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  • Technologies stack to create soccer game vizualization on web page [on hold]

    - by Lambrusco
    I want to create soccer game vizualization. What technologies will be best to create such one for web page? On input I have two teams with players. I have theory about their movements, the movement of the ball on field and so on. I just want to vizualize their movements. What will be the best technology stack? I mean programming languages (C++, Ruby, Java, PHP) and vizualization ways (Flash, HTML5, JS)

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  • queues in linux tcp stack

    - by poly
    I'm trying to understand the Linux kernel tcp_input/tcp_output and I'm lost. who create/control the queues, if the input is a thread and the out is another thread, who owns the queues in the TCP stack as there are many, I already asked about the retransmission queue before in this site, so the question would be who create this queue I know that this queue holds all sent packet to be retransmitted/deleted after ack later

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  • Android: bug in launchMode="singleTask"? -> activity stack not preserved

    - by Stefan Klumpp
    My main activity A has as set android:launchMode="singleTask" in the manifest. Now, whenever I start another activity from there, e.g. B and press the HOME BUTTON on the phone to return to the home screen and then again go back to my app, either via pressing the app's button or pressing the HOME BUTTONlong to show my most recent apps it doesn't preserve my activity stack and returns straight to A instead of the expected activity B. Here the two behaviors: Expected: A > B > HOME > B Actual: A > B > HOME > A (bad!) Is there a setting I'm missing or is this a bug? If the latter, is there a workaround for this until the bug is fixed? FYI: This question has already been discussed here. However, it doesn't seem that there is any real solution to this, yet.

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  • why gcc 4.x default reserve 8 bytes for stack on linux when calling a method?

    - by nikcname
    as a beginner of asm, I am checking gcc -S generated asm code to learn. why gcc 4.x default reserve 8 bytes for stack when calling a method? func18 is the empty function with no return no param no local var defined. I can't figure out why 8 bytes is reserved here (neither any forum/site mention for the reason, ppl seems take it for granted) is it for the %ebp just push? or return type?! many thx! .globl _func18 _func18: pushl %ebp movl %esp, %ebp subl $8, %esp .text

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  • why gcc 4.x default reserve 8 bytes for stack on linux when calling a method?

    - by nikcname
    as a beginner of asm, I am checking gcc -S generated asm code to learn. why gcc 4.x default reserve 8 bytes for stack when calling a method? func18 is the empty function with no return no param no local var defined. I can't figure out why 8 bytes is reserved here (neither any forum/site mention for the reason, ppl seems take it for granted) is it for the %ebp just push? or return type?! many thx! .globl _func18 _func18: pushl %ebp movl %esp, %ebp subl $8, %esp .text

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  • Using C++, why can `throw` cause `terminate()`, and when are the stack variables to be freed?

    - by nbolton
    I'm pondering a question on Brainbench. I actually realised that I could answer my question easily by compiling the code, but it's an interesting question nonetheless, so I'll ask the question anyway and answer it myself shortly. Take a look at this snippet: The question considers what happens when we throw from a destructor (which causes terminate() to be called). It's become clear to me by asking the question that the memory is indeed freed and the destructor is called, but, is this before or after throw is called from foo? Perhaps the issue here is that throw is used while the stack is unwinding that is the problem... Actually this is slightly confusing.

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  • Stack allocation fails and heap allocation succeeds!! Is it possible??

    - by Prabhu
    Hello All, I have the following piece of snippet Class Sample { Obj_Class1 o1; Obj_Class2 o2;}; But the size of Obj_Class1 and Obj_Class2 is huge so that the compiler shows a warning "Consider moving some space to heap". I was asked to replace Obj_Class1 o1 with Obj_Class1* o1 = new Obj_Class1(); But I feel that there is no use of making this change as heap allocation will also fail if stack allocation fails. Am I correct? Or does it make sense to make this change ( other than suppressing the compiler warning ).

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  • Does `throw` cause stack variables (full types) to be freed from memory in C++?

    - by nbolton
    I'm pondering a question on Brainbench. I actually realised that I could answer my question easily by compiling the code, but it's an interesting question nonetheless, so I'll ask the question anyway and answer it myself shortly. Take a look at this snippet: The question considers what happens when we throw from a destructor (which causes terminate() to be called). It's become clear to me by asking the question that the memory is indeed freed and the destructor is called, but, is this before or after throw is called from foo? Perhaps the issue here is that throw is used while the stack is unwinding that is the problem... Actually this is slightly confusing.

