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  • Startup error BackgroundContainer.dll on windows 8.1

    - by Manolis Karagiannis
    I have the same problem with this topic! How to resolve BackgroundContainer.dll error on startup? The thing is i did everything that says in answer but i)I found nothing when i started regedit.exe and searched (F3 or CTRL+F) for BackgroundContainer.dll ii)I made a full scan with AntiVirus Scanner like Microsoft Security Essentials/ Defender and also i scaned my PC with Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware,but i found nothing. So this pop up message on start up keep appeared! any idea? Thank you!

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  • How to monitor the size of files in Windows folder?

    - by zladuric
    What are some of good ways to automatically monitor the size of files in a directory and send warning email if they get close to a certain limit on a Windows server? I have a Progress DB installation to keep in check, and last week we hit some problems. Apparently, the size of extents has hit 2GB - and Progress won't work past that - we needed to open a new extent. I'm coming from a Linux environment, so I don't know what are the usual to monitor this in a Windows environment (or monitoring tools whatsoever). I prefer some generic solution, as I have a mixed environment (Windows 2000, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008 R2). Thanks in advance for all usable alternative answers.

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  • Windows remote shutdown: access denied

    - by gregseth
    I have 3 "client" computers, on which the mentioned user is administrator: CPU1: Win Vista 32-bit -- User: Domain\User1 -- IP: 192.168.42.1 CPU2: Win 7 64-bit -- User: localhost\User2 -- IP: 192.168.42.2 CPU3: Win 7 64-bit -- User: Domain\User3 -- IP: 192.168.42.3 And a "target" computer (the one that I want to shutdown from the three others): TGT: Win 7 64-bit -- User: localhost\User4 -- IP: 192.168.42.21 I'm trying to shutdown TGT with the following command: shutdown /s /m \\192.168.42.21 It's working from CPU1 (meaning TGT shuts down), but from CPU2 and CPU3 I get the following message: Access denied. (5) What am I to understand? What should I do to get it working form all of my computers.

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  • Windows Azure Learning Plan - Architecture

    - by BuckWoody
    This is one in a series of posts on a Windows Azure Learning Plan. You can find the main post here. This one deals with what an Architect needs to know about Windows Azure.   General Architectural Guidance Overview and general  information about Azure - what it is, how it works, and where you can learn more. Cloud Computing, A Crash Course for Architects (Video) http://www.msteched.com/2010/Europe/ARC202 Patterns and Practices for Cloud Development http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff898430.aspx Design Patterns, Anti-Patterns and Windows Azure http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ignitionshowcase/archive/2010/11/27/design-patterns-anti-patterns-and-windows-azure.aspx Application Patterns for the Cloud http://blogs.msdn.com/b/kashif/archive/2010/08/07/application-patterns-for-the-cloud.aspx Architecting Applications for High Scalability (Video) http://www.msteched.com/2010/Europe/ARC309 David Aiken on Azure Architecture Patterns (Video) http://blogs.msdn.com/b/architectsrule/archive/2010/09/09/arcast-tv-david-aiken-on-azure-architecture-patterns.aspx Cloud Application Architecture Patterns (Video) http://blogs.msdn.com/b/bobfamiliar/archive/2010/10/19/cloud-application-architecture-patterns-by-david-platt.aspx 10 Things Every Architect Needs to Know about Windows Azure http://geekswithblogs.net/iupdateable/archive/2010/10/20/slides-and-links-for-windows-azure-platform-session-at-software.aspx Key Differences Between Public and Private Clouds http://blogs.msdn.com/b/kadriu/archive/2010/10/24/key-differences-between-public-and-private-clouds.aspx Microsoft Application Platform at a Glance http://blogs.msdn.com/b/jmeier/archive/2010/10/30/microsoft-application-platform-at-a-glance.aspx Windows Azure is not just about Roles http://vikassahni.wordpress.com/2010/11/17/windows-azure-is-not-just-about-roles/ Example Application for Windows Azure http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff966482.aspx Implementation Guidance Practical applications for the architect to consider 5 Enterprise steps for adopting a Platform as a Service http://blogs.msdn.com/b/davidmcg/archive/2010/12/02/5-enterprise-steps-for-adopting-a-platform-as-a-service.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0 Performance-Based Scaling in Windows Azure http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/gg232759.aspx Windows Azure Guidance for the Development Process http://blogs.msdn.com/b/eugeniop/archive/2010/04/01/windows-azure-guidance-development-process.aspx Microsoft Developer Guidance Maps http://blogs.msdn.com/b/jmeier/archive/2010/10/04/developer-guidance-ia-at-a-glance.aspx How to Build a Hybrid On-Premise/In Cloud Application http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ignitionshowcase/archive/2010/11/09/how-to-build-a-hybrid-on-premise-in-cloud-application.aspx A Common Scenario of Multi-instances in Windows Azure http://blogs.msdn.com/b/windows-azure-support/archive/2010/11/03/a-common-scenario-of-multi_2d00_instances-in-windows-azure-.aspx Slides and Links for Windows Azure Platform Best Practices http://geekswithblogs.net/iupdateable/archive/2010/09/29/slides-and-links-for-windows-azure-platform-best-practices-for.aspx AppFabric Architecture and Deployment Topologies guide http://blogs.msdn.com/b/appfabriccat/archive/2010/09/10/appfabric-architecture-and-deployment-topologies-guide-now-available-via-microsoft-download-center.aspx Windows Azure Platform Appliance http://www.microsoft.com/windowsazure/appliance/ Integrating Cloud Technologies into Your Organization Interoperability with Open Source and other applications; business and cost decisions Interoperability Labs at Microsoft http://www.interoperabilitybridges.com/ Windows Azure Service Level Agreements http://www.microsoft.com/windowsazure/sla/

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  • Stream Media from Windows 7 to XP with VLC Media Player

