Search Results

Search found 53991 results on 2160 pages for 'asp net'.

Page 15/2160 | < Previous Page | 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22  | Next Page >

  • How to route tree-structured URLs with ASP.NET Routing?

    - by Venemo
    Hello Everyone, I would like to achieve something very similar to this question, with some enhancements. There is an ASP.NET MVC web application. I have a tree of entities. For example, a Page class which has a property called Children, which is of type IList<Page>. (An instance of the Page class corresponds to a row in a database.) I would like to assign a unique URL to every Page in the database. I handle Page objects with a Controller called PageController. Example URLs: http://mysite.com/Page1/ http://mysite.com/Page1/SubPage/ http://mysite.com/Page/ChildPage/GrandChildPage/ You get the picture. So, I'd like every single Page object to have its own URL that is equal to its parent's URL plus its own name. In addition to that, I also would like the ability to map a single Page to the / (root) URL. I would like to apply these rules: If a URL can be handled with any other route, or a file exists in the filesystem in the specified URL, let the default URL mapping happen If a URL can be handled by the virtual path provider, let that handle it If there is no other, map the other URLs to the PageController class I also found this question, and also this one and this one, but they weren't of much help, since they don't provide an explanation about my first two points. I see the following possible soutions: Map a route for each page invidually. This requires me to go over the entire tree when the application starts, and adding an exact match route to the end of the route table. I could add a route with {*path} and write a custom IRouteHandler that handles it, but I can't see how could I deal with the first two rules then, since this handler would get to handle everything. So far, the first solution seems to be the right one, because it is also the simplest. I would really appreciate your thoughts on this. Thank you in advance!

    Read the article

  • Adding an Admin user to an ASP.NET MVC 4 application using a single drop-in file

