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  • Sharing a printer over the net from Windows 7 to Windows Server 2003

    - by Grant Unwin
    Hi, I need to share a printer that is connected to a Windows 7 computer. The windows 7 computer is in another building about an hours drive away. The computer that needs to access the printer is running Windows Server 2008. Ive tried setting the printer as 'shared' for 'everyone' on the Windows 7 PC and accessing it from the server by adding a TCP/IP port to the IP address but the printer just wont add. From googling aparently it may need setting up as a printer server through IIS, but i'm just not sure on the best practice. Any help greatly appreciated. Thanks Grant Unwin

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  • Unable to access Windows 7 shared folder with Windows 98

    - by PabloG
    I'm unable to access a Windows 7 (Windows 7 Pro 64-bit) shared folder from an old Windows 98 box: I tried with: Turning on file and printer sharing Turning on public folder sharing Turning off password protected sharing Sharing the folder with read permissions to Everyone Lowering the encryption to 40-56 bits. The shared folder works fine using it from Windows XP, and even from Linux with CIFS / Samba, but when I try to use it from Win98 with: NET USE X: \\SERVER\SHARE an user / password dialog pops up. I entered the administrator's user / password from my Windows 7 box, but it doesn't work (incorrect password). The same Win98 machine works fine accessing a Windows XP shared folder, so it looks like a Windows 7 networking issue. Any ideas?

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  • Windows Store is open for business!

    - by pluginbaby
    In case you didn’t know, you don’t have to wait for the launch of Windows 8 on October 26 to start building and deploying your apps. Developers from 120 markets (including Canada) can publish Windows Store apps right now! How to start ? Anyone with an MSDN Subscription, Dreamspark account (students) or BizSpark account (startups) get a 1-year Windows Store membership for FREE!! If you don’t have such account, an annual membership is only CAD $49 and lasts a full year. Just go to the Windows Store Dashboard on the Windows Dev Center and sign up. The dev tools are free and the SDK is ready.

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  • Deploy Windows 7 Backup set to Windows 8

    - by Matthias
    Situation: We have a laptop here that's completely fubar. I.e: The hard drive is filled to the brim with bad sectors. Luckily, backups have been made using the built-in Windows 7 backup feature. This produces folders named Backup Set 2012-11-09 003009, containing folders like Backup Files 2012-11-09 003009, containing zip-files like Backup files 1, 2, 3,... Our brand new laptop comes with Windows 8. Now: Can we, using the standard back-up and restore feature in Windows 8, restore all the documents, music, etc. using the Windows 7 backup files? Thanks. (FYI: We also took a normal backup of all the documents just to be sure of course. I'm just curious what would happen. I would test it out, but the new laptop hasn't arrived yet and I wanted to make sure my efforts would not be in vain.)

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  • What would be the Query to get exact same result like Windows 7 start menu search for Programs using Windows Search service?

    - by Somnath
    I would like to implement the same search application like Windows 7 using microsoft.search.interop.dll, C#. Currently I'm using System.Kind property to retrieve information regarding the programs from Windows Search but the results set does not look same like Windows 7 search. Order of items are different. SELECT TOP 3 System.ItemNameDisplay, System.DateAccessed FROM SystemIndex WHERE System.ItemNameDisplay LIKE 'ad%' AND (System.Kind='Program') What would be the Query to get exact same result like Windows 7 start menu search for Programs? As an example : search token = 'ad' Windows 7 search result Adobe Reader 9, Add a device, Adobe Photoshop 7.0 Search Result from my code Adobe ImageReady 7.0 , Adobe Photoshop 7.0 , Adobe Reader 9

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  • How to make Windows Media Player play only audio of video files - Windows 7

    - by blasteralfred
    Usually, for any video file, Windows Media Player plays video along with audio, unless user press mute, so that only video comes out. In such a way reverse, is it possible to make media player play videos in which audio may come out, not video, and media player may show a blank screen or default animation instead of video? I use Windows 7. Is it possible to play videos without displaying video in Windows Media Player 12

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  • Windows 8 cannot connect remotely to Windows Server 2012

    - by raza naqvi
    I have installed Windows Server 2012 and then configured remote applications. At first it was working fine and I could be able to connect remotely and run remote applications from Windows 8 clients. But after few days the following error occurred: Remote Desktop Connection This computer can't connect to the remote computer. Try connecting again. If the problem continues, contact the owner of the remote computer or your network administrator. However I still can connect from Windows 7 without any problem. Only Windows 8 has a problem and cannot connect remotely. Neither remote apps nor RDP is working.

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  • Windows 8 upgrade to windows 8.1 RTM fails with error code 0x101 - 0x2000C

    - by vzczc
    I have a MSDN Subscription and downloaded Windows 8.1 RTM today. It fails to install. After mounting the ISO and installing (with a Windows 8.1 Pro product code), selecting "Keep my apps and settings", it copies all installation files, restarts and then bluescreens at around 50%, then rolls back to the previous version. System has 64 GB Memory, Supermicro, Xeon E5-1650, Intel SSD, runs Hyper-V, Windows 8 Pro. What may be causing this and how do I fix it?

