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  • Application Demos in UPK

    - by [email protected]
    Over the years, User Productivity Kit has expanded to include solutions to many project challenges. As of UPK 3.6.1, solutions are provided for pre and post application go-live learning, application testing, system documentation, presentation output, and more. New in UPK 3.6.1 are additional features that can be used effectively for application demo purposes. This can come in handy when you need to do a demo but don't want to show or can't show the live application. Maybe you're doing a presentation for a group of project stakeholders and want to focus on the business workflow implemented by the application rather than the mechanics of using it. Or possibly, you need to show the application but you're disconnected from any network preventing you from running the live application. In any of these cases, a presentation aid that represents the live application is what's needed. Previous versions of the UPK topic player would allow you to do this but would always show those UPK user interface elements that help a user learn the application. When you're presenting the narrative live, the UPK bubbles can be a distraction. UPK 3.6.1 provides some new features that allow you to control whether the bubbles display. There are two ways to hide bubbles in a topic. The first is a topic property that allows you to control bubbles across the entire topic. There are 3 settings for the Show Bubbles topic property. The default setting is Use frame settings which allows you to control whether bubbles display on a frame by frame basis. When you choose Always, the bubbles will always display regardless of the frame setting. The final choice is Never. Choosing Never will hide every bubble in your topic with one setting change. As with Always, choosing Never will ignore the frame setting. The second way to control the bubbles is at the frame level. First ensure that the topic's Show Bubbles property is set to Use frame settings. Navigate to the frame on which you want to turn off the bubble and click the Display bubble for this frame button to turn off the bubble. When you play the topic, the bubble will no longer be displayed. Depending on your needs, you might also use another longstanding UPK feature that allows you to control whether the action area displays on a frame. Just click the Action area on/off button to toggle its display. I've found the frame properties to be useful beyond creating presentation aids. When creating "See It!" only topics for more advanced users, I may hide the bubbles on some of the more straightforward frames. For example, if I have a form where one needs to fill out an address, I may display the first bubble in the sequence and explain what the subsequent steps are doing. I then hide bubbles on the remaining frames which are the more mechanical steps of entering the address. We'd like to hear your thoughts on this new UPK feature. Use the comments below to tell us how you've used it. John Zaums Senior Director, Product Development Oracle User Productivity Kit

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  • User Produtivity Kit - Powerful Packages (Part 1)

    - by [email protected]
    User Productivity Kit provides the ability to create a variety of content types including robust topics on system process and web pages with formatted text and graphics. There are times when you want to enhance content with media types not naively created by User Productivity Kit, media types such as video, custom animations, forms, and more. One method of doing this is to maintain these media files on a web server - separate from the User Productivity Kit player content and link to the files using absolute URLs such as http://myserver/overview.html. While this will get you going, you won't benefit from the content management capabilities of the UPK Developer. Features such as check-in / check-out, history, document properties, folder permissions and more are not available to this external content. Further, if you ever need to move that content to a server with a different name or domain, you'd need to update all your links. UPK version 3.1 introduced a new document type - the package. A package is a group of folders and files that you manage in the Developer library as a single document. These package documents work in the same manner as any other document in the library and you can use all of the collaborative content development features you see with other document types. Packages can be used for anything from single Word documents, PDF files, and graphics to more intricate sets of inter-related files commonly seen with HTML files and their graphics, style sheets, and JavaScript files. The structure of the files and folders within a package will always be preserved so this means that any relative links between files in the package will work. For example, an HTML file containing an image tag with a relative link to a graphic elsewhere in the same package will continue to function properly both when viewed in the Developer and when published to outputs such as the UPK Player. Once you start to use packages, you'll soon discover that there is a lot of existing content that can be re-purposed by placing it into UPK packages. Packages are easily created by selecting File...New...Package. Files can be added in a number of ways including the "Add Files" button, copy & paste from Windows Explorer, and drag & drop. To use one of the files in the package, just create a link to the file in the package you want to target. This is supported throughout the Developer in places such as section & topic concepts, frame links and hyperlinks in web pages. A little more challenging is determining how to structure packages in your library. As I mentioned earlier, a package can contain anything from a single file to dozens of files and folders. So what should you do? You could create a package for each file. You could create one package for all your files. But which one is right? Well, there's not a right and wrong answer to this question. There are advantages and disadvantages to each. The right decision will be influenced by the package files themselves, the structure of the content in the library, the size and working style of the development team, how content is shared between different outlines and more. The first consideration can be assessed the quickest. If the content to be placed in the package is composed of multiple files and those files reference each other, they should be in the same package. There are loads of examples of this type of content. HTML files with graphics and style sheets, HTML files with embedded Flash movies, and Word documents saved as HTML are all examples where the content is composed of multiple files and the files reference each other in some way. Content like this should always be placed in a singe package such that these relative links between the files are preserved and play properly in the UPK Player. In upcoming posts, I'll explain additional considerations.