    - by Jon Galloway
    I'm working on an ASP.NET MVC 4 tutorial and wanted to set it up so just dropping a file in App_Start would create a user named "Owner" and assign them to the "Administrator" role (more explanation at the end if you're interested). There are reasons why this wouldn't fit into most application scenarios: It's not efficient, as it checks for (and creates, if necessary) the user every time the app starts up The username, password, and role name are hardcoded in the app (although they could be pulled from config) Automatically creating an administrative account in code (without user interaction) could lead to obvious security issues if the user isn't informed However, with some modifications it might be more broadly useful - e.g. creating a test user with limited privileges, ensuring a required account isn't accidentally deleted, or - as in my case - setting up an account for demonstration or tutorial purposes. Challenge #1: Running on startup without requiring the user to install or configure anything I wanted to see if this could be done just by having the user drop a file into the App_Start folder and go. No copying code into Global.asax.cs, no installing addition NuGet packages, etc. That may not be the best approach - perhaps a NuGet package with a dependency on WebActivator would be better - but I wanted to see if this was possible and see if it offered the best experience. Fortunately ASP.NET 4 and later provide a PreApplicationStartMethod attribute which allows you to register a method which will run when the application starts up. You drop this attribute in your application and give it two parameters: a method name and the type that contains it. I created a static class named PreApplicationTasks with a static method named, then dropped this attribute in it: [assembly: PreApplicationStartMethod(typeof(PreApplicationTasks), "Initializer")] That's it. One small gotcha: the namespace can be a problem with assembly attributes. I decided my class didn't need a namespace. Challenge #2: Only one PreApplicationStartMethod per assembly In .NET 4, the PreApplicationStartMethod is marked as AllMultiple=false, so you can only have one PreApplicationStartMethod per assembly. This was fixed in .NET 4.5, as noted by Jon Skeet, so you can have as many PreApplicationStartMethods as you want (allowing you to keep your users waiting for the application to start indefinitely!). The WebActivator NuGet package solves the multiple instance problem if you're in .NET 4 - it registers as a PreApplicationStartMethod, then calls any methods you've indicated using [assembly: WebActivator.PreApplicationStartMethod(type, method)]. David Ebbo blogged about that here:  Light up your NuGets with startup code and WebActivator. In my scenario (bootstrapping a beginner level tutorial) I decided not to worry about this and stick with PreApplicationStartMethod. Challenge #3: PreApplicationStartMethod kicks in before configuration has been read This is by design, as Phil explains. It allows you to make changes that need to happen very early in the pipeline, well before Application_Start. That's fine in some cases, but it caused me problems when trying to add users, since the Membership Provider configuration hadn't yet been read - I got an exception stating that "Default Membership Provider could not be found." The solution here is to run code that requires configuration in a PostApplicationStart method. But how to do that? Challenge #4: Getting PostApplicationStartMethod without requiring WebActivator The WebActivator NuGet package, among other things, provides a PostApplicationStartMethod attribute. That's generally how I'd recommend running code that needs to happen after Application_Start: [assembly: WebActivator.PostApplicationStartMethod(typeof(TestLibrary.MyStartupCode), "CallMeAfterAppStart")] This works well, but I wanted to see if this would be possible without WebActivator. Hmm. Well, wait a minute - WebActivator works in .NET 4, so clearly it's registering and calling PostApplicationStartup tasks somehow. Off to the source code! Sure enough, there's even a handy comment in ActivationManager.cs which shows where PostApplicationStartup tasks are being registered: public static void Run() { if (!_hasInited) { RunPreStartMethods(); // Register our module to handle any Post Start methods. But outside of ASP.NET, just run them now if (HostingEnvironment.IsHosted) { Microsoft.Web.Infrastructure.DynamicModuleHelper.DynamicModuleUtility.RegisterModule(typeof(StartMethodCallingModule)); } else { RunPostStartMethods(); } _hasInited = true; } } Excellent. Hey, that DynamicModuleUtility seems familiar... Sure enough, K. Scott Allen mentioned it on his blog last year. This is really slick - a PreApplicationStartMethod can register a new HttpModule in code. Modules are run right after application startup, so that's a perfect time to do any startup stuff that requires configuration to be read. As K. Scott says, it's this easy: using System; using System.Web; using Microsoft.Web.Infrastructure.DynamicModuleHelper; [assembly:PreApplicationStartMethod(typeof(MyAppStart), "Start")] public class CoolModule : IHttpModule { // implementation not important // imagine something cool here } public static class MyAppStart { public static void Start() { DynamicModuleUtility.RegisterModule(typeof(CoolModule)); } } Challenge #5: Cooperating with SimpleMembership The ASP.NET