Search Results

Search found 57194 results on 2288 pages for 'windows'.

Page 15/2288 | < Previous Page | 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22  | Next Page >

  • Nagios check for wuauserv on Windows Server 2008+

    - by Mechaflash
    From Windows Server 2008+, wuauserv is no longer a service that's ran all of the time and is instead ran as a scheduled task. I'm not sure of the exact behavior of how the scheduled task is created as it seems the schedule is generated and edited by another service. Prior to this, we setup nagios to just check for the running service to ensure it was accepting updates. My question is, how does one track the proper execution/running of wuauserv service in Windows Server 2008+ to ensure it is accepting updates with nagios?

    Read the article

  • Windows 7 accounts on a 2008r2 DC keep getting locked out randomly

    - by Matt
    As the title states, this happens randomly to Windows 7 accounts on our Windows 2008R2 domain controller. We just had this start happening after changing from 123together hosted exchange to Rackspace hosted exchange. Also around this time our passwords on the DC started expiring, but not the exact day, and everyone has different days they need to change it before. It has only affected 10 out of 30 accounts, and I see no link between them. What are some fixes I should run or things to look for?

    Read the article

  • Why can't Windows home editions connect to domains?

    - by TyrionLannister
    The company that I work for continuously hires new people, and I'm the one who has to go and purchase new computers. The majority of them, if not all, come pre-installed with Windows Home editions. I'm noticing that the Windows 7/8 Home editions are unable to connect to domains. I'm having to buy the upgrades to the Pro editions. I'm trying to understand as to why the Home edition of the OS is unable to connect to domains?

    Read the article

  • Is there any way I can share the 3.42GB download of Windows 8.1 from Windows Store?

    - by LoneWOLFs
    Windows 8.1 is out and I would like to know if it is possible to share the Windows 8.1 download upgrade between different computers so that I don't have to download it over and over again? This might be helpful for people who are on a metered connection. Store is downloading 3.42GB of data so it must be stored somewhere. Is there any way I can copy it to my other computers and start the setup so that I don't have to download it over and over again on each computer I own?

    Read the article

  • Download Angry Birds For Windows 7 & Windows XP

    - by Gopinath
    The famous Angry Birds game from Rovio is now available for your personal computers. You can download the game from Intel’s App Store for windows. It costs $5 and supported on Windows 7 and Windows XP computers. Here is a video of Angry Birds running on Windows 7 Laptop. The survival of the Angry Birds is at stake. Dish out revenge on the green pigs who stole the Birds’ eggs. Use the unique destructive powers of the Angry Birds to lay waste to the pigs’ fortifications. Angry Birds features hours and hours of challenging physics-based demolition gameplay, with lots of replay value. Each level requires a mixture of logic, skill, and brute force to crush the enemy. Download Angry Birds For PCs From Intel AppUp This article titled,Download Angry Birds For Windows 7 & Windows XP, was originally published at Tech Dreams. Grab our rss feed or fan us on Facebook to get updates from us.

    Read the article

  • Installed ubuntu over windows vista..cant reinstall windows

    - by Marcuz J Hinojoz
    I recently used the "compress hard drive" option within windows. i got the horid "boot mngr is compressed" after the restart. i tried booting my system back to windows vista but it doesnt read the cd that came with my computer. i tried going into system recovery and going back to a previous date but it didnt work. i kept pressing f8 but nothing. i installed ubuntu(the ubuntu cd worked but windows didnt?) i installed ubuntu so i could atleast get in my computer, and i still wasnt able to install windows from there. my hard drive got reformatted to a ext4? and windows cant install because it doesnt read it? im not sure, but its very frustrating. my computer is a gateway gt5668e windows vista home premium with sp1. im a graphic designer and use programs such as photoshop and cinema 4d to do my projects..i have been at a unfortunate halt with my work and i am really bummed out and dont know what to do... any help?

    Read the article

  • How do I install an HP home-use printer on Windows Home Server (Windows Server 2003)

    - by Rob Allen
    I have an HP DeskJet F4210 printer that I would like to share on my network via Windows Home Server. Unfortunately, the driver installation checks for supported OS's, detects Home Server as Windows Server 2003 and exits. The driver install supports WinXP, W2k, Vista, and Win98SE. In theory, drivers for XP or Windows 2000 should work fine with Home Server. When using the "Install Printer" tool in Home Server I am only able to select .inf files (there are serveral on the install media) but the driver folders for XP and 2000 have .sys and .dll files. How can I bypass HP's short-sighted install program and get this printer up and running on Home server? I'll be happy with basic print functionality and will save the task of enabling scanning for another time.

