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  • A problem with the asp.net create user control

    - by Sir Psycho
    Hi, I've customised the asp.net login control and it seems to create new accounts fine, but if I duplicate the user id thats already registered or enter an email thats already used, the error messages arn't displaying. Its driving me crazy. The page just refreshes without showing an error. I've included the as instructed on the MSDN site but nothing. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms178342.aspx <asp:CreateUserWizard ErrorMessageStyle-BorderColor="Azure" ID="CreateUserWizard1" runat="server" ContinueDestinationPageUrl="~/home.aspx"> <WizardSteps> <asp:CreateUserWizardStep ID="CreateUserWizardStep1" runat="server"> <ContentTemplate> <asp:Literal ID="ErrorMessage" runat="server"></asp:Literal> <div class="fieldLine"> <asp:Label ID="lblFirstName" runat="server" Text="First Name:" AssociatedControlID="tbxFirstName"></asp:Label> <asp:Label ID="lblLastName" runat="server" Text="Last Name:" AssociatedControlID="tbxLastName"></asp:Label> </div> <div class="fieldLine"> <asp:TextBox ID="tbxFirstName" runat="server"></asp:TextBox> <asp:TextBox ID="tbxLastName" runat="server"></asp:TextBox> </div> <asp:Label ID="lblEmail" runat="server" Text="Email:" AssociatedControlID="Email"></asp:Label> <asp:TextBox ID="Email" runat="server" CssClass="wideInput"></asp:TextBox><br /> <asp:RequiredFieldValidator ID="RequiredFieldValidator1" runat="server" CssClass="aspValidator" Display="Dynamic" ControlToValidate="Email" ErrorMessage="Required"></asp:RequiredFieldValidator> <asp:RegularExpressionValidator ID="RegularExpressionValidator1" runat="server" Display="Dynamic" CssClass="aspValidator" ControlToValidate="Email" SetFocusOnError="true" ValidationExpression="^(?:[a-zA-Z0-9_'^&amp;/+-])+(?:\.(?:[a-zA-Z0-9_'^&amp;/+-])+)*@(?:(?:\[?(?:(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?))\.){3}(?:(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\]?)|(?:[a-zA-Z0-9-]+\.)+(?:[a-zA-Z]){2,}\.?)$" ErrorMessage="Email address not valid"></asp:RegularExpressionValidator> <asp:Label ID="lblEmailConfirm" runat="server" Text="Confirm Email Address:" AssociatedControlID="tbxEmailConfirm"></asp:Label> <asp:TextBox ID="tbxEmailConfirm" runat="server" CssClass="wideInput"></asp:TextBox><br /> <asp:RequiredFieldValidator ID="RequiredFieldValidator2" runat="server" CssClass="aspValidator" Display="Dynamic" ControlToValidate="tbxEmailConfirm" ErrorMessage="Required"></asp:RequiredFieldValidator> <asp:RegularExpressionValidator ID="RegularExpressionValidator2" runat="server" Display="Dynamic" CssClass="aspValidator" ControlToValidate="tbxEmailConfirm" SetFocusOnError="true" ValidationExpression="^(?:[a-zA-Z0-9_'^&amp;/+-])+(?:\.(?:[a-zA-Z0-9_'^&amp;/+-])+)*@(?:(?:\[?(?:(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?))\.){3}(?:(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\]?)|(?:[a-zA-Z0-9-]+\.)+(?:[a-zA-Z]){2,}\.?)$" ErrorMessage="Email address not valid"></asp:RegularExpressionValidator> <asp:CompareValidator ID="CompareValidator1" runat="server" Display="Dynamic" SetFocusOnError="true" CssClass="aspValidator" ControlToCompare="Email" ControlToValidate="tbxEmailConfirm" ErrorMessage="Email address' do not match"></asp:CompareValidator> <asp:Label ID="lblUsername" runat="server" Text="Username:" AssociatedControlID="UserName"></asp:Label> <asp:TextBox ID="UserName" runat="server" MaxLength="12"></asp:TextBox><br /> <asp:CustomValidator ID="CustomValidatorUserName" runat="server" Display="Dynamic" SetFocusOnError="true" CssClass="aspValidator" ValidateEmptyText="true" ControlToValidate="UserName" ErrorMessage="Username can be between 6 and 12 characters." ClientValidationFunction="ValidateLength" OnServerValidate="ValidateUserName"></asp:CustomValidator> <div class="fieldLine"> <asp:Label ID="lblPassword" runat="server" Text="Password:" AssociatedControlID="Password"></asp:Label> <asp:Label ID="lblPasswordConfirm" runat="server" Text="Confirm Password:" AssociatedControlID="ConfirmPassword" CssClass="confirmPassword"></asp:Label> </div> <div class="fieldLine"> <asp:TextBox ID="Password" runat="server" TextMode="Password"></asp:TextBox> <asp:TextBox ID="ConfirmPassword" runat="server" TextMode="Password"></asp:TextBox><br /> <asp:CustomValidator ID="CustomValidatorPassword" runat="server" Display="Dynamic" SetFocusOnError="true" CssClass="aspValidator" ControlToValidate="Password" ValidateEmptyText="true" ErrorMessage="Password can be between 6 and 12 characters" ClientValidationFunction="ValidateLength" OnServerValidate="ValidatePassword"></asp:CustomValidator> <asp:CustomValidator ID="CustomValidatorConfirmPassword" runat="server" Display="Dynamic" SetFocusOnError="true" CssClass="aspValidator" ControlToValidate="ConfirmPassword" ValidateEmptyText="true" ErrorMessage="Password can be between 6 and 12 characters" ClientValidationFunction="ValidateLength" OnServerValidate="ValidatePassword"></asp:CustomValidator> <asp:CompareValidator ID="CompareValidator2" runat="server" Enabled="false" Display="Dynamic" SetFocusOnError="true" CssClass="aspValidator" ControlToCompare="Password" ControlToValidate="ConfirmPassword" ErrorMessage="Passwords do not match"></asp:CompareValidator> </div> <asp:Label ID="lblCaptch" runat="server" Text="Captcha:" AssociatedControlID="imgCaptcha"></asp:Label> <div class="borderBlue" style="width:200px;"> <asp:Image ID="imgCaptcha" runat="server" ImageUrl="~/JpegImage.aspx" /><br /> </div> <asp:TextBox ID="tbxCaptcha" runat="server" CssClass="captchaText"></asp:TextBox> <asp:RequiredFieldValidator ControlToValidate="tbxCaptcha" CssClass="aspValidator" ID="RequiredFieldValidator3" runat="server" ErrorMessage="Required"></asp:RequiredFieldValidator> <asp:CustomValidator ID="CustomValidator1" ControlToValidate="tbxCaptcha" runat="server" OnServerValidate="ValidateCaptcha" ErrorMessage="Captcha incorrect"></asp:CustomValidator> </ContentTemplate> <CustomNavigationTemplate> <div style="float:left;"> <asp:Button ID="CreateUser" runat="server" Text="Register Now!" CausesValidation="true" CommandName="CreateUser" OnCommand="CreateUserClick" CssClass="registerButton" /> </div> </CustomNavigationTemplate> </asp:CreateUserWizardStep> <asp:CompleteWizardStep ID="CompleteWizardStep1" runat="server"> <ContentTemplate> <table border="0" style="font-size: 100%; font-family: Verdana" id="TABLE1" > <tr> <td align="center" colspan="2" style="font-weight: bold; color: white; background-color: #5d7b9d; height: 18px;"> Complete</td> </tr> <tr> <td> Your account has been successfully created.<br /> </td> </tr> <tr> <td align="right" colspan="2"> <asp:Button ID="Button1" PostBackUrl="~/home.aspx" runat="server" Text="Button" /> </td> </tr> </table> </ContentTemplate> </asp:CompleteWizardStep> </WizardSteps> </asp:CreateUserWizard>