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  • Samba between Ubuntu server 10.10 and Windows Vista, Windows 7

    - by chepukha
    I have a linux box running Linux server ubuntu 10.10. I have installed Samba on this linux box and want to share files with my laptops which run Windows Vista home and Windows 7 home. I have been struggling with the setup for almost a month but couldn't get it right. If I try to access share folder from Windows Vista, I get message "Windows cannot access \\server_ip_address". Error code: 0x80070035. The network path was not found. If I access from Windows 7, then after entering password to login I can see the list of share folders on Linux box. But if I click on a share folder, I get the same error message as above. Tail /var/log/samba/log.windows7-pc I got the following message: [2011/03/16 00:17:41.427238, 0] smbd/service.c:988(make_connection_snum) canonicalize_connect_path failed for service sharemedia, path /root/sharemedia Here is my setting in smb.conf [global] share modes = yes netbios name = Samba workgroup = WORKGROUP wins support = yes encrypt passwords = true [sharemedia] comment = Tesing sharing using Samba path=/root/sharemedia/ public = yes valid users = samba_usr_name ; make sure all files are sensible permissions create mask = 0660 force create mask = 0660 directory mask = 2770 force directory mask = 2770 directory security mask = 0000 ; Normal share parameters read only = no browseable = yes writable = yes guest ok = no

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  • Right Clicking error in windows 7 windows explorer

    - by Domenik VanBuskirk
    Whenever I right-click something in windows explorer other than favorites, libraries, computer, or network (the main headings in the left pane), the drop-down menu does not appear and an error pops up "windows explorer has stopped working" - "windows explorer is restarting". Once those both close the icons on the desktop and taskbar itself blink off and back on again. Is there any way of finding out what is going on when I right click and this problem ensues?

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  • Force Run System File Checker (SFC.exe)

    - by Zuck
    C:\Windows\system32>sfc /scannow Beginning system scan. This process will take some time. There is a system repair pending which requires reboot to complete. Restart Windows and run sfc again. Is there a way I can force SFC to scan again and make the new fixes on reboot? Probably by deleting some file or something? I removed C:\Windows\WinSxS\pending.xml by taking ownerships but it still shows the same message.

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  • Windows 8 Windows Store (Metro/ModernUI) applications not working (just show 'busy' animation or white screen)

    - by davidm_uk
    I have a Dell XPS 15 which shipped with Windows 7 x64, which I recently upgraded to Windows 8. The process went surprisingly smoothly (given that this was an upgrade, not a complete re-install), and the system generally seems very stable. However, today I noticed that several of the Windows Store apps don't work: they all behave in the same way, launching but then showing a spinning 'wait' animation indefinitely. This is affecting the standard Microsoft Mail, Store, Weather, News, Travel, Finance, Sport, Games and Music apps. The Bing app just shows a Bing logo on a coloured background (but no wait animation). The Calendar, Photos and SkyDrive apps open but then show a white screen. The Maps and Camera apps work without problems. The live tiles on the Start screen are updating correctly, for example the Mail app's tile shows a summary of new mail despite the Mail app's problems. All of these applications were working correctly a few days ago. I'm sure I've used several without problems since the last Windows update occurred on 7th November. Any suggestions on what might have happened and/or how to fix it would be very welcome. I don't need these Windows Store applications, but the fact that they're not working is irritating me.

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  • Java Resources for Windows Azure

    - by BuckWoody
    Windows Azure is a Platform as a Service – a PaaS – that runs code you write. That code doesn’t just mean the languages on the .NET platform – you can run code from multiple languages, including Java. In fact, you can develop for Windows and SQL Azure using not only Visual Studio but the Eclipse Integrated Development Environment (IDE) as well.  Although not an exhaustive list, here are several links that deal with Java and Windows Azure: Resource Link Windows Azure Java Development Center http://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/develop/java/  Java Development Guidance http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh690943(VS.103).aspx  Running a Java Environment on Windows Azure http://blogs.technet.com/b/port25/archive/2010/10/28/running-a-java-environment-on-windows-azure.aspx  Running a Java Environment on Windows Azure http://blogs.technet.com/b/port25/archive/2010/10/28/running-a-java-environment-on-windows-azure.aspx  Run Java with Jetty in Windows Azure http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dachou/archive/2010/03/21/run-java-with-jetty-in-windows-azure.aspx  Using the plugin for Eclipse http://blogs.msdn.com/b/craig/archive/2011/03/22/new-plugin-for-eclipse-to-get-java-developers-off-the-ground-with-windows-azure.aspx  Run Java with GlassFish in Windows Azure http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dachou/archive/2011/01/17/run-java-with-glassfish-in-windows-azure.aspx  Improving experience for Java developers with Windows  Azure http://blogs.msdn.com/b/interoperability/archive/2011/02/23/improving-experience-for-java-developers-with-windows-azure.aspx  Java Access to SQL Azure via the JDBC Driver for SQL  Server http://blogs.msdn.com/b/brian_swan/archive/2011/03/29/java-access-to-sql-azure-via-the-jdbc-driver-for-sql-server.aspx  How to Get Started with Java, Tomcat on Windows Azure http://blogs.msdn.com/b/usisvde/archive/2011/03/04/how-to-get-started-with-java-tomcat-on-windows-azure.aspx  Deploying Java Applications in Azure http://blogs.msdn.com/b/mariok/archive/2011/01/05/deploying-java-applications-in-azure.aspx  Using the Windows Azure Storage Explorer in Eclipse http://blogs.msdn.com/b/brian_swan/archive/2011/01/11/using-the-windows-azure-storage-explorer-in-eclipse.aspx  Windows Azure Tomcat Solution Accelerator http://archive.msdn.microsoft.com/winazuretomcat  Deploying a Java application to Windows Azure with  Command-line Ant http://java.interoperabilitybridges.com/articles/deploying-a-java-application-to-windows-azure-with-command-line-ant  Video: Open in the Cloud: Windows Azure and Java http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/PDC/PDC10/CS10  AzureRunMe  http://azurerunme.codeplex.com/  Windows Azure SDK for Java http://www.interoperabilitybridges.com/projects/windows-azure-sdk-for-java  AppFabric SDK for Java http://www.interoperabilitybridges.com/projects/azure-java-sdk-for-net-services  Information Cards for Java http://www.interoperabilitybridges.com/projects/information-card-for-java  Apache Stonehenge http://www.interoperabilitybridges.com/projects/apache-stonehenge  Channel 9 Case Study on Java and Windows Azure http://www.microsoft.com/casestudies/Windows-Azure/Gigaspaces/Solution-Provider-Streamlines-Java-Application-Deployment-in-the-Cloud/400000000081   

