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  • Creating Wizard in ASP.NET MVC (Part 3 - jQuery)

    - by bipinjoshi
    In Part 1 and Part 2 of this article series you developed a wizard in an ASP.NET MVC application using full page postback and Ajax helper respectively. In this final part of this series you will develop a client side wizard using jQuery. The navigation between various wizard steps (Next, Previous) happens without any postback (neither full nor partial). The only step that causes form submission to the server is clicking on the Finish wizard button.http://www.binaryintellect.net/articles/d278e8aa-3f37-40c5-92a2-74e65b1b5653.aspx 

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  • Can somebody explain the differences, status and future of the various ASP.NET AJAX libraries and to

    - by tjrobinson
    I'm confused about the differences and relationships between the various Microsoft ASP.NET AJAX components/libraries/toolkits and particularly the naming of them. It starts off relatively simple with ASP.NET AJAX itself: ASP.NET AJAX 1.0 (available for ASP.NET 2.0 in a separate package called ASP.NET 1.0 Extensions) ASP.NET AJAX 3.5 (included with ASP.NET 3.5) ASP.NET AJAX 4.0 (included with ASP.NET 4.0) Then come the various projects on CodePlex and elsewhere: ASP.NET AJAX Control Toolkit (aka Original Ajax Control Toolkit) Samples CodePlex It seems that the September 2009 Release is the final release of the Original Ajax Control Toolkit and that it's been superseded by... Ajax Control Toolkit in ASP.NET Ajax Library It looks like the old ASP.NET AJAX Control Toolkit has now become part of a larger ASP.NET Ajax Library but is still maintained seperately on CodePlex. This release is in beta at time of writing so presumably if I want to use the "Control Toolkit" I should stick with the September 2009 Release of the Original ASP.NET AJAX Control Toolkit CodePlex Microsoft Ajax Library Preview Is this the same as the ASP.NET Ajax Library mentioned above just with a confusing name variation? Is the "Control Toolkit" included in Preview 6 and is it older newer or older than the code in Ajax Control Toolkit in ASP.NET Ajax Library? CodePlex Microsoft ASP.NET Ajax Wiki - note the inconsistent insertion of ASP.NET into the name Links to useful articles, roadmaps would be useful.

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  • ASP.NET 4 Hosting :: ValidateRequest=”false” not working in .Net 4.0 (VS.Net 2010)

    - by mbridge
    When we migrated our project from .NET 3.5 to .NET 4.0, we can get this error: Error: System.Web.HttpRequestValidationException A potentially dangerous Request.Form value was detected from the client (ctl00$CC$txtAnswer=\”… World\r\n\r\nI am doing Testin…\”).”} System.Web.HttpRequestValidationException at System.Web.HttpRequest.ValidateString(String value, String collectionKey, RequestValidationSource requestCollection)    at System.Web.HttpRequest.ValidateNameValueCollection(NameValueCollection nvc, RequestValidationSource requestCollection)    at System.Web.HttpRequest.get_Form()    at System.Web.HttpRequest.get_HasForm()    at System.Web.UI.Page.GetCollectionBasedOnMethod(Boolean dontReturnNull)    at System.Web.UI.Page.DeterminePostBackMode()    at System.Web.UI.Page.ProcessRequestMain(Boolean includeStagesBeforeAsyncPoint, Boolean includeStagesAfterAsyncPoint)    at System.Web.UI.Page.ProcessRequest(Boolean includeStagesBeforeAsyncPoint, Boolean includeStagesAfterAsyncPoint)    at System.Web.UI.Page.ProcessRequest()    at System.Web.UI.Page.ProcessRequestWithNoAssert(HttpContext context)    at System.Web.UI.Page.ProcessRequest(HttpContext context)    at ASP.displaypost_aspx.ProcessRequest(HttpContext context) in c:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\Temporary ASP.NET Files\root\a37c2f81\cfc4c927\App_Web_i2rujncl.9.cs:line 0    at System.Web.HttpApplication.CallHandlerExecutionStep.System.Web.HttpApplication.IExecutionStep.Execute()    at System.Web.HttpApplication.ExecuteStep(IExecutionStep step, Boolean& completedSynchronously) What is the Cause? In ASP.NET 4, by default, request validation is enabled for all requests, because it is enabled before the BeginRequest phase of an HTTP request. As a result, request validation applies to requests for all ASP.NET resources, not just .aspx page requests. This includes requests such as Web service calls and custom HTTP handlers. Request validation is also active when custom HTTP modules are reading the contents of an HTTP request. Solution: To revert to the behavior of the ASP.NET 2.0 request validation feature, add the following setting in the Web.config file: <system.web>  <httpRuntime requestValidationMode=”2.0? /> </system.web>

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  • How to fix: Handler “PageHandlerFactory-Integrated” has a bad module “ManagedPipelineHandler” in its module list

    - by ybbest
    Issue: Recently, I am having issues with deploying asp.net mvc 4 application to Windows Server 2008 R2.After add the necessary role and features and I setup an application in IIS. However , I received the following error message: PageHandlerFactory-Integrated” has a bad module “ManagedPipelineHandler” in its module list   Solution: It turns out that this is because ASP.Net was not completely installed with IIS even though I checked that box in the “Add Feature” dialog.   To fix this, I simply ran the following command at the command prompt %windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\aspnet_regiis.exe -i If I had been on a 32 bit system, it would have looked like the following: %windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.21006\aspnet_regiis.exe –i   References: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6846544/how-to-fix-handler-pagehandlerfactory-integrated-has-a-bad-module-managedpip

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  • Integrate BING API for Search inside ASP.Net web application

    - by sreejukg
    As you might already know, Bing is the Microsoft Search engine and is getting popular day by day. Bing offers APIs that can be integrated into your website to increase your website functionality. At this moment, there are two important APIs available. They are Bing Search API Bing Maps The Search API enables you to build applications that utilize Bing’s technology. The API allows you to search multiple source types such as web; images, video etc. and supports various output prototypes such as JSON, XML, and SOAP. Also you will be able to customize the search results as you wish for your public facing website. Bing Maps API allows you to build robust applications that use Bing Maps. In this article I am going to describe, how you can integrate Bing search into your website. In order to start using Bing, First you need to sign in to http://www.bing.com/toolbox/bingdeveloper/ using your windows live credentials. Click on the Sign in button, you will be asked to enter your windows live credentials. Once signed in you will be redirected to the Developer page. Here you can create applications and get AppID for each application. Since I am a first time user, I don’t have any applications added. Click on the Add button to add a new application. You will be asked to enter certain details about your application. The fields are straight forward, only thing you need to note is the website field, here you need to enter the website address from where you are going to use this application, and this field is optional too. Of course you need to agree on the terms and conditions and then click Save. Once you click on save, the application will be created and application ID will be available for your use. Now we got the APP Id. Basically Bing supports three protocols. They are JSON, XML and SOAP. JSON is useful if you want to call the search requests directly from the browser and use JavaScript to parse the results, thus JSON is the favorite choice for AJAX application. XML is the alternative for applications that does not support SOAP, e.g. flash/ Silverlight etc. SOAP is ideal for strongly typed languages and gives a request/response object model. In this article I am going to demonstrate how to search BING API using SOAP protocol from an ASP.Net application. For the purpose of this demonstration, I am going to create an ASP.Net project and implement the search functionality in an aspx page. Open Visual Studio, navigate to File-> New Project, select ASP.Net empty web application, I named the project as “BingSearchSample”. Add a Search.aspx page to the project, once added the solution explorer will looks similar to the following. Now you need to add a web reference to the SOAP service available from Bing. To do this, from the solution explorer, right click your project, select Add Service Reference. Now the new service reference dialog will appear. In the left bottom of the dialog, you can find advanced button, click on it. Now the service reference settings dialog will appear. In the bottom left, you can find Add Web Reference button, click on it. The add web reference dialog will appear now. Enter the URL as http://api.bing.net/search.wsdl?AppID=<YourAppIDHere>&version=2.2 (replace <yourAppIDHere> with the appID you have generated previously) and click on the button next to it. This will find the web service methods available. You can change the namespace suggested by Bing, but for the purpose of this demonstration I have accepted all the default settings. Click on the Add reference button once you are done. Now the web reference to Search service will be added your project. You can find this under solution explorer of your project. Now in the Search.aspx, that you previously created, place one textbox, button and a grid view. For the purpose of this demonstration, I have given the identifiers (ID) as txtSearch, btnSearch, gvSearch respectively. The idea is to search the text entered in the text box using Bing service and show the results in the grid view. In the design view, the search.aspx looks as follows. In the search.aspx.cs page, add a using statement that points to net.bing.api. I have added the following code for button click event handler. The code is very straight forward. It just calls the service with your AppID, a query to search and a source for searching. Let us run this page and see the output when I enter Microsoft in my textbox. If you want to search a specific site, you can include the site name in the query parameter. For e.g. the following query will search the word Microsoft from www.microsoft.com website. searchRequest.Query = “site:www.microsoft.com Microsoft”; The output of this query is as follows. Integrating BING search API to your website is easy and there is no limit on the customization of the interface you can do. There is no Bing branding required so I believe this is a great option for web developers when they plan for site search.