    - by DigitalGeekery
    So you’ve got yourself a new computer with Windows 7 and you’re itching to take advantage of it’s ability to stream media across your home network. But, the rest of the family is still on Windows XP and you’re not quite ready to shell out the cash for the upgrades. Well, today we’ll show you how to easily stream media from Windows 7 to Windows XP with VLC Media Player. On the host computer running Windows 7, you’ll need to have an account set up with both a username and password. A blank password will not work. The media files will need to be located in a shared folder. Note: If the media files are located within the Public directory, or within the profile of the user account you use to log into the Windows 7 computer, they will be shared automatically. Sharing your Media Folders On your Windows 7 computer, right-click on the folder containing the files you’d like to stream and choose Properties.     On the Sharing Tab of the folder properties, click the Share button. Click OK.   Type or select from the drop down the user account you’ll use to log in, or select “Everyone” to share with all users. Then click Add. You may change the permission level, but only Read permission is required to play the media. Repeat this process for any additional folders you wish to share.    The Windows XP Client Computer Now that we’ve shared our media folders from the Windows 7 computer, we’re ready to play our files on the Windows XP computer. Download and install the VLC Media Player. (See link below) Then open VLC. Click on Media from the and select Open File… Browse your network for the shared folder that contains your media.   You’ll be prompted to log in to the host computer. Provide the credentials for a user on the Windows 7 computer. Click OK.   Select your media file and click Open.    Your media playback will begin momentarily.   This is a nice and easy way to stream media across your home network without upgrading multiple computers to Windows 7.  Plus, VLC is certainly no slouch as a Media Player. It’ll play virtually any video or audio file you can throw at it. Have you already upgraded all your home PCs to Windows 7? Check out our previous article on streaming media between Windows 7 computers on your home network. Download VLC Media Player Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Fixing When Windows Media Player Library Won’t Let You Add FilesShare Digital Media With Other Computers on a Home Network with Windows 7Enable Media Streaming in Windows Home Server to Windows Media PlayerInstall and Use the VLC Media Player on Ubuntu LinuxInstalling Windows Media Player Plugin for Firefox TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 Need Help with Your Home Network? Awesome Lyrics Finder for Winamp & Windows Media Player Download Videos from Hulu Pixels invade Manhattan Convert PDF files to ePub to read on your iPad Hide Your Confidential Files Inside Images

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  • Use Your Favorite Wallpapers in Windows 7 Starter Edition

    - by Asian Angel
    If you have Windows 7 Starter Edition installed on your netbook, the default wallpaper can get old. If you are tired of looking at the default wallpaper, then join us today as we look at changing it with Oceanis Change Background Windows 7. Special Notes This information is quoted directly from the website and needs to be kept in mind when using Oceanis Change Background Windows 7: If the Oceanis Change Background Windows 7 program no longer works properly after installing some Windows Updates, then uninstall and reinstall the Oceanis Change Background Windows 7 program to have it run properly again. If you ever do an in-place upgrade to another higher level edition of Windows 7 in the future, then be sure to uninstall this Oceanis Change Background Windows 7 program first to avoid incompatibility issues with it in the new edition of Windows 7. It was designed to only work in Windows 7 Starter edition. Before There it is…the default wallpaper everyone with the Starter Edition gets stuck with. Some people may not mind it, but if you are one of the people who really wants something different then get ready to rejoice. After The install file for Oceanis is contained in a zip file so you will need to unzip it to get started. The install process is quick and simple but you will need to do a system restart afterwards. Once you have restarted your computer this is what your screen will look like…do not panic and think that this is all there is to it. This is just the Starter Screen and can be easily changed… Note: Oceanis will auto-start with Windows each time. Using either the Desktop Icon or the Start Menu Entry, open up the Oceanis Main Window. You will see the set of four default wallpapers shown here. At this point the best thing to do is browse for the appropriate folder where you have all of those wonderful new wallpapers just waiting to be used. Note: We found Stretch to be the best Picture Position setting on our system. For our example we had three ready and waiting. We decided to try out the Wallpaper Slideshow feature first. We chose a time frame and saved our changes. Here are our three wallpapers as they switched through. This can be much more interesting than the default wallpaper. There was only one quirk that we encountered while using the Slideshow Setting. On occasion if we minimized a non-maximized window there would be a leftover partial image in place of the window. Our suggestion? Go with one wallpaper at a time and the settings shown below. These are the settings that we had terrific luck with…Only one picture selected, Picture Position = Stretch, & Change Picture Every = Every Day. Using these settings, the Starter Edition acted just like any of the other editions with regard to wallpaper management. Conclusion If you have grown tired of looking at the default wallpaper in Windows 7 Starter Edition then you will certainly appreciate what Oceanis Change Background Windows 7 can do to fix that problem. For more ways to customize your Windows 7 Started Edition, be sure to to check out how to personalize Windows 7 Starter. Links Download Oceanis Change Background Windows 7 Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Windows 7 Welcome Screen Taking Forever? Here’s the Fix (Maybe)Awesome Desktop Wallpapers: The Windows 7 EditionHow To Customize Wallpaper in Windows 7 Starter EditionDesktop Fun: Starship Theme WallpapersDesktop Fun: Underwater Theme Wallpapers TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips Acronis Online Backup DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows Vista style sidebar for Windows 7 Create Nice Charts With These Web Based Tools Track Daily Goals With 42Goals Video Toolbox is a Superb Online Video Editor Fun with 47 charts and graphs Tomorrow is Mother’s Day

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  • Change the User Interface Language in Vista or Windows 7

    - by Matthew Guay
    Would you like to change the user interface language in any edition of Windows 7 or Vista on your computer?  Here’s a free app that can help you do this quickly and easily. If your native language is not the one most spoken in your area, you’ve likely purchased a PC with Windows preinstalled with a language that is difficult or impossible for you to use.  Windows 7 and Vista Ultimate include the ability to install multiple user interface languages and switch between them. However, all other editions are stuck with the language they shipped with.  With the free Vistalizator app, you can add several different interface languages to any edition of Vista or Windows 7 and easily switch between them. Note:  In this test, we used an US English copy of both Windows 7 Home Premium and Windows Vista Home Premium, and it works the same on any edition. The built-in language switching in the Ultimate Editions lets you set a user interface language for each user account, but this will only switch it for all users.  Add a User Interface Language to Windows To add an interface language to any edition of Windows 7 and Vista, first download Vistalizator (link below).  Then, from the same page, download the language pack of your choice.  The language packs are specific for each service pack of Windows, so make sure to choose the correct version and service pack you have installed. Once the downloads are finished, launch the Vistalizator program. You do not need to install it; simply run it and you’re ready to go.  Click the Add languages button to add a language to Windows. Select the user interface language pack you downloaded, and click Open. Depending on the language you selected, it may not automatically update with Windows Update when a service pack is released.  If so, you will have to remove the language pack and reinstall the new one for that service pack at that time.  Click Ok to continue. Make sure you’ve selected the correct language, and click Install language. Vistalizator will extract and install the language pack.  This took around 5 to 10 minutes in our test. Once the language pack is installed, click Yes to make it the default display language. Now, you have two languages installed in Windows.  You may be prompted to check for updates to the language pack; if so, click Update languages and Vistalizator will automatically check for and install any updates. When finished, exit Vistalizator to finish switching the language.  Click Yes to automatically reboot and apply the changes. When you computer reboots, it will show your new language, which in our test is Thai.  Here’s our Windows 7 Home Premium machine with the Thai language pack installed and running. You can even add a right to left language, such as Arabic, to Windows.  Simply repeat the steps to add another language pack.    Vistalizator was originally designed for Windows Vista, and works great with Windows 7 too.  The language packs for Vista are larger downloads than their Windows 7 counterparts.  Here’s our Vista Home Premium in English… And here’s how it looks after installing the Simplified Chinese language pack with Vistalizator. Revert to Your Original Language If you wish to return to the language that your computer shipped with, or want to switch to another language you’ve installed, run Vistalizator again.  Select the language you wish to use, and click Change language.   When you close Vistalizator, you will again be asked to reboot.  Once you’ve rebooted, you’ll see your new (or original) language ready to use.  Here’s our Windows 7 Home Premium desktop, back in it’s original English interface. Conclusion This is a great way to change your computer’s language into your own native language, and is especially useful for expatriates around the world.  Also, if you’d like to simply change or add an input language instead of changing the language throughout your computer, check out our tutorial on How to Add Keyboard Languages to XP, Vista, and Windows 7. Download Vistalizator Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Enable Military Time in Windows 7 or VistaWhy Does My Password Expire in Windows?Use Windows Vista Aero through Remote Desktop ConnectionDisable User Account Control (UAC) the Easy Way on Win 7 or VistaAdd keyboard languages to XP, Vista, and Windows 7 TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 Home Networks – How do they look like & the problems they cause Check Your IMAP Mail Offline In Thunderbird Follow Finder Finds You Twitter Users To Follow Combine MP3 Files Easily QuicklyCode Provides Cheatsheets & Other Programming Stuff Download Free MP3s from Amazon