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  • Java Resources for Windows Azure

    - by BuckWoody
    Windows Azure is a Platform as a Service – a PaaS – that runs code you write. That code doesn’t just mean the languages on the .NET platform – you can run code from multiple languages, including Java. In fact, you can develop for Windows and SQL Azure using not only Visual Studio but the Eclipse Integrated Development Environment (IDE) as well.  Although not an exhaustive list, here are several links that deal with Java and Windows Azure: Resource Link Windows Azure Java Development Center http://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/develop/java/  Java Development Guidance http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh690943(VS.103).aspx  Running a Java Environment on Windows Azure http://blogs.technet.com/b/port25/archive/2010/10/28/running-a-java-environment-on-windows-azure.aspx  Running a Java Environment on Windows Azure http://blogs.technet.com/b/port25/archive/2010/10/28/running-a-java-environment-on-windows-azure.aspx  Run Java with Jetty in Windows Azure http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dachou/archive/2010/03/21/run-java-with-jetty-in-windows-azure.aspx  Using the plugin for Eclipse http://blogs.msdn.com/b/craig/archive/2011/03/22/new-plugin-for-eclipse-to-get-java-developers-off-the-ground-with-windows-azure.aspx  Run Java with GlassFish in Windows Azure http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dachou/archive/2011/01/17/run-java-with-glassfish-in-windows-azure.aspx  Improving experience for Java developers with Windows  Azure http://blogs.msdn.com/b/interoperability/archive/2011/02/23/improving-experience-for-java-developers-with-windows-azure.aspx  Java Access to SQL Azure via the JDBC Driver for SQL  Server http://blogs.msdn.com/b/brian_swan/archive/2011/03/29/java-access-to-sql-azure-via-the-jdbc-driver-for-sql-server.aspx  How to Get Started with Java, Tomcat on Windows Azure http://blogs.msdn.com/b/usisvde/archive/2011/03/04/how-to-get-started-with-java-tomcat-on-windows-azure.aspx  Deploying Java Applications in Azure http://blogs.msdn.com/b/mariok/archive/2011/01/05/deploying-java-applications-in-azure.aspx  Using the Windows Azure Storage Explorer in Eclipse http://blogs.msdn.com/b/brian_swan/archive/2011/01/11/using-the-windows-azure-storage-explorer-in-eclipse.aspx  Windows Azure Tomcat Solution Accelerator http://archive.msdn.microsoft.com/winazuretomcat  Deploying a Java application to Windows Azure with  Command-line Ant http://java.interoperabilitybridges.com/articles/deploying-a-java-application-to-windows-azure-with-command-line-ant  Video: Open in the Cloud: Windows Azure and Java http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/PDC/PDC10/CS10  AzureRunMe  http://azurerunme.codeplex.com/  Windows Azure SDK for Java http://www.interoperabilitybridges.com/projects/windows-azure-sdk-for-java  AppFabric SDK for Java http://www.interoperabilitybridges.com/projects/azure-java-sdk-for-net-services  Information Cards for Java http://www.interoperabilitybridges.com/projects/information-card-for-java  Apache Stonehenge http://www.interoperabilitybridges.com/projects/apache-stonehenge  Channel 9 Case Study on Java and Windows Azure http://www.microsoft.com/casestudies/Windows-Azure/Gigaspaces/Solution-Provider-Streamlines-Java-Application-Deployment-in-the-Cloud/400000000081   

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  • Installing Ubuntu with Windows installer on Windows 8 machine

    - by tpmeera
    I have a Windows 8 Ultrabook. I downloaded Ubuntu (release 12.04) and installed using the Windows installer (Wubi). On rebooting at the end of the installation, I get the Windows boot screen asking if I want to boot into Windows 8 or Ubuntu. I select Ubuntu, and I get an error message that says Ubuntu is missing a boot file or has errors. Please let me know how to fix, or if my procedure is incorrect.