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  • Does `throw` cause stack variables to be freed from memory in C++?

    - by nbolton
    I'm pondering a question on Brainbench. I actually realised that I could answer my question easily by compiling the code, but it's an interesting question nonetheless, so I'll ask the question anyway and answer it myself shortly. Take a look at this snippet: The question considers what happens when we throw from a destructor (which causes terminate() to be called). It's become clear to me by asking the question that the memory is indeed freed and the destructor is called, but, is this before or after throw is called from foo? Perhaps the issue here is that throw is used while the stack is unwinding that is the problem... Actually this is slightly confusing.

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  • C#/.NET Little Wonders: The Concurrent Collections (1 of 3)

    - by James Michael Hare
    Once again we consider some of the lesser known classes and keywords of C#.  In the next few weeks, we will discuss the concurrent collections and how they have changed the face of concurrent programming. This week’s post will begin with a general introduction and discuss the ConcurrentStack<T> and ConcurrentQueue<T>.  Then in the following post we’ll discuss the ConcurrentDictionary<T> and ConcurrentBag<T>.  Finally, we shall close on the third post with a discussion of the BlockingCollection<T>. For more of the "Little Wonders" posts, see the index here. A brief history of collections In the beginning was the .NET 1.0 Framework.  And out of this framework emerged the System.Collections namespace, and it was good.  It contained all the basic things a growing programming language needs like the ArrayList and Hashtable collections.  The main problem, of course, with these original collections is that they held items of type object which means you had to be disciplined enough to use them correctly or you could end up with runtime errors if you got an object of a type you weren't expecting. Then came .NET 2.0 and generics and our world changed forever!  With generics the C# language finally got an equivalent of the very powerful C++ templates.  As such, the System.Collections.Generic was born and we got type-safe versions of all are favorite collections.  The List<T> succeeded the ArrayList and the Dictionary<TKey,TValue> succeeded the Hashtable and so on.  The new versions of the library were not only safer because they checked types at compile-time, in many cases they were more performant as well.  So much so that it's Microsoft's recommendation that the System.Collections original collections only be used for backwards compatibility. So we as developers came to know and love the generic collections and took them into our hearts and embraced them.  The problem is, thread safety in both the original collections and the generic collections can be problematic, for very different reasons. Now, if you are only doing single-threaded development you may not care – after all, no locking is required.  Even if you do have multiple threads, if a collection is “load-once, read-many” you don’t need to do anything to protect that container from multi-threaded access, as illustrated below: 1: public static class OrderTypeTranslator 2: { 3: // because this dictionary is loaded once before it is ever accessed, we don't need to synchronize 4: // multi-threaded read access 5: private static readonly Dictionary<string, char> _translator = new Dictionary<string, char> 6: { 7: {"New", 'N'}, 8: {"Update", 'U'}, 9: {"Cancel", 'X'} 10: }; 11:  12: // the only public interface into the dictionary is for reading, so inherently thread-safe 13: public static char? Translate(string orderType) 14: { 15: char charValue; 16: if (_translator.TryGetValue(orderType, out charValue)) 17: { 18: return charValue; 19: } 20:  21: return null; 22: } 23: } Unfortunately, most of our computer science problems cannot get by with just single-threaded applications or with multi-threading in a load-once manner.  Looking at  today's trends, it's clear to see that computers are not so much getting faster because of faster processor speeds -- we've nearly reached the limits we can push through with today's technologies -- but more because we're adding more cores to the boxes.  With this new hardware paradigm, it is even more important to use multi-threaded applications to take full advantage of parallel processing to achieve higher application speeds. So let's look at how to use collections in a thread-safe manner. Using historical collections in a concurrent fashion The early .NET collections (System.Collections) had a Synchronized() static method that could be used to wrap the early collections to make them completely thread-safe.  