    Read the article

  • Showing folder size in Windows Explorer is a missing feature in Windows 7 [closed]

    - by JamesM
    Why doesn't Microsoft implement Folder Size in the file explorer for Windows 7? When viewing a directory you get a list of files and folders. The files all show their filesize, but the folders do not. To see the folder size you have to use the tooltip, or go to File Properties. Folder Size for Windows is a project that already exists which provides an addon to do this. I cannot believe Microsoft didnt put it in Windows 7! Unless I am wrong. I am sure however, they may have a good reason for which I lack understanding.

    Read the article

  • Windows 7 (32bit) not adding favorites to Windows Explorer

    - by bsigrist
    I am attempting to add several locations on my disk to my "Favorites" in Windows Explorer. I have used this feature in the 64bit version of Windows 7 without a problem, but it does not seem to work in this install. Here is my methodology so far. 1.) Go to a location in Windows Explorer "C:\users\Benjamin" 2.) Right click on the "favorites" in the left hand folder navigation window and select "Add current location to Favorites" It does not fire an error, but the location does not appear under favorites. What might be happening here to prevent "favorites" from populating?

    Read the article

  • Problem Adding Windows 7 64-bit print drivers to 32-bit Windows 2003 Print Server

    - by Richard West
    I have installed the final RTM version of Windows 7 professional 64 bit on a test system before we begin the roll out in our company. I'm having problems connecting to several HP printers that we have on the network. These printers are being shared from a Windows 2003 server host. I have downloaded the lastest HP Universal Printer dirver, however I'm unable to add the 64 bit driver onto the 2003 server system (it's 32 bit). Does anyone have any advice on how I can get connected to these printers from the Windows 7 system?

    Read the article

  • Windows 7 / Windows Vista won't connect to 802.1x RADIUS Server

    - by Calvin Froedge
    I've deployed Radius and have no problems connecting with TTLS, PEAP, or MD5 using linux, mac, and windows xp. For Windows 7 and Vista, I'm never prompted with the dialog box to enter username & password after configuring 802.1x support on the client. Steps taken: Enabled Wired Autoconfig in services.msc Set to use PEAP Set to require user authentication When I enable the network connection it says "Trying to authenticate" then fails with no error log / message given. The radius server gives no indication that there was ever a request (no Access-Reject - the client simply never tries to authenticate). On the windows 7 client, I can see that the DHCP server does not assign an IP to the client when 802.1x is enabled on the client (though it does when it isn't). How can I debug this further? Has anyone else run into a similar situation? My radius server is freeradius on Ubuntu 11.10.

    Read the article

  • Installing/Uninstalling Windows 8 UI Apps in Windows 8 for all users

    - by Donotalo
    I'm using Windows 8 Pro 64 bit quite a while now. My account is the only Administrator account on the PC. There are 2 other standard (and local) accounts. I've noticed that if I install an app from Windows Store, that app is only available from my start screen. Also when I uninstall an app that's common for all users (e.g., Finance), it only uninstalled from my account. I want to install app and want it to be available for all users. When I'll uninstall an app, it should be removed for all users. No other user should have access to it. Just like installing/uninstalling programs on previous versions of Windows. How can I do that?

    Read the article

  • Cannot access Windows 7 share from Windows XP

    - by artfulrobot
    I have a new Windows 7 machine named PAP44 in the PAP workgroup. The networking is set to "Work" mode for the wired LAN. I have a couple of users and I've shared a folder and set it so both users can read/write. Confusingly for me, rather than sharing just that folder (as I'm used to with older versions of Windows) it appears to be sharing a path (\\pap44\users\...\myFolder) From another machine on the LAN, running XP, when I go to \\PAP44\Users I'm asked for a username and password, but neither of the usernames+passwords work. It just jumps back to the username and password dialogue, except that the username I entered gets prefixed with PAP44\ My end goal is to get my Debian/Ubuntu machines to be able to access this share, but first of all I thought I'd try to get it working in Windows, after all, that's supposed to be easy! Is there another step? (PS. I am not a "hit and run" case!)

