “Index.cshtml” view template will be added to the \Views\Home\ folder within our project.  Let’s add some simple default static content to it: Notice above how we don’t have an <html> or <body> section defined within our view template.  This is because we are going to rely on a layout template to supply these elements and use it to define the common site layout and structure for our site (ensuring that it is consistent across all pages and URLs within the site).  Customizing our Layout File Let’s open and customize the default “_Layout.cshtml” file that was automatically added to the \Views\Shared folder when we created our new project: The default layout file (shown above) is pretty basic and simply outputs a title (if specified in either the Controller or the View template) and adds links to a stylesheet and jQuery.  The call to “RenderBody()” indicates where the main body content of our Index.cshtml file will merged into the output sent back to the browser. Let’s modify the Layout template to add a common header, footer and sidebar to the site: We’ll then edit the “Site.css” file within the \Content folder of our project and add 4 CSS rules to it: And now when we run the project and browse to the home “/” URL of our project we’ll see a page like below: Notice how the content of the HomeController’s Index view template and the site’s Shared Layout template have been merged together into a single HTML response.  Below is what the HTML sent back from the server looks like: Part 2: Adding a “SideBar” Section Our site so far has a layout template that has only one “section” in it – what we call the main “body” section of the response.  Razor also supports the ability to add additional "named sections” to layout templates as well.  These sections can be defined anywhere in the layout file (including within the <head> section of the HTML), and allow you to output dynamic content to multiple, non-contiguous, regions of the final response. Defining the “SideBar” section in our Layout Let’s update our Layout template to define an additional “SideBar” section of content that will be rendered within the <div id=”sidebar”> region of our HTML.  We can do this by calling the RenderSection(string sectionName, bool required) helper method within our Layout.cshtml file like below:   The first parameter to the “RenderSection()” helper method specifies the name of the section we want to render at that location in the layout template.  The second parameter is optional, and allows us to define whether the section we are rendering is required or not.  If a section is “required”, then Razor will throw an error at runtime if that section is not implemented within a view template that is based on the layout file (which can make it easier to track down content errors).  If a section is not required, then its presence within a view template is optional, and the above RenderSection() code will render nothing at runtime if it isn’t defined. Now that we’ve made the above change to our layout file, let’s hit refresh in our browser and see what our Home page now looks like: Notice how we currently have no content within our SideBar <div> – that is because the Index.cshtml view template doesn’t implement our new “SideBar” section yet. Implementing the “SideBar” Section in our View Template Let’s change our home-page so that it has a SideBar section that outputs some custom content.  We can do that by opening up the Index.cshtml view template, and by adding a new “SiderBar” section to it.  We’ll do this using Razor’s @section SectionName { } syntax: We could have put our SideBar @section declaration anywhere within the view template.  I think it looks cleaner when defined at the top or bottom of the file – but that is simply personal preference.  You can include any content or code you want within @section declarations.  Notice above how I have a C# code nugget that outputs the current time at the bottom of the SideBar section.  I could have also written code that used ASP.NET MVC’s HTML/AJAX helper methods and/or accessed any strongly-typed model objects passed to the Index.cshtml view template. Now that we’ve made the above template changes, when we hit refresh in our browser again we’ll see that our SideBar content – that is specific to the Home Page of our site – is now included in the page response sent back from the server: The SideBar section content has been merged into the proper location of the HTML response : Part 3: Conditionally Detecting if a Layout Section Has Been Implemented Razor provides the ability for you to conditionally check (from within a layout file) whether a section has been defined within a view template, and enables you to output an alternative response in the event that the section has not been defined.  This provides a convenient way to specify default UI for optional layout sections.  Let’s modify our Layout file to take advantage of this capability.  Below we are conditionally checking whether the “SideBar” section has been defined without the view template being rendered (using the IsSectionDefined() method), and if so we render the section.  If the section has not been defined, then we now instead render some default content for the SideBar:  Note: You want to make sure you prefix calls to the RenderSection() helper method with a @ character – which will tell Razor to execute the HelperResult it returns and merge in the section content in the appropriate place of the output.  Notice how we wrote @RenderSection(“SideBar”) above instead of just RenderSection(“SideBar”).  Otherwise you’ll get an error. Above we are simply rendering an inline static string (<p>Default SideBar Content</p>) if the section is not defined.  A real-world site would more likely refactor this default content to be stored within a separate partial template (which we’d render using the Html.RenderPartial() helper method within the else block) or alternatively use the Html.Action() helper method within the else block to encapsulate both the logic and rendering of the default sidebar. When we hit refresh on our home-page, we will still see the same custom SideBar content we had before.  This is because we implemented the SideBar section within our Index.cshtml view template (and so our Layout rendered it): Let’s now implement a “/Home/About” URL for our site by adding a new “About” action method to our HomeController: The About() action method above simply renders a view back to the client when invoked.  We can implement the corresponding view template for this action by right-clicking within the “About()” method and using the “Add View” menu command (like before) to create a new About.cshtml view template.  We’ll implement the About.cshtml view template like below. Notice that we are not defining a “SideBar” section within it: When we browse the /Home/About URL we’ll see the content we supplied above in the main body section of our response, and the default SideBar content will rendered: The layout file determined at runtime that a custom SideBar section wasn’t present in the About.cshtml view template, and instead rendered the default sidebar content. One Last Tweak… Let’s suppose that at a later point we decide that instead of rendering default side-bar content, we just want to hide the side-bar entirely from pages that don’t have any custom sidebar content defined.  We could implement this change simply by making a small modification to our layout so that the sidebar content (and its surrounding HTML chrome) is only rendered if the SideBar section is defined.  The code to do this is below: Razor is flexible enough so that we can make changes like this and not have to modify any of our view templates (nor make change any Controller logic changes) to accommodate this.  We can instead make just this one modification to our Layout file and the rest happens cleanly.  This type of flexibility makes Razor incredibly powerful and productive. Summary Razor’s layout capability enables you to define a common site template, and then inherit its look and feel across all the views/pages on your site. Razor enables you to define multiple, non-contiguous, “sections” within layout templates that can be “filled-in” by view templates.  The @section {} syntax for doing this is clean and concise.  Razor also supports the ability to dynamically check at runtime whether a particular section has been defined, and to provide alternate content (or even an alternate layout) in the event that it isn’t specified.  This provides a powerful and easy way to customize the UI of your site - and make it clean and DRY from an implementation perspective. Hope this helps, Scott P.S. In addition to blogging, I am also now using Twitter for quick updates and to share links. Follow me at: twitter.com/scottgu