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  • Unobtrusive Client Side Validation with Dynamic Contents in ASP.NET MVC 3

    - by imran_ku07
        Introduction:          A while ago, I blogged about how to perform client side validation for dynamic contents in ASP.NET MVC 2 at here. Using the approach given in that blog, you can easily validate your dynamic ajax contents at client side. ASP.NET MVC 3 also supports unobtrusive client side validation in addition to ASP.NET MVC 2 client side validation for backward compatibility. I feel it is worth to rewrite that blog post for ASP.NET MVC 3 unobtrusive client side validation. In this article I will show you how to do this.       Description:           I am going to use the same example presented at here. Create a new ASP.NET MVC 3 application. Then just open HomeController.cs and add the following code,   public ActionResult CreateUser() { return View(); } [HttpPost] public ActionResult CreateUserPrevious(UserInformation u) { return View("CreateUserInformation", u); } [HttpPost] public ActionResult CreateUserInformation(UserInformation u) { if(ModelState.IsValid) return View("CreateUserCompanyInformation"); return View("CreateUserInformation"); } [HttpPost] public ActionResult CreateUserCompanyInformation(UserCompanyInformation uc, UserInformation ui) { if (ModelState.IsValid) return Content("Thank you for submitting your information"); return View("CreateUserCompanyInformation"); }             Next create a CreateUser view and add the following lines,   <%@ Page Title="" Language="C#" MasterPageFile="~/Views/Shared/Site.Master" Inherits="System.Web.Mvc.ViewPage<UnobtrusiveValidationWithDynamicContents.Models.UserInformation>" %> <asp:Content ID="Content1" ContentPlaceHolderID="TitleContent" runat="server"> CreateUser </asp:Content> <asp:Content ID="Content2" ContentPlaceHolderID="MainContent" runat="server"> <div id="dynamicData"> <%Html.RenderPartial("CreateUserInformation"); %> </div> </asp:Content>             Next create a CreateUserInformation partial view and add the following lines,   <%@ Control Language="C#" Inherits="System.Web.Mvc.ViewUserControl<UnobtrusiveValidationWithDynamicContents.Models.UserInformation>" %> <% Html.EnableClientValidation(); %> <%using (Html.BeginForm("CreateUserInformation", "Home")) { %> <table id="table1"> <tr style="background-color:#E8EEF4;font-weight:bold"> <td colspan="3" align="center"> User Information </td> </tr> <tr> <td> First Name </td> <td> <%=Html.TextBoxFor(a => a.FirstName)%> </td> <td> <%=Html.ValidationMessageFor(a => a.FirstName)%> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Last Name </td> <td> <%=Html.TextBoxFor(a => a.LastName)%> </td> <td> <%=Html.ValidationMessageFor(a => a.LastName)%> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Email </td> <td> <%=Html.TextBoxFor(a => a.Email)%> </td> <td> <%=Html.ValidationMessageFor(a => a.Email)%> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" align="center"> <input type="submit" name="userInformation" value="Next"/> </td> </tr> </table> <%} %> <script type="text/javascript"> $("form").submit(function (e) { if ($(this).valid()) { $.post('<%= Url.Action("CreateUserInformation")%>', $(this).serialize(), function (data) { $("#dynamicData").html(data); $.validator.unobtrusive.parse($("#dynamicData")); }); } e.preventDefault(); }); </script>             Next create a CreateUserCompanyInformation partial view and add the following lines,   <%@ Control Language="C#" Inherits="System.Web.Mvc.ViewUserControl<UnobtrusiveValidationWithDynamicContents.Models.UserCompanyInformation>" %> <% Html.EnableClientValidation(); %> <%using (Html.BeginForm("CreateUserCompanyInformation", "Home")) { %> <table id="table1"> <tr style="background-color:#E8EEF4;font-weight:bold"> <td colspan="3" align="center"> User Company Information </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Company Name </td> <td> <%=Html.TextBoxFor(a => a.CompanyName)%> </td> <td> <%=Html.ValidationMessageFor(a => a.CompanyName)%> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Company Address </td> <td> <%=Html.TextBoxFor(a => a.CompanyAddress)%> </td> <td> <%=Html.ValidationMessageFor(a => a.CompanyAddress)%> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Designation </td> <td> <%=Html.TextBoxFor(a => a.Designation)%> </td> <td> <%=Html.ValidationMessageFor(a => a.Designation)%> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="3" align="center"> <input type="button" id="prevButton" value="Previous"/>   <input type="submit" name="userCompanyInformation" value="Next"/> <%=Html.Hidden("FirstName")%> <%=Html.Hidden("LastName")%> <%=Html.Hidden("Email")%> </td> </tr> </table> <%} %> <script type="text/javascript"> $("#prevButton").click(function () { $.post('<%= Url.Action("CreateUserPrevious")%>', $($("form")[0]).serialize(), function (data) { $("#dynamicData").html(data); $.validator.unobtrusive.parse($("#dynamicData")); }); }); $("form").submit(function (e) { if ($(this).valid()) { $.post('<%= Url.Action("CreateUserCompanyInformation")%>', $(this).serialize(), function (data) { $("#dynamicData").html(data); $.validator.unobtrusive.parse($("#dynamicData")); }); } e.preventDefault(); }); </script>             Next create a new class file UserInformation.cs inside Model folder and add the following code,   public class UserInformation { public int Id { get; set; } [Required(ErrorMessage = "First Name is required")] [StringLength(10, ErrorMessage = "First Name max length is 10")] public string FirstName { get; set; } [Required(ErrorMessage = "Last Name is required")] [StringLength(10, ErrorMessage = "Last Name max length is 10")] public string LastName { get; set; } [Required(ErrorMessage = "Email is required")] [RegularExpression(@"^\w+([-+.']\w+)*@\w+([-.]\w+)*\.\w+([-.]\w+)*$", ErrorMessage = "Email Format is wrong")] public string Email { get; set; } }             Next create a new class file UserCompanyInformation.cs inside Model folder and add the following code,    public class UserCompanyInformation { public int UserId { get; set; } [Required(ErrorMessage = "Company Name is required")] [StringLength(10, ErrorMessage = "Company Name max length is 10")] public string CompanyName { get; set; } [Required(ErrorMessage = "CompanyAddress is required")] [StringLength(50, ErrorMessage = "Company Address max length is 50")] public string CompanyAddress { get; set; } [Required(ErrorMessage = "Designation is required")] [StringLength(50, ErrorMessage = "Designation max length is 10")] public string Designation { get; set; } }            Next add the necessary script files in Site.Master,   <script src="<%= Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery-1.4.4.min.js")%>" type="text/javascript"></script> <script src="<%= Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.validate.min.js")%>" type="text/javascript"></script> <script src="<%= Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.validate.unobtrusive.min.js")%>" type="text/javascript"></script>            Now run this application. You will get the same behavior as described in this article. The key important feature to note here is the $.validator.unobtrusive.parse method, which is used by ASP.NET MVC 3 unobtrusive client side validation to initialize jQuery validation plug-in to start the client side validation process. Another important method to note here is the jQuery.valid method which return true if the form is valid and return false if the form is not valid .       Summary:          There may be several occasions when you need to load your HTML contents dynamically. These dynamic HTML contents may also include some input elements and you need to perform some client side validation for these input elements before posting thier values to server. In this article I shows you how you can enable client side validation for dynamic input elements in ASP.NET MVC 3. I am also attaching a sample application. Hopefully you will enjoy this article too.   SyntaxHighlighter.all()