MVC Internet template includes SimpleMembership. SimpleMembership is a big improvement over traditional ASP.NET Membership. For one thing, rather than forcing a database schema, it can work with your database schema. In the MVC 4 Internet template case, it uses Entity Framework Code First to define the user model. SimpleMembership bootstrap includes a call to InitializeDatabaseConnection, and I want to play nice with that. There's a new [InitializeSimpleMembership] attribute on the AccountController, which calls \Filters\InitializeSimpleMembershipAttribute.cs::OnActionExecuting(). That comment in that method that says "Ensure ASP.NET Simple Membership is initialized only once per app start" which sounds like good advice. I figured the best thing would be to call that directly: new Mvc4SampleApplication.Filters.InitializeSimpleMembershipAttribute().OnActionExecuting(null); I'm not 100% happy with this - in fact, it's my least favorite part of this solution. There are two problems - first, directly calling a method on a filter, while legal, seems odd. Worse, though, the Filter lives in the application's namespace, which means that this code no longer works well as a generic drop-in. The simplest workaround would be to duplicate the relevant SimpleMembership initialization code into my startup code, but I'd rather not. I'm interested in your suggestions here. Challenge #6: Module Init methods are called more than once When debugging, I noticed (and remembered) that the Init method may be called more than once per page request - it's run once per instance in the app pool, and an individual page request can cause multiple resource requests to the server. While SimpleMembership does have internal checks to prevent duplicate user or role entries, I'd rather not cause or handle those exceptions. So here's the standard single-use lock in the Module's init method: void IHttpModule.Init(HttpApplication context) { lock (lockObject) { if (!initialized) { //Do stuff } initialized = true; } } Putting it all together With all of that out of the way, here's the code I came up with: using Mvc4SampleApplication.Filters; using System.Web; using System.Web.Security; using WebMatrix.WebData; [assembly: PreApplicationStartMethod(typeof(PreApplicationTasks), "Initializer")] public static class PreApplicationTasks { public static void Initializer() { Microsoft.Web.Infrastructure.DynamicModuleHelper.DynamicModuleUtility .RegisterModule(typeof(UserInitializationModule)); } } public class UserInitializationModule : IHttpModule { private static bool initialized; private static object lockObject = new object(); private const string _username = "Owner"; private const string _password = "[email protected]"; private const string _role = "Administrator"; void IHttpModule.Init(HttpApplication context) { lock (lockObject) { if (!initialized) { new InitializeSimpleMembershipAttribute().OnActionExecuting(null); if (!WebSecurity.UserExists(_username)) WebSecurity.CreateUserAndAccount(_username, _password); if (!Roles.RoleExists(_role)) Roles.CreateRole(_role); if (!Roles.IsUserInRole(_username, _role)) Roles.AddUserToRole(_username, _role); } initialized = true; } } void IHttpModule.Dispose() { } } The Verdict: Is this a good thing? Maybe. I think you'll agree that the journey was undoubtedly worthwhile, as it took us through some of the finer points of hooking into application startup, integrating with membership, and understanding why the WebActivator NuGet package is so useful Will I use this in the tutorial? I'm leaning towards no - I think a NuGet package with a dependency on WebActivator might work better: It's a little more clear what's going on Installing a NuGet package might be a little less error prone than copying a file A novice user could uninstall the package when complete It's a good introduction to NuGet, which is a good thing for beginners to see This code either requires either duplicating a little code from that filter or modifying the file to use the namespace Honestly I'm undecided at this point, but I'm glad that I can weigh the options. If you're interested: Why are you doing this? I'm updating the MVC Music Store tutorial to ASP.NET MVC 4, taking advantage of a lot of new ASP.NET MVC 4 features and trying to simplify areas that are giving people trouble. One change that addresses both needs us using the new OAuth support for membership as much as possible - it's a great new feature from an application perspective, and we get a fair amount of beginners struggling with setting up membership on a variety of database and development setups, which is a distraction from the focus of the tutorial - learning ASP.NET MVC. Side note: Thanks to some great help from Rick Anderson, we had a draft of the tutorial that was looking pretty good earlier this summer, but there were enough changes in ASP.NET MVC 4 all the way up to RTM that there's still some work to be done. It's high priority and should be out very soon. The one issue I ran into with OAuth is that we still need an Administrative user who can edit the store's inventory. I thought about a number of solutions for that - making the first user to register the admin, or the first user to use the username "Administrator" is assigned to the Administrator role - but they both ended up requiring extra code; also, I worried that people would use that code without understanding it or thinking about whether it was a good fit.