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  • AdvancedFormatProvider: Making string.format do more

    - by plblum
    When I have an integer that I want to format within the String.Format() and ToString(format) methods, I’m always forgetting the format symbol to use with it. That’s probably because its not very intuitive. Use {0:N0} if you want it with group (thousands) separators. text = String.Format("{0:N0}", 1000); // returns "1,000"   int value1 = 1000; text = value1.ToString("N0"); Use {0:D} or {0:G} if you want it without group separators. text = String.Format("{0:D}", 1000); // returns "1000"   int value2 = 1000; text2 = value2.ToString("D"); The {0:D} is especially confusing because Microsoft gives the token the name “Decimal”. I thought it reasonable to have a new format symbol for String.Format, "I" for integer, and the ability to tell it whether it shows the group separators. Along the same lines, why not expand the format symbols for currency ({0:C}) and percent ({0:P}) to let you omit the currency or percent symbol, omit the group separator, and even to drop the decimal part when the value is equal to the whole number? My solution is an open source project called AdvancedFormatProvider, a group of classes that provide the new format symbols, continue to support the rest of the native symbols and makes it easy to plug in additional format symbols. Please visit https://github.com/plblum/AdvancedFormatProvider to learn about it in detail and explore how its implemented. The rest of this post will explore some of the concepts it takes to expand String.Format() and ToString(format). AdvancedFormatProvider benefits: Supports {0:I} token for integers. It offers the {0:I-,} option to omit the group separator. Supports {0:C} token with several options. {0:C-$} omits the currency symbol. {0:C-,} omits group separators, and {0:C-0} hides the decimal part when the value would show “.00”. For example, 1000.0 becomes “$1000” while 1000.12 becomes “$1000.12”. Supports {0:P} token with several options. {0:P-%} omits the percent symbol. {0:P-,} omits group separators, and {0:P-0} hides the decimal part when the value would show “.00”. For example, 1 becomes “100 %” while 1.1223 becomes “112.23 %”. Provides a plug in framework that lets you create new formatters to handle specific format symbols. You register them globally so you can just pass the AdvancedFormatProvider object into String.Format and ToString(format) without having to figure out which plug ins to add. text = String.Format(AdvancedFormatProvider.Current, "{0:I}", 1000); // returns "1,000" text2 = String.Format(AdvancedFormatProvider.Current, "{0:I-,}", 1000); // returns "1000" text3 = String.Format(AdvancedFormatProvider.Current, "{0:C-$-,}", 1000.0); // returns "1000.00" The IFormatProvider parameter Microsoft has made String.Format() and ToString(format) format expandable. They each take an additional parameter that takes an object that implements System.IFormatProvider. This interface has a single member, the GetFormat() method, which returns an object that knows how to convert the format symbol and value into the desired string. There are already a number of web-based resources to teach you about IFormatProvider and the companion interface ICustomFormatter. I’ll defer to them if you want to dig more into the topic. The only thing I want to point out is what I think are implementation considerations. Why GetFormat() always tests for ICustomFormatter When you see examples of implementing IFormatProviders, the GetFormat() method always tests the parameter against the ICustomFormatter type. Why is that? public object GetFormat(Type formatType) { if (formatType == typeof(ICustomFormatter)) return this; else return null; } The value of formatType is already predetermined by the .net framework. String.Format() uses the StringBuilder.AppendFormat() method to parse the string, extracting the tokens and calling GetFormat() with the ICustomFormatter type. (The .net framework also calls GetFormat() with the types of System.Globalization.NumberFormatInfo and System.Globalization.DateTimeFormatInfo but these are exclusive to how the System.Globalization.CultureInfo class handles its implementation of IFormatProvider.) Your code replaces instead of expands I would have expected the caller to pass in the format string to GetFormat() to allow your code to determine if it handles the request. My vision would be to return null when the format string is not supported. The caller would iterate through IFormatProviders until it finds one that handles the format string. Unfortunatley that is not the case. The reason you write GetFormat() as above is because the caller is expecting an object that handles all formatting cases. You are effectively supposed to write enough code in your formatter to handle your new cases and call .net functions (like String.Format() and ToString(format)) to handle the original cases. Its not hard to support the native functions from within your ICustomFormatter.Format function. Just test the format string to see if it applies to you. If not, call String.Format() with a token using the format passed in. public string Format(string format, object arg, IFormatProvider formatProvider) { if (format.StartsWith("I")) { // handle "I" formatter } else return String.Format(formatProvider, "{0:" + format + "}", arg); } Formatters are only used by explicit request Each time you write a custom formatter (implementer of ICustomFormatter), it is not used unless you explicitly passed an IFormatProvider object that supports your formatter into String.Format() or ToString(). This has several disadvantages: Suppose you have several ICustomFormatters. In order to have all available to String.Format() and ToString(format), you have to merge their code and create an IFormatProvider to return an instance of your new class. You have to remember to utilize the IFormatProvider parameter. Its easy to overlook, especially when you have existing code that calls String.Format() without using it. Some APIs may call String.Format() themselves. If those APIs do not offer an IFormatProvider parameter, your ICustomFormatter will not be available to them. The AdvancedFormatProvider solves the first two of these problems by providing a plug-in architecture.

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  • Use ASP.NET 4 Browser Definitions with ASP.NET 3.5