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  • Integrate Microsoft Translator into your ASP.Net application

    - by sreejukg
    In this article I am going to explain how easily you can integrate the Microsoft translator API to your ASP.Net application. Why we need a translation API? Once you published a website, you are opening a channel to the global audience. So making the web content available only in one language doesn’t cover all your audience. Especially when you are offering products/services it is important to provide contents in multiple languages. Users will be more comfortable when they see the content in their native language. How to achieve this, hiring translators and translate the content to all your user’s languages will cost you lot of money, and it is not a one time job, you need to translate the contents on the go. What is the alternative, we need to look for machine translation. Thankfully there are some translator engines available that gives you API level access, so that automatically you can translate the content and display to the user. Microsoft Translator API is an excellent set of web service APIs that allows developers to use the machine translation technology in their own applications. The Microsoft Translator API is offered through Windows Azure market place. In order to access the data services published in Windows Azure market place, you need to have an account. The registration process is simple, and it is common for all the services offered through the market place. Last year I had written an article about Bing Search API, where I covered the registration process. You can refer the article here. http://weblogs.asp.net/sreejukg/archive/2012/07/04/integrate-bing-search-api-to-asp-net-application.aspx Once you registered with Windows market place, you will get your APP ID. Now you can visit the Microsoft Translator page and click on the sign up button. http://datamarket.azure.com/dataset/bing/microsofttranslator As you can see, there are several options available for you to subscribe. There is a free version available, great. Click on the sign up button under the package that suits you. Clicking on the sign up button will bring the sign up form, where you need to agree on the terms and conditions and go ahead. You need to have a windows live account in order to sign up for any service available in Windows Azure market place. Once you signed up successfully, you will receive the thank you page. You can download the C# class library from here so that the integration can be made without writing much code. The C# file name is TranslatorContainer.cs. At any point of time, you can visit https://datamarket.azure.com/account/datasets to see the applications you are subscribed to. Click on the Use link next to each service will give you the details of the application. You need to not the primary account key and URL of the service to use in your application. Now let us start our ASP.Net project. I have created an empty ASP.Net web application using Visual Studio 2010 and named it Translator Sample, any name could work. By default, the web application in solution explorer looks as follows. Now right click the project and select Add -> Existing Item and then browse to the TranslatorContainer.cs. Now let us create a page where user enter some data and perform the translation. I have added a new web form to the project with name Translate.aspx. I have placed one textbox control for user to type the text to translate, the dropdown list to select the target language, a label to display the translated text and a button to perform the translation. For the dropdown list I have selected some languages supported by Microsoft translator. You can get all the supported languages with their codes from the below link. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh456380.aspx The form looks as below in the design surface of Visual Studio. All the class libraries in the windows market place requires reference to System.Data.Services.Client, let us add the reference. You can find the documentation of how to use the downloaded class library from the below link. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg312154.aspx Let us evaluate the translatorContainer.cs file. You can refer the code and it is self-explanatory. Note the namespace name used (Microsoft), you need to add the namespace reference to your page. I have added the following event for the translate button. The code is self-explanatory. You are creating an object of TranslatorContainer class by passing the translation service URL. Now you need to set credentials for your Translator container object, which will be your account key. The TranslatorContainer support a method that accept a text input, source language and destination language and returns DataServiceQuery<Translation>. Let us see this working, I just ran the application and entered Good Morning in the Textbox. Selected target language and see the output as follows. It is easy to build great translator applications using Microsoft translator API, and there is a reasonable amount of translation you can perform in your application for free. For enterprises, you can subscribe to the appropriate package and make your application multi-lingual.

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  • Table sorting & pagination with jQuery and Razor in ASP.NET MVC