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  • Team Leaders & Authors - Manage and Report Workflow using "Print an Outline" in UPK

    - by [email protected]
    Did you know you can "print an outline?" You can print any outline or portion of an outline. Why might you want to "print an outline" in UPK... Have you ever wondered how many topics you have recorded, how many of your topics are ready for review, or even better, how many topics are complete! Do you need to report your project status to management? Maybe you just like to have a copy of your outline to refer to during development. Included in this output is the outline structure as well as the layout defined in the Details View of the Outline Editor. To print an outline, you must open either a module or section in the Outline Editor. A set of default data columns is automatically included in the output; however, you can configure which columns you want to appear in the report by switching to the Details view and customizing the columns. (To learn more about customizing your columns refer to the Add and Remove Columns section of the Content Development.pdf guide) To print an outline from the Outline Editor: 1. Open a module or section document in the Outline Editor. 2. Expand the documents to display the details that you want included in the report. 3. On the File menu, choose Print and use the toolbar icons to print, view, or save the report to a file. Personally, I opt to save my outline in Microsoft Excel. Using the delivered features of Microsoft Excel you can add columns of information, such as development notes, to your outline or you can graph and chart your Project status. As mentioned above you can configure what columns you want to appear in the outline. When utilizing the Print an Outline feature in conjunction with the Managing Workflow features of the UPK Multi-user instance you as a Team Lead or Author can better report project status. Read more about Managing Workflow below. Managing Workflow: The Properties toolpane contains special properties that allow authors to track document status or State as well as assign Document Ownership. Assign Content State The State property is an editable property for communicating the status of a document. This is particularly helpful when collaborating with other authors in a development team. Authors can assign a state to documents from the master list defined by the administrator. The default list of States includes (blank), Not Started, Draft, In Review, and Final. Administrators can customize the list by adding, deleting or renaming the values. To assign a State value to a document: 1. Make sure you are working online. 2. Display the Properties toolpane. 3. Select the document(s) to which you want to assign a state. Note: You can select multiple documents using the standard Windows selection keys (CTRL+click and SHIFT+click). 4. In the Workflow category, click in the State cell. 5. Select a value from the list. Assign Document Ownership In many enterprises, multiple authors often work together developing content in a team environment. Team leaders typically handle large projects by assigning specific development responsibilities to authors. The Owner property allows team leaders and authors to assign documents to themselves and other authors to track who is responsible for a specific document. You view and change document assignments for a document using the Owner property in the Properties toolpane. To assign a document owner: 1. Make sure you are working online. 2. On the View menu, choose Properties. 3. Select the document(s) to which you want to assign document responsibility. Note: You can select multiple documents using the standard Windows selection keys (CTRL+click and SHIFT+click). 4. In the Workflow category, click in the Owner cell. 5. Select a name from the list. Is anyone out there already using this feature? Share your ideas with the group. Those of you new to this feature, give it a test drive and let us know what you think. - Kathryn Lustenberger, Oracle UPK & Tutor Outbound Product Management

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  • Screenshot Tour: XBMC 11 Eden Rocks Improved iOS Support, AirPlay, and Even a Custom XBMC OS

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    XBMC, the wildly popular, free, and robust open-source media center suite, has a new version. XBMC 11 Eden is bursting with new features, improvements, and is even available as a stand-alone XBMC-centric OS. We’re big XBMC fans around here, so you’ll have to excuse us if we gush a little about how great the new XBMC 11 Eden release is. If you’re currently on XBMC 10, you’re in for quite a few treats with this upgrade. If you’ve never used XBMC before, well then, you’re in for a media center experience like you’ve never had one before. Here is what’s new in XBMC 11. How To Be Your Own Personal Clone Army (With a Little Photoshop) How To Properly Scan a Photograph (And Get An Even Better Image) The HTG Guide to Hiding Your Data in a TrueCrypt Hidden Volume

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  • what are the benefits of closure, primarily for PHP?