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  • RavenDB Ids and ASP.NET MVC3 Routes

    - by goober
    Hey all, Just building a quick, simple site with MVC 3 RC2 and RavenDB to test some things out. I've been able to make a bunch of projects, but I'm curious as to how Html.ActionLink() handles a raven DB ID. My example: I have a Document called "reasons" (a reason for something, just text mostly), which has reason text and a list of links. I can add, remove, and do everything else fine via my repository. Below is the part of my razor view that lists each reason in a bulleted list, with an Edit link as the first text: @foreach(var Reason in ViewBag.ReasonsList) { <li>@Html.ActionLink("Edit", "Reasons", "Edit", new { id = Reason.Id }, null) @Reason.ReasonText</li> <ul> @foreach (var reasonlink in Reason.ReasonLinks) { <li><a href="@reasonlink.URL">@reasonlink.URL</a></li> } </ul> } The Problem This works fine, except for the edit link. While the values and code here appear to work directly (i.e the link is firing directly), RavenDB saves my document's ID as "reasons/1". So, when the URL happens and it passes the ID, the resulting route is "http://localhost:4976/Reasons/Edit/reasons/2". So, the ID is appended correctly, but MVC is interpreting it as its own route. Any suggestions on how I might be able to get around this? Do I need to create a special route to handle it or is there something else I can do?

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  • Facebook IFrame Application issues for certain users

    - by Kon
    We have a strange issue with running an Facebook IFrame application (using MVC 2). When I run my app and log into Facebook, I get to the application just fine. But when my coworker does it, she gets the following error: API Error Code: 100 API Error Description: Invalid parameter Error Message: Requires valid next URL. Typically this error is resolved by updating the "New Data Permissions" setting of the Facebook application. However, in this case it doesn't help. We've also tried logging in with our accounts from different computers and it seems that neither computer nor which one the MVC ASP.NET app is running from matters. The only difference is who is logged into Facebook. We've looked at our Facebook account settings, but couldn't find any obvious differences. We both have Developer access to the FB application and we both can edit its settings. However, only one of us can actually run the application without getting the above mentioned error message. Any idea what could be happening here?