    - by hajan
    Introduction jQuery enjoys living inside pages which are built on top of ASP.NET MVC Framework. The ASP.NET MVC is a place where things are organized very well and it is quite hard to make them dirty, especially because the pattern enforces you on purity (you can still make it dirty if you want so ;) ). We all know how easy is to build a HTML table with a header row, footer row and table rows showing some data. With ASP.NET MVC we can do this pretty easy, but, the result will be pure HTML table which only shows data, but does not includes sorting, pagination or some other advanced features that we were used to have in the ASP.NET WebForms GridView. Ok, there is the WebGrid MVC Helper, but what if we want to make something from pure table in our own clean style? In one of my recent projects, I’ve been using the jQuery tablesorter and tablesorter.pager plugins that go along. You don’t need to know jQuery to make this work… You need to know little CSS to create nice design for your table, but of course you can use mine from the demo… So, what you will see in this blog is how to attach this plugin to your pure html table and a div for pagination and make your table with advanced sorting and pagination features.   Demo Project Resources The resources I’m using for this demo project are shown in the following solution explorer window print screen: Content/images – folder that contains all the up/down arrow images, pagination buttons etc. You can freely replace them with your own, but keep the names the same if you don’t want to change anything in the CSS we will built later. Content/Site.css – The main css theme, where we will add the theme for our table too Controllers/HomeController.cs – The controller I’m using for this project Models/Person.cs – For this demo, I’m using Person.cs class Scripts – jquery-1.4.4.min.js, jquery.tablesorter.js, jquery.tablesorter.pager.js – required script to make the magic happens Views/Home/Index.cshtml – Index view (razor view engine) the other items are not important for the demo. ASP.NET MVC 1. Model In this demo I use only one Person class which defines Person entity with several properties. You can use your own model, maybe one which will access data from database or any other resource. Person.cs public class Person {     public string Name { get; set; }     public string Surname { get; set; }     public string Email { get; set; }     public int? Phone { get; set; }     public DateTime? DateAdded { get; set; }     public int? Age { get; set; }     public Person(string name, string surname, string email,         int? phone, DateTime? dateadded, int? age)     {         Name = name;         Surname = surname;         Email = email;         Phone = phone;         DateAdded = dateadded;         Age = age;     } } 2. View In our example, we have only one Index.chtml page where Razor View engine is used. Razor view engine is my favorite for ASP.NET MVC because it’s very intuitive, fluid and keeps your code clean. 3. Controller Since this is simple example with one page, we use one HomeController.cs where we have two methods, one of ActionResult type (Index) and another GetPeople() used to create and return list of people. HomeController.cs public class HomeController : Controller {     //     // GET: /Home/     public ActionResult Index()     {         ViewBag.People = GetPeople();         return View();     }     public List<Person> GetPeople()     {         List<Person> listPeople = new List<Person>();                  listPeople.Add(new Person("Hajan", "Selmani", "[email protected]", 070070070,DateTime.Now, 25));                     listPeople.Add(new Person("Straight", "Dean", "[email protected]", 123456789, DateTime.Now.AddDays(-5), 35));         listPeople.Add(new Person("Karsen", "Livia", "[email protected]", 46874651, DateTime.Now.AddDays(-2), 31));         listPeople.Add(new Person("Ringer", "Anne", "[email protected]", null, DateTime.Now, null));         listPeople.Add(new Person("O'Leary", "Michael", "[email protected]", 32424344, DateTime.Now, 44));         listPeople.Add(new Person("Gringlesby", "Anne", "[email protected]", null, DateTime.Now.AddDays(-9), 18));         listPeople.Add(new Person("Locksley", "Stearns", "[email protected]", 2135345, DateTime.Now, null));         listPeople.Add(new Person("DeFrance", "Michel", "[email protected]", 235325352, DateTime.Now.AddDays(-18), null));         listPeople.Add(new Person("White", "Johnson", null, null, DateTime.Now.AddDays(-22), 55));         listPeople.Add(new Person("Panteley", "Sylvia", null, 23233223, DateTime.Now.AddDays(-1), 32));         listPeople.Add(new Person("Blotchet-Halls", "Reginald", null, 323243423, DateTime.Now, 26));         listPeople.Add(new Person("Merr", "South", "[email protected]", 3232442, DateTime.Now.AddDays(-5), 85));         listPeople.Add(new Person("MacFeather", "Stearns", "[email protected]", null, DateTime.Now, null));         return listPeople;     } }   TABLE CSS/HTML DESIGN Now, lets start with the implementation. First of all, lets create the table structure and the main CSS. 1. HTML Structure @{     Layout = null;     } <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head>     <title>ASP.NET & jQuery</title>     <!-- referencing styles, scripts and writing custom js scripts will go here --> </head> <body>     <div>         <table class="tablesorter">             <thead>                 <tr>                     <th> value </th>                 </tr>             </thead>             <tbody>                 <tr>                     <td>value</td>                 </tr>             </tbody>             <tfoot>                 <tr>                     <th> value </th>                 </tr>             </tfoot>         </table>         <div id="pager">                      </div>     </div> </body> </html> So, this is the main structure you need to create for each of your tables where you want to apply the functionality we will create. Of course the scripts are referenced once ;). As you see, our table has class tablesorter and also we have a div with id pager. In the next steps we will use both these to create the needed functionalities. The complete Index.cshtml coded to get the data from controller and display in the page is: <body>     <div>         <table class="tablesorter">             <thead>                 <tr>                     <th>Name</th>                     <th>Surname</th>                     <th>Email</th>                     <th>Phone</th>                     <th>Date Added</th>                 </tr>             </thead>             <tbody>                 @{                     foreach (var p in ViewBag.People)                     {                                 <tr>                         <td>@p.Name</td>                         <td>@p.Surname</td>                         <td>@p.Email</td>                         <td>@p.Phone</td>                         <td>@p.DateAdded</td>                     </tr>                     }                 }             </tbody>             <tfoot>                 <tr>                     <th>Name</th>                     <th>Surname</th>                     <th>Email</th>                     <th>Phone</th>                     <th>Date Added</th>                 </tr>             </tfoot>         </table>         <div id="pager" style="position: none;">             <form>             <img src="@Url.Content("~/Content/images/first.png")" class="first" />             <img src="@Url.Content("~/Content/images/prev.png")" class="prev" />             <input type="text" class="pagedisplay" />             <img src="@Url.Content("~/Content/images/next.png")" class="next" />             <img src="@Url.Content("~/Content/images/last.png")" class="last" />             <select class="pagesize">                 <option selected="selected" value="5">5</option>                 <option value="10">10</option>                 <option value="20">20</option>                 <option value="30">30</option>                 <option value="40">40</option>             </select>             </form>         </div>     </div> </body> So, mainly the structure is the same. I have added @Razor code to create table with data retrieved from the ViewBag.People which has been filled with data in the home controller. 2. CSS Design The CSS code I’ve created is: /* DEMO TABLE */ body {     font-size: 75%;     font-family: Verdana, Tahoma, Arial, "Helvetica Neue", Helvetica, Sans-Serif;     color: #232323;     background-color: #fff; } table { border-spacing:0; border:1px solid gray;} table.tablesorter thead tr .header {     background-image: url(images/bg.png);     background-repeat: no-repeat;     background-position: center right;     cursor: pointer; } table.tablesorter tbody td {     color: #3D3D3D;     padding: 4px;     background-color: #FFF;     vertical-align: top; } table.tablesorter tbody tr.odd td {     background-color:#F0F0F6; } table.tablesorter thead tr .headerSortUp {     background-image: url(images/asc.png); } table.tablesorter thead tr .headerSortDown {     background-image: url(images/desc.png); } table th { width:150px;            border:1px outset gray;            background-color:#3C78B5;            color:White;            cursor:pointer; } table thead th:hover { background-color:Yellow; color:Black;} table td { width:150px; border:1px solid gray;} PAGINATION AND SORTING Now, when everything is ready and we have the data, lets make pagination and sorting functionalities 1. jQuery Scripts referencing <link href="@Url.Content("~/Content/Site.css")" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" /> <script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery-1.4.4.min.js")" type="text/javascript"></script> <script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.tablesorter.js")" type="text/javascript"></script> <script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.tablesorter.pager.js")" type="text/javascript"></script> 2. jQuery Sorting and Pagination script   <script type="text/javascript">     $(function () {         $("table.tablesorter").tablesorter({ widthFixed: true, sortList: [[0, 0]] })         .tablesorterPager({ container: $("#pager"), size: $(".pagesize option:selected").val() });     }); </script> So, with only two lines of code, I’m using both tablesorter and tablesorterPager plugins, giving some options to both these. Options added: tablesorter - widthFixed: true – gives fixed width of the columns tablesorter - sortList[[0,0]] – An array of instructions for per-column sorting and direction in the format: [[columnIndex, sortDirection], ... ] where columnIndex is a zero-based index for your columns left-to-right and sortDirection is 0 for Ascending and 1 for Descending. A valid argument that sorts ascending first by column 1 and then column 2 looks like: [[0,0],[1,0]] (source: http://tablesorter.com/docs/) tablesorterPager – container: $(“#pager”) – tells the pager container, the div with id pager in our case. tablesorterPager – size: the default size of each page, where I get the default value selected, so if you put selected to any other of the options in your select list, you will have this number of rows as default per page for the table too. END RESULTS 1. Table once the page is loaded (default results per page is 5 and is automatically sorted by 1st column as sortList is specified) 2. Sorted by Phone Descending 3. Changed pagination to 10 items per page 4. Sorted by Phone and Name (use SHIFT to sort on multiple columns) 5. Sorted by Date Added 6. Page 3, 5 items per page   ADDITIONAL ENHANCEMENTS We can do additional enhancements to the table. We can make search for each column. I will cover this in one of my next blogs. Stay tuned. DEMO PROJECT You can download demo project source code from HERE.CONCLUSION Once you finish with the demo, run your page and open the source code. You will be amazed of the purity of your code.Working with pagination in client side can be very useful. One of the benefits is performance, but if you have thousands of rows in your tables, you will get opposite result when talking about performance. Hence, sometimes it is nice idea to make pagination on back-end. So, the compromise between both approaches would be best to combine both of them. I use at most up to 500 rows on client-side and once the user reach the last page, we can trigger ajax postback which can get the next 500 rows using server-side pagination of the same data. I would like to recommend the following blog post http://weblogs.asp.net/gunnarpeipman/archive/2010/09/14/returning-paged-results-from-repositories-using-pagedresult-lt-t-gt.aspx, which will help you understand how to return page results from repository. I hope this was helpful post for you. Wait for my next posts ;). Please do let me know your feedback. Best Regards, Hajan

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  • Free .NET Training at DevCare in Dallas...

    - by [email protected]
    Come take an early look at the debugging experience in VS 2010 this Friday (3/25/2010) at TekFocus in Dallas, at the InfoMart, at 9 AM: In this session, we’ll … Dive deep into the new IntelliTrace (formerly, historical debugging) feature, which enables you to step back in time within your debugging session and inspect or re-execute code, without having to restart your application See how to manage large numbers of breakpoints with labeling, searching and filtering Extend “data tips” by adding comments, notes and strategically “pinning” these resources to maintain their visibility throughout your session Demonstrate “collaborative debugging,“ by debugging a portion of an application and then exporting breakpoints and labeled data tips, so that others can leverage your effort, without having to start over Leverage these new debugging features in applications built in earlier versions of the .NET Framework through the MultiTargeting features available in VS 2010 You’ll walk-away with a clear understanding of how you can use this upcoming technology to vastly increase your productivity and build better software.Register to attend ==>  http://www.dallasdevcares.com/upcoming-sessions/ DevCares is a monthly series of FREE half-day events sponsored by TekFocus and Microsoft. Targeted specifically at developers, the content is presented by experts on a variety of .NET topics. These briefings include expert testimonials, working demos and sample code designed to help you get the most out of application development with .NET. Events are held on the last Friday of each month at the TekFocus offices in the Infomart near downtown Dallas.TekFocus is a full-service technology training provider with a core business delivering Microsoft-certified technical training and product skills enhancements to customers worldwide    