    - by Patrick
    I am beginning the process of moving code over to PHP 5.3 and one of the most highly touted features of PHP 5.3 is the ability to use closures. My understanding of closures is that they allow anonymous functions, can be assigned to variable names, and have interesting scoping abilities. From my point of view the only seeming benefits in real world applications is the reduction of clutter in the namespace because closures are anonymous. Am I wrong in this? Should I be trying to put closures wherever I code? EDIT: I have already read this post on Javascript closures.

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  • How to Own Your Own Website (Even If You Can’t Build One) Pt 3

    - by Eric Z Goodnight
    If you’ve followed along, you’ve bought hosting and installed WordPress software for a swanky new webpage. Today we’ll explain the less obvious perks of WordPress and how you can get a bit more mileage out of your new web software. This is the third and final entry in our series on owning your own website and creating content with a basic WordPress installation. In language any beginner could understand, we’ll talk about the plugins and tweaks that you can use to get features you might have not realized were even possible. How to Own Your Own Website (Even If You Can’t Build One) Pt 3 How to Sync Your Media Across Your Entire House with XBMC How to Own Your Own Website (Even If You Can’t Build One) Pt 2

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  • I am the Webmaster now. Where do I start? [closed]

    - by John C
    I just changed jobs and will soon be in charge of a custom-built ASP.NET CMS and website for a fairly large corporation with global offices. I have IT and developer FTE resources available to me but I am trying to build a list of branding, project, and functionality points to review. What guides or lists can/should I use to evaluate this website before I begin adding features, creating new projects, or even redesigning and redeveloping the site? (I have been a webmaster/designer/developer for small, WordPress/Drupal sites for 10 years. I have been an unofficial webmaster (director/content manager) for a large site for 3 years (no direct development control over Sharepoint administration, IIS, or hosting ... but everything else, I did. Analytics, email, advertising, social, SEO, etc.).) Thank you!

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  • How To Boot 10 Different Live CDs From 1 USB Flash Drive

    - by YatriTrivedi
    Ever get the urge to try out a bunch of Linux distros at once? Maybe you’re hosting a Linux installation party. Here’s an easy way to get a bunch of Live CDs working from a single thumb drive Latest Features How-To Geek ETC How To Boot 10 Different Live CDs From 1 USB Flash Drive The 20 Best How-To Geek Linux Articles of 2010 The 50 Best How-To Geek Windows Articles of 2010 The 20 Best How-To Geek Explainer Topics for 2010 How to Disable Caps Lock Key in Windows 7 or Vista How to Use the Avira Rescue CD to Clean Your Infected PC Tune Pop Enhances Android Music Notifications Another Busy Night in Gotham City Wallpaper Classic Super Mario Brothers Theme for Chrome and Iron Experimental Firefox Builds Put Tabs on the Title Bar (Available for Download) Android Trojan Found in the Wild Chaos, Panic, and Disorder Wallpaper

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  • Our Geek Trivia App for Windows 8 is Now Available Everywhere

    - by The Geek
    When we first released our Geek Trivia app, it was sadly only available in the US store for Windows 8, but now you can get it no matter where you live. It’s completely free, so get your copy right now! For those that aren’t familiar with this app—it’s really quite simple: if you want your daily dose of Geek Trivia to show up on a Live Tile on your Windows 8 Start Screen, get this app. We’ve also got quizzes, loads of previous trivia, and we’ll be adding even more features in the near future. Our Geek Trivia App for Windows 8 is Now Available Everywhere How To Boot Your Android Phone or Tablet Into Safe Mode HTG Explains: Does Your Android Phone Need an Antivirus?