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  • Install Ubuntu and erase Windows Vista

    - by miguel
    I have an older laptop with a ADA hard disk I can't really buy a new one so I want to erase Windows Vista on my computer and only have Ubuntu so that I can have more space. How do I make it go directly to my blank CD? My Windows Vista is messed up and I can't even get into it. I want to download the new version of Ubuntu while in Ubuntu. I downloaded it but it didn't go directly to the blank CD. I tried to copy all of Ubuntu onto the CD once it was downloaded but it says there was an error while copying. What should I do?

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  • Running Windows 98 in 2013 with Modern Apps and Web

    - by Akemi Iwaya
    Do you ever have those moments when curiosity for the sake of fun gets a hold on you? Perhaps that curiosity gets focused on computer-related “what ifs” such as how well would a very old operating system handle being used with today’s modern apps and web? Nazmus Shakib Khandaker decided to find out how well Windows 98 could and would do in 2013. Have you tried something similar to this? Do you know of any individuals who are holding on to an older operating system no matter what? Share your experiences in the comments! Running Windows 98 in 2013 with Modern Web and Apps [YouTube]     

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  • Weird caching bug where old version of the same web page (same filename) is still called (Windows 2008 R2, Tomcat 5.5)

    - by user717236
    This is definitely one of the strangest errors I've seen and it occurs intermittently. I am running Windows 2008 R2, IIS 7.5, and Apache Tomcat 5.5, by the way. Let's say I have two machines, A and B. Both A and B are running Windows 2008 R2. I have a web page called login.jsp on machine A, and I have a newer, modified version of login.jsp on machine B . Now, I copy the new login.jsp from machine B and paste it to machine A, replacing the older version with the same filename. For whatever reason, when I hit up the web page in my browser from a local machine (i.e. my laptop), it still recalls the old version of the web page, even though it's been replaced! I tried restarting IIS and Apache Tomcat. That didn't work. I tried restarting machine A and that didn't work. I tried a cold reboot of my local machine and that didn't work, either. So, I spoke to someone I can confide in for help. He said to open the login.jsp page in notepad, put a space in, save the file, and try again. Sure enough, it worked. He said he hasn't seen it in Windows 2003, but this is occurring with Windows 2008. What I don't understand is why did it work and what the heck is this error and I do I really diagnose it and resolve it for good, instead of the hack my colleague proposed? Is this bug related to Windows 2008, Windows 2008 R2, Tomcat, or something else entirely? Anyone else have the same problem? Thank you for any help.

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  • Setting Windows 7's Recycle Bin to automatically have a default disk space allocation for deleted files from newly mounted drives

    - by galacticninja
    How do I set Windows 7's Recycle Bin to automatically have a default disk space allocation for deleted files from external hard drives and TrueCrypt-mounted volumes? I remember in Windows XP, I can set a percentage of total disk space that will automatically be used as storage capacity for deleted files by the Recycle Bin, and this will be applied to all external HDs or TC-mounted volumes. Windows 7 defaults to the 'Don't move files to the Recycle Bin. Remove files immediately when deleted' setting for newly mounted external HDs and TC mounted volumes. Since I am expecting deleted files to go to the Recycle Bin, sometimes this causes an 'Oops' when I delete files in external hard drives or TC mounted volumes, as Windows does not move deleted files to the Recycle Bin, but just deletes the files permanently. I have to remember to manually set a custom Recycle Bin storage space for each new drive that is mounted by Windows to avoid this issue. I only use and mount TrueCrypt file containers, not drives. I also don't mount TrueCrypt file containers as removable drives. ('Mount volume as removable medium' is unchecked in Mount Options.) In my $Recycle.Bin > Properties > Security settings, 'System' and 'Administrators' are already set to 'Full Control', while 'Users' only have 'Special Permissions' checked in gray. There are no other groups. I haven't changed or edited anything in these settings. I am using Windows 7 Ultimate.