    - by Stephen Walther
    We updated the browser definitions files included with ASP.NET 4 to include information on recent browsers and devices such as Google Chrome and the iPhone. You can use these browser definition files with earlier versions of ASP.NET such as ASP.NET 3.5. The updated browser definition files, and instructions for installing them, can be found here: http://aspnet.codeplex.com/releases/view/41420 The changes in the browser definition files can cause backwards compatibility issues when you upgrade an ASP.NET 3.5 web application to ASP.NET 4. If you encounter compatibility issues, you can install the old browser definition files in your ASP.NET 4 application. The old browser definition files are included in the download file referenced above. What’s New in the ASP.NET 4 Browser Definition Files The complete set of browsers supported by the new ASP.NET 4 browser definition files is represented by the following figure:     If you look carefully at the figure, you’ll notice that we added browser definitions for several types of recent browsers such as Internet Explorer 8, Firefox 3.5, Google Chrome, Opera 10, and Safari 4. Furthermore, notice that we now include browser definitions for several of the most popular mobile devices: BlackBerry, IPhone, IPod, and Windows Mobile (IEMobile). The mobile devices appear in the figure with a purple background color. To improve performance, we removed a whole lot of outdated browser definitions for old cell phones and mobile devices. We also cleaned up the information contained in the browser files. Here are some of the browser features that you can detect: Are you a mobile device? <%=Request.Browser.IsMobileDevice %> Are you an IPhone? <%=Request.Browser.MobileDeviceModel == "IPhone" %> What version of JavaScript do you support? <%=Request.Browser["javascriptversion"] %> What layout engine do you use? <%=Request.Browser["layoutEngine"] %>   Here’s what you would get if you displayed the value of these properties using Internet Explorer 8: Here’s what you get when you use Google Chrome: Testing Browser Settings When working with browser definition files, it is useful to have some way to test the capability information returned when you request a page with different browsers. You can use the following method to return the HttpBrowserCapabilities the corresponds to a particular user agent string and set of browser headers: public HttpBrowserCapabilities GetBrowserCapabilities(string userAgent, NameValueCollection headers) { HttpBrowserCapabilities browserCaps = new HttpBrowserCapabilities(); Hashtable hashtable = new Hashtable(180, StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase); hashtable[string.Empty] = userAgent; // The actual method uses client target browserCaps.Capabilities = hashtable; var capsFactory = new System.Web.Configuration.BrowserCapabilitiesFactory(); capsFactory.ConfigureBrowserCapabilities(headers, browserCaps); capsFactory.ConfigureCustomCapabilities(headers, browserCaps); return browserCaps; } At the end of this blog entry, there is a link to download a simple Visual Studio 2008 project – named Browser Definition Test -- that uses this method to display capability information for arbitrary user agent strings. For example, if you enter the user agent string for an iPhone then you get the results in the following figure: The Browser Definition Test application enables you to submit a user-agent string and display a table of browser capabilities information. The browser definition files contain sample user-agent strings for each browser definition. I got the iPhone user-agent string from the comments in the iphone.browser file. Enumerating Browser Definitions Someone asked in the comments whether or not there is a way to enumerate all of the browser definitions. You can do this if you ware willing to use a little reflection and read a private property. The browser definition files in the config\browsers folder get parsed into a class named BrowserCapabilitesFactory. After you run the aspnet_regbrowsers tool, you can see the source for this class in the config\browser folder by opening a file named BrowserCapsFactory.cs. The BrowserCapabilitiesFactoryBase class has a protected property named BrowserElements that represents a Hashtable of all of the browser definitions. Here's how you can read this protected property and display the ID for all of the browser definitions: var propInfo = typeof(BrowserCapabilitiesFactory).GetProperty("BrowserElements", BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance); Hashtable browserDefinitions = (Hashtable)propInfo.GetValue(new BrowserCapabilitiesFactory(), null); foreach (var key in browserDefinitions.Keys) { Response.Write("" + key); } If you run this code using Visual Studio 2008 then you get the following results: You get a huge number of outdated browsers and devices. In all, 449 browser definitions are listed. If you run this code using Visual Studio 2010 then you get the following results: In the case of Visual Studio 2010, all the old browsers and devices have been removed and you get only 19 browser definitions. Conclusion The updated browser definition files included in ASP.NET 4 provide more accurate information for recent browsers and devices. If you would like to test the new browser definitions with different user-agent strings then I recommend that you download the Browser Definition Test project: Browser Definition Test Project

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  • List of blogs - year 2010

    - by hajan
    This is the last day of year 2010 and I would like to add links to all blogs I have posted in this year. First, I would like to mention that I started blogging in ASP.NET Community in May / June 2010 and have really enjoyed writing for my favorite technologies, such as: ASP.NET, jQuery/JavaScript, C#, LINQ, Web Services etc. I also had great feedback either through comments on my blogs or in Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn where I met many new experts just as a result of my blog posts. Thanks to the interesting topics I have in my blog, I became DZone MVB. Here is the list of blogs I made in 2010 in my ASP.NET Community Weblog: (newest to oldest) Great library of ASP.NET videos – Pluralsight! NDepend – Code Query Language (CQL) NDepend tool – Why every developer working with Visual Studio.NET must try it! jQuery Templates in ASP.NET - Blogs Series jQuery Templates - XHTML Validation jQuery Templates with ASP.NET MVC jQuery Templates - {Supported Tags} jQuery Templates – tmpl(), template() and tmplItem() Introduction to jQuery Templates ViewBag dynamic in ASP.NET MVC 3 - RC 2 Today I had a presentation on "Deep Dive into jQuery Templates in ASP.NET" jQuery Data Linking in ASP.NET How do you prefer getting bundles of technologies?? Case-insensitive XPath query search on XML Document in ASP.NET jQuery UI Accordion in ASP.NET MVC - feed with data from database (Part 3) jQuery UI Accordion in ASP.NET WebForms - feed with data from database (Part 2) jQuery UI Accordion in ASP.NET – Client side implementation (Part 1) Using Images embedded in Project’s Assembly Macedonian Code Camp 2010 event has finished successfully Tips and Tricks: Deferred execution using LINQ Using System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch class to measure the elapsed time Speaking at Macedonian Code Camp 2010 URL Routing in ASP.NET 4.0 Web Forms Conflicts between ASP.NET AJAX UpdatePanels & jQuery functions Integration of jQuery DatePicker in ASP.NET Website – Localization (part 3) Why not to use HttpResponse.Close and HttpResponse.End Calculate Business Days using LINQ Get Distinct values of an Array using LINQ Using CodeRun browser-based IDE to create ASP.NET Web Applications Using params keyword – Methods with variable number of parameters Working with Code Snippets in VS.NET  Working with System.IO.Path static class Calculating GridView total using JavaScript/JQuery The new SortedSet<T> Collection in .NET 4.0 JavaScriptSerializer – Dictionary to JSON Serialization and Deserialization Integration of jQuery DatePicker in ASP.NET Website – JS Validation Script (part 2) Integration of jQuery DatePicker in ASP.NET Website (part 1) Transferring large data when using Web Services Forums dedicated to WebMatrix Microsoft WebMatrix – Short overview & installation Working with embedded resources in Project's assembly Debugging ASP.NET Web Services Save and Display YouTube Videos on ASP.NET Website Hello ASP.NET World... In addition, I would like to mention that I have big list of blog posts in CodeASP.NET Community (total 60 blogs) and the local MKDOT.NET Community (total 61 blogs). You may find most of my weblogs.asp.net/hajan blogs posted there too, but there you can find many others. In my blog on MKDOT.NET Community you can find most of my ASP.NET Weblog posts translated in Macedonian language, some of them posted in English and some other blogs that were posted only there. By reading my blogs, I hope you have learnt something new or at least have confirmed your knowledge. And also, if you haven't, I encourage you to start blogging and share your Microsoft Tech. thoughts with all of us... Sharing and spreading knowledge is definitely one of the noblest things which we can do in our life. "Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he will eat for a lifetime" HAPPY NEW 2011 YEAR!!! Best Regards, Hajan

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  • Creating dynamic breadcrumb in asp.net mvc with mvcsitemap provider