This paradigm was dropped in the generic collections (System.Collections.Generic) because having a synchronized wrapper resulted in atomic locks for all operations, which could prove overkill in many multithreading situations.  Thus the paradigm shifted to having the user of the collection specify their own locking, usually with an external object: 1: public class OrderAggregator 2: { 3: private static readonly Dictionary<string, List<Order>> _orders = new Dictionary<string, List<Order>>(); 4: private static readonly _orderLock = new object(); 5:  6: public void Add(string accountNumber, Order newOrder) 7: { 8: List<Order> ordersForAccount; 9:  10: // a complex operation like this should all be protected 11: lock (_orderLock) 12: { 13: if (!_orders.TryGetValue(accountNumber, out ordersForAccount)) 14: { 15: _orders.Add(accountNumber, ordersForAccount = new List<Order>()); 16: } 17:  18: ordersForAccount.Add(newOrder); 19: } 20: } 21: } Notice how we’re performing several operations on the dictionary under one lock.  With the Synchronized() static methods of the early collections, you wouldn’t be able to specify this level of locking (a more macro-level).  So in the generic collections, it was decided that if a user needed synchronization, they could implement their own locking scheme instead so that they could provide synchronization as needed. The need for better concurrent access to collections Here’s the problem: it’s relatively easy to write a collection that locks itself down completely for access, but anything more complex than that can be difficult and error-prone to write, and much less to make it perform efficiently!  For example, what if you have a Dictionary that has frequent reads but in-frequent updates?  Do you want to lock down the entire Dictionary for every access?  This would be overkill and would prevent concurrent reads.  In such cases you could use something like a ReaderWriterLockSlim which allows for multiple readers in a lock, and then once a writer grabs the lock it blocks all further readers until the writer is done (in a nutshell).  This is all very complex stuff to consider. Fortunately, this is where the Concurrent Collections come in.  The Parallel Computing Platform team at Microsoft went through great pains to determine how to make a set of concurrent collections that would have the best performance characteristics for general case multi-threaded use. Now, as in all things involving threading, you should always make sure you evaluate all your container options based on the particular usage scenario and the degree of parallelism you wish to acheive. This article should not be taken to understand that these collections are always supperior to the generic collections. Each fills a particular need for a particular situation. Understanding what each container is optimized for is key to the success of your application whether it be single-threaded or multi-threaded. General points to consider with the concurrent collections The MSDN points out that the concurrent collections all support the ICollection interface. However, since the collections are already synchronized, the IsSynchronized property always returns false, and SyncRoot always returns null.  Thus you should not attempt to use these properties for synchronization purposes. Note that since the concurrent collections also may have different operations than the traditional data structures you may be used to.  Now you may ask why they did this, but it was done out of necessity to keep operations safe and atomic.  For example, in order to do a Pop() on a stack you have to know the stack is non-empty, but between the time you check the stack’s IsEmpty property and then do the Pop() another thread may have come in and made the stack empty!  This is why some of the traditional operations have been changed to make them safe for concurrent use. In addition, some properties and methods in the concurrent collections achieve concurrency by creating a snapshot of the collection, which means that some operations that were traditionally O(1) may now be O(n) in the concurrent models.  I’ll try to point these out as we talk about each collection so you can be aware of any potential performance impacts.  Finally, all the concurrent containers are safe for enumeration even while being modified, but some of the containers support this in different ways (snapshot vs. dirty iteration).  