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  • Installing .NET Framework 4 Client Profile breaks Windows Update

    - by Richard
    I have a Samsung NC-10 netbook with a fresh install of Windows 7 Home Premium 32-bit (it only had 2GB). If Microsoft .NET Framework 4 Client Profile is installed on it, Windows Update will always return error code 8024402F ("Windows Update encountered an unknown error"). As soon as I uninstall it, Windows Update works just fine again. Out of the four computers in this house, only this netbook has the problem. My question is: How can I get the .NET Framework 4 Client Profile installed on my netbook and continue to have a functioning Windows Update? ----- More information ----- The hard-drive recently died on my netbook so I replaced it with a nice new SSD and did a fresh installation of Windows 7 Home Premium (SP1) - along with all the updates. At some point I found that, when I ran Windows Update, I was greeted with error code 8024402F ("Windows Update encountered an unknown error"). Looking in C:\Windows\WindowsUpdate.log, I saw the following issue: WARNING: ECP: Failed to validate cab file digest downloaded from http://download.windowsupdate.com/msdownload/update/software/dflt/2012/02/4913552_4a5c9563d1f58c77f30d0d5c9999e4b8bff3ab21.cab with error 0x80091007 WARNING: ECP: This roundtrip contained some optimized updates which failed. New Update count = 0, Old Count = 3 FATAL: ProcessCoreMetadata did not return any update to be committed WARNING: Sync of Updates: 0x8024402f WARNING: SyncServerUpdatesInternal failed: 0x8024402f When I downloaded the CAB from the URL listed and opened it, it contained a file called 4913552.txt. A search on Google suggested that it's related to Microsoft .NET Framework 4 Client Profile. Other people had reported problems with it breaking Windows Update, but they were running Windows XP. I tried the steps outlined on the Microsoft site for this error code, but it reported that there was nothing wrong. I also found this superuser question, I tried all the answers listed but none of them made any difference. My router doesn't block ActiveX, changing my internet settings in IE made no difference, assuming it was a corrupted update repository didn't do anything (except wipe my update history), my date and time was correct, switching to Google's DNS didn't work and neither did disabling IPv6. Figuring that this update was corrupted, I repaired it and nothing changed. In desperation I un-installed it and Windows Update started working again! Brilliant! I then downloaded the full version from the Microsoft website, installed it and, thankfully, Windows Update continued to work just fine. A week later I turn on my netbook and Windows Update is broken again with exactly the same error message and log entries as before. Repairing .NET Framework 4 Client Profile did nothing, removing it entirely solved the problem again. Thinking this might be some odd Windows installation issue, I formatted the hard-drive and re-installed Windows. Same problem as before - as soon as .NET Framework 4 Client Profile ended up on the netbook, Windows Update stopped working and reported error 8024402F. As soon as it was un-installed, everything worked just fine again. There are three other machines in this house and all of them have working Windows Update and this Client Profile. Does anyone know why it causes this netbook to break and, more importantly, how I can fix it?

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  • Trouble with Windows 7

    - by vtimmerm
    Hi, I'm trying to virtualize an application for Windows 7 but am running into trouble: Application will run fine in Windows 7 if installed in the base. When it is virtualized, it will run on XP, but not on Windows 7. I have tried this in three ways: Captured on XP with ThinApp 4.0 Captured on XP with ThinApp 4.5 Captured on Windows 7 with ThinApp 4.5 Even when captured on Windows 7, it will not run on Windows 7 but will run on XP. When captured with a rival product, Altiris SVS, the virtualized app runs fine on Windows 7. Any idea's what could cause this behaviour? Looking at the trace file, you see that they are different right from the start when comparing Windows 7 and XP tracefiles. What could cause it to go in completely different directions? (And why does the tracefile on Windows 7 say: Operating System Unknown? Does everybody have that on Windows 7 even with 4.5?) The error message is: "Object variable or with block variable not set". Thanks, Vincent

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  • Trouble virtualizing application under Windows 7

    - by vtimmerm
    Hi, I'm trying to virtualize an application for Windows 7 but am running into trouble: Application will run fine in Windows 7 if installed in the base. When it is virtualized, it will run on XP, but not on Windows 7. I have tried this in three ways: Captured on XP with ThinApp 4.0 Captured on XP with ThinApp 4.5 Captured on Windows 7 with ThinApp 4.5 Even when captured on Windows 7, it will not run on Windows 7 but will run on XP. When captured with a rival product, Altiris SVS, the virtualized app runs fine on Windows 7. Any idea what could cause this behaviour? Looking at the trace file, you see that they are different right from the start when comparing Windows 7 and XP tracefiles. What could cause it to go in completely different directions? (And why does the tracefile on Windows 7 say: Operating System Unknown? Does everybody have that on Windows 7 even with 4.5?) The error message is: "Object variable or with block variable not set".

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  • Windows 7 - Windows XP - sharing - why isn't working?

    - by durumdara
    Hi! This is seems to be "hardware" and not "software" / "programming" question, but I need to use this share in my programs, so it is "close to programming". We had an XP based wireless network. The server is XP Professional, the clients are XP Home (Notebooks). This was working well with folder sharing (with user rights, not simple share). Then we replaced the one of the notebook with Win7/X64 notebook. First time this can reach the server, and the another client too. Later I went to another sites, and connect to another servers, another networks. And then, when I return to this network, I saw that I cannot connect to this server. Nothing of resources I see, and when try to dbl click on this computer, I got login window, where I can write anything, never I can login... The interesting part, that: Another XP home can see the server, can login as quest, or with other user. The server can see the XP home notebook. The Win7 can see the notebook's shared folders, and XP home can see the Win7 shared folders. The server can see the Win7 folders, BUT: the Win7 cannot see the server folders. Cannot see the resources too... The Win7 is in "work networking group", the group name is not mshome. I tried everything on the server, I tried to remove MS client, restore it with simple sharing, set guest password, etc., but I lost the possibilities to access this server from Win7. Does anyone have any idea what I need to see, what I need to set to access these resource - to use them in my programs? Thanks for every info, link: dd

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  • Folder Redirection won't load on Windows 7 Machine in Windows 2008 R2 Network

    - by leeand00
    Okay so redirected profiles don't load exactly, but the computer is joined to the network and it won't display any of the users files on their desktop that are in their redirected profile. I know this because we have a Terminal Server and when the user logs in there, her files appear. I checked the users' profile in Active Directory Users and Computers and compared it with a working users profile. When that didn't turn up any differences, I looked at her computer and found that on the Dial-in tab the Network Access Permission wasn't set to Control access through NPS Network Policy like it was on the other machines on the network; so I selected it, ran gpupdate /force on her machine and rebooted. This did not fix the issue. Is there anything else that could be preventing the redirected files on the users desktop from showing up when the user logs in?