    - by Jalpesh P. Vadgama
    I have done lots breadcrumb kind of things in normal asp.net web forms I was looking for same for asp.net mvc. After searching on internet I have found one great nuget package for mvpsite map provider which can be easily implemented via site map provider. So let’s check how its works. I have create a new MVC 3 web application called breadcrumb and now I am adding a reference of site map provider via nuget package like following. You can find more information about MVC sitemap provider on following URL. https://github.com/maartenba/MvcSiteMapProvid So once you add site map provider. You will find a Mvc.SiteMap file like following. And following is content of that file. <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?> <mvcSiteMap xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://mvcsitemap.codeplex.com/schemas/MvcSiteMap-File-3.0" xsi:schemaLocation="http://mvcsitemap.codeplex.com/schemas/MvcSiteMap-File-3.0 MvcSiteMapSchema.xsd" enableLocalization="true"> <mvcSiteMapNode title="Home" controller="Home" action="Index"> <mvcSiteMapNode title="About" controller="Home" action="About"/> </mvcSiteMapNode> </mvcSiteMap> So now we have added site map so now its time to make breadcrumb dynamic. So as we all know that with in the standard asp.net mvc template we have action link by default for Home and About like following. <div id="menucontainer"> <ul id="menu"> <li>@Html.ActionLink("Home", "Index", "Home")</li> <li>@Html.ActionLink("About", "About", "Home")</li> </ul> </div> Now I want to replace that with our sitemap provider and make it dynamic so I have added the following code. <div id="menucontainer"> @Html.MvcSiteMap().Menu(true) </div> That’s it. This is the magic code @Html.MvcSiteMap will dynamically create breadcrumb for you. Now let’s run this in browser. You can see that it has created breadcrumb dynamically without writing any action link code. So here you can see with MvcSiteMap provider we don’t have to write any code we just need to add menu syntax and rest it will do automatically. That’s it. Hope you liked it. Stay tuned for more till then happy programming.

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  • Dynamically creating meta tags in asp.net mvc

    - by Jalpesh P. Vadgama
    As we all know that Meta tag has very important roles in Search engine optimization and if we want to have out site listed with good ranking on search engines then we have to put meta tags. Before some time I have blogged about dynamically creating meta tags in asp.net 2.0/3.5 sites, in this blog post I am going to explain how we can create a meta tag dynamically very easily. To have meta tag dynamically we have to create a meta tag on server-side. So I have created a method like following. public string HomeMetaTags() { System.Text.StringBuilder strMetaTag = new System.Text.StringBuilder(); strMetaTag.AppendFormat(@"<meta content='{0}' name='Keywords'/>","Home Action Keyword"); strMetaTag.AppendFormat(@"<meta content='{0}' name='Descption'/>", "Home Description Keyword"); return strMetaTag.ToString(); } Here you can see that I have written a method which will return a string with meta tags. Here you can write any logic you can fetch it from the database or you can even fetch it from xml based on key passed. For the demo purpose I have written that hardcoded. So it will create a meta tag string and will return it. Now I am going to store that meta tag in ViewBag just like we have a title tag. In this post I am going to use standard template so we have our title tag there in viewbag message. Same way I am going save meta tag like following in ViewBag. public ActionResult Index() { ViewBag.Message = "Welcome to ASP.NET MVC!"; ViewBag.MetaTag = HomeMetaTags(); return View(); } Here in the above code you can see that I have stored MetaTag ViewBag. Now as I am using standard ASP.NET MVC3 template so we have our we have out head element in Shared folder _layout.cshtml file. So to render meta tag I have modified the Head tag part of _layout.cshtml like following. <head> <title>@ViewBag.Title</title> <link href="@Url.Content("~/Content/Site.css")" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" /> <script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery-1.5.1.min.js")" type="text/javascript"></script> @Html.Raw(ViewBag.MetaTag) </head> Here in the above code you can see I have use @Html.Raw method to embed meta tag in _layout.cshtml page. This HTML.Raw method will embed output to head tag section without encoding html. As we have already taken care of html tag in string function we don’t need the html encoding. Now it’s time to run application in browser. Now once you run your application in browser and click on view source you will find meta tag for home page as following. That’s its It’s very easy to create dynamically meta tag. Hope you liked it.. Stay tuned for more.. Till then happy programming.

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  • Can somebody explain the differences, status and future of the various ASP.NET AJAX libraries and to

    - by tjrobinson
    I'm confused about the differences and relationships between the various Microsoft ASP.NET AJAX components/libraries/toolkits and particularly the naming of them. It starts off relatively simple with ASP.NET AJAX itself: ASP.NET AJAX 1.0 (available for ASP.NET 2.0 in a separate package called ASP.NET 1.0 Extensions) ASP.NET AJAX 3.5 (included with ASP.NET 3.5) ASP.NET AJAX 4.0 (included with ASP.NET 4.0) Then come the various projects on CodePlex and elsewhere: ASP.NET AJAX Control Toolkit (aka Original Ajax Control Toolkit) Samples CodePlex It seems that the September 2009 Release is the final release of the Original Ajax Control Toolkit and that it's been superseded by... Ajax Control Toolkit in ASP.NET Ajax Library It looks like the old ASP.NET AJAX Control Toolkit has now become part of a larger ASP.NET Ajax Library but is still maintained seperately on CodePlex. This release is in beta at time of writing so presumably if I want to use the "Control Toolkit" I should stick with the September 2009 Release of the Original ASP.NET AJAX Control Toolkit CodePlex Microsoft Ajax Library Preview Is this the same as the ASP.NET Ajax Library mentioned above just with a confusing name variation? Is the "Control Toolkit" included in Preview 6 and is it older newer or older than the code in Ajax Control Toolkit in ASP.NET Ajax Library? CodePlex Microsoft ASP.NET Ajax Wiki - note the inconsistent insertion of ASP.NET into the name Links to useful articles, roadmaps would be useful.

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  • ASP.NET Charting Control no longer working with .NET 4

    - by Moose Factory
    I've just upgraded to .NET 4 and my ASP.NET Chart Control no longer displays. For .NET 3.5, the HTML produced by the control used to look like this: <img id="20_Chart" src="/ChartImg.axd?i=chart_5f6a8fd179a246a5a0f4f44fcd7d5e03_0.png&amp;g=16eb7881335e47dcba16fdfd8339ba1a" alt="" style="height:300px;width:300px;border-width:0px;" /> and now, for .NET 4, it looks like this (note the change in the source path): <img id="20_Chart" src="/Statistics/Summary/ChartImg.axd?i=chart_5f6a8fd179a246a5a0f4f44fcd7d5e03_0.png&amp;g=16eb7881335e47dcba16fdfd8339ba1a" alt="" style="height:300px;width:300px;border-width:0px;" /> The chart is in an MVC partial view that is in an MVC Area folder called "Statistics" and a MVC Views folder called "Summary" (i.e. "/Areas/Statistics/Views/Summary"), so this is obviously where the change of path is coming from. All I've done is to switch the System.Web.DataVisualization assembly from, 3.5 to 4.0. Any help greatly appreciated.