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  • Beginner Geek: Everything You Need To Know About Browser Extensions

    - by Chris Hoffman
    Browser extensions extend your web browser with additional features, modify web pages, and integrate your browser with the other services you use. This guide will introduce you to the world of browser extensions and help you get started. If you’re a geek, this stuff is obvious to you. We geeks take this for granted — we know exactly what browser extensions can do, when to use them, and what to avoid. But not everyone knows all this stuff.    

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  • Tuesday at Oracle OpenWorld 2012 - Must See Session: “Jump-starting Integration Projects with Oracle AIA Foundation Pack”

    - by Lionel Dubreuil
    Don’t miss this “CON8769 - Jump-starting Integration Projects with Oracle AIA Foundation Pack“session: Date: Tuesday, Oct 2 Time: 1:15 PM - 2:15 PM Location: Marriott Marquis - Salon 7 Speakers: Robert Wunderlich - Principal Product Manager, Oracle Munazza Bukhari - Group Manager, AIA FP Product Management, Oracle The Oracle Application Integration Architecture Foundation Pack development lifecycle prescribes the best practice methodology for developing integrations between applications. The lifecycle is supported by a toolset that focuses on the architects and developers. Attend this session to understand how Oracle AIA Foundation Pack can jump-start integration project development and boost developer productivity. It demonstrates what the product does today and showcases new features such as support for building direct integrations. Objectives for this session are to: Understand how to boost developer productivity Hear about support for direct integrations Learn what’s new in Oracle AIA Foundation Pack

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  • What is the annoying/lacking feature in C#, in your opinion?

    - by Vimvq1987
    To be honest, I'm working with C# everyday, and I can say that I love its elegant syntax. But no language is perfect, so does C#. In my opinion, these two features are missing: Full-featured enum. I was pretty happy with enum in C#, until I know about enum in Java. Of course, we can "simulate" a full-featured enum in C# by class, but it's much better if Microsoft simplify this. Immutable keyword. We are told to let a class/struct immutable whenever possible. But to do that, we have to add readonly keyword to every field, and then if we add setter by a mistake, our class will be mutable, and nobody knows. By immutable keyword, every field will be automatically readonly, and any setter will be prohibited (error when compile). It's like static keyword added to class in C# 2.0 well. what's is your annoying/lacking feature in C#?

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  • How do you balance the speed of Sprints with the customer's conservative adoption schedule?

    - by Cheeso
    I'd prefer to have sprints that last 3-4 weeks, but customers don't want to adopt new feature/function every 3-4 weeks. Existing customers are conservative and, once we meet their minimum bar for features and capabilities, they like to remain on a stable release for much longer than 4 weeks. Even a 3-month cycle would be pushing it for them. On the other hand, newer customers tend to have more feature requests, and are willing to follow sprints. But this willingness dissipates after we've met their bar. How do you balance the need for rapid sprints with the customer's conservative view of application change? I'm particularly interested in SaaS scenarios.

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  • Are there any off the shelf solutions for feature use analysis?

    - by Riviera
    I write a set of productivity tools that sells online and have tens of thousands of users. While we do get very good feedback, this tens to come from only the most vocal users, so we fear we might be missing the big picture. We would like to know if there is any off the shelf (or nearly so) solution to capture usage of different features and to report usage patterns and trends over time. Note: These tools are native apps, not web-based. I know about Google Analytics and the like. They're great, but I'm looking for native code solutions.

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  • How to Use Google Chrome as Your Default PDF Reader (the Easy Way)

    - by The Geek
    If you’re anything like 99% of everybody, you have some sort of PDF viewing software installed on your PC—but did you realize that you can use Google Chrome to view PDFs from your PC? It’s easy! We’re showing off how to do this in Windows, but theoretically it would work for OS X or Linux as well. If you’ve tried it, let us know in the comments Latest Features How-To Geek ETC How to Use Google Chrome as Your Default PDF Reader (the Easy Way) How To Remove People and Objects From Photographs In Photoshop Ask How-To Geek: How Can I Monitor My Bandwidth Usage? Internet Explorer 9 RC Now Available: Here’s the Most Interesting New Stuff Here’s a Super Simple Trick to Defeating Fake Anti-Virus Malware How to Change the Default Application for Android Tasks Final Man vs. Machine Round of Jeopardy Unfolds; Watson Dominates The Legend of Zelda – 1980s High School Style [Video] Suspended Sentence is a Free Cross-Platform Point and Click Game Build a Batman-Style Hidden Bust Switch Make Your Clock Creates a Custom Clock for your Android Homescreen Download the Anime Angels Theme for Windows 7

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  • Windows 7 Service Pack 1 is Released: But Should You Install It?