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  • NullReferenceException when changing skin/theme via Application.Current.Resources

    - by CoolCat
    I am writing an wpf application with multiple skins. The code to switch theme is as below: try { Application.Current.Resources.MergedDictionaries.Add( resource ); } catch( Exception ex ) { } The first time the code is called (to switch to a new theme), it is executed successfully; however, any subsequent calls to the same code would throw System.NullReferenceException. The way I set up my themes are similar to what described here: http://www.codewrecks.com/blog/index.php/2008/05/22/simple-skinnable-and-theme-management-in-wpf-user-interface/. Has anyone seen this error before? How do I go about debugging this since the exception is thrown else where? Any help is greatly appreciated. StackTrace: at System.Windows.EffectiveValueEntry.GetFlattenedEntry(RequestFlags requests) at System.Windows.DependencyObject.EvaluateEffectiveValue(EntryIndex entryIndex, DependencyProperty dp, PropertyMetadata metadata, EffectiveValueEntry oldEntry, EffectiveValueEntry newEntry, OperationType operationType) at System.Windows.DependencyObject.UpdateEffectiveValue(EntryIndex entryIndex, DependencyProperty dp, PropertyMetadata metadata, EffectiveValueEntry oldEntry, EffectiveValueEntry& newEntry, Boolean coerceWithDeferredReference, OperationType operationType) at System.Windows.StyleHelper.ApplyStyleOrTemplateValue(FrameworkObject fo, DependencyProperty dp) at System.Windows.StyleHelper.InvalidateContainerDependents(DependencyObject container, FrugalStructList`1& exclusionContainerDependents, FrugalStructList`1& oldContainerDependents, FrugalStructList`1& newContainerDependents) at System.Windows.StyleHelper.DoStyleInvalidations(FrameworkElement fe, FrameworkContentElement fce, Style oldStyle, Style newStyle) at System.Windows.StyleHelper.UpdateStyleCache(FrameworkElement fe, FrameworkContentElement fce, Style oldStyle, Style newStyle, Style& styleCache) at System.Windows.FrameworkElement.OnStyleChanged(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e) at System.Windows.DependencyObject.OnPropertyChanged(DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e) at System.Windows.FrameworkElement.OnPropertyChanged(DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e) at System.Windows.DependencyObject.NotifyPropertyChange(DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs args) at System.Windows.DependencyObject.UpdateEffectiveValue(EntryIndex entryIndex, DependencyProperty dp, PropertyMetadata metadata, EffectiveValueEntry oldEntry, EffectiveValueEntry& newEntry, Boolean coerceWithDeferredReference, OperationType operationType) at System.Windows.DependencyObject.InvalidateProperty(DependencyProperty dp) at System.Windows.FrameworkElement.UpdateStyleProperty() at System.Windows.TreeWalkHelper.InvalidateStyleAndReferences(DependencyObject d, ResourcesChangeInfo info, Boolean containsTypeOfKey) at System.Windows.TreeWalkHelper.OnResourcesChanged(DependencyObject d, ResourcesChangeInfo info, Boolean raiseResourceChangedEvent) at System.Windows.TreeWalkHelper.OnResourcesChangedCallback(DependencyObject d, ResourcesChangeInfo info) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1._VisitNode(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.VisitNode(FrameworkElement fe) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.VisitNode(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.WalkLogicalChildren(FrameworkElement feParent, FrameworkContentElement fceParent, IEnumerator logicalChildren) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.WalkFrameworkElementLogicalThenVisualChildren(FrameworkElement feParent, Boolean hasLogicalChildren) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.IterateChildren(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1._VisitNode(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.VisitNode(FrameworkElement fe) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.VisitNode(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.WalkLogicalChildren(FrameworkElement feParent, FrameworkContentElement fceParent, IEnumerator logicalChildren) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.WalkFrameworkElementLogicalThenVisualChildren(FrameworkElement feParent, Boolean hasLogicalChildren) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.IterateChildren(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1._VisitNode(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.VisitNode(FrameworkElement fe) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.VisitNode(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.WalkLogicalChildren(FrameworkElement feParent, FrameworkContentElement fceParent, IEnumerator logicalChildren) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.WalkFrameworkElementLogicalThenVisualChildren(FrameworkElement feParent, Boolean hasLogicalChildren) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.IterateChildren(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1._VisitNode(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.VisitNode(FrameworkElement fe) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.VisitNode(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.WalkLogicalChildren(FrameworkElement feParent, FrameworkContentElement fceParent, IEnumerator logicalChildren) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.WalkFrameworkElementLogicalThenVisualChildren(FrameworkElement feParent, Boolean hasLogicalChildren) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.IterateChildren(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1._VisitNode(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.VisitNode(FrameworkElement fe) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.VisitNode(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.WalkFrameworkElementLogicalThenVisualChildren(FrameworkElement feParent, Boolean hasLogicalChildren) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.IterateChildren(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1._VisitNode(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.VisitNode(FrameworkElement fe) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.VisitNode(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.WalkLogicalChildren(FrameworkElement feParent, FrameworkContentElement fceParent, IEnumerator logicalChildren) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.WalkFrameworkElementLogicalThenVisualChildren(FrameworkElement feParent, Boolean hasLogicalChildren) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.IterateChildren(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1._VisitNode(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.VisitNode(FrameworkElement fe) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.VisitNode(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.WalkLogicalChildren(FrameworkElement feParent, FrameworkContentElement fceParent, IEnumerator logicalChildren) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.WalkFrameworkElementLogicalThenVisualChildren(FrameworkElement feParent, Boolean hasLogicalChildren) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.IterateChildren(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1._VisitNode(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.VisitNode(FrameworkElement fe) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.VisitNode(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.WalkLogicalChildren(FrameworkElement feParent, FrameworkContentElement fceParent, IEnumerator logicalChildren) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.WalkFrameworkElementLogicalThenVisualChildren(FrameworkElement feParent, Boolean hasLogicalChildren) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.IterateChildren(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1._VisitNode(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.VisitNode(FrameworkElement fe) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.VisitNode(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.WalkLogicalChildren(FrameworkElement feParent, FrameworkContentElement fceParent, IEnumerator logicalChildren) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.WalkFrameworkElementLogicalThenVisualChildren(FrameworkElement feParent, Boolean hasLogicalChildren) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.IterateChildren(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1._VisitNode(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.VisitNode(FrameworkElement fe) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.VisitNode(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.WalkLogicalChildren(FrameworkElement feParent, FrameworkContentElement fceParent, IEnumerator logicalChildren) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.WalkFrameworkElementLogicalThenVisualChildren(FrameworkElement feParent, Boolean hasLogicalChildren) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.IterateChildren(DependencyObject d) at System.Windows.DescendentsWalker`1.StartWalk(DependencyObject startNode, Boolean skipStartNode) at System.Windows.TreeWalkHelper.InvalidateOnResourcesChange(FrameworkElement fe, FrameworkContentElement fce, ResourcesChangeInfo info) at System.Windows.Application.InvalidateResourceReferenceOnWindowCollection(WindowCollection wc, ResourcesChangeInfo info) at System.Windows.ResourceDictionary.NotifyOwners(ResourcesChangeInfo info) at System.Windows.ResourceDictionary.OnMergedDictionariesChanged(Object sender, NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e) at System.Collections.ObjectModel.ObservableCollection`1.OnCollectionChanged(NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e) at System.Collections.ObjectModel.ObservableCollection`1.InsertItem(Int32 index, T item) at System.Windows.ResourceDictionaryCollection.InsertItem(Int32 index, ResourceDictionary item) at System.Collections.ObjectModel.Collection`1.Add(T item)