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  • ASP.NET MVC 2 Released

    - by Latest Microsoft Blogs
    I’m happy to announce that the final release of ASP.NET MVC 2 is now available for VS 2008/Visual Web Developer 2008 Express with ASP.NET 3.5.  You can download and install it from the following locations: Download ASP.NET MVC 2 using the Microsoft Read More......(read more)

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  • Dependency Injection in ASP.NET MVC NerdDinner App using Unity 2.0

    - by shiju
    In my previous post Dependency Injection in ASP.NET MVC NerdDinner App using Ninject, we did dependency injection in NerdDinner application using Ninject. In this post, I demonstrate how to apply Dependency Injection in ASP.NET MVC NerdDinner App using Microsoft Unity Application Block (Unity) v 2.0.Unity 2.0Unity 2.0 is available on Codeplex at http://unity.codeplex.com . In earlier versions of Unity, the ObjectBuilder generic dependency injection mechanism, was distributed as a separate assembly, is now integrated with Unity core assembly. So you no longer need to reference the ObjectBuilder assembly in your applications. Two additional Built-In Lifetime Managers - HierarchicalifetimeManager and PerResolveLifetimeManager have been added to Unity 2.0.Dependency Injection in NerdDinner using UnityIn my Ninject post on NerdDinner, we have discussed the interfaces and concrete types of NerdDinner application and how to inject dependencies controller constructors. The following steps will configure Unity 2.0 to apply controller injection in NerdDinner application. Step 1 – Add reference for Unity Application BlockOpen the NerdDinner solution and add  reference to Microsoft.Practices.Unity.dll and Microsoft.Practices.Unity.Configuration.dllYou can download Unity from at http://unity.codeplex.com .Step 2 – Controller Factory for Unity The controller factory is responsible for creating controller instances.We extend the built in default controller factory with our own factory for working Unity with ASP.NET MVC. public class UnityControllerFactory : DefaultControllerFactory {     protected override IController GetControllerInstance(RequestContext reqContext, Type controllerType)     {         IController controller;         if (controllerType == null)             throw new HttpException(                     404, String.Format(                         "The controller for path '{0}' could not be found" +         "or it does not implement IController.",                     reqContext.HttpContext.Request.Path));           if (!typeof(IController).IsAssignableFrom(controllerType))             throw new ArgumentException(                     string.Format(                         "Type requested is not a controller: {0}",                         controllerType.Name),                         "controllerType");         try         {             controller = MvcUnityContainer.Container.Resolve(controllerType)                             as IController;         }         catch (Exception ex)         {             throw new InvalidOperationException(String.Format(                                     "Error resolving controller {0}",                                     controllerType.Name), ex);         }         return controller;     }   }   public static class MvcUnityContainer {     public static IUnityContainer Container { get; set; } }  Step 3 – Register Types and Set Controller Factory private void ConfigureUnity() {     //Create UnityContainer               IUnityContainer container = new UnityContainer()     .RegisterType<IFormsAuthentication, FormsAuthenticationService>()     .RegisterType<IMembershipService, AccountMembershipService>()     .RegisterInstance<MembershipProvider>(Membership.Provider)     .RegisterType<IDinnerRepository, DinnerRepository>();     //Set container for Controller Factory     MvcUnityContainer.Container = container;     //Set Controller Factory as UnityControllerFactory     ControllerBuilder.Current.SetControllerFactory(                         typeof(UnityControllerFactory));            } Unity 2.0 provides a fluent interface for type configuration. Now you can call all the methods in a single statement.The above Unity configuration specified in the ConfigureUnity method tells that, to inject instance of DinnerRepositiry when there is a request for IDinnerRepositiry and  inject instance of FormsAuthenticationService when there is a request for IFormsAuthentication and inject instance of AccountMembershipService when there is a request for IMembershipService. The AccountMembershipService class has a dependency with ASP.NET Membership provider. So we configure that inject the instance of Membership Provider.After the registering the types, we set UnityControllerFactory as the current controller factory. //Set container for Controller Factory MvcUnityContainer.Container = container; //Set Controller Factory as UnityControllerFactory ControllerBuilder.Current.SetControllerFactory(                     typeof(UnityControllerFactory)); When you register a type  by using the RegisterType method, the default behavior is for the container to use a transient lifetime manager. It creates a new instance of the registered, mapped, or requested type each time you call the Resolve or ResolveAll method or when the dependency mechanism injects instances into other classes. The following are the LifetimeManagers provided by Unity 2.0ContainerControlledLifetimeManager - Implements a singleton behavior for objects. The object is disposed of when you dispose of the container.ExternallyControlledLifetimeManager - Implements a singleton behavior but the container doesn't hold a reference to object which will be disposed of when out of scope.HierarchicalifetimeManager - Implements a singleton behavior for objects. However, child containers don't share instances with parents.PerResolveLifetimeManager - Implements a behavior similar to the transient lifetime manager except that instances are reused across build-ups of the object graph.PerThreadLifetimeManager - Implements a singleton behavior for objects but limited to the current thread.TransientLifetimeManager - Returns a new instance of the requested type for each call. (default behavior)We can also create custome lifetime manager for Unity container. The following code creating a custom lifetime manager to store container in the current HttpContext. public class HttpContextLifetimeManager<T> : LifetimeManager, IDisposable {     public override object GetValue()     {         return HttpContext.Current.Items[typeof(T).AssemblyQualifiedName];     }     public override void RemoveValue()     {         HttpContext.Current.Items.Remove(typeof(T).AssemblyQualifiedName);     }     public override void SetValue(object newValue)     {         HttpContext.Current.Items[typeof(T).AssemblyQualifiedName]             = newValue;     }     public void Dispose()     {         RemoveValue();     } }  Step 4 – Modify Global.asax.cs for configure Unity container In the Application_Start event, we call the ConfigureUnity method for configuring the Unity container and set controller factory as UnityControllerFactory void Application_Start() {     RegisterRoutes(RouteTable.Routes);       ViewEngines.Engines.Clear();     ViewEngines.Engines.Add(new MobileCapableWebFormViewEngine());     ConfigureUnity(); }Download CodeYou can download the modified NerdDinner code from http://nerddinneraddons.codeplex.com

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  • Update on ASP.NET MVC 3 RC2 (and a workaround for a bug in it)

    - by ScottGu
    Last week we published the RC2 build of ASP.NET MVC 3.  I blogged a bunch of details about it here. One of the reasons we publish release candidates is to help find those last “hard to find” bugs. So far we haven’t seen many issues reported with the RC2 release (which is good) - although we have seen a few reports of a metadata caching bug that manifests itself in at least two scenarios: Nullable parameters in action methods have problems: When you have a controller action method with a nullable parameter (like int? – or a complex type that has a nullable sub-property), the nullable parameter might always end up being null - even when the request contains a valid value for the parameter. [AllowHtml] doesn’t allow HTML in model binding: When you decorate a model property with an [AllowHtml] attribute (to turn off HTML injection protection), the model binding still fails when HTML content is posted to it. Both of these issues are caused by an over-eager caching optimization we introduced very late in the RC2 milestone.  This issue will be fixed for the final ASP.NET MVC 3 release.  Below is a workaround step you can implement to fix it today. Workaround You Can Use Today You can fix the above issues with the current ASP.NT MVC 3 RC2 release by adding one line of code to the Application_Start() event handler within the Global.asax class of your application: The above code sets the ModelMetaDataProviders.Current property to use the DataAnnotationsModelMetadataProvider.  This causes ASP.NET MVC 3 to use a meta-data provider implementation that doesn’t have the more aggressive caching logic we introduced late in the RC2 release, and prevents the caching issues that cause the above issues to occur.  You don’t need to change any other code within your application.  Once you make this change the above issues are fixed.  You won’t need to have this line of code within your applications once the final ASP.NET MVC 3 release ships (although keeping it in also won’t cause any problems). Hope this helps – and please keep any reports of issues coming our way, Scott P.S. In addition to blogging, I am also now using Twitter for quick updates and to share links. Follow me at: twitter.com/scottgu

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  • ASP.NET Asynchronous Pages and when to use them