    - by The Geek
    Microsoft has just released the final version of Service Pack 1 for Windows 7, but should you drop everything and go through the process of installing it? Where can you get it? We’ve got the answers for you. If you’ve never installed a service pack before, it’s just a big collection of fixes and changes for your operating system, bundled into a big fat download to make it more convenient if you reinstall—if you’ve kept Windows updated, it should have most of the fixes already installed through Windows Update Latest Features How-To Geek ETC How To Make Hundreds of Complex Photo Edits in Seconds With Photoshop Actions How to Enable User-Specific Wireless Networks in Windows 7 How to Use Google Chrome as Your Default PDF Reader (the Easy Way) How To Remove People and Objects From Photographs In Photoshop Ask How-To Geek: How Can I Monitor My Bandwidth Usage? Internet Explorer 9 RC Now Available: Here’s the Most Interesting New Stuff Never Call Me at Work [Humorous Star Wars Video] Add an Image Properties Listing to the Context Menu in Chrome and Iron Add an Easy to View Notification Badge to Tabs in Firefox SpellBook Parks Bookmarklets in Chrome’s Context Menu Drag2Up Brings Multi-Source Drag and Drop Uploading to Firefox Enchanted Swing in the Forest Wallpaper

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  • How to convince the agile product owner to change their mind? [closed]

    - by Joshiatto
    A friend of a friend ran into a situation recently in which the agile product owner specified features down to exactly what every single user click should look like. The problem is, the dev team has already figured out a way to accomplish the business value in fewer clicks (better UX), but in the past, questioning the product owner has led to career disaster. How do we convince the product owner to change their mind and go along with our recommendation? What can be done within the agile model to fix this situation and how do we accomplish it? On a bigger level: What can be done to make agile product owners better at their job to prevent this kind of thing from happening?

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  • What do you do when a user asks for a feature you will not implement?

    - by ifvc
    What do you do when a user asks for a complex feature that you could implement, but you aren't going to do it because 1) it adds unnecessary complexity to other users 2) you are not going to do it as an option either because you don't want your settings panel to be complicated. I wrote an iOS app and there are a few users that asked me for some complex features that I can't do because of the reasons above. Most of the times I just answered them that "We will take that into consideration." Explaining them that they are in the minority that wants this feature is not going to help either. So, what do you do in the case like this?

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  • Disabling redraw in WinForms app

    - by Ryan
    I'm working on a C#.Net application which has a somewhat annoying bug in it. The main window has a number of tabs, each of which has a grid on it. When switching from one tab to another, or selecting a different row in a grid, it does some background processing, and during this the menu flickers as it's redrawn (File, Help, etc menu items as well as window icon and title). I tried disabling the redraw on the window while switching tabs/rows (WM_SETREDRAW message) at first. In one case, it works perfectly. In the other, it solves the immediate bug (title/menu flicker), but between disabling the redraw and enabling it again, the window is "transparent" to mouse clicks - there's a small window (<1 sec) in which I can click and it will, say, highlight an icon on my desktop, as if the app wasn't there at all. If I have something else running in the background (Firefox, say) it will actually get focus when clicked (and draw part of the browser, say the address bar.) Here's code I added. m = new Message(); m.HWnd = System.Windows.Forms.Application.OpenForms[0].Handle; //top level m.WParam = (IntPtr)0; //disable redraw m.LParam = (IntPtr)0; //unused m.Msg = 11; //wm_setredraw WndProc(ref m); <snip - Application ignores clicks while in this section (in one case) m = new Message(); m.HWnd = System.Windows.Forms.Application.OpenForms[0].Handle; //top level m.WParam = (IntPtr)1; //enable m.LParam = (IntPtr)0; //unused m.Msg = 11; //wm_setredraw WndProc(ref m); System.Windows.Forms.Application.OpenForms[0].Refresh(); Does anyone know if a) there's a way to fix the transparent-application problem here, or b) if I'm doing it wrong in the first place and this should be fixed some other way?