    Read the article

  • Setting up a lab with Windows 2003 server and windows 7 clients

    - by Tathagata
    We are overhauling a lab with new machines with Windows 7 (as clients - around 150 of them). In the current infrastructure we have students logging in using a generic student id (as having individual student accounts doesn't really serve any additional purpose). This account, as you would imagine is a locked down one that can run a few (age old) softwares required by students in the class. Currently, the individual machines have XP images created by BartPE. What should be an ideal infrastructure design to cater to such a need with Windows Server 2003 and Windows 7 clients? It would be great if you can give me pointers to what concepts and background I need to have (like GPO), any design guidelines, best practices?

    Read the article

  • Open Windows Server 2012/Windows 8 Start Menu

    - by bmccleary
    I realize that Windows Server 2012 (and Windows 8) removed the start menu button and replaced it with moving your mouse to the upper right corner of the screen. This works fine when the desktop is full screen. However, I access all my servers through windowed RDP connections (or through the Hyper-V console window) and in this case, the desktop is not full screen. Therefore, in order to open the new "start" menu, I have to slowly move my mouse very carefully within the window to just a few pixels within top right corner of the window in order to open the menu. Also, because the session is windowed, the default hot keys (Windows + D, etc.) won't work. There has got to be an easier way. Has anyone else experienced this frustration?

    Read the article

  • Windows 8, Truecrypt drive mounts but Windows cannot read its content

    - by phil
    I installed Windows 8 and when I started it, it said that it was repairing a disk. The disk was an encrypted Truecrypt disk. I couldn't mount the disk in Truecrypt after that. I tried to repair the header and it worked, now I can mount the disk but neither Windows 7 or 8 can read the content. Windows asks if it should format the disk. I have all the important files on backup, but there are some media files that I would like to get back. Any ideas?

    Read the article

  • Windows 7- New Windows Are Not Displayed

    - by Peter
    I am running an up-to-date and OEM version of Windows 7. I have been experiencing an annoying problem for the past few weeks where new windows are not displayed 70-80% of the time. For example, when I launch notepad, the notepad window is not displayed or when I select save from the file menu, the save dialog is not displayed. The window is there, but it is not being displayed; the screen is not refreshed. The way to work around this problem is to force a system-wide refresh by pressing CTRL+SHIFT+DEL and then cancelling hiding all windows using "show desktop" then displaying the window needed via taskbar Can anyone please point me in the right direction to solving this problem? What could be causing this?

    Read the article

  • How do I set Windows 7 as default OS but retain Windows 8 Boot screen?

    - by PJC
    I am dual-booting between Windows 7 and Windows 8 on a test workstation, and typically reboot 3-4 times per day. If I set Windows 8 as the default OS, I get the Windows 8 graphical boot screen, which is easy to 'see' during the boot process, but if I set Windows 7 as the default OS, I only get the Windows 7 text-mode boot screen. While I mostly want Windows 7 (at the moment), on the occasions I restart to get to Windows 8, I often 'miss' seeing the text-only boot and have to restart twice. Is it possible to (and if so, how do I) configure this such that Windows 7 is the default OS, but still having the Windows 8 boot screen appear? Edit: Just so you guys know, I've tried setting Windows 7 as the default both from the Windows 8 Boot screen itself, and from within Windows 8 -- neither of these have the desired effect.

    Read the article

  • Sync clock on Windows XP machine to external (non-domain, non-workgroup) Windows Server 2008 R2 machine

    - by Eric
    I have two machines and I'd like their clocks to be in sync for various reasons. Machine 1 is an XP machine located in the office. Machine 2 is a VPS hosted by a third party running Windows Server 2008 R2. These machines are not in any kind of workgroup or on a domain together. They are completely separate machines. Machine 2 is currently syncing once a week to time.windows.com. The clock on Machine 2 does seem to wander a bit within that week interval. What I would like to do is have Machine 1 set its clock based on the clock of Machine 2. I have tried configuring w32tm on the XP machine. This is what I used for configuration: w32tm /config /syncfromflags:manual /manualpeerlist:"<ip address of machine 2>" However, whenever I issue the /resync command I get "The computer did not resync because no time data was available". I have made sure to start the windows time service on machine 2, and I have added firewall exceptions for UDP port 123. Is there something I need to configure on Machine 2 (other than just starting the time service) in order to get it to respond? Edit: I have also run w32tm /config /reliable:YES /update on Machine 2. I am still getting "The computer did not resync because no time data was available". Is there something else I'm missing?