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  • New Release: ImageGlue 7.0 .NET

    When it comes to manipulating images dynamically there are few toolkits that can compete with ImageGlue 6 in terms of versatility and performance. With extensive support for a huge range of graphic formats including JPEG2000, Very Large TIFF Support™, and fully multi-threaded processing, ImageGlue has proved a popular choice for use in ASP and ASP.NET server environments. Now ImageGlue 7 has arrived, introducing support for 64-bit systems, improved PostScript handling, and many other enhancements. We've also used the opportunity to revise the API, to make it more friendly and familiar to .NET coders. But don't worry about rewriting legacy code - you'll find the 'string parameter' interface is still available through the WebSupergoo.ImageGlue6 namespace. So what's new in ImageGlue 7.0? Support for 64-bit systems. ImageGlue now incorporates the PostScript rendering engine as used by ABCpdf, our PDF component, which has proven to be fast, robust and accurate. This greatly improves support for importing and exporting PS, EPS, and PDF files, and also enables you to make use of powerful PostScript drawing operations for drawing to canvas. Leveraging ABCpdf's powerful vector graphics import and export functionality also makes it possible to interoperate with XPS and MS Office documents. An improved API with new classes, methods and properties, more in keeping with normal .NET development. Plus of course the usual range of bug fixes and minor enhancements. span.fullpost {display:none;}

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  • Localization with ASP.NET MVC ModelMetadata

    - by kazimanzurrashid
    When using the DisplayFor/EditorFor there has been built-in support in ASP.NET MVC to show localized validation messages, but no support to show the associate label in localized text, unless you are using the .NET 4.0 with Mvc Future. Lets a say you are creating a create form for Product where you have support both English and German like the following. English German I have recently added few helpers for localization in the MvcExtensions, lets see how we can use it to localize the form. As mentioned in the past that I am not a big fan when it comes to decorate class with attributes which is the recommended way in ASP.NET MVC. Instead, we will use the fluent configuration (Similar to FluentNHibernate or EF CodeFirst) of MvcExtensions to configure our View Models. For example for the above we will using: public class ProductEditModelConfiguration : ModelMetadataConfiguration<ProductEditModel> { public ProductEditModelConfiguration() { Configure(model => model.Id).Hide(); Configure(model => model.Name).DisplayName(() => LocalizedTexts.Name) .Required(() => LocalizedTexts.NameCannotBeBlank) .MaximumLength(64, () => LocalizedTexts.NameCannotBeMoreThanSixtyFourCharacters); Configure(model => model.Category).DisplayName(() => LocalizedTexts.Category) .Required(() => LocalizedTexts.CategoryMustBeSelected) .AsDropDownList("categories", () => LocalizedTexts.SelectCategory); Configure(model => model.Supplier).DisplayName(() => LocalizedTexts.Supplier) .Required(() => LocalizedTexts.SupplierMustBeSelected) .AsListBox("suppliers"); Configure(model => model.Price).DisplayName(() => LocalizedTexts.Price) .FormatAsCurrency() .Required(() => LocalizedTexts.PriceCannotBeBlank) .Range(10.00m, 1000.00m, () => LocalizedTexts.PriceMustBeBetweenTenToThousand); } } As you can we are using Func<string> to set the localized text, this is just an overload with the regular string method. There are few more methods in the ModelMetadata which accepts this Func<string> where localization can applied like Description, Watermark, ShortDisplayName etc. The LocalizedTexts is just a regular resource, we have both English and German:   Now lets see the view markup: <%@ Page Language="C#" MasterPageFile="~/Views/Shared/Site.Master" Inherits="System.Web.Mvc.ViewPage<Demo.Web.ProductEditModel>" %> <asp:Content ID="Content1" ContentPlaceHolderID="TitleContent" runat="server"> <%= LocalizedTexts.Create %> </asp:Content> <asp:Content ID="Content2" ContentPlaceHolderID="MainContent" runat="server"> <h2><%= LocalizedTexts.Create %></h2> <%= Html.ValidationSummary(false, LocalizedTexts.CreateValidationSummary)%> <% Html.EnableClientValidation(); %> <% using (Html.BeginForm()) {%> <fieldset> <%= Html.EditorForModel() %> <p> <input type="submit" value="<%= LocalizedTexts.Create %>" /> </p> </fieldset> <% } %> <div> <%= Html.ActionLink(LocalizedTexts.BackToList, "Index")%> </div> </asp:Content> As we can see that we are using the same LocalizedTexts for the other parts of the view which is not included in the ModelMetadata like the Page title, button text etc. We are also using EditorForModel instead of EditorFor for individual field and both are supported. One of the added benefit of the fluent syntax based configuration is that we will get full compile type checking for our resource as we are not depending upon the string based resource name like the ASP.NET MVC. You will find the complete localized CRUD example in the MvcExtensions sample folder. That’s it for today.

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  • ASP.NET Performance tip- Combine multiple script file into one request with script manager

    - by Jalpesh P. Vadgama
    We all need java script for our web application and we storing our JavaScript code in .js files. Now If we have more then .js file then our browser will create a new request for each .js file. Which is a little overhead in terms of performance. If you have very big enterprise application you will have so much over head for this. Asp.net Script Manager provides a feature to combine multiple JavaScript into one request but you must remember that this feature will be available only with .NET Framework 3.5 sp1 or higher versions.  Let’s take a simple example. I am having two javascript files Jscrip1.js and Jscript2.js both are having separate functions. //Jscript1.js function Task1() { alert('task1'); } Here is another one for another file. ////Jscript1.js function Task2() { alert('task2'); } Now I am adding script reference with script manager and using this function in my code like this. <form id="form1" runat="server"> <asp:ScriptManager ID="myScriptManager" runat="server" > <Scripts> <asp:ScriptReference Path="~/JScript1.js" /> <asp:ScriptReference Path="~/JScript2.js" /> </Scripts> </asp:ScriptManager> <script language="javascript" type="text/javascript"> Task1(); Task2(); </script> </form> Now Let’s test in Firefox with Lori plug-in which will show you how many request are made for this. Here is output of that. You can see 5 Requests are there. Now let’s do same thing in with ASP.NET Script Manager combined script feature. Like following <form id="form1" runat="server"> <asp:ScriptManager ID="myScriptManager" runat="server" > <CompositeScript> <Scripts> <asp:ScriptReference Path="~/JScript1.js" /> <asp:ScriptReference Path="~/JScript2.js" /> </Scripts> </CompositeScript> </asp:ScriptManager> <script language="javascript" type="text/javascript"> Task1(); Task2(); </script> </form> Now let’s run it and let’s see how many request are there like following. As you can see now we have only 4 request compare to 5 request earlier. So script manager combined multiple script into one request. So if you have lots of javascript files you can save your loading time with this with combining multiple script files into one request. Hope you liked it. Stay tuned for more!!!.. Happy programming.. Technorati Tags: ASP.NET,ScriptManager,Microsoft Ajax

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  • Getting Started with Chart control in ASP.Net 4.0