Once again I’ll highlight how thread-safe enumeration works for each collection. ConcurrentStack<T>: The thread-safe LIFO container The ConcurrentStack<T> is the thread-safe counterpart to the System.Collections.Generic.Stack<T>, which as you may remember is your standard last-in-first-out container.  If you think of algorithms that favor stack usage (for example, depth-first searches of graphs and trees) then you can see how using a thread-safe stack would be of benefit. The ConcurrentStack<T> achieves thread-safe access by using System.Threading.Interlocked operations.  This means that the multi-threaded access to the stack requires no traditional locking and is very, very fast! For the most part, the ConcurrentStack<T> behaves like it’s Stack<T> counterpart with a few differences: Pop() was removed in favor of TryPop() Returns true if an item existed and was popped and false if empty. PushRange() and TryPopRange() were added Allows you to push multiple items and pop multiple items atomically. Count takes a snapshot of the stack and then counts the items. This means it is a O(n) operation, if you just want to check for an empty stack, call IsEmpty instead which is O(1). ToArray() and GetEnumerator() both also take snapshots. This means that iteration over a stack will give you a static view at the time of the call and will not reflect updates. Pushing on a ConcurrentStack<T> works just like you’d expect except for the aforementioned PushRange() method that was added to allow you to push a range of items concurrently. 1: var stack = new ConcurrentStack<string>(); 2:  3: // adding to stack is much the same as before 4: stack.Push("First"); 5:  6: // but you can also push multiple items in one atomic operation (no interleaves) 7: stack.PushRange(new [] { "Second", "Third", "Fourth" }); For looking at the top item of the stack (without removing it) the Peek() method has been removed in favor of a TryPeek().  This is because in order to do a peek the stack must be non-empty, but between the time you check for empty and the time you execute the peek the stack contents may have changed.  Thus the TryPeek() was created to be an atomic check for empty, and then peek if not empty: 1: // to look at top item of stack without removing it, can use TryPeek. 2: // Note that there is no Peek(), this is because you need to check for empty first. TryPeek does. 3: string item; 4: if (stack.TryPeek(out item)) 5: { 6: Console.WriteLine("Top item was " + item); 7: } 8: else 9: { 10: Console.WriteLine("Stack was empty."); 11: } Finally, to remove items from the stack, we have the TryPop() for single, and TryPopRange() for multiple items.  Just like the TryPeek(), these operations replace Pop() since we need to ensure atomically that the stack is non-empty before we pop from it: 1: // to remove items, use TryPop or TryPopRange to get multiple items atomically (no interleaves) 2: if (stack.TryPop(out item)) 3: { 4: Console.WriteLine("Popped " + item); 5: } 6:  7: // TryPopRange will only pop up to the number of spaces in the array, the actual number popped is returned. 8: var poppedItems = new string[2]; 9: int numPopped = stack.TryPopRange(poppedItems); 10:  11: foreach (var theItem in poppedItems.Take(numPopped)) 12: { 13: Console.WriteLine("Popped " + theItem); 14: } Finally, note that as stated before, GetEnumerator() and ToArray() gets a snapshot of the data at the time of the call.  That means if you are enumerating the stack you will get a snapshot of the stack at the time of the call.  This is illustrated below: 1: var stack = new ConcurrentStack<string>(); 2:  3: // adding to stack is much the same as before 4: stack.Push("First"); 5:  6: var results = stack.GetEnumerator(); 7:  8: // but you can also push multiple items in one atomic operation (no interleaves) 9: stack.PushRange(new [] { "Second", "Third", "Fourth" }); 10:  11: while(results.MoveNext()) 12: { 13: Console.WriteLine("Stack only has: " + results.Current); 14: } The only item that will be printed out in the above code is "First" because the snapshot was taken before the other items were added. This may sound like an issue, but it’s really for safety and is more correct.  You don’t want to enumerate a stack and have half a view of the stack before an update and half a view of the stack after an update, after all.  In addition, note that this is still thread-safe, whereas iterating through a non-concurrent collection while updating it in the old collections would cause an exception. ConcurrentQueue<T>: The thread-safe FIFO container The ConcurrentQueue<T> is the thread-safe counterpart of the System.Collections.Generic.Queue<T> class.  The concurrent queue uses an underlying list of small arrays and lock-free System.Threading.Interlocked operations on the head and tail arrays.  