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  • Windows is not available in GRUB's boot menu, but Windows Recovery is available

    - by rafalcieslak
    I had Windows Vista installed on a laptop. I have installed separately Ubuntu, wanting to have a dual-boot system. Now, Ubuntu works OK, but I am unable to boot into Windows. GRUB menu provides me with two entries: "Windows Vista (loader)" and "Windows Recovery Environment (loader)". However, BOTH boot into recovery environment. Running sudo update-grub does not change anything. I use an up-to-date 10.10.

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  • windows 8.1 upgrade fails with error code 0xc1900101-0x20017

    - by cmorse
    I just tried to install windows 8.1 on my laptop, but it fails to install with the message: Sorry we couldn't complete the update to Windows 8.1. We restored your previous version of Windows to this PC 0xC1900101 - 0x20017 It looks like on the first boot that the laptop is going to the PC restore screen (it asks what kind of keyboard I have, and then what repair optins I would like to take). Thus far I have just been selecting "Continue to windows 8." I'm running a Lenovo x220i tablet. I've got 43GB of free disk space. It installed just fine on my desktop. The primary difference between the two machines is that the desktop has media center install, and isn't using TrueCrypt. Full WindowsUpdate.log http://pastebin.com/hGmAW4Q1 Most important portion of WindowsUpdate.log: 2013-10-17 10:41:06:671 964 694 Agent ************* 2013-10-17 10:41:06:671 964 694 Agent ** START ** Agent: Finding updates [CallerId = AutomaticUpdates] 2013-10-17 10:41:06:671 964 694 Agent ********* 2013-10-17 10:41:06:671 964 694 Agent * Online = No; Ignore download priority = No 2013-10-17 10:41:06:671 964 694 Agent * Criteria = "IsInstalled=0 and DeploymentAction='Installation' or IsPresent=1 and DeploymentAction='Uninstallation' or IsInstalled=1 and DeploymentAction='Installation' and RebootRequired=1 or IsInstalled=0 and DeploymentAction='Uninstallation' and RebootRequired=1" 2013-10-17 10:41:06:671 964 694 Agent * ServiceID = {7971F918-A847-4430-9279-4A52D1EFE18D} Third party service 2013-10-17 10:41:06:671 964 694 Agent * Search Scope = {Machine & All Users} 2013-10-17 10:41:06:671 964 694 Agent * Caller SID for Applicability: S-1-5-18 2013-10-17 10:41:07:233 964 870 Report REPORT EVENT: {AD47FBDC-F7F9-4E7F-BAF4-DBA3784C7101} 2013-10-17 10:41:06:436-0600 1 202 [AU_REBOOT_COMPLETED] 102 {00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000} 0 0 AutomaticUpdates Success Content Install Reboot completed. 2013-10-17 10:41:07:233 964 870 Report REPORT EVENT: {8D4E7A67-9526-4702-A897-5BE5F97497AF} 2013-10-17 10:41:06:639-0600 1 204 [AGENT_INSTALLING_FAILED_POST_REBOOT] 101 {8951E70D-4332-4F7C-B92D-D9362E384959} 1 c1900101 WSAcquisition Failure Content Install Installation Failure Post Reboot. 2013-10-17 10:41:07:249 964 870 Report CWERReporter::HandleEvents - WER report upload completed with status 0x8 2013-10-17 10:41:07:249 964 870 Report WER Report sent: 7.8.9200.16715 0xc1900101(0x20017) 8951E70D-4332-4F7C-B92D-D9362E384959 Install 101 Unmanaged 2013-10-17 10:41:07:249 964 870 Report CWERReporter finishing event handling. (00000000)

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  • svchost consuming more than 50% CPU all the time in windows 7

    - by claws
    Hello, I'm using windows 7 ultimate. svchost containing DCOM Server Process Launcher Plug and Play Power services is consuming more than 50% of CPU for most of the time. I found this blog post: http://blog.hansmelis.be/2007/06/17/windows-vista-long-delay-when-switching-songs-in-media-player/ That process is associated with two services: DCOM Server Process Launcher and Plug and Play. For the Vulcans among us, all logic stops there for a second. What do those two services have to do with WMP? The answer is provided by Vista's new audio engine. The new engine supports several audio "enhancements". But for the enhancements to work, the engine needs to determine if your hardware is up to the task. And when does it check that? Each time a sound output device is accessed. That's pretty nice if you can do a hot swap of sound hardware, but I don't see me doing that anytime soon. Anyways, it does provide us with the link to the correct service because checking hardware is done by the "Plug and Play" service. One might think that deactivating each enhancement would solve the problem, but that's wishful thinking. The configuration of the enhancements is located in the properties of the sound hardware. When opening the tab, I found out that no enhancements were active. Hmmm... so why does it check the hardware? Well, it does that in case you actually enable an enhancement. To completely stop the hardware checking, you have to tick the box labelled Disable all enhancements. As soon as you do that, Vista finally understands you don't want to use them buts thats for vista. Is it the same case with windows 7 too? and I couldn't find any "Disable all enhancements" in my controlpanelsounds (mmsys.cpl). Where can I find this option in windows 7? How to solve this?