    - by rajbk
    There have been several articles posted about using  asynchronous pages in ASP.NET but none of them go into detail as to when you should use them. I finally found a great post by Thomas Marquardt that explains the process in depth. He addresses a key misconception also: So, in your ASP.NET application, when should you perform work asynchronously instead of synchronously? Well, only 1 thread per CPU can execute at a time.  Did you catch that?  A lot of people seem to miss this point...only one thread executes at a time on a CPU. When you have more than this, you pay an expensive penalty--a context switch. However, if a thread is blocked waiting on work...then it makes sense to switch to another thread, one that can execute now.  It also makes sense to switch threads if you want work to be done in parallel as opposed to in series, but up until a certain point it actually makes much more sense to execute work in series, again, because of the expensive context switch. Pop quiz: If you have a thread that is doing a lot of computational work and using the CPU heavily, and this takes a while, should you switch to another thread? No! The current thread is efficiently using the CPU, so switching will only incur the cost of a context switch. Ok, well, what if you have a thread that makes an HTTP or SOAP request to another server and takes a long time, should you switch threads? Yes! You can perform the HTTP or SOAP request asynchronously, so that once the "send" has occurred, you can unwind the current thread and not use any threads until there is an I/O completion for the "receive". Between the "send" and the "receive", the remote server is busy, so locally you don't need to be blocking on a thread, but instead make use of the asynchronous APIs provided in .NET Framework so that you can unwind and be notified upon completion. Again, it only makes sense to switch threads if the benefit from doing so out weights the cost of the switch. Read more about it in these posts: Performing Asynchronous Work, or Tasks, in ASP.NET Applications http://blogs.msdn.com/tmarq/archive/2010/04/14/performing-asynchronous-work-or-tasks-in-asp-net-applications.aspx ASP.NET Thread Usage on IIS 7.0 and 6.0 http://blogs.msdn.com/tmarq/archive/2007/07/21/asp-net-thread-usage-on-iis-7-0-and-6-0.aspx   PS: I generally do not write posts that simply link to other posts but think it is warranted in this case.

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  • ASP.NET Meta Keywords and Description

    - by Ben Griswold
    Some of the ASP.NET 4 improvements around SEO are neat.  The ASP.NET 4 Page.MetaKeywords and Page.MetaDescription properties, for example, are a welcomed change.  There’s nothing earth-shattering going on here – you can now set these meta tags via your Master page’s code behind rather than relying on updates to your markup alone.  It isn’t difficult to manage meta keywords and descriptions without these ASP.NET 4 properties but I still appreciate the attention SEO is getting.  It’s nice to get gentle reminder via new coding features that some of the more subtle aspects of one’s application deserve thought and attention too.  For the record, this is how I currently manage my meta: <meta name="keywords"     content="<%= Html.Encode(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["Meta.Keywords"]) %>" /> <meta name="description"     content="<%= Html.Encode(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["Meta.Description"]) %>" /> All Master pages assume the same keywords and description values as defined by the application settings.  Nothing fancy. Nothing dynamic. But it’s manageable.  It works, but I’m looking forward to the new way in ASP.NET 4.

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  • Chart Control in ASP.Net 4 – Second Part

    - by sreejukg
      Couple of weeks before, I have written an introduction about the chart control available in .Net framework. In that article, I explained the basic usage of the chart control with a simple example. You can read that article from the url http://weblogs.asp.net/sreejukg/archive/2010/12/31/getting-started-with-chart-control-in-asp-net-4-0.aspx. In this article I am going to demonstrate how one can generate various types of charts that can be generated easily using the ASP.Net chart control. Let us recollect the data sample we were working in the previous sample. The following is the data I used in the previous article. id SaleAmount SalesPerson SaleType SaleDate CompletionStatus (%) 1 1000 Jack Development 2010-01-01 100 2 300 Mills Consultancy 2010-04-14 90 3 4000 Mills Development 2010-05-15 80 4 2500 Mike eMarketting 2010-06-15 40 5 1080 Jack Development 2010-07-15 30 6 6500 Mills Consultancy 2010-08-24 65 In this article I am going to demonstrate various graphical reports generated from this data with the help of chart control. The following are the reports I am going to generate 1. Representation of share of Sales by each Sales person. 2. Representation of share of sales data according to sale type 3. Representation of sales progress over time period I am going to demonstrate how to bind the chart control programmatically. In order to facilitate this, I created an aspx page named “SalesAnalysis.Aspx” to my project. In the page I added the following controls 1. Dropdownlist control – with id ddlAnalysisType, user will use this to choose the type of chart they want to see. 2. A Button control – with id btnSubmit , by clicking this button, the chart based on the dropdownlist selection will be shown to the user 3. A label Control – with id lblMessage, to display the message to the user, initially this will ask the user to select an option and click on the button. 4. Chart control – with id chrtAnalysis, by default, I set visible = false so that during the page load the chart will be hidden to the users. The following is the initial output of the page. Generating chart for salesperson share Now from Visual Studio, I have double clicked on the button; it created the event handler btnSubmit_Click. In the button Submit event handler, I am using a switch case to execute the corresponding SQL statement and bind it to the chart control. The below is the code for generating the sales person share chart using a pie chart. The above code produces the following output The steps for creating the above chart can be summarized as follows. You specify a chart area, then a series and bind the chart to some x and y values. That is it. If you want to control the chart size and position, you can set the properties for the ChartArea.Position element. For e.g. in the previous code, after instantiating the chart area, setting the below code will give you a bigger pie chart. c.Position.Width = 100; c.Position.Height = 100; The width and height values are in percentage. In this case the chart will be generated by utilizing all the width and height of the chart object. See the output updated with the width and height set to 100% each. Generate Chart for sales type share Now for generating the chart according to the sales type, you just need to change the SQL query and x and y values of the chart. The Sql query used is “SELECT SUM(saleAmount) amount, SaleType from SalesData group by SaleType” and the X-Value is amount and Y-Values is SaleType. s.XValueMember = "SaleType"; s.YValueMembers = "amount"; After modifying the above code with these, the following output is generated. Generate Chart for sales progress over time period For generating the progress of sale chart against sales amount / period, line chart is the ideal tool. In order to facilitate the line chart, you can use Chart Type as System.Web.UI.DataVisualization.Charting.SeriesChartType.Line. Also we need to retrieve the amount and sales date from the data source. I have used the following query to facilitate this. “SELECT SaleAmount, SaleDate FROM SalesData” The output for the line chart is as follows Now you have seen how easily you can build various types of charts. Chart control is an excellent one that helps you to bring business intelligence to your applications. What I demonstrated in only a small part of what you can do with the chart control. Refer http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd456632.aspx for further reading. If you want to get the project files in zip format, post your email below. Hope you enjoyed reading this article.

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  • NuGet – My favorite .Net OSS project of the year 2010

    - by shiju
    NuGet is a free, open source, package management system for the .NET platform.NuGet is a member of the  the Outercurve Foundation. NuGet is very useful tool for .NET developers who are using open source libraries for their applications. NuGet enables .NET developers to easily discover, download, install and update packages into .NET projects. NuGet will also handles dependency management between libraries. Today, the .NET open source community is widely growing and providing huge set of useful libraries. Using NuGet, .NET developers can easily find and update these libraries into their .NET projects. The client-side NuPack tools provides full integration with Visual Studio 2010. You can get NuGet form its project site  http://nuget.codeplex.com. Read the Getting Started page at Codeplex to learn how to use NuGet The below screen shot shows NuGet package window for add library package reference wit hin the Visual Studio 2010.