Once again, this allows us to do thread-safe operations without the need for heavy locks! The ConcurrentQueue<T> (like the ConcurrentStack<T>) has some departures from the non-concurrent counterpart.  Most notably: Dequeue() was removed in favor of TryDequeue(). Returns true if an item existed and was dequeued and false if empty. Count does not take a snapshot It subtracts the head and tail index to get the count.  This results overall in a O(1) complexity which is quite good.  It’s still recommended, however, that for empty checks you call IsEmpty instead of comparing Count to zero. ToArray() and GetEnumerator() both take snapshots. This means that iteration over a queue will give you a static view at the time of the call and will not reflect updates. The Enqueue() method on the ConcurrentQueue<T> works much the same as the generic Queue<T>: 1: var queue = new ConcurrentQueue<string>(); 2:  3: // adding to queue is much the same as before 4: queue.Enqueue("First"); 5: queue.Enqueue("Second"); 6: queue.Enqueue("Third"); For front item access, the TryPeek() method must be used to attempt to see the first item if the queue.  There is no Peek() method since, as you’ll remember, we can only peek on a non-empty queue, so we must have an atomic TryPeek() that checks for empty and then returns the first item if the queue is non-empty. 1: // to look at first item in queue without removing it, can use TryPeek. 2: // Note that there is no Peek(), this is because you need to check for empty first. TryPeek does. 3: string item; 4: if (queue.TryPeek(out item)) 5: { 6: Console.WriteLine("First item was " + item); 7: } 8: else 9: { 10: Console.WriteLine("Queue was empty."); 11: } Then, to remove items you use TryDequeue().  Once again this is for the same reason we have TryPeek() and not Peek(): 1: // to remove items, use TryDequeue. If queue is empty returns false. 2: if (queue.TryDequeue(out item)) 3: { 4: Console.WriteLine("Dequeued first item " + item); 5: } Just like the concurrent stack, the ConcurrentQueue<T> takes a snapshot when you call ToArray() or GetEnumerator() which means that subsequent updates to the queue will not be seen when you iterate over the results.  Thus once again the code below will only show the first item, since the other items were added after the snapshot. 1: var queue = new ConcurrentQueue<string>(); 2:  3: // adding to queue is much the same as before 4: queue.Enqueue("First"); 5:  6: var iterator = queue.GetEnumerator(); 7:  8: queue.Enqueue("Second"); 9: queue.Enqueue("Third"); 10:  11: // only shows First 12: while (iterator.MoveNext()) 13: { 14: Console.WriteLine("Dequeued item " + iterator.Current); 15: } Using collections concurrently You’ll notice in the examples above I stuck to using single-threaded examples so as to make them deterministic and the results obvious.  Of course, if we used these collections in a truly multi-threaded way the results would be less deterministic, but would still be thread-safe and with no locking on your part required! For example, say you have an order processor that takes an IEnumerable<Order> and handles each other in a multi-threaded fashion, then groups the responses together in a concurrent collection for aggregation.  This can be done easily with the TPL’s Parallel.ForEach(): 1: public static IEnumerable<OrderResult> ProcessOrders(IEnumerable<Order> orderList) 2: { 3: var proxy = new OrderProxy(); 4: var results = new ConcurrentQueue<OrderResult>(); 5:  6: // notice that we can process all these in parallel and put the results 7: // into our concurrent collection without needing any external locking! 8: Parallel.ForEach(orderList, 9: order => 10: { 11: var result = proxy.PlaceOrder(order); 12:  13: results.Enqueue(result); 14: }); 15:  16: return results; 17: } Summary Obviously, if you do not need multi-threaded safety, you don’t need to use these collections, but when you do need multi-threaded collections these are just the ticket! The plethora of features (I always think of the movie The Three Amigos when I say plethora) built into these containers and the amazing way they acheive thread-safe access in an efficient manner is wonderful to behold. Stay tuned next week where we’ll continue our discussion with the ConcurrentBag<T> and the ConcurrentDictionary<TKey,TValue>. For some excellent information on the performance of the concurrent collections and how they perform compared to a traditional brute-force locking strategy, see this wonderful whitepaper by the Microsoft Parallel Computing Platform team here.   Tweet Technorati Tags: C#,.NET,Concurrent Collections,Collections,Multi-Threading,Little Wonders,BlackRabbitCoder,James Michael Hare