    Read the article

  • The configuration section 'system.web.extensions' cannot be read because it is missing a section declaration

    - by Jeff Widmer
    After upgrading an ASP.NET application from .NET Framework 3.5 to .NET Framework 4.0 I ran into the following error message dialog when trying to view any of the modules in IIS on the server. What happened is during the upgrade, the web.config file was automatically converted for .NET Framework 4.0.  This left behind an empty system.web.extensions section: It was an easy fix to resolve, just remove the unused system.web.extensions section.   ERROR DIALOG TEXT: --------------------------- ASP --------------------------- There was an error while performing this operation. Details: Filename: \\?\web.config Line number: 171 Error: The configuration section 'system.web.extensions' cannot be read because it is missing a section declaration --------------------------- OK   ---------------------------

    Read the article

  • MVC : Does Code to save data in cache or session belongs in controller?

    - by newbie
    I'm a bit confused if saving the information to session code below, belongs in the controller action as shown below or should it be part of my Model? I would add that I have other controller methods that will read this session value later. public ActionResult AddFriend(FriendsContext viewModel) { if (!ModelState.IsValid) { return View(viewModel); } // Start - Confused if the code block below belongs in Controller? Friend friend = new Friend(); friend.FirstName = viewModel.FirstName; friend.LastName = viewModel.LastName; friend.Email = viewModel.UserEmail; httpContext.Session["latest-friend"] = friend; // End Confusion return RedirectToAction("Home"); } I thought about adding a static utility class in my Model which does something like below, but it just seems stupid to add 2 lines of code in another file. public static void SaveLatestFriend(Friend friend, HttpContextBase httpContext) { httpContext.Session["latest-friend"] = friend; } public static Friend GetLatestFriend(HttpContextBase httpContext) { return httpContext.Session["latest-friend"] as Friend; }

    Read the article

  • Weblogs.asp.net has a problem, it is spam

    - by Chris Hammond
    Is anyone at Microsoft listening to the SPAM problem here on Weblogs.asp.net? My “ Can anyone do anything about the spam here on weblogs.asp.net? ” post from October got over 12 spam comments posted to it in the past 24 hours. I have comments all moderated, but that just means I have a crapload of work to do each time people comment. Also, when you click on a link from a comment notification email you are taken to an insecure site warning due to an invalid SSL Cert. We really just need some updates...(read more)

    Read the article

  • Pluralsight Meet the Author Podcast on Building ASP.NET MVC Applications with HTML5 and jQuery

    - by dwahlin
    In the latest installment of Pluralsight’s Meet the Author podcast series, Fritz Onion and I talk about my new course, Building ASP.NET MVC Apps with Entity Framework Code First, HTML5, and jQuery.  In the interview I describe how the course provides a complete end-to-end view of building an application using multiple technologies.  I go into some detail about how the data access layer was built as well as how the UI works. Listen to it below:   Meet the Author:  Dan Wahlin on Building ASP.NET MVC Apps with Entity Framework Code First, HTML5, and jQuery

    Read the article

  • Render an asp.net control from a text string

    - by madness
    Hi All, I'm not sure if it is possible to render an asp.net control from a string. The string contains fragments of html code and I've tried rendering that string to a div tag with runat="server" set, asp panel contain, asp lalbel control and asp literal control. All of them doesn't render the asp control in that text to an actual control, it just come up as a string. I've tried adding <% % around them and it appears it doesn't like it. Thanks in advance.

    Read the article

  • Why does not Asp.net mvc application work on Asp.Net Classic Application Pool?

    - by Amitabh
    I have an Asp.Net MVC 2 web application deployed on IIS 7.5 on .Net 4.0. When I select application pool as Asp.Net v4.0 Classic I get the following error. HTTP Error 403.14 - Forbidden The Web server is configured to not list the contents of this directory. The same application works fine when I select application pool as Asp.Net v4.0 Integrated. Does anyone know what is the reason for this?

    Read the article

  • Selling upper management on converting to ASP.net from Classic ASP

    - by Tarzan
    A client of mine has an application written in Classic ASP and COM+. The managers are interested in migrating it to ASP.net MVC but they have to convince the CIO that it is a good move. The old app still works OK, other than the fact that no one at the company can maintain it. How can we sell upper management on converting to ASP.net from Classic ASP? Thanks in advance!