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  • [GEEK SCHOOL] Network Security 4: Windows Firewall: Your System’s Best Defense

    - by Ciprian Rusen
    If you have your computer connected to a network, or directly to your Internet connection, then having a firewall is an absolute necessity. In this lesson we will discuss the Windows Firewall – one of the best security features available in Windows! The Windows Firewall made its debut in Windows XP. Prior to that, Windows system needed to rely on third-party solutions or dedicated hardware to protect them from network-based attacks. Over the years, Microsoft has done a great job with it and it is one of the best firewalls you will ever find for Windows operating systems. Seriously, it is so good that some commercial vendors have decided to piggyback on it! Let’s talk about what you will learn in this lesson. First, you will learn about what the Windows Firewall is, what it does, and how it works. Afterward, you will start to get your hands dirty and edit the list of apps, programs, and features that are allowed to communicate through the Windows Firewall depending on the type of network you are connected to. Moving on from there, you will learn how to add new apps or programs to the list of allowed items and how to remove the apps and programs that you want to block. Last but not least, you will learn how to enable or disable the Windows Firewall, for only one type of networks or for all network connections. By the end of this lesson, you should know enough about the Windows Firewall to use and manage it effectively. What is the Windows Firewall? Windows Firewall is an important security application that’s built into Windows. One of its roles is to block unauthorized access to your computer. The second role is to permit authorized data communications to and from your computer. Windows Firewall does these things with the help of rules and exceptions that are applied both to inbound and outbound traffic. They are applied depending on the type of network you are connected to and the location you have set for it in Windows, when connecting to the network. Based on your choice, the Windows Firewall automatically adjusts the rules and exceptions applied to that network. This makes the Windows Firewall a product that’s silent and easy to use. It bothers you only when it doesn’t have any rules and exceptions for what you are trying to do or what the programs running on your computer are trying to do. If you need a refresher on the concept of network locations, we recommend you to read our How-To Geek School class on Windows Networking. Another benefit of the Windows Firewall is that it is so tightly and nicely integrated into Windows and all its networking features, that some commercial vendors decided to piggyback onto it and use it in their security products. For example, products from companies like Trend Micro or F-Secure no longer provide their proprietary firewall modules but use the Windows Firewall instead. Except for a few wording differences, the Windows Firewall works the same in Windows 7 and Windows 8.x. The only notable difference is that in Windows 8.x you will see the word “app” being used instead of “program”. Where to Find the Windows Firewall By default, the Windows Firewall is turned on and you don’t need to do anything special in order for it work. You will see it displaying some prompts once in a while but they show up so rarely that you might forget that is even working. If you want to access it and configure the way it works, go to the Control Panel, then go to “System and Security” and select “Windows Firewall”. Now you will see the Windows Firewall window where you can get a quick glimpse on whether it is turned on and the type of network you are connected to: private networks or public network. For the network type that you are connected to, you will see additional information like: The state of the Windows Firewall How the Windows Firewall deals with incoming connections The active network When the Windows Firewall will notify you You can easily expand the other section and view the default settings that apply when connecting to networks of that type. If you have installed a third-party security application that also includes a firewall module, chances are that the Windows Firewall has been disabled, in order to avoid performance issues and conflicts between the two security products. If that is the case for your computer or device, you won’t be able to view any information in the Windows Firewall window and you won’t be able to configure the way it works. Instead, you will see a warning that says: “These settings are being managed by vendor application – Application Name”. In the screenshot below you can see an example of how this looks. How to Allow Desktop Applications Through the Windows Firewall Windows Firewall has a very comprehensive set of rules and most Windows programs that you install add their own exceptions to the Windows Firewall so that they receive network and Internet access. This means that you will see prompts from the Windows Firewall on occasion, generally when you install programs that do not add their own exceptions to the Windows Firewall’s list. In a Windows Firewall prompt, you are asked to select the network locations to which you allow access for that program: private networks or public networks. By default, Windows Firewall selects the checkbox that’s appropriate for the network you are currently using. You can decide to allow access for both types of network locations or just to one of them. To apply your setting press “Allow access”. If you want to block network access for that program, press “Cancel” and the program will be set as blocked for both network locations. At this step you should note that only administrators can set exceptions in the Windows Firewall. If you are using a standard account without administrator permissions, the programs that do not comply with the Windows Firewall rules and exceptions are automatically blocked, without any prompts being shown. You should note that in Windows 8.x you will never see any Windows Firewall prompts related to apps from the Windows Store. They are automatically given access to the network and the Internet based on the assumption that you are aware of the permissions they require based on the information displayed by the Windows Store. Windows Firewall rules and exceptions are automatically created for each app that you install from the Windows Store. However, you can easily block access to the network and the Internet for any app, using the instructions in the next section. How to Customize the Rules for Allowed Apps Windows Firewall allows any user with an administrator account to change the list of rules and exceptions applied for apps and desktop programs. In order to do this, first start the Windows Firewall. On the column on the left, click or tap “Allow an app or feature through Windows Firewall” (in Windows 8.x) or “Allow a program or feature through Windows Firewall” (in Windows 7). Now you see the list of apps and programs that are allowed to communicate through the Windows Firewall. At this point, the list is grayed out and you can only view which apps, features, and programs have rules that are enabled in the Windows Firewall.