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  • How can I force overflow: hidden to not use up my padding-right space

    - by AlfaTeK
    I have the following code: <div style="width: 100px; overflow: hidden; border: 1px solid red; background-color: #c0c0c0; padding-right: 20px; "> 2222222222222222222222111111111111111111111111113333333333333333333</div> (XHTML 1.0 transitional) What happens is that the padding-right doesn't appear, it's occupied by the content, which means the overflow uses up the padding right space and only "cuts off" after the padding. Is there any way to force the browser to overflow before the padding-right, which means my div will show with the padding right? What I get is the first div in the following image, what i want is something like the 2nd div: image

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  • Dragged external events from div overflow do not appear using FullCalender and FCDraggable

    - by user327066
    I am using the FCDraggable version of FullCalendar and everything is working well. However, I would like my external events to be contained in a div with an overflow (ex. JQuery UI Accordian) and dragged onto the calendar. When overflow is on, the external event gets hidden behind the calendar and does not appear until dropped onto the calendar. Without overflow, the external events show fine during the dragging process onto the calendar. Has anyone else encountered this scenario? I know FCDraggable isn't part of the official release branch of FullCalendar but it works so well except for this one issue.

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  • Div box not expanding on overflow

    - by Mirage
    I have the following html (not proper code but for understanding) <div id=content-wrap overflow-hidden> <div1 float-left overflow hidden> </div> <div2 float-right overflow hidden> </div> </div> Now when the content in div 1 is more, then it expands the main container but by div2 which is on the right is not expanding Is there any way so that div2 also expands with div1 without changing the html

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  • Why is IE7 hiding my overflow when, as far as I can tell, all it's containing elements have overflow

    - by dougoftheabaci
    If you visit the site in question (haddongrant.com) and go to the Artwork section, if you click on an image and view it's stack in Safari, Chrome or Firefox you'll notice the images extend up and down the page, eventually disappearing over the edge. This is what you should be seeing. In Internet Explorer 7, however, the overflow gets cut off at some point before it ever gets to the end of the page. The problem is... I can't tell where! I've had a look and every containing element should show overflow. I don't know why IE7 isn't. Does anyone have any ideas where I might need to add an overflow-y:visible;?

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  • Autoscroll on parent panel, when there is overflow on child panels.Extjs

    - by Ashwin
    I'm having a single Parent Panel, which has 2 child panels. One has content dynamically created, while the other is fixed height and width. The Parent panel is using border layout, with center and east regions defined. I'm trying to get autoscroll to trigger on the parent panel when there is an overflow on on the center region panel. I've set the autoscroll option to true to the parent panel, but everytime there is an overflow on the center panel, it just gets cuts off. When I'm adding an overflow to center region panel, i get a scrollbar for that panel alone. I don't need that, but rather I want it on the entire Parent Panel. Let me know if anyone has any suggestions..

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  • Jquery, get div width when overflow: hidden;

    - by Fabio
    Hello all. How can I get a div width when the div is inside another div with "overflow: hidden;" ? I tried to set overflow as auto and after using $("#divselector").width() but I always get the parent div width! Ex: html: <div id="content"> <div id="item">content content content ...</div> </div> css: #content { width: 760px; height: 100%; overflow: hidden; display: block; position: relative; cursor: move; }

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  • T-SQL Tuesday #006: LOB, row-overflow and locking behavior

    - by Michael Zilberstein
    This post is my contribution to T-SQL Tuesday #006 , hosted this time by Michael Coles . Actually this post was born last Thursday when I attended Kalen Delaney's "Deep dive into SQL Server Internals" seminar in Tel-Aviv. I asked question, Kalen didn't have answer at hand, so during a break I created demo in order to check certain behavior. Demo goes later in this post but first small teaser. I have MyTable table with 10 rows. I take 2 rows that reside on different pages. In first session...(read more)

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  • Software development stack 2012