    Read the article

  • Clipboard bug in Wordpad in Windows 7 (accidentally pasting large file into application)

    - by frenchglen
    In Win7, I use Wordpad, and I really like it. For my needs it's lean and fast, yet has the formatting functionalities I'm after when working on my TXT/RTF files on a daily basis. I don't intend to change text editors. There's a really bad bug which has ALWAYS plagued me. If you have a large file contained in the clipboard, like a 238MB FLAC file, and you accidentally paste it into Wordpad for whatever reason - it hangs the application for a VERY long time (like 2 hours, it depends on how big the file is, because it tries to 'handle' it). You either have to close the application and lose any unsaved changes, or go do something else until the item has finished pasting into Wordpad (it actually eventually drops the file's icon in wordpad just like how it appears in Windows Explorer). It's a Windows bug, a Wordpad bug. Is there some solution for this? Or is the problem fixed in Windows 8 (if anyone can tell me)? .....I'm not going to try out Win8 myself, merely to answer this question - that's what I'm asking it on SuperUSer for! I'm really hoping it's one of those little-yet-big things that they've fixed in Win8 (like removing the 255-character file path limit in Explorer, which is awesome). Thank you for your help, if you have Win8 handy and can test this. :)

    Read the article

  • Create Custom Windows Key Keyboard Shortcuts in Windows

    - by Asian Angel
    Nearly everyone uses keyboard shortcuts of some sort on their Windows system but what if you could create new ones for your favorite apps or folders? You might just be amazed at how simple it can be with just a few clicks and no programming using WinKey. WinKey in Action During the installation process you will see this window that gives you a good basic idea of just what can be accomplished with this wonderful little app. As soon as the installation process has finished you will see the “Main App Window”. It provides a simple straightforward listing of all the keyboard shortcuts that it is currently managing. Note: WinKey will automatically add an entry to the “Startup Listing” in your “Start Menu” during installation. To see the regular built-in Windows keyboard shortcuts that it is managing click “Standard Shortcuts” to select it and then click on “Properties”. For those who are curious WinKey does have a “System Tray Icon” that can be disabled if desired. Now onto creating those new keyboard shortcuts… For our example we decided to create a keyboard shortcut for an app rather than a folder. To create a shortcut for an app click on the small “Paper Icon” as shown here. Once you have done that browse to the appropriate folder and select the exe file. The second step will be choosing which keyboard shortcut you would like to associate with that particular app. You can use the drop-down list to choose from a listing of available keyboard combinations. For our example we chose “Windows Key + A”. The final step is choosing the “Run Mode”. There are three options available in the drop-down list…choose the one that best suits your needs. Here is what our example looked like once finished. All that is left to do at this point is click “OK” to finish the process. And just like that your new keyboard shortcut is now listed in the “Main App Window”. Time to try out your new keyboard shortcut! One quick use of our new keyboard shortcut and Iron Browser opened right up. WinKey really does make creating new keyboard shortcuts as simple as possible. Conclusion If you have been wanting to create new keyboard shortcuts for your favorite apps and folders then it really does not get any simpler than with WinKey. This is definitely a recommended app for anyone who loves “get it done” software. Links Download WinKey at Softpedia Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Show Keyboard Shortcut Access Keys in Windows VistaCreate a Keyboard Shortcut to Access Hidden Desktop Icons and FilesKeyboard Ninja: 21 Keyboard Shortcut ArticlesAnother Desktop Cube for Windows XP/VistaHow-To Geek on Lifehacker: Control Your Computer with Shortcuts & Speed Up Vista Setup TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 Recycle ! Find That Elusive Icon with FindIcons Looking for Good Windows Media Player 12 Plug-ins? Find Out the Celebrity You Resemble With FaceDouble Whoa ! Use Printflush to Solve Printing Problems