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  • MetroTwit is a Sleek Native Twitter Client for Your Windows System

    - by Asian Angel
    Do you love the new Metro design and need a native Twitter desktop client for your Windows system too? Then you may want to have a look at MetroTwit. When you kick-start the MetroTwit exe file it will download the necessary .NET Framework components if you do not already have them installed. Once that is finished it will then download the MetroTwit installation files to ensure that you have the latest release. MetroTwit will automatically start once the setup process has finished. From there you can quickly modify the layout (i.e. visible columns, etc.), theme, and other UI features to make MetroTwit right at home on your system. UI features visible in the screenshot above: Top: Access the Settings in the center at the top of the window Bottom: Add Column, Lists, Refresh, Tweet Window, Search Twitter, User Profile, and Twitter Trends As you can see here the Settings are laid out nicely and very easy to navigate through. Features of MetroTwit: Drag and drop image support TwitLonger support for longer tweets Tweet breadcrumbs Infinite scrolling Auto-complete for user names and hashtags Themes and accents Resizable and reorderable columns What The Trend access URL shortening and previews Windows 7 Taskbar integration Quick-glance notifications Flawless high DPI support Note: Requires .NET Framework 4.0. Download MetroTwit [via DownloadSquad] Latest Features How-To Geek ETC What Can Super Mario Teach Us About Graphics Technology? Windows 7 Service Pack 1 is Released: But Should You Install It? How To Make Hundreds of Complex Photo Edits in Seconds With Photoshop Actions How to Enable User-Specific Wireless Networks in Windows 7 How to Use Google Chrome as Your Default PDF Reader (the Easy Way) How To Remove People and Objects From Photographs In Photoshop MetroTwit is a Sleek Native Twitter Client for Your Windows System Make Efficient Use of Tab Bar Space by Customizing Tab Width in Firefox See the Geeky Work Done Behind the Scenes to Add Sounds to Movies [Video] Use a Crayon to Enhance Engraved Lettering on Electronics Adult Swim Brings Their Programming Lineup to iOS Devices Feel the Chill of the South Atlantic with the Antarctica Theme for Windows 7

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  • Network profile reverts to 'Unidentified' following Windows Update reboot

    - by user140575
    I have searched high and low for a solution to this problem. I have multiple servers running Windows 2000 Server as well as Windows Server 2003, 2003 R2, and 2008 R2. All of these servers are on the same Active Directory domain. The servers run showing the network profile as Domain Network, which is fine and correct. However, when a Windows update is installed, the server changes the profile to Unidentified Network once it has rebooted. This then doesn't allow any traffic to the server. For security reasons, we can't turn the firewalls off for. The only way to fix the problem is to physically be in front of the machine and work on it to change the profile back. Once the Profile has been reinstated to the Domain profile, it will be fine until the next month's update. This happens on all the Windows software mentioned above. The machines are not all identical, so it's not a hardware problem either. If anyone can help I'd be very grateful.

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  • Windows 7 and Ubuntu Boot/Corruption Problems

    - by Kiraisuki
    I searched around, but I couldn't find the answer to why Windows 7 Ultimate 64x and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS 64x could'nt live together happily on my Asus G1s-X1 laptop. I had Windows 7 Ultimate 64x installed on the laptop when I bought it (bought it used, it comes with Vista new) and I wanted to try out Ubuntu and see what all the hype about the free OS was. I installed Ubuntu on an external 80GB iomega HDD with Windows 7 on my main drive. They both work fine for about 2-3 weeks, until Ubuntu suddenly is unable to boot. A few days after Ubuntu fails, Windows corrupts majorly (winload.exe, ntkrnlpa.exe, and various others corrupt randomly) and Windows Recovery Environment is completely useless. Booting to a live USB with Ubuntu and trying to reinstall it fails, and trying to wipe the main drive and install it there fails as well (something about my graphics card.) I managed to get Windows 7 Ultimate 64x back up and running (after many disk formats) but now I am left with a broken (and invisible) Ubuntu installation on the external drive. Is there any way to get the broken and non-bootable Ubuntu installation off the HDD without damaging or erasing the many files and programs installed and stored on the 80GB drive?

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  • 10 Windows Tweaking Myths Debunked