    Read the article

  • An Unusual UpdatePanel

    - by João Angelo
    The code you are about to see was mostly to prove a point, to myself, and probably has limited applicability. Nonetheless, in the remote possibility this is useful to someone here it goes… So this is a control that acts like a normal UpdatePanel where all child controls are registered as postback triggers except for a single control specified by the TriggerControlID property. You could basically achieve the same thing by registering all controls as postback triggers in the regular UpdatePanel. However with this, that process is performed automatically. Finally, here is the code: public sealed class SingleAsyncTriggerUpdatePanel : WebControl, INamingContainer { public string TriggerControlID { get; set; } [TemplateInstance(TemplateInstance.Single)] [PersistenceMode(PersistenceMode.InnerProperty)] public ITemplate ContentTemplate { get; set; } public override ControlCollection Controls { get { this.EnsureChildControls(); return base.Controls; } } protected override void CreateChildControls() { if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(this.TriggerControlID)) throw new InvalidOperationException( "The TriggerControlId property must be set."); this.Controls.Clear(); var updatePanel = new UpdatePanel() { ID = string.Concat(this.ID, "InnerUpdatePanel"), ChildrenAsTriggers = false, UpdateMode = UpdatePanelUpdateMode.Conditional, ContentTemplate = this.ContentTemplate }; updatePanel.Triggers.Add(new SingleControlAsyncUpdatePanelTrigger { ControlID = this.TriggerControlID }); this.Controls.Add(updatePanel); } } internal sealed class SingleControlAsyncUpdatePanelTrigger : UpdatePanelControlTrigger { private Control target; private ScriptManager scriptManager; public Control Target { get { if (this.target == null) { this.target = this.FindTargetControl(true); } return this.target; } } public ScriptManager ScriptManager { get { if (this.scriptManager == null) { var page = base.Owner.Page; if (page != null) { this.scriptManager = ScriptManager.GetCurrent(page); } } return this.scriptManager; } } protected override bool HasTriggered() { string asyncPostBackSourceElementID = this.ScriptManager.AsyncPostBackSourceElementID; if (asyncPostBackSourceElementID == this.Target.UniqueID) return true; return asyncPostBackSourceElementID.StartsWith( string.Concat(this.target.UniqueID, "$"), StringComparison.Ordinal); } protected override void Initialize() { base.Initialize(); foreach (Control control in FlattenControlHierarchy(this.Owner.Controls)) { if (control == this.Target) continue; bool isApplicableControl = false; isApplicableControl |= control is INamingContainer; isApplicableControl |= control is IPostBackDataHandler; isApplicableControl |= control is IPostBackEventHandler; if (isApplicableControl) { this.ScriptManager.RegisterPostBackControl(control); } } } private static IEnumerable<Control> FlattenControlHierarchy( ControlCollection collection) { foreach (Control control in collection) { yield return control; if (control.Controls.Count > 0) { foreach (Control child in FlattenControlHierarchy(control.Controls)) { yield return child; } } } } } You can use it like this, meaning that only the B2 button will trigger an async postback: <cc:SingleAsyncTriggerUpdatePanel ID="Test" runat="server" TriggerControlID="B2"> <ContentTemplate> <asp:Button ID="B1" Text="B1" runat="server" OnClick="Button_Click" /> <asp:Button ID="B2" Text="B2" runat="server" OnClick="Button_Click" /> <asp:Button ID="B3" Text="B3" runat="server" OnClick="Button_Click" /> <asp:Label ID="LInner" Text="LInner" runat="server" /> </ContentTemplate> </cc:SingleAsyncTriggerUpdatePanel>

    Read the article

  • ASP.Net MVC 2 - Need To Add A Default Property To A Strongly Typed Html.Textbox Helper In Asp.Net MV

    - by Sara
    I'm having a problem with something that I'm sure is very simple. I have been using Asp.Net MVC and I decided to start using Asp.Net MVC 2. Something has changed and now I need a little help. The strongly typed helpers are now written like this - <%= Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.State) %> I need to add a default value to a textbox. In the prior version of Asp.Net MVC it was easy to assign a default value. I thought doing the following would work in MVC 2- <%= Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.CountyId, new{ value = 840 })%> This, however, does not work for me in Asp.Net MVC 2. The value is still blank for the textbox. I want to make sure that this isn't some random error that I am having. Has anyone else encountered the same problem? I have searched and searched to find more information on the default property for the html helpers in MVC 2, but I can't find anything. Does anyone out there know how to correctly assign a default value to a textbox in Asp.Net MVC 2?