    A couple of months ago, I posted on Google+ about my evaluation period for a new software development stack in general. "Analysing existing 'jungle' of multiple applications and tools in various languages for clarification and future design decisions. Great fun and lots of headaches... #DevelopersLife" Surprisingly, there was response... ;-) - And this series of articles is initiated by this post. Thanks Olaf. The past few years... Well, after all my first choice of software development in the past was Microsoft Visual FoxPro 6.0 - 9.0 in combination with Microsoft SQL Server 2000 - 2008 and Crystal Reports 9.x - XI. Honestly, it is my main working environment due to exisiting maintenance and support plans with my customers, but also for new project requests. And... hands on, it is still my first choice for data manipulation and migration options. But the earth is spinning, and as a software craftsman one has to be flexible with the choice of tools. In parallel to my knowledge and expertise in the above mentioned tools, I already started very early to get my hands dirty with the Microsoft .NET Framework. If I remember correctly, I started back in 2002/2003 with the first version ever. But this was more out of curiousity. During the years this kind of development got more serious and demanding, and I focused myself on interop and integrational libraries and applications. Mainly, to expose exisitng features of the .NET Framework to Visual FoxPro - I even had a session about that at the German Developer's Conference in Frankfurt. Observation of recent developments With the recent hype on Javascript and HTML5, especially for Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8 development, I had several 'Deja vu' events... Back in early 2006 (roughly) I had a conversation on the future of Web and Desktop development with my former colleagues Golo Roden and Thomas Wilting about the underestimation of Javascript and its root as a prototype-based, dynamic, full-featured programming language. During this talk with them I took the Mozilla applications, namely Firefox and Thunderbird, as a reference which are mainly based on XML, CSS, Javascript and images - besides the core rendering engine. And that it is very simple to write your own extensions for the Gecko rendering engine. Looking at the Windows Vista Sidebar widgets, just underlines this kind of usage. So, yes the 'Modern UI' of Windows 8 based on HTML5, CSS3 and Javascript didn't come as any surprise to me. Just allow me to ask why did it take so long for Microsoft to come up with this step? A new set of tools Ok, coming from web development in HTML 4, CSS and Javascript prior to Visual FoxPro, I am partly going back to that combination of technologies. What is the other part of the software development stack here at IOS Indian Ocean Software Ltd? Frankly, it is easy and straight forward to describe: Microsoft Visual FoxPro 9.0 SP 2 - still going strong! Visual Studio 2012 (C# on latest .NET Framework) MonoDevelop Telerik DevCraft Suite WPF ASP.NET MVC Windows 8 Kendo UI OpenAccess ORM Reporting JustCode CODE Framework by EPS Software MonoTouch and Mono for Android Subversion and additional tools for the daily routine: Notepad++, JustCode, SQL Compare, DiffMerge, VMware, etc. Following the principles of Clean Code Developer and the Agile Manifesto Actually, nothing special about this combination but rather a solid fundament to work with and create line of business applications for customers.Honestly, I am really interested in your choice of 'weapons' for software development, and hopefully there might be some nice conversations in the comment section. Over the next coming days/weeks I'm going to describe a little bit more in detail about the reasons for my decision. Articles will be added bit by bit here as reference, too. Please bear with me... Regards, JoKi

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  • No database selected error in CodeIgniter running on MAMP stack

    - by Apophenia Overload
    First off, does anyone know of a good place to get help with CodeIgniter? The official community forums are somewhat disappointing in terms of getting many responses. I have ci installed on a regular MAMP stack, and I’m working on this tutorial. However, I have only gone through the Created section, and currently I am getting a No database selected error. Model: <?php class submit_model extends Model { function submitForm($school, $district) { $data = array( 'school' => $school, 'district' => $district ); $this->db->insert('your_stats', $data); } } View: <?php $this->load->helper('form'); ?> <?php echo form_open('main'); ?> <p> <?php echo form_input('school'); ?> </p> <p> <?php echo form_input('district'); ?> </p> <p> <?php echo form_submit('submit', 'Submit'); ?> </p> <?php echo form_close(); ?> Controller: <?php class Main extends controller { function index() { // Check if form is submitted if ($this->input->post('submit')) { $school = $this->input->xss_clean($this->input->post('school')); $district = $this->input->xss_clean($this->input->post('district')); $this->load->model('submit_model'); // Add the post $this->submit_model->submitForm($school, $district); } $this->load->view('main_view'); } } database.php $db['default']['hostname'] = "localhost:8889"; $db['default']['username'] = "root"; $db['default']['password'] = "root"; $db['default']['database'] = "stats_test"; $db['default']['dbdriver'] = "mysql"; $db['default']['dbprefix'] = ""; $db['default']['pconnect'] = TRUE; $db['default']['db_debug'] = TRUE; $db['default']['cache_on'] = FALSE; $db['default']['cachedir'] = ""; $db['default']['char_set'] = "utf8"; $db['default']['dbcollat'] = "utf8_general_ci"; config.php $config['base_url'] = "http://localhost:8888/ci/"; ... $config['index_page'] = "index.php"; ... $config['uri_protocol'] = "AUTO"; So, how come it’s giving me this error message? A Database Error Occurred Error Number: 1046 No database selected INSERT INTO `your_stats` (`school`, `district`) VALUES ('TJHSST', 'FairFax') Is there any way for me to test if CodeIgniter can actually detect the mySQL databases I've created with phpMyAdmin in my MAMP stack?

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  • SO-overflow induced passivity - how to cope?