    - by sreejukg
    In this article I am going to demonstrate the Chart control available in ASP.Net 4 and Visual Studio 2010. Most of the web applications need to generate reports for business users. The business users are happy to view the results in a graphical format more that seeing it in numbers. For the purpose of this demonstration, I have created a sales table. I am going to create charts from this sale data. The sale table looks as follows I have created an ASP.Net web application project in Visual Studio 2010. I have a default.aspx page that I am going to use for the demonstration. First I am going to add a chart control to the page. Visual Studio 2010 has a chart control. The Chart Control comes under the Data Tab in the toolbox. Drag and drop the Chart control to the default.aspx page. Visual Studio adds the below markup to the page. <asp:Chart ID="Chart1" runat="server"></asp:Chart> In the designer view, the Chart controls gives the following output. As you can see this is exactly similar to other server controls in ASP.Net, and similar to other controls under the data tab, Chart control is also a data bound control. So I am going to bind this with my sales data. From the design view, right click the chart control and select “show smart tag” Here you need so choose the Data source property and the chart type. From the choose data source drop down, select new data source. In the data source configuration wizard, select the SQL data base and write the query to retrieve the data. At first I am going to show the chart for amount of sales done by each sales person. I am going to use the following query inside sqldatasource select command. “SELECT SUM(SaleAmount) AS Expr1, salesperson FROM SalesData GROUP BY SalesPerson” This query will give me the amount of sales achieved by each sales person. The mark up of SQLDataSource is as follows. <asp:SqlDataSource ID="SqlDataSource1" runat="server" ConnectionString="<%$ ConnectionStrings:SampleConnectionString %>" SelectCommand="SELECT SUM(SaleAmount) as amount, SalesPerson FROM SalesData GROUP BY SalesPerson"></asp:SqlDataSource> Once you selected the data source for the chart control, you need to select the X and Y values for the columns. I have entered salesperson in the X Value member and amount in the Y value member. After modifications, the Chart control looks as follows Click F5 to run the application. The output of the page is as follows. Using ASP.Net it is much easier to represent your data in graphical format. To show this chart, I didn’t even write any single line of code. The chart control is a great tool that helps the developer to show the business intelligence in their applications without using third party products. I will write another blog that explore further possibilities that shows more reports by using the same sales data. If you want to get the Project in zipped format, post your email below.

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  • New Features in ASP.NET Web API 2 - Part I

    - by dwahlin
    I’m a big fan of ASP.NET Web API. It provides a quick yet powerful way to build RESTful HTTP services that can easily be consumed by a variety of clients. While it’s simple to get started using, it has a wealth of features such as filters, formatters, and message handlers that can be used to extend it when needed. In this post I’m going to provide a quick walk-through of some of the key new features in version 2. I’ll focus on some two of my favorite features that are related to routing and HTTP responses and cover additional features in a future post.   Attribute Routing Routing has been a core feature of Web API since it’s initial release and something that’s built into new Web API projects out-of-the-box. However, there are a few scenarios where defining routes can be challenging such as nested routes (more on that in a moment) and any situation where a lot of custom routes have to be defined. For this example, let’s assume that you’d like to define the following nested route:   /customers/1/orders   This type of route would select a customer with an Id of 1 and then return all of their orders. Defining this type of route in the standard WebApiConfig class is certainly possible, but it isn’t the easiest thing to do for people who don’t understand routing well. Here’s an example of how the route shown above could be defined:   public static class WebApiConfig { public static void Register(HttpConfiguration config) { config.Routes.MapHttpRoute( name: "CustomerOrdersApiGet", routeTemplate: "api/customers/{custID}/orders", defaults: new { custID = 0, controller = "Customers", action = "Orders" } ); config.Routes.MapHttpRoute( name: "DefaultApi", routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{id}", defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional } ); GlobalConfiguration.Configuration.Formatters.Insert(0, new JsonpFormatter()); } } .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; }   With attribute based routing, defining these types of nested routes is greatly simplified. To get started you first need to make a call to the new MapHttpAttributeRoutes() method in the standard WebApiConfig class (or a custom class that you may have created that defines your routes) as shown next:   public static class WebApiConfig { public static void Register(HttpConfiguration config) { // Allow for attribute based routes config.MapHttpAttributeRoutes(); config.Routes.MapHttpRoute( name: "DefaultApi", routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{id}", defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional } ); } } Once attribute based routes are configured, you can apply the Route attribute to one or more controller actions. Here’s an example:   [HttpGet] [Route("customers/{custId:int}/orders")] public List<Order> Orders(int custId) { var orders = _Repository.GetOrders(custId); if (orders == null) { throw new HttpResponseException(new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.NotFound)); } return orders; }   This example maps the custId route parameter to the custId parameter in the Orders() method and also ensures that the route parameter is typed as an integer. The Orders() method can be called using the following route: /customers/2/orders   While this is extremely easy to use and gets the job done, it doesn’t include the default “api” string on the front of the route that you might be used to seeing. You could add “api” in front of the route and make it “api/customers/{custId:int}/orders” but then you’d have to repeat that across other attribute-based routes as well. To simply this type of task you can add the RoutePrefix attribute above the controller class as shown next so that “api” (or whatever the custom starting point of your route is) is applied to all attribute routes: [RoutePrefix("api")] public class CustomersController : ApiController { [HttpGet] [Route("customers/{custId:int}/orders")] public List<Order> Orders(int custId) { var orders = _Repository.GetOrders(custId); if (orders == null) { throw new HttpResponseException(new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.NotFound)); } return orders; } }   There’s much more that you can do with attribute-based routing in ASP.NET. Check out the following post by Mike Wasson for more details.   Returning Responses with IHttpActionResult The first version of Web API provided a way to return custom HttpResponseMessage objects which were pretty easy to use overall. However, Web API 2 now wraps some of the functionality available in version 1 to simplify the process even more. A new interface named IHttpActionResult (similar to ActionResult in ASP.NET MVC) has been introduced which can be used as the return type for Web API controller actions. To return a custom response you can use new helper methods exposed through ApiController such as: Ok NotFound Exception Unauthorized BadRequest Conflict Redirect InvalidModelState Here’s an example of how IHttpActionResult and the helper methods can be used to cleanup code. This is the typical way to return a custom HTTP response in version 1:   public HttpResponseMessage Delete(int id) { var status = _Repository.DeleteCustomer(id); if (status) { return new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.OK); } else { throw new HttpResponseException(HttpStatusCode.NotFound); } } With version 2 we can replace HttpResponseMessage with IHttpActionResult and simplify the code quite a bit:   public IHttpActionResult Delete(int id) { var status = _Repository.DeleteCustomer(id); if (status) { //return new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.OK); return Ok(); } else { //throw new HttpResponseException(HttpStatusCode.NotFound); return NotFound(); } } You can also cleanup post (insert) operations as well using the helper methods. Here’s a version 1 post action:   public HttpResponseMessage Post([FromBody]Customer cust) { var newCust = _Repository.InsertCustomer(cust); if (newCust != null) { var msg = new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.Created); msg.Headers.Location = new Uri(Request.RequestUri + newCust.ID.ToString()); return msg; } else { throw new HttpResponseException(HttpStatusCode.Conflict); } } This is what the code looks like in version 2:   public IHttpActionResult Post([FromBody]Customer cust) { var newCust = _Repository.InsertCustomer(cust); if (newCust != null) { return Created<Customer>(Request.RequestUri + newCust.ID.ToString(), newCust); } else { return Conflict(); } } More details on IHttpActionResult and the different helper methods provided by the ApiController base class can be found here. Conclusion Although there are several additional features available in Web API 2 that I could cover (CORS support for example), this post focused on two of my favorites features. If you have .NET 4.5.1 available then I definitely recommend checking the new features out. Additional articles that cover features in ASP.NET Web API 2 can be found here.

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  • Using transactions with LINQ-to-SQL

    - by Jalpesh P. Vadgama
    Today one of my colleague asked that how we can use transactions with the LINQ-to-SQL Classes when we use more then one entities updated at same time. It was a good question. Here is my answer for that.For ASP.NET 2.0  or higher version have a new class called TransactionScope which can be used to manage transaction with the LINQ. Let’s take a simple scenario we are having a shopping cart application in which we are storing details or particular order placed into the database using LINQ-to-SQL. There are two tables Order and OrderDetails which will have all the information related to order. Order will store particular information about orders while OrderDetails table will have product and quantity of product for particular order.We need to insert data in both tables as same time and if any errors comes then it should rollback the transaction. To use TransactionScope in above scenario first we have add a reference to System.Transactions like below. After adding the transaction we need to drag and drop the Order and Order Details tables into Linq-To-SQL Classes it will create entities for that. Below is the code for transaction scope to use mange transaction with Linq Context. MyContextDataContext objContext = new MyContextDataContext(); using (System.Transactions.TransactionScope tScope = new System.Transactions.TransactionScope(TransactionScopeOption.Required)) { objContext.Order.InsertOnSubmit(Order); objContext.OrderDetails.InsertOnSumbit(OrderDetails); objContext.SubmitChanges(); tScope.Complete(); } Here it will commit transaction only if using blocks will run successfully. Hope this will help you. Technorati Tags: Linq,Transaction,System.Transactions,ASP.NET