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  • ASP.NET MVC HandleError Attribute

    - by Ben Griswold
    Last Wednesday, I took a whopping 15 minutes out of my day and added ELMAH (Error Logging Modules and Handlers) to my ASP.NET MVC application.  If you haven’t heard the news (I hadn’t until recently), ELMAH does a killer job of logging and reporting nearly all unhandled exceptions.  As for handled exceptions, I’ve been using NLog but since I was already playing with the ELMAH bits I thought I’d see if I couldn’t replace it. Atif Aziz provided a quick solution in his answer to a Stack Overflow question.  I’ll let you consult his answer to see how one can subclass the HandleErrorAttribute and override the OnException method in order to get the bits working.  I pretty much took rolled the recommended logic into my application and it worked like a charm.  Along the way, I did uncover a few HandleError fact to which I wasn’t already privy.  Most of my learning came from Steven Sanderson’s book, Pro ASP.NET MVC Framework.  I’ve flipped through a bunch of the book and spent time on specific sections.  It’s a really good read if you’re looking to pick up an ASP.NET MVC reference. Anyway, my notes are found a comments in the following code snippet.  I hope my notes clarify a few things for you too. public class LogAndHandleErrorAttribute : HandleErrorAttribute {     public override void OnException(ExceptionContext context)     {         // A word from our sponsors:         //      http://stackoverflow.com/questions/766610/how-to-get-elmah-to-work-with-asp-net-mvc-handleerror-attribute         //      and Pro ASP.NET MVC Framework by Steven Sanderson         //         // Invoke the base implementation first. This should mark context.ExceptionHandled = true         // which stops ASP.NET from producing a "yellow screen of death." This also sets the         // Http StatusCode to 500 (internal server error.)         //         // Assuming Custom Errors aren't off, the base implementation will trigger the application         // to ultimately render the "Error" view from one of the following locations:         //         //      1. ~/Views/Controller/Error.aspx         //      2. ~/Views/Controller/Error.ascx         //      3. ~/Views/Shared/Error.aspx         //      4. ~/Views/Shared/Error.ascx         //         // "Error" is the default view, however, a specific view may be provided as an Attribute property.         // A notable point is the Custom Errors defaultRedirect is not considered in the redirection plan.         base.OnException(context);           var e = context.Exception;                  // If the exception is unhandled, simply return and let Elmah handle the unhandled exception.         // Otherwise, try to use error signaling which involves the fully configured pipeline like logging,         // mailing, filtering and what have you). Failing that, see if the error should be filtered.         // If not, the error simply logged the exception.         if (!context.ExceptionHandled                || RaiseErrorSignal(e)                   || IsFiltered(context))                  return;           LogException(e); // FYI. Simple Elmah logging doesn't handle mail notifications.     }

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  • Does Java Spring 3.0 MVC support annotation/attribute based client side validation like Asp.net MVC

    - by Athens
    In Asp.Net MVC 2.0, at least in the beta, you could decoration your model classes with data annotation attributes and enable client side validation that leverages that criteria defined in your model data annotation attibutes. Is there anything similar for Java Spring MVC 3.0? Is it possible to inject a component into the response pipeline that can inspect the model's annotated properties and render client side validation logic to complement the server side validation logic that is invoked prior to the controller handling the request?

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  • MVC Authorize Attribute + HttpUnauthorizedResult + FormsAuthentication

    - by Anthony
    After browsing the MVC section on CodePlex I noticed that the [Authorize] attribute in MVC returns a HttpUnauthorizedResult() when authorization fails (codeplex AuthorizeAttribute class). In the source of HttpUnauthorizedResult() from CodePlex is the code (I'm not allowed to enter another URL as my rep isn't high enough, but replace the numbers on the URL above with 22929#266476): // 401 is the HTTP status code for unauthorized access - setting this // will cause the active authentication module to execute its default // unauthorized handler context.HttpContext.Response.StatusCode = 401; In particular, the comment describes the authentication module's default unauthorized handler. I can't seem to find any information on this default unauthorized handler. In particular, I'm not using FormsAuthentication and when authorization fails I get an ugly IIS 401 error page. Does anyone know about this default unauthorized handler, and in particular how FormsAuthentication hooks itself in to override it? I'm writing a really simple app for my football team who confirm or deny whether they can play a particular match. If I enable FormsAuthentication in the web.config the redirect works, but I'm not using FormsAuthentication and I'd like to know if there's a workaround.