    Read the article

  • Deploying ASP.NET Web Applications

    - by Ben Griswold
    In this episode, Noah and I explain how to use Web Deployment Projects to deploy your web application. This screencast will get you up and running, but in a future screencast, we discuss more advanced topics like excluding files, swapping out the right config files per environment, and alternate solution configurations.  This screencast (and the next) are based on a write-up I did about ASP.NET Web Application deployment with Web Deployment Projects a while back.  Multi-media knowledge sharing.  You have to love it! This is the first video hosted on Vimeo.  What do you think?

    Read the article

  • What is the equivalent of ASP:Timer control in ASP.NET MVC?

    - by Rupa
    Hi Recently i am working on migrating the ASP.NET Web application to MVC. I am wondering if there is any equivalent of ASP:Timer control in ASP.NET MVC Framework. So that this Timer control can automatically check for a particular value from the Database once in every couple of Seconds(that we specify). If there is no equivalent of Timer control in MVC, Are there any other ways to implement this. Appreciate your responses. Thanks

    Read the article

  • why can't asp.net find my textbox?

    - by phunehehe
    Hello, I'm trying to add more fields to the CreateUserWizardStep, here is what I added: <asp:CreateUserWizardStep ID="CreateUserWizardStep1" runat="server"> <ContentTemplate> <table border="0"> <tr> <td align="right"> <asp:Label ID="NickNameLabel" runat="server" AssociatedControlID="NickName">Nick Name:</asp:Label> </td> <td> <asp:TextBox ID="NickName" runat="server"></asp:TextBox> <asp:RequiredFieldValidator ID="RequiredFieldValidator1" runat="server" ControlToValidate="NickName" ErrorMessage="Nick Name is required." ToolTip="Nick Name is required." ValidationGroup="CreateUserWizard1">*</asp:RequiredFieldValidator> </td> </tr> <%-- The default code is left unchanged, but not shown here --%> </table> </ContentTemplate> </asp:CreateUserWizardStep> Then I tried to reference the objects like this protected void NewUserWizard_CreatedUser(object sender, EventArgs e) { CreateUserWizardStep step = NewUserWizard.FindControl("CreateUserWizardStep1") as CreateUserWizardStep; TextBox nickName= step.FindControl("NickName") as TextBox; // insert additional information to the database } The problem is, I'm getting nulls for nickName. Am I using FindControl("") incorrectly?

    Read the article

  • ASP.NET custom templates, still ASP.NET controls possible?

    - by Sha Le
    Hello: we currently do not use asp.net controls (no web forms). The way we do is: 1 Read HTML file from disk 2 lookup database, parse tags and populate data finally, Response.Write(page.ToString()); here there is no possibility of using asp.net controls. What I am wondering is, if we use asp.net controls in those HTML files, is there way to process them during step 2? Thanks and appreciate your response.

    Read the article

  • Using ExtJS with ASP.NET, Webforms or MVC?

    - by TigrouMeow
    Hello, For a scenario using 0 ASP.NET controls at all but rather an 100% extJS interface, what would be the advantages of using ASP.NET MVC or ASP.NET WebForms? And the disadvantages? Is there a OBVIOUS way to do it properly? I would love to have feedback's on your experiences. Thank you!