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  • 6 Ways to Free Up Hard Drive Space Used by Windows System Files

    - by Chris Hoffman
    We’ve previously covered the standard ways to free up space on Windows. But if you have a small solid-state drive and really want more hard space, there are geekier ways to reclaim hard drive space. Not all of these tips are recommended — in fact, if you have more than enough hard drive space, following these tips may actually be a bad idea. There’s a tradeoff to changing all of these settings. Erase Windows Update Uninstall Files Windows allows you to uninstall patches you install from Windows Update. This is helpful if an update ever causes a problem — but how often do you need to uninstall an update, anyway? And will you really ever need to uninstall updates you’ve installed several years ago? These uninstall files are probably just wasting space on your hard drive. A recent update released for Windows 7 allows you to erase Windows Update files from the Windows Disk Cleanup tool. Open Disk Cleanup, click Clean up system files, check the Windows Update Cleanup option, and click OK. If you don’t see this option, run Windows Update and install the available updates. Remove the Recovery Partition Windows computers generally come with recovery partitions that allow you to reset your computer back to its factory default state without juggling discs. The recovery partition allows you to reinstall Windows or use the Refresh and Reset your PC features. These partitions take up a lot of space as they need to contain a complete system image. On Microsoft’s Surface Pro, the recovery partition takes up about 8-10 GB. On other computers, it may be even larger as it needs to contain all the bloatware the manufacturer included. Windows 8 makes it easy to copy the recovery partition to removable media and remove it from your hard drive. If you do this, you’ll need to insert the removable media whenever you want to refresh or reset your PC. On older Windows 7 computers, you could delete the recovery partition using a partition manager — but ensure you have recovery media ready if you ever need to install Windows. If you prefer to install Windows from scratch instead of using your manufacturer’s recovery partition, you can just insert a standard Window disc if you ever want to reinstall Windows. Disable the Hibernation File Windows creates a hidden hibernation file at C:\hiberfil.sys. Whenever you hibernate the computer, Windows saves the contents of your RAM to the hibernation file and shuts down the computer. When it boots up again, it reads the contents of the file into memory and restores your computer to the state it was in. As this file needs to contain much of the contents of your RAM, it’s 75% of the size of your installed RAM. If you have 12 GB of memory, that means this file takes about 9 GB of space. On a laptop, you probably don’t want to disable hibernation. However, if you have a desktop with a small solid-state drive, you may want to disable hibernation to recover the space. When you disable hibernation, Windows will delete the hibernation file. You can’t move this file off the system drive, as it needs to be on C:\ so Windows can read it at boot. Note that this file and the paging file are marked as “protected operating system files” and aren’t visible by default. Shrink the Paging File The Windows paging file, also known as the page file, is a file Windows uses if your computer’s available RAM ever fills up. Windows will then “page out” data to disk, ensuring there’s always available memory for applications — even if there isn’t enough physical RAM. The paging file is located at C:\pagefile.sys by default. You can shrink it or disable it if you’re really crunched for space, but we don’t recommend disabling it as that can cause problems if your computer ever needs some paging space. On our computer with 12 GB of RAM, the paging file takes up 12 GB of hard drive space by default. If you have a lot of RAM, you can certainly decrease the size — we’d probably be fine with 2 GB or even less. However, this depends on the programs you use and how much memory they require. The paging file can also be moved to another drive — for example, you could move it from a small SSD to a slower, larger hard drive. It will be slower if Windows ever needs to use the paging file, but it won’t use important SSD space. Configure System Restore Windows seems to use about 10 GB of hard drive space for “System Protection” by default. This space is used for System Restore snapshots, allowing you to restore previous versions of system files if you ever run into a system problem. If you need to free up space, you could reduce the amount of space allocated to system restore or even disable it entirely. Of course, if you disable it entirely, you’ll be unable to use system restore if you ever need it. You’d have to reinstall Windows, perform a Refresh or Reset, or fix any problems manually. Tweak Your Windows Installer Disc Want to really start stripping down Windows, ripping out components that are installed by default? You can do this with a tool designed for modifying Windows installer discs, such as WinReducer for Windows 8 or RT Se7en Lite for Windows 7. These tools allow you to create a customized installation disc, slipstreaming in updates and configuring default options. You can also use them to remove components from the Windows disc, shrinking the size of the resulting Windows installation. This isn’t recommended as you could cause problems with your Windows installation by removing important features. But it’s certainly an option if you want to make Windows as tiny as possible. Most Windows users can benefit from removing Windows Update uninstallation files, so it’s good to see that Microsoft finally gave Windows 7 users the ability to quickly and easily erase these files. However, if you have more than enough hard drive space, you should probably leave well enough alone and let Windows manage the rest of these settings on its own. Image Credit: Yutaka Tsutano on Flickr     