    - by Ruben
    After not really working on my pet project for a while, I discovered Stackoverflow and upon perusing it more intensely I was quite amazed. I'm a bit of a perfectionist, so when I found eye-openers here highlighting many of the mistakes I made, I first wanted to fix everything. However, it's a pet project for a reason: I'm self-taught and I'm studying psychology, so programming skills can never become priority one (though it often helps, even in this field). Issues that stuck out were numerous security issues (e.g. CSRF-prevention and bcrypt eluded me) not object-oriented (at least the PHP part, the JS-part mostly is) no PHP framework used, so many of my DIY takes on commonly-tackled components (auth, ...) are either bad or inefficient really poor MySQL usage (no prepared statements, mysql extension, heard about setting proper indices two days ago) using mootools even though JQuery seems to be fashionable, so there's more probably always going to be better integration with services I'd like to use (like google visualization) So, my SO-induced frenzy turned into passivity. I can't do it all (soon) in the rather small amount of spare time I can spend on working on my project. I can leave some of the issues be in good conscience (speed stuff: an unfinished & unpublished project will never become popular, right?). No clear conscience without good security though and if I don't use a framework for auth and other complex stuff I'll regret having to do it myself. One obvious answer would probably be going open-source, but I think the project would need to become more impressive before others would commit to it. I can't afford to employ someone either. I do think the project deserves being worked on, though. How should I tackle it anyway? What's the best practice for little-practice people?

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  • CVE-2006-3744 Multiple Integer overflow vulnerabilities in ImageMagick

    - by chandan
    CVE DescriptionCVSSv2 Base ScoreComponentProduct and Resolution CVE-2006-3744 Numeric Errors vulnerability 5.1 ImageMagick Solaris 10 SPARC: 136882-03 X86: 136883-03 This notification describes vulnerabilities fixed in third-party components that are included in Sun's product distribution.Information about vulnerabilities affecting Oracle Sun products can be found on Oracle Critical Patch Updates and Security Alerts page.

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  • CVE-2006-4514 Buffer overflow vulnerability in Gnome Structured File library (libgsf)

    - by RitwikGhoshal
    CVE DescriptionCVSSv2 Base ScoreComponentProduct and Resolution CVE-2006-4514 Improper Restriction of Operations within the Bounds of a Memory Buffer vulnerability 7.5 Gnome Structured File library (libgsf) Solaris 10 SPARC: 149108-01 X86: 149109-01 This notification describes vulnerabilities fixed in third-party components that are included in Oracle's product distributions.Information about vulnerabilities affecting Oracle products can be found on Oracle Critical Patch Updates and Security Alerts page.

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  • CVE-2012-2763 Buffer overflow vulnerability in Gimp

    - by RitwikGhoshal
    CVE DescriptionCVSSv2 Base ScoreComponentProduct and Resolution CVE-2012-2763 Improper Restriction of Operations within the Bounds of a Memory Buffer vulnerability 7.5 Gimp Solaris 11 11/11 SRU 11.4 This notification describes vulnerabilities fixed in third-party components that are included in Oracle's product distributions.Information about vulnerabilities affecting Oracle products can be found on Oracle Critical Patch Updates and Security Alerts page.

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  • CVE-2011-4128 Buffer Overflow vulnerability in gnutls

    - by Umang_D
    CVE DescriptionCVSSv2 Base ScoreComponentProduct and Resolution CVE-2011-4128 Improper Restriction of Operations within the Bounds of a Memory Buffer vulnerability 4.3 gnutls Solaris 11 11/11 SRU 12.4 This notification describes vulnerabilities fixed in third-party components that are included in Oracle's product distributions.Information about vulnerabilities affecting Oracle products can be found on Oracle Critical Patch Updates and Security Alerts page.

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  • CVE-2008-3529 Buffer overflow vulnerability in libxml2

    - by chandan
    CVE DescriptionCVSSv2 Base ScoreComponentProduct and Resolution CVE-2008-3529 Improper Restriction of Operations within the Bounds of a Memory Buffer vulnerability 10.0 libxml2 Solaris 10 SPARC: 125731-07 X86: 125732-07 Solaris 9 Contact Support This notification describes vulnerabilities fixed in third-party components that are included in Sun's product distribution.Information about vulnerabilities affecting Oracle Sun products can be found on Oracle Critical Patch Updates and Security Alerts page.

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