    Read the article

  • Calling Web Services in classic ASP

    - by cabhilash
      Last day my colleague asked me the provide her a solution to call the Web service from classic ASP. (Yes Classic ASP. still people are using this :D ) We can call web service SOAP toolkit also. But invoking the service using the XMLHTTP object was more easier & fast. To create the Service I used the normal Web Service in .Net 2.0 with [Webmethod] public class WebService1 : System.Web.Services.WebService { [WebMethod] public string HelloWorld(string name){return name + " Pay my dues :) "; // a reminder to pay my consultation fee :D} } In Web.config add the following entry in System.web<webServices><protocols><add name="HttpGet"/><add name="HttpPost"/></protocols></webServices> Alternatively, you can enable these protocols for all Web services on the computer by editing the <protocols> section in Machine.config. The following example enables HTTP GET, HTTP POST, and also SOAP and HTTP POST from localhost: <protocols> <add name="HttpSoap"/> <add name="HttpPost"/> <add name="HttpGet"/> <add name="HttpPostLocalhost"/> <!-- Documentation enables the documentation/test pages --> <add name="Documentation"/> </protocols> By adding these entries I am enabling the HTTPGET & HTTPPOST (After .Net 1.1 by default HTTPGET & HTTPPOST is disabled because of security concerns)The .NET Framework 1.1 defines a new protocol that is named HttpPostLocalhost. By default, this new protocol is enabled. This protocol permits invoking Web services that use HTTP POST requests from applications on the same computer. This is true provided the POST URL uses http://localhost, not http://hostname. This permits Web service developers to use the HTML-based test form to invoke the Web service from the same computer where the Web service resides. Classic ASP Code to call Web service <%Option Explicit Dim objRequest, objXMLDoc, objXmlNode Dim strRet, strError, strNome Dim strName strName= "deepa" Set objRequest = Server.createobject("MSXML2.XMLHTTP") With objRequest .open "GET", "http://localhost:3106/WebService1.asmx/HelloWorld?name=" & strName, False .setRequestHeader "Content-Type", "text/xml" .setRequestHeader "SOAPAction", "http://localhost:3106/WebService1.asmx/HelloWorld" .send End With Set objXMLDoc = Server.createobject("MSXML2.DOMDocument") objXmlDoc.async = false Response.ContentType = "text/xml" Response.Write(objRequest.ResponseText) %> In Line 6 I created an MSXML XMLHTTP object. Line 9 Using the HTTPGET protocol I am openinig connection to WebService Line 10:11 – setting the Header for the service In line 15, I am getting the output from the webservice in XML Doc format & reading the responseText(line 18). In line 9 if you observe I am passing the parameter strName to the Webservice You can pass multiple parameters to the Web service by just like any other QueryString Parameters. In similar fashion you can invoke the Web service using HTTPPost. Only you have to ensure that the form contains all th required parameters for webmethod.  Happy coding !!!!!!!

    Read the article

  • What is .Net Framework 4 extended?

    - by Click Ok
    For testing purposes, I installed .Net Framework 4 Client Profile. My tests ended and I was to uninstall it, in order to install .Net Framework 4 full. The uninstaller told me to uninstall .Net Framework 4 extended first. I've already found it and uninstalled, but the question remains: What is .Net Framework 4 extended?

    Read the article

  • May 20th Links: ASP.NET MVC, ASP.NET, .NET 4, VS 2010, Silverlight

    Here is the latest in my link-listing series.  Also check out my VS 2010 and .NET 4 series and ASP.NET MVC 2 series for other on-going blog series Im working on. [In addition to blogging, I am also now using Twitter for quick updates and to share links. Follow me at: twitter.com/scottgu] ASP.NET MVC How to Localize an ASP.NET MVC Application: Michael Ceranski has a good blog post that describes how to localize ASP.NET MVC 2 applications. ASP.NET...Did you know that DotNetSlackers also publishes .net articles written by top known .net Authors? We already have over 80 articles in several categories including Silverlight. Take a look: here.