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  • Keyboard locking up in Visual Studio 2010

    - by Jim Wang
    One of the initiatives I’m involved with on the ASP.NET and Visual Studio teams is the Tactical Test Team (TTT), which is a group of testers who dedicate a portion of their time to roaming around and testing different parts of the product.  What this generally translates to is a day and a bit a week helping out with areas of the product that have been flagged as risky, or tackling problems that span both ASP.NET and Visual Studio.  There is also a separate component of this effort outside of TTT which is to help with customer scenarios and design. I enjoy being on TTT because it allows me the opportunity to look at the entire product and gain expertise in a wide range of areas.  This week, I’m looking at Visual Studio 2010 performance problems, and this gem with the keyboard in Visual Studio locking up ended up catching my attention. First of all, here’s a link to one of the many Connect bugs describing the problem: Microsoft Connect I like this problem because it really highlights the challenges of reproducing customer bugs.  There aren’t any clear steps provided here, and I don’t know a lot about your environment: not just the basics like our OS version, but also what third party plug-ins or antivirus software you might be running that might contribute to the problem.  In this case, my gut tells me that there is more than one bug here, just by the sheer volume of reports.  Here’s another thread where users talk about it: Microsoft Connect The volume and different configurations are staggering.  From a customer perspective, this is a very clear cut case of basic functionality not working in the product, but from our perspective, it’s hard to find something reproducible: even customers don’t quite agree on what causes the problem (installing ReSharper seems to cause a problem…or does it?). So this then, is the start of a QA investigation. If anybody has isolated repro steps (just comment on this post) that they can provide this will immensely help us nail down the issue(s), but I’ll be doing a multi-part series on my progress and methodologies as I look into the problem.

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  • .NET Reflector Pro Support: How do I activate .NET Reflector Pro with my serial number?

    - by Bart Read
    This is actually very straightforward, once you know where to look for it. Open up a version of Visual Studio into which you've installed the .NET Reflector add-in. Now on the main menu bar click .NET Reflector > Choose Assemblies to Debug (figure 1). Figure 1. Bring up the "Choose Assemblies to Debug" dialog from the .NET Reflector menu. The .NET Reflector Pro trial dialog will appear as shown in figure 2. Figure 2. Click Activate in the trial dialog. At this point just click Activate....(read more)

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  • Use ASP.NET 4 Browser Definitions with ASP.NET 3.5

    - by Stephen Walther
    We updated the browser definitions files included with ASP.NET 4 to include information on recent browsers and devices such as Google Chrome and the iPhone. You can use these browser definition files with earlier versions of ASP.NET such as ASP.NET 3.5. The updated browser definition files, and instructions for installing them, can be found here: http://aspnet.codeplex.com/releases/view/41420 The changes in the browser definition files can cause backwards compatibility issues when you upgrade an ASP.NET 3.5 web application to ASP.NET 4. If you encounter compatibility issues, you can install the old browser definition files in your ASP.NET 4 application. The old browser definition files are included in the download file referenced above. What’s New in the ASP.NET 4 Browser Definition Files The complete set of browsers supported by the new ASP.NET 4 browser definition files is represented by the following figure:     If you look carefully at the figure, you’ll notice that we added browser definitions for several types of recent browsers such as Internet Explorer 8, Firefox 3.5, Google Chrome, Opera 10, and Safari 4. Furthermore, notice that we now include browser definitions for several of the most popular mobile devices: BlackBerry, IPhone, IPod, and Windows Mobile (IEMobile). The mobile devices appear in the figure with a purple background color. To improve performance, we removed a whole lot of outdated browser definitions for old cell phones and mobile devices. We also cleaned up the information contained in the browser files. Here are some of the browser features that you can detect: Are you a mobile device? <%=Request.Browser.IsMobileDevice %> Are you an IPhone? <%=Request.Browser.MobileDeviceModel == "IPhone" %> What version of JavaScript do you support? <%=Request.Browser["javascriptversion"] %> What layout engine do you use? <%=Request.Browser["layoutEngine"] %>   Here’s what you would get if you displayed the value of these properties using Internet Explorer 8: Here’s what you get when you use Google Chrome: Testing Browser Settings When working with browser definition files, it is useful to have some way to test the capability information returned when you request a page with different browsers. You can use the following method to return the HttpBrowserCapabilities the corresponds to a particular user agent string and set of browser headers: public HttpBrowserCapabilities GetBrowserCapabilities(string userAgent, NameValueCollection headers) { HttpBrowserCapabilities browserCaps = new HttpBrowserCapabilities(); Hashtable hashtable = new Hashtable(180, StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase); hashtable[string.Empty] = userAgent; // The actual method uses client target browserCaps.Capabilities = hashtable; var capsFactory = new System.Web.Configuration.BrowserCapabilitiesFactory(); capsFactory.ConfigureBrowserCapabilities(headers, browserCaps); capsFactory.ConfigureCustomCapabilities(headers, browserCaps); return browserCaps; } At the end of this blog entry, there is a link to download a simple Visual Studio 2008 project – named Browser Definition Test -- that uses this method to display capability information for arbitrary user agent strings. For example, if you enter the user agent string for an iPhone then you get the results in the following figure: The Browser Definition Test application enables you to submit a user-agent string and display a table of browser capabilities information. The browser definition files contain sample user-agent strings for each browser definition. I got the iPhone user-agent string from the comments in the iphone.browser file. Enumerating Browser Definitions Someone asked in the comments whether or not there is a way to enumerate all of the browser definitions. You can do this if you ware willing to use a little reflection and read a private property. The browser definition files in the config\browsers folder get parsed into a class named BrowserCapabilitesFactory. After you run the aspnet_regbrowsers tool, you can see the source for this class in the config\browser folder by opening a file named BrowserCapsFactory.cs. The BrowserCapabilitiesFactoryBase class has a protected property named BrowserElements that represents a Hashtable of all of the browser definitions. Here's how you can read this protected property and display the ID for all of the browser definitions: var propInfo = typeof(BrowserCapabilitiesFactory).GetProperty("BrowserElements", BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance); Hashtable browserDefinitions = (Hashtable)propInfo.GetValue(new BrowserCapabilitiesFactory(), null); foreach (var key in browserDefinitions.Keys) { Response.Write("" + key); } If you run this code using Visual Studio 2008 then you get the following results: You get a huge number of outdated browsers and devices. In all, 449 browser definitions are listed. If you run this code using Visual Studio 2010 then you get the following results: In the case of Visual Studio 2010, all the old browsers and devices have been removed and you get only 19 browser definitions. Conclusion The updated browser definition files included in ASP.NET 4 provide more accurate information for recent browsers and devices. If you would like to test the new browser definitions with different user-agent strings then I recommend that you download the Browser Definition Test project: Browser Definition Test Project

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  • ASP.NET MVC ModelCopier

    - by shiju
     In my earlier post ViewModel patten and AutoMapper in ASP.NET MVC application, We have discussed the need for  View Model objects and how to map values between View Model objects and Domain model objects using AutoMapper. ASP.NET MVC futures assembly provides a static class ModelCopier that can also use for copying values between View Model objects and Domain model objects. ModelCopier class has two static methods - CopyCollection and CopyModel.CopyCollection method would copy values between two collection objects and CopyModel would copy values between two model objects. <PRE class="c#" name="code"> var expense=new Expense(); ModelCopier.CopyModel(expenseViewModel, expense);</PRE>The above code copying values from expenseViewModel object to  expense object.                For simple mapping between model objects, you can use ModelCopier but for complex scenarios, I highly recommending to using AutoMapper for mapping between model objects.