    Read the article

  • Geek Fun: Virtualized Old School WindowsWindows 95

    - by Matthew Guay
    Last week we enjoyed looking at Windows 3.1 running in VMware Player on Windows 7.  Today, let’s upgrade our 3.1 to 95, and get a look at how most of us remember Windows from the 90’s. In this demo, we’re running the first release of Windows 95 (version 4.00.950) in VMware Player 3.0 running on Windows 7 x64.  For fun, we ran the 95 upgrade on the 3.1 virtual machine we built last week. Windows 95 So let’s get started.  Here’s the first setup screen.  For the record, Windows 95 installed in about 15 minutes or less in VMware in our test. Strangely, Windows 95 offered several installation choices.  They actually let you choose what extra parts of Windows to install if you wished.  Oh, and who wants to run Windows 95 on your “Portable Computer”?  Most smartphones today are more powerful than the “portable computers” of 95. Your productivity may vastly increase if you run Windows 95.  Anyone want to switch? No, I don’t want to restart … I want to use my computer! Welcome to Windows 95!  Hey, did you know you can launch programs from the Start button? Our quick spin around Windows 95 reminded us why Windows got such a bad reputation in the ‘90’s for being unstable.  We didn’t even get our test copy fully booted after installation before we saw our first error screen.  Windows in space … was that the most popular screensaver in Windows 95, or was it just me? Hello Windows 3.1!  The UI was still outdated in some spots.   Ah, yes, Media Player before it got 101 features to compete with iTunes. But, you couldn’t even play CDs in Media Player.  Actually, CD player was one program I used almost daily in Windows 95 back in the day. Want some new programs?  This help file about new programs designed for Windows 95 lists a lot of outdated names in tech.    And, you really may want some programs.  The first edition of Windows 95 didn’t even ship with Internet Explorer.   We’ve still got Minesweeper, though! My Computer had really limited functionality, and by default opened everything in a new window.  Double click on C:, and it opens in a new window.  Ugh. But Explorer is a bit more like more modern versions. Hey, look, Start menu search!  If only it found the files you were looking for… Now I’m feeling old … this shutdown screen brought back so many memories … of shutdowns that wouldn’t shut down! But, you still have to turn off your computer.  I wonder how many old monitors had these words burned into them? So there’s yet another trip down Windows memory lane.  Most of us can remember using Windows 95, so let us know your favorite (or worst) memory of it!  At least we can all be thankful for our modern computers and operating systems today, right?  Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Geek Fun: Remember the Old-School SkiFree Game?Geek Fun: Virtualized old school Windows 3.11Stupid Geek Tricks: Tile or Cascade Multiple Windows in Windows 7Stupid Geek Tricks: Select Multiple Windows on the TaskbarHow to Delete a System File in Windows 7 or Vista TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 PCmover Professional Enable Check Box Selection in Windows 7 OnlineOCR – Free OCR Service Betting on the Blind Side, a Vanity Fair article 30 Minimal Logo Designs that Say More with Less LEGO Digital Designer – Free Create a Personal Website Quickly using Flavors.me

    Read the article

  • Geek Fun: Virtualized Old School WindowsWindows 95

    - by Matthew Guay
    Last week we enjoyed looking at Windows 3.1 running in VMware Player on Windows 7.  Today, let’s upgrade our 3.1 to 95, and get a look at how most of us remember Windows from the 90’s. In this demo, we’re running the first release of Windows 95 (version 4.00.950) in VMware Player 3.0 running on Windows 7 x64.  For fun, we ran the 95 upgrade on the 3.1 virtual machine we built last week. Windows 95 So let’s get started.  Here’s the first setup screen.  For the record, Windows 95 installed in about 15 minutes or less in VMware in our test. Strangely, Windows 95 offered several installation choices.  They actually let you choose what extra parts of Windows to install if you wished.  Oh, and who wants to run Windows 95 on your “Portable Computer”?  Most smartphones today are more powerful than the “portable computers” of 95. Your productivity may vastly increase if you run Windows 95.  Anyone want to switch? No, I don’t want to restart … I want to use my computer! Welcome to Windows 95!  Hey, did you know you can launch programs from the Start button? Our quick spin around Windows 95 reminded us why Windows got such a bad reputation in the ‘90’s for being unstable.  We didn’t even get our test copy fully booted after installation before we saw our first error screen.  Windows in space … was that the most popular screensaver in Windows 95, or was it just me? Hello Windows 3.1!  The UI was still outdated in some spots.   Ah, yes, Media Player before it got 101 features to compete with iTunes. But, you couldn’t even play CDs in Media Player.  Actually, CD player was one program I used almost daily in Windows 95 back in the day. Want some new programs?  This help file about new programs designed for Windows 95 lists a lot of outdated names in tech.    And, you really may want some programs.  The first edition of Windows 95 didn’t even ship with Internet Explorer.   We’ve still got Minesweeper, though! My Computer had really limited functionality, and by default opened everything in a new window.  Double click on C:, and it opens in a new window.  Ugh. But Explorer is a bit more like more modern versions. Hey, look, Start menu search!  If only it found the files you were looking for… Now I’m feeling old … this shutdown screen brought back so many memories … of shutdowns that wouldn’t shut down! But, you still have to turn off your computer.  I wonder how many old monitors had these words burned into them? So there’s yet another trip down Windows memory lane.  Most of us can remember using Windows 95, so let us know your favorite (or worst) memory of it!  At least we can all be thankful for our modern computers and operating systems today, right?  Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Geek Fun: Remember the Old-School SkiFree Game?Geek Fun: Virtualized old school Windows 3.11Stupid Geek Tricks: Tile or Cascade Multiple Windows in Windows 7Stupid Geek Tricks: Select Multiple Windows on the TaskbarHow to Delete a System File in Windows 7 or Vista TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 PCmover Professional Enable Check Box Selection in Windows 7 OnlineOCR – Free OCR Service Betting on the Blind Side, a Vanity Fair article 30 Minimal Logo Designs that Say More with Less LEGO Digital Designer – Free Create a Personal Website Quickly using Flavors.me