    Read the article

  • May 20th Links: ASP.NET MVC, ASP.NET, .NET 4, VS 2010, Silverlight

    Here is the latest in my link-listing series.  Also check out my VS 2010 and .NET 4 series and ASP.NET MVC 2 series for other on-going blog series Im working on. [In addition to blogging, I am also now using Twitter for quick updates and to share links. Follow me at: twitter.com/scottgu] ASP.NET MVC How to Localize an ASP.NET MVC Application: Michael Ceranski has a good blog post that describes how to localize ASP.NET MVC 2 applications. ASP.NET...Did you know that DotNetSlackers also publishes .net articles written by top known .net Authors? We already have over 80 articles in several categories including Silverlight. Take a look: here.

    Read the article

  • Daily tech links for .net and related technologies - Apr 26-28, 2010

    - by SanjeevAgarwal
    Daily tech links for .net and related technologies - Apr 26-28, 2010 Web Development MVC: Unit Testing Action Filters - Donn ASP.NET MVC 2: Ninja Black Belt Tips - Scott Hanselman Turn on Compile-time View Checking for ASP.NET MVC Projects in TFS Build 2010 - Jim Lamb Web Design List of 25+ New tags introduced in HTML 5 - techfreakstuff 15 CSS Habits to Develop for Frustration-Free Coding - noupe Silverlight, WPF & RIA Essential Silverlight and WPF Skills: The UI Thread, Dispatchers, Background...(read more)

    Read the article

  • IE9 RC fixed the “Internet Explorer cannot display the webpage” error when running an ASP.NET application in Visual Studio

    - by Jon Galloway
    One of the obstacles ASP.NET developers faced in using the Internet Explorer 9 Beta was the dreaded “Internet Explorer cannot display the webpage” error when running an ASP.NET application in Visual Studio. In the bug information on Connect (issue 601047), Eric Lawrence said that the problem was due to “caused by failure to failover from IPv6 to IPv4 when the connection is local.” Robert MacLean gives some more information as what was going wrong: “The problem is Windows, especially since it assumes IPv6 is better than IPv4. Note […] that when you ping localhost you get an IPv6 address. So what appears to be happening is when IE9 tries to go to localhost it uses IPv6, and the ASP.NET Development Server is IPv4 only and so nothing loads and we get the error.” The Simple Fix - Install IE 9 RC Internet Explorer 9 RC fixes this bug, so if you had tried IE 9 Beta and stopped using it due to problems with ASP.NET development, install the RC. The Workaround in IE 9 Beta If you're stuck on IE 9 Beta for some reason, you can follow Robert's workaround, which involves a one character edit to your hosts file. I've been using it for months, and it works great. Open notepad (running as administrator) and edit the hosts file (found in %systemroot%\system32\drivers\etc) Remove the # comment character before the line starting with 127.0.0.1 Save the file - if you have problems saving, it's probably because you weren't running as administrator When you're done, your hosts file will end with the following lines (assuming you were using a default hosts file setup beforehand): # localhost name resolution is handled within DNS itself.     127.0.0.1       localhost #    ::1             localhost Note: more information on editing your hosts file here. This causes Windows to default to IPv4 when resolving localhost, which will point to 127.0.0.1, which is right where Cassini - I mean the ASP.NET Web Development Server - is waiting for it.

    Read the article

  • 10 Ways to Get a Document into AxCMS.net

    - by Axinom
    Since AxCMS.net 9.1 there is a possibility to upload multiple files simultenously (with a simple Silverlight component). While I was waiting for my files to upload, I started to think about which other methods we currently have in AxCMS.net for uploading documents. I came up with 10 and same evening this article was ready: 10 Ways to Get a Document into AxCMS.net The Classic: Individual Manual Upload Document Creation Box Upload Multiple Files Files from a Remote URL Files from Windows SharePoint Services (WSS) WebDAV ZIP Create Documents Programmatically Apply Auto-Formatting Send the Documents via Email Always choose the most appropriate way to upload your documents into AxCMS.net. Consider size of the documents, how many you have, where to they come from and which other tools you use.  

    Read the article

< Previous Page | 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22  | Next Page >