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  • Visual Studio 2010 Full and ASP.NET MVC 2.0 Template

    - by Daniel
    Hello, I've installed full version (not RC nor Beta) of Visual Studio 2010, a then setup within Web Platform Installer 2.0 announce me that I need to install MVC 2.0, so i did it. When I want to create project "MvcWebApplicationProjectTemplate" in VS I have following message: error: this template attempted to load component assembly 'Microsoft.VisualStudio.Web.Mvc.2.0, Version=10.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35'. For more information on this problem and how to enable this template, please see documentation on Customizing Project Templates. Any idea how to fix it? Do you think that Web Platform Installer 2.0 might have corrupted this template? Thanks, Daniel

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  • MVC.NET project won't start under IIS 5.1 on Windows XP SP3

    - by mrjoltcola
    I've a MVC.NET 2 project that runs fine under Windows 7 and will start on Windows XP if I use the Visual Studio Development Server, however, starting under IIS generates an error: Unable to start debugging on the web server With the message The specified procedure could not be found No errors in the system event viewer. If I start without debugging I get an "HTTP 500 Internal Server Error" The reason I run it under IIS is the project also includes some WCF wsHttp web services that use certificates, so the VS Development Server is not adequate for hosting those. I have already seen the links on SO that talk about adding the wildcard mapping. I've already done that, just as I've done on Windows Server 2003 where I successfully host MVC.NET RC2 for quite a while.

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  • Using LLBL as Model in MVC

    - by Quentin J S
    I have settled on trying to use ASP.NET MVC but the first part I want to replace is the Model. I am using LLBL Pro for the model. I have a table called "Groups" that is a simple look up table. I want to take thhe results of the table and populate a list in MVC. Something that should be very simple... or so I thought.... I've tried all kinds of things as I was getting errors like: The model item passed into the dictionary is of type 'System.Collections.Generic.List1[glossary.EntityClasses.GroupEntity]', but this dictionary requires a model item of type 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable1[glossary.CollectionClasses.GroupCollection]'. private GroupCollection gc = new GroupCollection(); public ActionResult Index() { gc.GetMulti(null); return View( gc.?????? ); } This is all I am trying to do, I've tried lots of variations, but my goal is simply to take the data and display it.

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  • ASP.NET mvc on mono 2.2

    - by Markus
    Hi, I am having a trouble. I am trying to run asp.net mvc 1.0 on mono 2.2.I have copied the system.web.mvc.dll to bin directory. I have done HttpContext.Current.RewritePath("/Home/Index");. Still I am having te error: Server Error in '/' Application The incoming request does not match any route Description: HTTP 500. Error processing request. Stack Trace: System.Web.HttpException: The incoming request does not match any route at System.Web.Routing.UrlRoutingHandler.ProcessRequest (System.Web.HttpContextBase httpContext) [0x00000] at System.Web.Routing.UrlRoutingHandler.ProcessRequest (System.Web.HttpContext httpContext) [0x00000] at System.Web.Routing.UrlRoutingHandler.System.Web.IHttpHandler.ProcessRequest (System.Web.HttpContext context) [0x00000] at MvcApplication4._Default.Page_Load (System.Object sender, System.EventArgs e) [0x00000] at System.Web.UI.Control.OnLoad (System.EventArgs e) [0x00000] at System.Web.UI.Control.LoadRecursive () [0x00000] at System.Web.UI.Page.ProcessLoad () [0x00000] at System.Web.UI.Page.ProcessPostData () [0x00000] at System.Web.UI.Page.InternalProcessRequest () [0x00000] at System.Web.UI.Page.ProcessRequest (System.Web.HttpContext context) [0x00000] Version information: Mono Version: 2.0.50727.1433; ASP.NET Version: 2.0.50727.1433

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  • Personalization in ASP.Net MVC -- friendly URLs, and skinning

    - by larryq
    Hi everyone, I haven't delved into custom generation of friendly URLs in ASP.Net MVC, and was wondering if anyone had suggestions. For example, if John Smith were to create an account on www.example.com, I'd like for his homepage to read www.example.com/JohnSmith -- along with the option for him to choose his URL. The ideal is for this to happen with no intervention on my part in the route maps. Also, does anyone have guidelines on good ways to go to customize an MVC site based on URL? Again, using example.com I'd like for John to choose a color theme and logo for his homepage, then apply it accordingly. Thanks for your tips and suggestions.

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  • ASP. Net MVC and RegisterClientScriptBlock alternative

    - by Noel
    I currently have a web form aspx page that calls RegisterClientScriptBlock. This sends down message text that I use for client side validation e.g. <script type="text/javascript"> //<![CDATA[ var c_errorMessages = { RequiredField : "* Mandatory field" }; //]]> </script> The values are generated on the server side based on culture and resource files. I believe you cannot use RegisterClientScriptBlock with MVC. Any ideas on how I can achieve this with MVC?

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