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  • Should I migrate to MVC3?

    - by eestein
    Hi everyone. I have a MVC2 project, my question is: should I migrate to MVC3? Why? I'd like the opinion of some who already migrated, or at least used MVC3 and MVC2. Already read http://weblogs.asp.net/scottgu/archive/2011/01/13/announcing-release-of-asp-net-mvc-3-iis-express-sql-ce-4-web-farm-framework-orchard-webmatrix.aspx and I already know about the described tool for migrating: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/marcinon/archive/2011/01/13/mvc-3-project-upgrade-tool.aspx What I'd really appreciate is your valuable insight. Best regards.

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  • ASP.NET Connections Spring 2012 Talks and Code

    - by Stephen.Walther
    Thank you everyone who attended my ASP.NET Connections talks last week in Las Vegas. I’ve attached the slides and code for the three talks that I delivered:   Using jQuery to interact with the Server through Ajax – In this talk, I discuss the different ways to communicate information between browser and server using Ajax. I explain the difference between the different types of Ajax calls that you can make with jQuery. I also discuss the differences between the JavaScriptSerializer, the DataContractJsonSerializer, and the JSON.NET serializer.   ASP.NET Validation In-Depth – In this talk, I distinguish between View Model Validation and Domain Model Validation. I demonstrate how you can use the validation attributes (including the new .NET 4.5 validation attributes), the jQuery Validation library, and the HTML5 input validation attributes to perform View Model Validation. I then demonstrate how you can use the IValidatableObject interface with the Entity Framework to perform Domain Model Validation.   Using the MVVM Pattern with JavaScript Views – In this talk, I discuss how you can create single page applications (SPA) by taking advantage of the open-source KnockoutJS library and the ASP.NET Web API.   Be warned that the sample code is contained in Visual Studio 11 Beta projects. If you don’t have this version of Visual Studio, then you will need to open the code samples in Notepad. Also, I apologize for getting the code for these talks posted so slowly. I’ve been down with a nasty case of the flu for the past week and haven’t been able to get to a computer.

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  • Creating Wizard in ASP.NET MVC (Part 2)

    - by bipinjoshi
    In Part 1 of this article series you developed a wizard in an ASP.NET MVC application. Although the wizard developed in Part 1 works as expected it has one shortcoming. It causes full page postback whenever you click on Previous or Next button. This behavior may not pose much problem if a wizard has only a few steps. However, if a wizard has many steps and each step accepts many entries then full page postback can deteriorate the user experience. To overcome this shortcoming you can add Ajax to the wizard so that only the form is posted to the server. In this part of the series you will convert the application developed in Part 1 to use Ajax.http://www.binaryintellect.net/articles/8e278bfa-7244-4e3e-b5aa-2954a91331da.aspx 

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  • ASP.NET Connections Spring 2012 Talks and Code

    - by Stephen.Walther
    Thank you everyone who attended my ASP.NET Connections talks last week in Las Vegas. I’ve attached the slides and code for the three talks that I delivered: Using jQuery to interact with the Server through Ajax– In this talk, I discuss the different ways to communicate information between browser and server using Ajax. I explain the difference between the different types of Ajax calls that you can make with jQuery. I also discuss the differences between the JavaScriptSerializer, the DataContractJsonSerializer, and the JSON.NET serializer. ASP.NET Validation In-Depth– In this talk, I distinguish between View Model Validation and Domain Model Validation. I demonstrate how you can use the validation attributes (including the new .NET 4.5 validation attributes), the jQuery Validation library, and the HTML5 input validation attributes to perform View Model Validation. I then demonstrate how you can use the IValidatableObject interface with the Entity Framework to perform Domain Model Validation. Using the MVVM Pattern with JavaScript Views – In this talk, I discuss how you can create single page applications (SPA) by taking advantage of the open-source KnockoutJS library and the ASP.NET Web API. Be warned that the sample code is contained in Visual Studio 11 Beta projects. If you don’t have this version of Visual Studio, then you will need to open the code samples in Notepad. Also, I apologize for getting the code for these talks posted so slowly. I’ve been down with a nasty case of the flu for the past week and haven’t been able to get to a computer.

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  • ASP.NET Web API - Screencast series Part 4: Paging and Querying

    - by Jon Galloway
    We're continuing a six part series on ASP.NET Web API that accompanies the getting started screencast series. This is an introductory screencast series that walks through from File / New Project to some more advanced scenarios like Custom Validation and Authorization. The screencast videos are all short (3-5 minutes) and the sample code for the series is both available for download and browsable online. I did the screencasts, but the samples were written by the ASP.NET Web API team. In Part 1 we looked at what ASP.NET Web API is, why you'd care, did the File / New Project thing, and did some basic HTTP testing using browser F12 developer tools. In Part 2 we started to build up a sample that returns data from a repository in JSON format via GET methods. In Part 3, we modified data on the server using DELETE and POST methods. In Part 4, we'll extend on our simple querying methods form Part 2, adding in support for paging and querying. This part shows two approaches to querying data (paging really just being a specific querying case) - you can do it yourself using parameters passed in via querystring (as well as headers, other route parameters, cookies, etc.). You're welcome to do that if you'd like. What I think is more interesting here is that Web API actions that return IQueryable automatically support OData query syntax, making it really easy to support some common query use cases like paging and filtering. A few important things to note: This is just support for OData query syntax - you're not getting back data in OData format. The screencast demonstrates this by showing the GET methods are continuing to return the same JSON they did previously. So you don't have to "buy in" to the whole OData thing, you're just able to use the query syntax if you'd like. This isn't full OData query support - full OData query syntax includes a lot of operations and features - but it is a pretty good subset: filter, orderby, skip, and top. All you have to do to enable this OData query syntax is return an IQueryable rather than an IEnumerable. Often, that could be as simple as using the AsQueryable() extension method on your IEnumerable. Query composition support lets you layer queries intelligently. If, for instance, you had an action that showed products by category using a query in your repository, you could also support paging on top of that. The result is an expression tree that's evaluated on-demand and includes both the Web API query and the underlying query. So with all those bullet points and big words, you'd think this would be hard to hook up. Nope, all I did was change the return type from IEnumerable<Comment> to IQueryable<Comment> and convert the Get() method's IEnumerable result using the .AsQueryable() extension method. public IQueryable<Comment> GetComments() { return repository.Get().AsQueryable(); } You still need to build up the query to provide the $top and $skip on the client, but you'd need to do that regardless. Here's how that looks: $(function () { //--------------------------------------------------------- // Using Queryable to page //--------------------------------------------------------- $("#getCommentsQueryable").click(function () { viewModel.comments([]); var pageSize = $('#pageSize').val(); var pageIndex = $('#pageIndex').val(); var url = "/api/comments?$top=" + pageSize + '&$skip=' + (pageIndex * pageSize); $.getJSON(url, function (data) { // Update the Knockout model (and thus the UI) with the comments received back // from the Web API call. viewModel.comments(data); }); return false; }); }); And the neat thing is that - without any modification to our server-side code - we can modify the above jQuery call to request the comments be sorted by author: $(function () { //--------------------------------------------------------- // Using Queryable to page //--------------------------------------------------------- $("#getCommentsQueryable").click(function () { viewModel.comments([]); var pageSize = $('#pageSize').val(); var pageIndex = $('#pageIndex').val(); var url = "/api/comments?$top=" + pageSize + '&$skip=' + (pageIndex * pageSize) + '&$orderby=Author'; $.getJSON(url, function (data) { // Update the Knockout model (and thus the UI) with the comments received back // from the Web API call. viewModel.comments(data); }); return false; }); }); So if you want to make use of OData query syntax, you can. If you don't like it, you're free to hook up your filtering and paging however you think is best. Neat. In Part 5, we'll add on support for Data Annotation based validation using an Action Filter.