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  • Windows Server 2008 32 bit & windows 7 professional SP1

    - by Harry
    I'm testing my new Windows Server 2008 32 bit edition (2 servers) as a server and Windows 7 professional 32 bit as a client. Let say one is a primary domain controller (PDC) and the other is a backup domain controller (BDC) like the old time to ease. Every setup were done in the PDC and just replicate to BDC. Didn't setup anything, just install the server with AD, DNS, DHCP, that's all. Then I use my windows 7 pro 32 bit to join the domain. It worked. After that I tried to change the password of a the user (not administrator) but it always failed said it didn't meet the password complexity setup while in fact there's no setup at all either in account policy, default domain policy or even local policy. Tried to disable the password complexity in the default domain policy instead of didn't set all then test again but still failed. Browse and found suggestion to setup the minimum and maximum password age to 0 but it also failed. Tried to restart the server and the client then change password, still failed with the same error, didn't meet password complexity setup. Tried to see in the rsop.msc but didn't found anything. In fact, if I see the setup in another system with windows server 2003 and windows xp, using rsop.msc I can see there's setup for computer configuration windows settings security settings account policies password policy. I also have a windows 7 pro 32 bit in a windows server 2003 32 bit environment but unable to find the same setting using rsop but this windows 7 works fine. anyone can give suggestion what's the problem and what to do so I can change my windows 7 pro laptop password in a windows server 2008 environment? another thing, is it the right assumption that we can see all the policies setting in windows 7 whether it's in a windows server 2003 or 2008 environment? thanks.

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  • How to Enable User-Specific Wireless Networks in Windows 7

    - by The Geek
    Wireless network settings in Windows 7 are global across all users, but there’s a little-known option that lets you switch them to per-user, so each user has access to only the networks they are allowed to connect to. Here’s how it all works. How is this useful? Maybe you want to prevent a particular user from accessing the internet—if you don’t give them the wireless password, they won’t be able to get online. This could be very useful if you’ve got mini-people playing games on the family PC, but you don’t want them getting online Latest Features How-To Geek ETC How to Enable User-Specific Wireless Networks in Windows 7 How to Use Google Chrome as Your Default PDF Reader (the Easy Way) How To Remove People and Objects From Photographs In Photoshop Ask How-To Geek: How Can I Monitor My Bandwidth Usage? Internet Explorer 9 RC Now Available: Here’s the Most Interesting New Stuff Here’s a Super Simple Trick to Defeating Fake Anti-Virus Malware The Citroen GT – An Awesome Video Game Car Brought to Life [Video] Final Man vs. Machine Round of Jeopardy Unfolds; Watson Dominates Give Chromium-Based Browser Desktop Notifications a Native System Look in Ubuntu Chrome Time Track Is a Simple Task Time Tracker Google Sky Map Turns Your Android Phone into a Digital Telescope Walking Through a Seaside Village Wallpaper

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  • How to Get All the Windows 8 Editions on One Install Disk

    - by Taylor Gibb
    There are a lot of different versions of Windows, but you probably didn’t know that short of the Enterprise edition, the disc or image that you own contains all versions for that architecture. Read on to see how we can use them to make a universal Windows 8 install disc. Things You Will Need A x86 Version of Windows 8 A x64 Version of Windows 8 A x86 Version of Windows 8 Enterprise A x64 Version of Windows 8 Enterprise A Windows 8 PC Note: While we will use all the images above you don’t really need the Enterprise Edition. You could always leave out parts of the tutorial if you know what you are doing, if you are not comfortable with that and still want to follow through you could always grab the Enterprise evaluation images that are available for free to the public, on MSDN. Getting Started To get started you will need to Download the Windows 8 ADK from Microsoft. Once downloaded go ahead and install it, you will only need the Deployment tools so be sure to uncheck the rest of the options. Lastly you will also need to create the following folder structure on the root of your C:\ drive to make things a bit easier. C:\Windows8Root C:\Windows8Root\x86 C:\Windows8Root\x64 C:\Windows8Root\Enterprisex86 C:\Windows8Root\Enterprisex64 C:\Windows8Root\Temp C:\Windows8Root\Final OK lets get started. Making The Image The first thing we need to do is create a base image, so mount the x86 version of Windows 8 and copy its files to: C:\Windows8Root\Final Now move the install.wim file from: C:\Windows8Root\Final\sources To: C:\Windows8Root\x86 Next go ahead and copy the install.wim file from the other 3 images, Windows 8 x64, Windows 8 Enterprise x86 and Windows 8 Enterprise x64 to the respective folders in Windows8Root, the install.wim file can be located at: D:\sources\install.wim Note: The above assumes that the images are always mounted at drive D. Remember that each install.wim is different so don’t copy them to the wrong directories or the rest of the tutorial wont work. Next switch to the Metro Start Screen and open the Deployment and Imaging Tools Environment. Note: If you are not a local administrator on your PC, you will need to right-click on it and choose to run it as an administrator. Now run the following commands: Dism /Export-Image /SourceImageFile:c:\Windows8Root\x86\install.wim /SourceIndex:2 /DestinationImageFile:c:\Windows8Root\Final\sources\install.wim /DestinationName:”Windows 8″ /compress:maximum Dism /Export-Image /SourceImageFile:c:\Windows8Root\x86\install.wim /SourceIndex:1 /DestinationImageFile:c:\Windows8Root\Final\sources\install.wim /DestinationName:”Windows 8 Pro” /compress:maximum Dism /Export-Image /SourceImageFile:c:\Windows8Root\x86\install.wim /SourceIndex:1 /DestinationImageFile:c:\Windows8Root\Final\sources\install.wim /DestinationName:”Windows 8 Pro with Media Center” /compress:maximum Dism /Export-Image /SourceImageFile:c:\Windows8Root\Enterprisex86\install.wim /SourceIndex:1 /DestinationImageFile:c:\Windows8Root\Final\sources\install.wim /DestinationName:”Windows 8 Enterprise” /compress:maximum Dism /Export-Image /SourceImageFile:c:\Windows8Root\x64\install.wim /SourceIndex:2 /DestinationImageFile:c:\Windows8Root\Final\sources\install.wim /DestinationName:”Windows 8″ /compress:maximum Dism /Export-Image /SourceImageFile:c:\Windows8Root\x64\install.wim /SourceIndex:1 /DestinationImageFile:c:\Windows8Root\Final\sources\install.wim /DestinationName:”Windows 8 Pro” /compress:maximum Dism /Export-Image /SourceImageFile:c:\Windows8Root\x64\install.wim /SourceIndex:1 /DestinationImageFile:c:\Windows8Root\Final\sources\install.wim /DestinationName:”Windows 8 Pro with Media Center” /compress:maximum Dism /Export-Image /SourceImageFile:c:\Windows8Root\Enterprisex64\install.wim /SourceIndex:1 /DestinationImageFile:c:\Windows8Root\Final\sources\install.wim /DestinationName:”Windows 8 Enterprise” /compress:maximum Next navigate to: C:\Windows8Root\sources\ And create a new text file. You will need to call it: EI.cfg Then edit it to look like the following: The last thing we need to do is work some magic to get Windows Media Center added to the WMC editions of Windows 8. For that I have written a little script to make it easier for everybody, you can grab it here. Once you have downloaded it extract it. In order to use it right-click in the bottom left hand corner of the screen, and open an elevated command prompt. Then go ahead and paste the following into the command prompt window. powershell.exe -ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted -File C:\Users\Taylor\Documents\HTGWindows8Converter.ps1 Note: You will need to replace the path to the script, another thing to note is that if the path you replace it with has spaces you will need to enclose the path in quotes. The script should kick off straight away and has some progress bars you can watch while it does its thing. Half way through another Window will pop open, which will start creating your final ISO image. When its complete, close the command prompt and you should have an ISO image on the root of your C drive called: HTGWindows8.iso That’s all there is to it. 7 Ways To Free Up Hard Disk Space On Windows HTG Explains: How System Restore Works in Windows HTG Explains: How Antivirus Software Works