    Read the article

  • How To Disable Control Panel in Windows 7

    - by Mysticgeek
    If you have a shared computer that your family and friends can access, you might not want them to mess around in the Control Panel, and luckily with a simple tweak you can disable it. Disable Control Panel with Group Policy Note: This process uses Local Group Policy Editor which is not available in Home versions of Windows 7. Skip down below for the registry hack version that works on Home editions as well. First type gpedit.msc into the Search box in the Start menu and hit Enter. When Local Group Policy Editor opens, navigate to User Configuration \ Administrative Templates then select Control Panel in the left Column. In the right column double-click on Prohibit access to the Control Panel. In the next window, select Enable, click OK, then close out of Local Group Policy Editor. After the Control Panel is disabled, you’ll notice it’s no longer listed in the Start Menu. If the user tries to type Control Panel into the Search box in the Start menu, they will get the following message indicating it’s restricted. Disable Control Panel with a Registry Tweak You can also tweak the Registry to disable Control Panel. This will work with all versions of Windows 7, Vista, and XP. Making changes in the Registry is not recommended for beginners and you should create a Restore Point, or backup the Registry before making any changes. Type regedit into the Search box in the Start menu and hit Enter. In Registry Editor navigate to HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Current Version\Policies\Explorer. Then right-click in the right pane and create a new DWORD (32-bit) Value. Name the value NoControlPanel. Then right-click on the new Value and click Modify…   In the Value data field change the value to “1” then click OK. Close out of Registry Editor and restart the machine to complete the process. When you get back from reboot, you’ll notice Control Panel is no longer listed in the Start menu. If a user tries to access it by typing Control Panel into the Search box in the Start menu… They will get the following message indicating it is restricted, just like if you were to disable it via Group Policy. If you want to re-enable the Control Panel, go back into the Registry and change the NoControlPanel value back to “0” then reboot the computer. This comes in handy if you have inexperienced users working on your machine and don’t want them messing with Control Panel settings. Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Disable User Account Control (UAC) the Easy Way on Win 7 or VistaStill Useful in Vista: Startup Control PanelRestore Missing Items in Windows Vista Control PanelHow To Manage Action Center in Windows 7New Vista Syntax for Opening Control Panel Items from the Command-line TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 Home Networks – How do they look like & the problems they cause Check Your IMAP Mail Offline In Thunderbird Follow Finder Finds You Twitter Users To Follow Combine MP3 Files Easily QuicklyCode Provides Cheatsheets & Other Programming Stuff Download Free MP3s from Amazon

    Read the article

  • Official List of ‘Windows 8 Release Preview Ready’ Anti-Virus/Malware Software Now Available

    - by Asian Angel
    With the recent availability of the Windows 8 Release Preview you may be wondering just which anti-virus/malware apps have been cleared/approved by Microsoft to work with it. Well, your wait is now over. Microsoft has posted an official list along with the download links for the anti-virus/malware apps that are Windows 8 Release Preview ready. Antimalware apps for Windows 8 Release Preview [via The Windows Club] How to Banish Duplicate Photos with VisiPic How to Make Your Laptop Choose a Wired Connection Instead of Wireless HTG Explains: What Is Two-Factor Authentication and Should I Be Using It?

    Read the article

< Previous Page | 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22  | Next Page >