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  • Here’s a Super Simple Trick to Defeating Fake Anti-Virus Malware

    - by The Geek
    You might be wondering why we have a screenshot of what appears to be AVG Anti-Virus, but is in fact a fake anti-virus malware that holds your computer hostage until you pay them. Here’s a really simple tip to defeating these types of malware, and a quick review of other options. Not sure what we’re talking about? Be sure to check out our previous articles on cleaning up fake antivirus infections. How To Remove Internet Security 2010 and other Rogue/Fake Antivirus Malware How To Remove Antivirus Live and Other Rogue/Fake Antivirus Malware How To Remove Advanced Virus Remover and Other Rogue/Fake Antivirus Malware How To Remove Security Tool and other Rogue/Fake Antivirus Malware So what’s the problem? Can’t you just run a anti-virus scan? Well… it’s not quite that simple. What actually happens is that these pieces of malware block you from running almost anything on your PC, and often prevent you from running apps from a Flash drive, with an error like this: Once you encounter this error, there’s a couple things you can do. The first one is almost stupidly simple, and works some of the time Latest Features How-To Geek ETC Here’s a Super Simple Trick to Defeating Fake Anti-Virus Malware How to Change the Default Application for Android Tasks Stop Believing TV’s Lies: The Real Truth About "Enhancing" Images The How-To Geek Valentine’s Day Gift Guide Inspire Geek Love with These Hilarious Geek Valentines RGB? CMYK? Alpha? What Are Image Channels and What Do They Mean? Project M Brings Classic Super Smash Bro Style Gameplay to the Wii Now Together and Complete – McBain: The Movie [Simpsons Video] Be Creative by Using Hex and RGB Codes for Crayola Crayon Colors on Your Next Web or Art Project [Geek Fun] Flash Updates; Finally Supports Full Screen Video on Multiple Monitors 22 Ways to Recycle an Altoids Mint Tin Make Your Desktop Go Native with the Tribal Arts Theme for Windows 7

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  • The 50 Best Registry Hacks that Make Windows Better

    - by The Geek
    We’re big fans of hacking the Windows Registry around here, and we’ve got one of the biggest collections of registry hacks you’ll find. Don’t believe us? Here’s a list of the top 50 registry hacks that we’ve covered. It’s important to note that you should never hack the registry if you don’t know what you’re doing, because your computer will light on fire and some squirrels may be injured. Also, you should create a System Restore point before doing so. Otherwise, keep reading Latest Features How-To Geek ETC The 50 Best Registry Hacks that Make Windows Better The How-To Geek Holiday Gift Guide (Geeky Stuff We Like) LCD? LED? Plasma? The How-To Geek Guide to HDTV Technology The How-To Geek Guide to Learning Photoshop, Part 8: Filters Improve Digital Photography by Calibrating Your Monitor Our Favorite Tech: What We’re Thankful For at How-To Geek Snowy Christmas House Personas Theme for Firefox The Mystic Underground Tunnel Wallpaper Ubunchu! – The Ubuntu Manga Available in Multiple Languages Breathe New Life into Your PlayStation 2 Peripherals by Hooking Them Up to Your Computer Move the Window Control Buttons to the Left Side in Windows Fun and Colorful Firefox Theme for Windows 7