    - by Chris Hoffman
    Windows is big, complicated, and misunderstood. You’ll still stumble across bad advice from time to time when browsing the web. These Windows tweaking, performance, and system maintenance tips are mostly just useless, but some are actively harmful. Luckily, most of these myths have been stomped out on mainstream sites and forums. However, if you start searching the web, you’ll still find websites that recommend you do these things. Erase Cache Files Regularly to Speed Things Up You can free up disk space by running an application like CCleaner, another temporary-file-cleaning utility, or even the Windows Disk Cleanup tool. In some cases, you may even see an old computer speed up when you erase a large amount of useless files. However, running CCleaner or similar utilities every day to erase your browser’s cache won’t actually speed things up. It will slow down your web browsing as your web browser is forced to redownload the files all over again, and reconstruct the cache you regularly delete. If you’ve installed CCleaner or a similar program and run it every day with the default settings, you’re actually slowing down your web browsing. Consider at least preventing the program from wiping out your web browser cache. Enable ReadyBoost to Speed Up Modern PCs Windows still prompts you to enable ReadyBoost when you insert a USB stick or memory card. On modern computers, this is completely pointless — ReadyBoost won’t actually speed up your computer if you have at least 1 GB of RAM. If you have a very old computer with a tiny amount of RAM — think 512 MB — ReadyBoost may help a bit. Otherwise, don’t bother. Open the Disk Defragmenter and Manually Defragment On Windows 98, users had to manually open the defragmentation tool and run it, ensuring no other applications were using the hard drive while it did its work. Modern versions of Windows are capable of defragmenting your file system while other programs are using it, and they automatically defragment your disks for you. If you’re still opening the Disk Defragmenter every week and clicking the Defragment button, you don’t need to do this — Windows is doing it for you unless you’ve told it not to run on a schedule. Modern computers with solid-state drives don’t have to be defragmented at all. Disable Your Pagefile to Increase Performance When Windows runs out of empty space in RAM, it swaps out data from memory to a pagefile on your hard disk. If a computer doesn’t have much memory and it’s running slow, it’s probably moving data to the pagefile or reading data from it. Some Windows geeks seem to think that the pagefile is bad for system performance and disable it completely. The argument seems to be that Windows can’t be trusted to manage a pagefile and won’t use it intelligently, so the pagefile needs to be removed. As long as you have enough RAM, it’s true that you can get by without a pagefile. However, if you do have enough RAM, Windows will only use the pagefile rarely anyway. Tests have found that disabling the pagefile offers no performance benefit. Enable CPU Cores in MSConfig Some websites claim that Windows may not be using all of your CPU cores or that you can speed up your boot time by increasing the amount of cores used during boot. They direct you to the MSConfig application, where you can indeed select an option that appears to increase the amount of cores used. In reality, Windows always uses the maximum amount of processor cores your CPU has. (Technically, only one core is used at the beginning of the boot process, but the additional cores are quickly activated.) Leave this option unchecked. It’s just a debugging option that allows you to set a maximum number of cores, so it would be useful if you wanted to force Windows to only use a single core on a multi-core system — but all it can do is restrict the amount of cores used. Clean Your Prefetch To Increase Startup Speed Windows watches the programs you run and creates .pf files in its Prefetch folder for them. The Prefetch feature works as a sort of cache — when you open an application, Windows checks the Prefetch folder, looks at the application’s .pf file (if it exists), and uses that as a guide to start preloading data that the application will use. This helps your applications start faster. Some Windows geeks have misunderstood this feature. They believe that Windows loads these files at boot, so your boot time will slow down due to Windows preloading the data specified in the .pf files. They also argue you’ll build up useless files as you uninstall programs and .pf files will be left over. In reality, Windows only loads the data in these .pf files when you launch the associated application and only stores .pf files for the 128 most recently launched programs. If you were to regularly clean out the Prefetch folder, not only would programs take longer to open because they won’t be preloaded, Windows will have to waste time recreating all the .pf files. You could also modify the PrefetchParameters setting to disable Prefetch, but there’s no reason to do that. Let Windows manage Prefetch on its own. Disable QoS To Increase Network Bandwidth Quality of Service (QoS) is a feature that allows your computer to prioritize its traffic. For example, a time-critical application like Skype could choose to use QoS and prioritize its traffic over a file-downloading program so your voice conversation would work smoothly, even while you were downloading files. Some people incorrectly believe that QoS always reserves a certain amount of bandwidth and this bandwidth is unused until you disable it. This is untrue. In reality, 100% of bandwidth is normally available to all applications unless a program chooses to use QoS. Even if a program does choose to use QoS, the reserved space will be available to other programs unless the program is actively using it. No bandwidth is ever set aside and left empty. Set DisablePagingExecutive to Make Windows Faster The DisablePagingExecutive registry setting is set to 0 by default, which allows drivers and system code to be paged to the disk. When set to 1, drivers and system code will be forced to stay resident in memory. Once again, some people believe that Windows isn’t smart enough to manage the pagefile on its own and believe that changing this option will force Windows to keep important files in memory rather than stupidly paging them out. If you have more than enough memory, changing this won’t really do anything. If you have little memory, changing this setting may force Windows to push programs you’re using to the page file rather than push unused system files there — this would slow things down. This is an option that may be helpful for debugging in some situations, not a setting to change for more performance. Process Idle Tasks to Free Memory Windows does things, such as creating scheduled system restore points, when you step away from your computer. It waits until your computer is “idle” so it won’t slow your computer and waste your time while you’re using it. Running the “Rundll32.exe advapi32.dll,ProcessIdleTasks” command forces Windows to perform all of these tasks while you’re using the computer. This is completely pointless and won’t help free memory or anything like that — all you’re doing is forcing Windows to slow your computer down while you’re using it. This command only exists so benchmarking programs can force idle tasks to run before performing benchmarks, ensuring idle tasks don’t start running and interfere with the benchmark. Delay or Disable Windows Services There’s no real reason to disable Windows services anymore. There was a time when Windows was particularly heavy and computers had little memory — think Windows Vista and those “Vista Capable” PCs Microsoft was sued over. Modern versions of Windows like Windows 7 and 8 are lighter than Windows Vista and computers have more than enough memory, so you won’t see any improvements from disabling system services included with Windows. Some people argue for not disabling services, however — they recommend setting services from “Automatic” to “Automatic (Delayed Start)”. By default, the Delayed Start option just starts services two minutes after the last “Automatic” service starts. Setting services to Delayed Start won’t really speed up your boot time, as the services will still need to start — in fact, it may lengthen the time it takes to get a usable desktop as services will still be loading two minutes after booting. Most services can load in parallel, and loading the services as early as possible will result in a better experience. The “Delayed Start” feature is primarily useful for system administrators who need to ensure a specific service starts later than another service. If you ever find a guide that recommends you set a little-known registry setting to improve performance, take a closer look — the change is probably useless. Want to actually speed up your PC? Try disabling useless startup programs that run on boot, increasing your boot time and consuming memory in the background. This is a much better tip than doing any of the above, especially considering most Windows PCs come packed to the brim with bloatware.     