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  • ASP.NET Dynamic Data Deployment Error

    - by rajbk
    You have an ASP.NET 3.5 dynamic data website that works great on your local box. When you deploy it to your production machine and turn on debug, you get the YSD Server Error in '/MyPath/MyApp' Application. Parser Error Description: An error occurred during the parsing of a resource required to service this request. Please review the following specific parse error details and modify your source file appropriately. Parser Error Message: Unknown server tag 'asp:DynamicDataManager'. Source Error: Line 5:  Line 6:  <asp:Content ID="Content1" ContentPlaceHolderID="ContentPlaceHolder1" Runat="Server"> Line 7:      <asp:DynamicDataManager ID="DynamicDataManager1" runat="server" AutoLoadForeignKeys="true" /> Line 8:  Line 9:      <h2><%= table.DisplayName%></h2> Probable Causes The server does not have .NET 3.5 SP1, which includes ASP.NET Dynamic Data, installed. Download it here. The third tagPrefix shown below is missing from web.config <pages> <controls> <add tagPrefix="asp" namespace="System.Web.UI" assembly="System.Web.Extensions, Version=3.5.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31BF3856AD364E35"/> <add tagPrefix="asp" namespace="System.Web.UI.WebControls" assembly="System.Web.Extensions, Version=3.5.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31BF3856AD364E35"/> <add tagPrefix="asp" namespace="System.Web.DynamicData" assembly="System.Web.DynamicData, Version=3.5.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31BF3856AD364E35"/> </controls></pages>     Hope that helps!

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  • LLBLGen Pro v3.5 has been released!

    - by FransBouma
    Last weekend we released LLBLGen Pro v3.5! Below the list of what's new in this release. Of course, not everything is on this list, like the large amount of work we put in refactoring the runtime framework. The refactoring was necessary because our framework has two paradigms which are added to the framework at a different time, and from a design perspective in the wrong order (the paradigm we added first, SelfServicing, should have been built on top of Adapter, the other paradigm, which was added more than a year after the first released version). The refactoring made sure the framework re-uses more code across the two paradigms (they already shared a lot of code) and is better prepared for the future. We're not done yet, but refactoring a massive framework like ours without breaking interfaces and existing applications is ... a bit of a challenge ;) To celebrate the release of v3.5, we give every customer a 30% discount! Use the coupon code NR1ORM with your order :) The full list of what's new: Designer Rule based .NET Attribute definitions. It's now possible to specify a rule using fine-grained expressions with an attribute definition to define which elements of a given type will receive the attribute definition. Rules can be assigned to attribute definitions on the project level, to make it even easier to define attribute definitions in bulk for many elements in the project. More information... Revamped Project Settings dialog. Multiple project related properties and settings dialogs have been merged into a single dialog called Project Settings, which makes it easier to configure the various settings related to project elements. It also makes it easier to find features previously not used  by many (e.g. type conversions) More information... Home tab with Quick Start Guides. To make new users feel right at home, we added a home tab with quick start guides which guide you through four main use cases of the designer. System Type Converters. Many common conversions have been implemented by default in system type converters so users don't have to develop their own type converters anymore for these type conversions. Bulk Element Setting Manipulator. To change setting values for multiple project elements, it was a little cumbersome to do that without a lot of clicking and opening various editors. This dialog makes changing settings for multiple elements very easy. EDMX Importer. It's now possible to import entity model data information from an existing Entity Framework EDMX file. Other changes and fixes See for the full list of changes and fixes the online documentation. LLBLGen Pro Runtime Framework WCF Data Services (OData) support has been added. It's now possible to use your LLBLGen Pro runtime framework powered domain layer in a WCF Data Services application using the VS.NET tools for WCF Data Services. WCF Data Services is a Microsoft technology for .NET 4 to expose your domain model using OData. More information... New query specification and execution API: QuerySpec. QuerySpec is our new query specification and execution API as an alternative to Linq and our more low-level API. It's build, like our Linq provider, on top of our lower-level API. More information... SQL Server 2012 support. The SQL Server DQE allows paging using the new SQL Server 2012 style. More information... System Type converters. For a common set of types the LLBLGen Pro runtime framework contains built-in type conversions so you don't need to write your own type converters anymore. Public/NonPublic property support. It's now possible to mark a field / navigator as non-public which is reflected in the runtime framework as an internal/friend property instead of a public property. This way you can hide properties from the public interface of a generated class and still access it through code added to the generated code base. FULL JOIN support. It's now possible to perform FULL JOIN joins using the native query api and QuerySpec. It's left to the developer to check whether the used target database supports FULL (OUTER) JOINs. Using a FULL JOIN with entity fetches is not recommended, and should only be used when both participants in the join aren't the target of the fetch. Dependency Injection Tracing. It's now possible to enable tracing on dependency injection. Enable tracing at level '4' on the traceswitch 'ORMGeneral'. This will emit trace information about which instance of which type got an instance of type T injected into property P. Entity Instances in projections in Linq. It's now possible to return an entity instance in a custom Linq projection. It's now also possible to pass this instance to a method inside the query projection. Inheritance fully supported in this construct. Entity Framework support The Entity Framework has been updated in the recent year with code-first support and a new simpler context api: DbContext (with DbSet). The amount of code to generate is smaller and the context simpler. LLBLGen Pro v3.5 comes with support for DbContext and DbSet and generates code which utilizes these new classes. NHibernate support NHibernate v3.2+ built-in proxy factory factory support. By default the built-in ProxyFactoryFactory is selected. FluentNHibernate Session Manager uses 1.2 syntax. Fluent NHibernate mappings generate a SessionManager which uses the v1.2 syntax for the ProxyFactoryFactory location Optionally emit schema / catalog name in mappings Two settings have been added which allow the user to control whether the catalog name and/or schema name as known in the project in the designer is emitted into the mappings.

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  • ASP.NET Web API - Screencast series Part 2: Getting Data

    - by Jon Galloway
    We're continuing a six part series on ASP.NET Web API that accompanies the getting started screencast series. This is an introductory screencast series that walks through from File / New Project to some more advanced scenarios like Custom Validation and Authorization. The screencast videos are all short (3-5 minutes) and the sample code for the series is both available for download and browsable online. I did the screencasts, but the samples were written by the ASP.NET Web API team. In Part 1 we looked at what ASP.NET Web API is, why you'd care, did the File / New Project thing, and did some basic HTTP testing using browser F12 developer tools. This second screencast starts to build out the Comments example - a JSON API that's accessed via jQuery. This sample uses a simple in-memory repository. At this early stage, the GET /api/values/ just returns an IEnumerable<Comment>. In part 4 we'll add on paging and filtering, and it gets more interesting.   The get by id (e.g. GET /api/values/5) case is a little more interesting. The method just returns a Comment if the Comment ID is valid, but if it's not found we throw an HttpResponseException with the correct HTTP status code (HTTP 404 Not Found). This is an important thing to get - HTTP defines common response status codes, so there's no need to implement any custom messaging here - we tell the requestor that the resource the requested wasn't there.  public Comment GetComment(int id) { Comment comment; if (!repository.TryGet(id, out comment)) throw new HttpResponseException(HttpStatusCode.NotFound); return comment; } This is great because it's standard, and any client should know how to handle it. There's no need to invent custom messaging here, and we can talk to any client that understands HTTP - not just jQuery, and not just browsers. But it's crazy easy to consume an HTTP API that returns JSON via jQuery. The example uses Knockout to bind the JSON values to HTML elements, but the thing to notice is that calling into this /api/coments is really simple, and the return from the $.get() method is just JSON data, which is really easy to work with in JavaScript (since JSON stands for JavaScript Object Notation and is the native serialization format in Javascript). $(function() { $("#getComments").click(function () { // We're using a Knockout model. This clears out the existing comments. viewModel.comments([]); $.get('/api/comments', function (data) { // Update the Knockout model (and thus the UI) with the comments received back // from the Web API call. viewModel.comments(data); }); }); }); That's it! Easy, huh? In Part 3, we'll start modifying data on the server using POST and DELETE.

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  • Compress session state in ASP.Net 4.0

    - by nikolaosk
    Hello folks, In this post I would like to talk about a new feature of ASP.NET 4.0 - easy state compression . When we create web-asp.net applications the user must feel that whenever he interacts with the website, he actually interacts with something that can be safely described as an application. What I mean by this is that is that during a postback the whole page is re-created and is sent back to the client in a fraction of a second. The server has no idea what the user does with the page. If we...(read more)

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