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  • Getting More Out of UPK

    - by [email protected]
    Are you getting the most out of UPK? Remember the idea of streamlining your content creation efforts? How about the concept of collaboration during development? How are you leveraging the System Process Documents or Test Scripts? Is your training team benefiting from the creation of process documentation? Is UPK linked into the help menu of your application or your even at the browser level (Smart Help)? Many customers underutilize UPK. Some customers just think of UPK as a training creation solution or just for creating documentation. To get the full value of UPK you need to first evaluate how the UPK developer is installed. Single User or Multi User? If you have more than two developers of UPK, then there is a significant benefit from installing UPK in multi user mode. This helps drive collaboration, automatic version control and better facilitation of the workflow and state features with use of customized views for the developers. Has your organization installed Usage Tracking? How are the outputs deployed and for how many applications? If these questions have you thinking about your overall usage of UPK and you see significant improvement by using more of what UPK has to offer, then it could be time for a UPK Health Check. Contact your UPK Sales Consultant to help understand your environment and how to maximize the value of UPK and start getting more out of the product.

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  • In-Application Support Made Easier

    - by matt.hicks
    With the availability of Oracle UPK 3.6.1 and Enablement Service Pack 1 for Oracle UPK 3.6.1 (Oracle Support login required for both), there are quite a few changes for content admins to absorb. In addition to the support added for dozens of application releases, patches and new target applications, we've also added features to make implementing and using In-Application Support even easier. First, the old Help Menu Integration Guides have been updated and combined into a single In-Application Support Guide. If you integrate UPK content for user assistance, or if you're interested in doing so, read the new guide! It covers all the integration steps, including a section on the new In-Application Support Configuration Utility. If you've integrated content in multiple languages, or if you've ever had to make configuration changes for UPK Help Integration, then you know how cumbersome it was to manually edit javascript files. No longer! The Player now includes a configuration utility that provides a web browser interface for setting all In-Application Support options. From the main screen, you see a list of applications covered by the published content. Clicking on an application name takes you to the edit configuration screen where you can set all Player options for that application. No more digging through the Player folders to find the right javascript file to edit. No complicated javascript syntax to make changes. And with Enablement Service Pack 1 we've added a new feature we're calling the Tabbed Gateway. The Tabbed Gateway is a top-level navigation bar for Help Integration. And all tabs, links, and text are controlled with the Configuration Utility... I think the Tabbed Gateway is a really cool and exciting feature for content launch. I can't wait to hear how your ideas for how to use it for your content. Let me know in comments or email!

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  • HTG Explains: What’s a Solid State Drive and What Do I Need to Know?

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    Solid State Drives (SSDs) are the lighting fast new kid on the hard drive block, but are they a good match for you? Read on as we demystify SSDs. The last few years have seen a marked increase in the availability of SSDs and a decrease in price (although it certainly may not feel that way when comparing prices between SSDs and traditional HDDs). What is an SSD? In what ways do you benefit the most from paying the premium for an SSD? What, if anything, do you need to do differently with an SSD? Read on as we cut through  the new-product-haze surrounding Solid State Drives. Latest Features How-To Geek ETC How to Get Amazing Color from Photos in Photoshop, GIMP, and Paint.NET Learn To Adjust Contrast Like a Pro in Photoshop, GIMP, and Paint.NET Have You Ever Wondered How Your Operating System Got Its Name? Should You Delete Windows 7 Service Pack Backup Files to Save Space? What Can Super Mario Teach Us About Graphics Technology? Windows 7 Service Pack 1 is Released: But Should You Install It? Save Files Directly from Your Browser to the Cloud in Chrome and Iron The Steve Jobs Chronicles – Charlie and the Apple Factory [Video] Google Chrome Updates; Faster, Cleaner Menus, Encrypted Password Syncing, and More Glowing Chess Set Combines LEDs, Chess, and DIY Electronics Fun Peaceful Alpine River on a Sunny Day [Wallpaper] Fast Society Creates Mini and Mobile Temporary Social Networks

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