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  • HTC to launch Windows 7 phone in India

    - by samsudeen
    It is a good news for the Indian smart phone users as the wait is finally over for Windows 7 mobile.The Taiwanese  mobile giant HTC is all set to release its Windows 7 based Smartphone series in India from January. HTC HD7 & HTC Mozart , the two smart phones running on Windows 7 OS started appearing on the HTC Indian website (HTC India) from last week.Though Flip kart (Indian online e-commerce website)  has started getting pre -orders for HTC HD7 a month ago , the buzz has started from last week after the introduction of “HTC Mozart”. The complete feature comparison between both the smart phones is given below. Feature Comparison HTC Mozart HTC HD 7 Microsoft Windows 7 Microsoft Windows 7 Qualcomm Snapdragon Processor QSD 8250 1 GHz CPU Qualcomm Snapdragon Processor QSD 8250 1 GHz CPU 8MegaPixel camera with Xenon Flash 5 MP, 2592?1944 pixels, autofocus, dual-LED flash, 480 x 800 pixels, 3.7 inches 480 x 800 pixels, 4.3 inches 11.9mm thick and Weighs 130g 11.2 mm thick and Weighs 162 g Bluetooth 2.1 Bluetooth 2.1 8 GB of internal storage memory 8 GB of internal storage memory 512MB of ROM and 576 of RAM 512MB of ROM and 576 of RAM 3G HSDPA 7.2 Mbps and HSUPA 2 Mbps 3G HSDPA 7.2 Mbps; HSUPA 2 Mbps Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n Micro-USB interconnector Micro-USB interconnector 3.5mm audio jack 3.5mm audio jack GPS antenna GPS antenna Standard battery Li-Po 1300 MA Standard battery, Li-Ion 1230 MA Standby 360 h (2G) up to 435 h (3G) Up to 310 h (2G) / Up to 320 h (3G) Talk time Up to 6 h 40 min (2G) and 5 h 30 min (3G) Up to 6 h 20 min (2G) / Up to 5 h 20 min (3G) Estimated Price “HTC HD 7″ is priced between  INR 27855 to 32000. though the price of “HDT Mozart” is officially not announced it is estimated to be around INR 30000. Where to Buy The Windows 7 phone is not yet available in stores directly, but most of the leading mobile stores are getting pre -orders. I have given some of the online store links below. Flip kart UniverCell This article titled,HTC to launch Windows 7 phone in India, was originally published at Tech Dreams. Grab our rss feed or fan us on Facebook to get updates from us.

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  • Add "My Dropbox" to Your Windows 7 Start Menu

    - by The Geek
    Over here at How-To Geek, we’re huge fans of Dropbox, the amazingly fast online file sync utility, but we’d be even happier if we could natively add it to the Windows 7 Start Menu, where it belongs. And today, that’s what we’ll do. Yep, that’s right. You can add it to the Start Menu… using a silly hack to the Libraries feature and renaming the Recorded TV library to a different name. It’s not a perfect solution, but you can access your Dropbox folder this way and it just seems to belong there. First things first, head into the Customize Start Menu panel by right-clicking on the start menu and using Properties, then make sure that Recorded TV is set to “Display as a link”. Next, right-click on Recorded TV, choose Rename, and then change it to something else like My Dropbox.   Now you’ll want to right-click on that button again, and choose Properties, where you’ll see the Library locations in the list… the general idea is that you want to remove Recorded TV, and then add your Dropbox folder. Oh, and you’ll probably want to make sure to set “Optimize this library for” to “General Items”. At this point, you can just click on My Dropbox, and you’ll see, well, Your Dropbox! (no surprise there). Yeah, I know, it’s totally a hack. But it’s a very useful one! Also, if you aren’t already using Dropbox, you should really check it out—2 GB for free, accessible via the web from anywhere, and you can sync to multiple desktops. Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Use the Windows Key for the "Start" Menu in Ubuntu LinuxAccess Your Dropbox Files in Google ChromeSpeed up Windows Vista Start Menu Search By Limiting ResultsPin Any Folder to the Vista Start Menu the Easy WayEnable "Pin to Start Menu" for Folders in Windows Vista / XP TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 Classic Cinema Online offers 100’s of OnDemand Movies OutSync will Sync Photos of your Friends on Facebook and Outlook Windows 7 Easter Theme YoWindoW, a real time weather screensaver Optimize your computer the Microsoft way Stormpulse provides slick, real time weather data

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