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  • S#arp Architecture 1.5 released

    - by AlecWhittington
    The past two weeks have been wonderful for me, spending 12 days on Oahu, Hawaii. Then followed up with the S#arp Architecture 1.5 release. It has been a short 4 months since taking over as the project lead and this is my first major milestone. With this release, we advance S# even more forward with the ASP.NET MVC 2 enhancements. What's is S#? Pronounced "Sharp Architecture," this is a solid architectural foundation for rapidly building maintainable web applications leveraging the ASP.NET MVC framework...(read more)

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  • ASP.NET Membership Provider Setup

    - by Ben Griswold
    In this screencast, Noah and I show you how to quickly get started with the ASP.NET Membership Provider.  We’ll take you through basic features and setup and walk you through membership table creation with the ASP.NET SQL Server Wizard. I’ve written about the ASP.NET Membership Provider and setup before.  If you missed the post, this introductory video may be for you.     This is one of our first screencasts.  If you have feedback, I’d love to hear it.

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  • Create PDF document using iTextSharp in ASP.Net 4.0 and MemoryMappedFile

    - by sreejukg
    In this article I am going to demonstrate how ASP.Net developers can programmatically create PDF documents using iTextSharp. iTextSharp is a software component, that allows developers to programmatically create or manipulate PDF documents. Also this article discusses the process of creating in-memory file, read/write data from/to the in-memory file utilizing the new feature MemoryMappedFile. I have a database of users, where I need to send a notice to all my users as a PDF document. The sending mail part of it is not covered in this article. The PDF document will contain the company letter head, to make it more official. I have a list of users stored in a database table named “tblusers”. For each user I need to send customized message addressed to them personally. The database structure for the users is give below. id Title Full Name 1 Mr. Sreeju Nair K. G. 2 Dr. Alberto Mathews 3 Prof. Venketachalam Now I am going to generate the pdf document that contains some message to the user, in the following format. Dear <Title> <FullName>, The message for the user. Regards, Administrator Also I have an image, bg.jpg that contains the background for the document generated. I have created .Net 4.0 empty web application project named “iTextSharpSample”. First thing I need to do is to download the iTextSharp dll from the source forge. You can find the url for the download here. http://sourceforge.net/projects/itextsharp/files/ I have extracted the Zip file and added the itextsharp.dll as a reference to my project. Also I have added a web form named default.aspx to my project. After doing all this, the solution explorer have the following view. In the default.aspx page, I inserted one grid view and associated it with a SQL Data source control that bind data from tblusers. I have added a button column in the grid view with text “generate pdf”. The output of the page in the browser is as follows. Now I am going to create a pdf document when the user clicking on the Generate PDF button. As I mentioned before, I am going to work with the file in memory, I am not going to create a file in the disk. I added an event handler for button by specifying onrowcommand event handler. My gridview source looks like <asp:GridView ID="GridView1" runat="server" AutoGenerateColumns="False" DataSourceID="SqlDataSource1" Width="481px" CellPadding="4" ForeColor="#333333" GridLines="None" onrowcommand="Generate_PDF" > ………………………………………………………………………….. ………………………………………………………………………….. </asp:GridView> In the code behind, I wrote the corresponding event handler. protected void Generate_PDF(object sender, GridViewCommandEventArgs e) { // The button click event handler code. // I am going to explain the code for this section in the remaining part of the article } The Generate_PDF method is straight forward, It get the title, fullname and message to some variables, then create the pdf using these variables. The code for getting data from the grid view is as follows // get the row index stored in the CommandArgument property int index = Convert.ToInt32(e.CommandArgument); // get the GridViewRow where the command is raised GridViewRow selectedRow = ((GridView)e.CommandSource).Rows[index]; string title = selectedRow.Cells[1].Text; string fullname = selectedRow.Cells[2].Text; string msg = @"There are some changes in the company policy, due to this matter you need to submit your latest address to us. Please update your contact details / personnal details by visiting the member area of the website. ................................... "; since I don’t want to save the file in the disk, I am going the new feature introduced in .Net framework 4, called Memory-Mapped Files. Using Memory-Mapped mapped file, you can created non-persisted memory mapped files, that are not associated with a file in a disk. So I am going to create a temporary file in memory, add the pdf content to it, then write it to the output stream. To read more about MemoryMappedFile, read this msdn article http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd997372.aspx The below portion of the code using MemoryMappedFile object to create a test pdf document in memory and perform read/write operation on file. The CreateViewStream() object will give you a stream that can be used to read or write data to/from file. The code is very straight forward and I included comment so that you can understand the code. using (MemoryMappedFile mmf = MemoryMappedFile.CreateNew("test1.pdf", 1000000)) { // Create a new pdf document object using the constructor. The parameters passed are document size, left margin, right margin, top margin and bottom margin. iTextSharp.text.Document d = new iTextSharp.text.Document(PageSize.A4, 72,72,172,72); //get an instance of the memory mapped file to stream object so that user can write to this using (MemoryMappedViewStream stream = mmf.CreateViewStream()) { // associate the document to the stream. PdfWriter.GetInstance(d, stream); /* add an image as bg*/ iTextSharp.text.Image jpg = iTextSharp.text.Image.GetInstance(Server.MapPath("Image/bg.png")); jpg.Alignment = iTextSharp.text.Image.UNDERLYING; jpg.SetAbsolutePosition(0, 0); //this is the size of my background letter head image. the size is in points. this will fit to A4 size document. jpg.ScaleToFit(595, 842); d.Open(); d.Add(jpg); d.Add(new Paragraph(String.Format("Dear {0} {1},", title, fullname))); d.Add(new Paragraph("\n")); d.Add(new Paragraph(msg)); d.Add(new Paragraph("\n")); d.Add(new Paragraph(String.Format("Administrator"))); d.Close(); } //read the file data byte[] b; using (MemoryMappedViewStream stream = mmf.CreateViewStream()) { BinaryReader rdr = new BinaryReader(stream); b = new byte[mmf.CreateViewStream().Length]; rdr.Read(b, 0, (int)mmf.CreateViewStream().Length); } Response.Clear(); Response.ContentType = "Application/pdf"; Response.BinaryWrite(b); Response.End(); } Press ctrl + f5 to run the application. First I got the user list. Click on the generate pdf icon. The created looks as follows. Summary: Creating pdf document using iTextSharp is easy. You will get lot of information while surfing the www. Some useful resources and references are mentioned below http://itextsharp.com/ http://www.mikesdotnetting.com/Article/82/iTextSharp-Adding-Text-with-Chunks-Phrases-and-Paragraphs http://somewebguy.wordpress.com/2009/05/08/itextsharp-simplify-your-html-to-pdf-creation/ Hope you enjoyed the article.

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