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  • How to Print or Save a Directory Listing to a File

    - by Lori Kaufman
    Printing a directory listing is something you may not do often, but when you need to print a listing of a directory with a lot of files in it, you would rather not manually type the filenames. You may want to print a directory listing of your videos, music, ebooks, or other media. Or, someone at work may ask you for a list of test case files you have created for the software you’re developing, or a list of chapter files for the user guide, etc. If the list of files is small, writing it down or manually typing it out is not a problem. However, if you have a lot of files, automatically creating a directory listing would get the task done quickly and easily. This article shows you how to write a directory listing to a file using the command line and how to use a free tool to print or save a directory listing in Windows Explorer. Amazon’s New Kindle Fire Tablet: the How-To Geek Review HTG Explains: How Hackers Take Over Web Sites with SQL Injection / DDoS Use Your Android Phone to Comparison Shop: 4 Scanner Apps Reviewed

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  • Windows Azure Myths

    - by BuckWoody
    Windows Azure is part of the Microsoft "stack" - the suite of software and services we offer. Because we have so many products in almost every part of technology, it's hard to know everything about all parts of what we do - even for those of us who work here. So it's no surprise that some folks are not as familiar with Windows and SQL Azure as they are, say Windows Server or XBox. As I chat with folks about a solution for a business or organization need, I put Windows Azure into the mix. I always start off with "What do you already know about Windows Azure?" so that I don't bore folks with information they already have. I some cases they've checked out the product ahead of time and have specific questions, in others they aren't as familiar, and in still others there is a fair amount of mis-information. Sometimes that's because of a marketing failure, sometimes it's hearsay, and somtetimes it's active misinformation. I thought I might lay out a few of these misconceptions. As always - do your fact-checking! Never take anyone's word alone (including mine) as gospel. Make sure you educate yourself on your options. Your company or your clients depend on you to have the right information on IT, so make sure you live up to that. Myth 1: Nobody uses Windows Azure It's true that we don't give out numbers on the amount of clients on Windows and SQL Azure. But lots of folks are here - companies you may have heard of like Boeing, NASA, Fujitsu, The City of London, Nuedesic, and many others. I deal with firms small and large that use Windows Azure for mission-critical applications, sometimes totally on Windows and/or SQL Azure, sometimes in conjunction with an on-premises system, sometimes for only a specific component in Windows Azure like storage. The interesting thing is that many sites you visit have a Windows Azure component, or are running on Windows Azure. They just don't announce it. Just like the other cloud providers, the companies have asked to be completely branded themselves - they don't want you to be aware or care that they are on Windows Azure. Sometimes that's for security, other times it's for different reasons. It's just like the web sites you visit. For the most part, they don't advertise which OS or Web Server they use. It really just shouldn't matter. The point is that they just use what works to solve a given problem. Check out a few public case studies here: https://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/home/case-studies/ Myth 2: It's only for Microsoft stuff - can't use Open Source This is the one I face the most, and am the most dismayed by. We work just fine with many open source products, including Java, NodeJS, PHP, Ruby, Python, Hadoop, and many other languages and applications. You can quickly deploy a Wordpress, Umbraco and other "kits". We have software development kits (SDK's) for iPhones, iPads, Android, Windows phones and more. We have an SDK to work with FaceBook and other social networks. In short, we play well with others. More on the languages and runtimes we support here: https://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/develop/overview/ More on the SDK's here: http://www.wadewegner.com/2011/05/windows-azure-toolkit-for-ios/, http://www.wadewegner.com/2011/08/windows-azure-toolkits-for-devices-now-with-android/, http://azuretoolkit.codeplex.com/ Myth 3: Microsoft expects me to switch everything to "the cloud" No, we don't. That would be disasterous, unless the only things you run in your company uses works perfectly in Azure. Use Windows Azure  - or any cloud for that matter - where it works. Whenever I talk to companies, I focus on two things: Something that is broken and needs to be re-architected Something you want to do that is new If something is broken, and you need new tools to scale, extend, add capacity dynamically and so on, then you can consider using Windows or SQL Azure. It can help solve problems that you have, or it may include a component you don't want to write or architect yourself. Sometimes you want to do something new, like extend your company's offerings to mobile phones, to the web, or to a social network. More info on where it works here: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/buckwoody/archive/2011/01/18/windows-azure-and-sql-azure-use-cases.aspx Myth 4: I have to write code to use Windows and SQL Azure If Windows Azure is a PaaS - a Platform as a Service - then don't you have to write code to use it? Nope. Windows and SQL Azure are made up of various components. Some of those components allow you to write and deploy code (like Compute) and others don't. We have lots of customers using Windows Azure storage as a backup, to securely share files instead of using DropBox, to distribute videos or code or firmware, and more. Others use our High Performance Computing (HPC) offering to rent a supercomputer when they need one. You can even throw workloads at that using Excel! In addition there are lots of other components in Windows Azure you can use, from the Windows Azure Media Services to others. More here: https://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/home/scenarios/saas/ Myth 5: Windows Azure is just another form of "vendor lock-in" Windows Azure uses .NET, OSS languages and standard interfaces for the code. Sure, you're not going to take the code line-for-line and run it on a mainframe, but it's standard code that you write, and can port to something else. And the data is yours - you can bring it back whever you want. It's either in text or binary form, that you have complete control over. There are no licenses - you can "pay as you go", and when you're done, you can leave the service and take all your code, data and IP with you.   So go out there, read up, try it. Use it where it works. And don't believe everything you hear - sometimes the Internet doesn't get it all correct. :)

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  • Windows Azure Myths

    - by BuckWoody
    Windows Azure is part of the Microsoft "stack" - the suite of software and services we offer. Because we have so many products in almost every part of technology, it's hard to know everything about all parts of what we do - even for those of us who work here. So it's no surprise that some folks are not as familiar with Windows and SQL Azure as they are, say Windows Server or XBox. As I chat with folks about a solution for a business or organization need, I put Windows Azure into the mix. I always start off with "What do you already know about Windows Azure?" so that I don't bore folks with information they already have. I some cases they've checked out the product ahead of time and have specific questions, in others they aren't as familiar, and in still others there is a fair amount of mis-information. Sometimes that's because of a marketing failure, sometimes it's hearsay, and somtetimes it's active misinformation. I thought I might lay out a few of these misconceptions. As always - do your fact-checking! Never take anyone's word alone (including mine) as gospel. Make sure you educate yourself on your options. Your company or your clients depend on you to have the right information on IT, so make sure you live up to that. Myth 1: Nobody uses Windows Azure It's true that we don't give out numbers on the amount of clients on Windows and SQL Azure. But lots of folks are here - companies you may have heard of like Boeing, NASA, Fujitsu, The City of London, Nuedesic, and many others. I deal with firms small and large that use Windows Azure for mission-critical applications, sometimes totally on Windows and/or SQL Azure, sometimes in conjunction with an on-premises system, sometimes for only a specific component in Windows Azure like storage. The interesting thing is that many sites you visit have a Windows Azure component, or are running on Windows Azure. They just don't announce it. Just like the other cloud providers, the companies have asked to be completely branded themselves - they don't want you to be aware or care that they are on Windows Azure. Sometimes that's for security, other times it's for different reasons. It's just like the web sites you visit. For the most part, they don't advertise which OS or Web Server they use. It really just shouldn't matter. The point is that they just use what works to solve a given problem. Check out a few public case studies here: https://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/home/case-studies/ Myth 2: It's only for Microsoft stuff - can't use Open Source This is the one I face the most, and am the most dismayed by. We work just fine with many open source products, including Java, NodeJS, PHP, Ruby, Python, Hadoop, and many other languages and applications. You can quickly deploy a Wordpress, Umbraco and other "kits". We have software development kits (SDK's) for iPhones, iPads, Android, Windows phones and more. We have an SDK to work with FaceBook and other social networks. In short, we play well with others. More on the languages and runtimes we support here: https://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/develop/overview/ More on the SDK's here: http://www.wadewegner.com/2011/05/windows-azure-toolkit-for-ios/, http://www.wadewegner.com/2011/08/windows-azure-toolkits-for-devices-now-with-android/, http://azuretoolkit.codeplex.com/ Myth 3: Microsoft expects me to switch everything to "the cloud" No, we don't. That would be disasterous, unless the only things you run in your company uses works perfectly in Azure. Use Windows Azure  - or any cloud for that matter - where it works. Whenever I talk to companies, I focus on two things: Something that is broken and needs to be re-architected Something you want to do that is new If something is broken, and you need new tools to scale, extend, add capacity dynamically and so on, then you can consider using Windows or SQL Azure. It can help solve problems that you have, or it may include a component you don't want to write or architect yourself. Sometimes you want to do something new, like extend your company's offerings to mobile phones, to the web, or to a social network. More info on where it works here: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/buckwoody/archive/2011/01/18/windows-azure-and-sql-azure-use-cases.aspx Myth 4: I have to write code to use Windows and SQL Azure If Windows Azure is a PaaS - a Platform as a Service - then don't you have to write code to use it? Nope. Windows and SQL Azure are made up of various components. Some of those components allow you to write and deploy code (like Compute) and others don't. We have lots of customers using Windows Azure storage as a backup, to securely share files instead of using DropBox, to distribute videos or code or firmware, and more. Others use our High Performance Computing (HPC) offering to rent a supercomputer when they need one. You can even throw workloads at that using Excel! In addition there are lots of other components in Windows Azure you can use, from the Windows Azure Media Services to others. More here: https://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/home/scenarios/saas/ Myth 5: Windows Azure is just another form of "vendor lock-in" Windows Azure uses .NET, OSS languages and standard interfaces for the code. Sure, you're not going to take the code line-for-line and run it on a mainframe, but it's standard code that you write, and can port to something else. And the data is yours - you can bring it back whever you want. It's either in text or binary form, that you have complete control over. There are no licenses - you can "pay as you go", and when you're done, you can leave the service and take all your code, data and IP with you.   So go out there, read up, try it. Use it where it works. And don't believe everything you hear - sometimes the Internet doesn't get it all correct. :)

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  • Ubuntu ver 14.04 Network discovery not showing up on windows 8 but on windows 7

    - by Schwabber
    I have an old PC that is now my new Ubuntu machine. Currently I was working on sharing a drive so that backups and streaming could take place. I have it set up perfectly on my windows 7 laptop (able to read and write to it). For some reason however my wife's windows 8 laptop is not showing up on the Ubuntu and vice versa. I turned on network discovery on the win8 machine, but that didn't help. Thanks in advance edit- I have my win7 and win8 in the same homegroup and both can see each other in the network. Also the workgroup is the same.

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  • Stop chkdsk when Windows 7 on one drive and Windows 8 on another

    - by markmnl
    I installed Windows 8 (retail) on a new drive with my Windows 7 drive unplugged. So each Windows has no idea about the other one and I use the BIOS boot options to select which drive hence OS to boot into. Now whenever I boot into Windows 8 then boot into Windows 7, Windows 7 runs chkdisk presumably because Windows 8 messed with it. Is there anyway to stop this? (In hindsight I should have installed Windows 8 with Windows 7 drive plugged in so I could use the Windows dual boot options).

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