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  • attempted WUBI install corrupted Vista

    - by oliver zimmermann
    Tried to install WUBI through Google Chrome on my Vista machine. Got through the usual warning about running new software, selected "continue" and waited for a prompt about where to install WUBI. Never got one...waited about 30 minutes (computer still running fine)...decided to reboot and try again. OOOOOPS. Was not able to reboot Vista. Ouch. When I run a Vista recovery CD it tells me there is an "X:" drive on what used to be my C: drive and it cannot find a Vista install to recover. Anyone seen this ? It is making me very happy... THANKS!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  • Sharing between Vista and Windows 7

    - by Metro Smurf
    Vista Ultimate 32 bit Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit I've read through similar questions about sharing between Win7 and Vista, but none of them have resolved my issue of not being able to share between Win7 and Vista: Connecting to a Vista shared folder from Windows 7 Networking Windows 7 and Vista Enable File sharing in Windows Vista Previously I had previously had my Vista and XP system sharing back and forth without any problems. I was able to access the shares without entering a user name / password in the NT challenge prompt (note: account names and passwords were different on the Vista and XP systems). Currently I replaced my XP system with a Win7 system. Now, when I attempt to access shares to/from Vista / Win7, I am continually prompted with an NT challenge to enter my credentials. Things I've Verified/Tried Both systems are on the same workgroup. Win 7 is using the Home network. Vista is using the Private network. In other words, neither system is using a Public network profile. Enabled file sharing with and without password protection on both Vista and Win7 Tried HomeGroup Connections (win7) with Windows to manage connections and Use user accounts to connect. Reviewed too many online articles to count to trouble shoot. Set the shares to have full control by everyone. Set up the shares directly on the directory and through the share manager. My Question How can I enable file sharing between Vista and Win7 without being prompted with a username/password challenge, ever?

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  • Triple boot vista xp ubuntu

    - by Artyom2033
    My partition table is pretty messed up from install/uninstall os and what I want to do now is to clear that and have vista/xp/ubuntu 12.04 on the same hard drive. I have create a new partition for xp on vista, everything was fine, but when I restarted my pc, I was getting the grub restore prompt. Even when I was trying to install xp, when the 'lunch windows' came, a wild BSOD appear. So I have deleted my partition for xp using gParted include in the 12.04 live cd. This haven't resolve the problem and I am still unable to boot in vista nor ubuntu. But I realy what this triple boot for LoL purpose (since my vista installation keep giving latency spike in this game and I hope this will not be the case in a fresh xp installation (I have tested it in ubuntu, the ping was good, but the fps wasn't). So what I want to do, is to install xp on a partition, then be able to boot on any of them without a problem from a nice installation of grub or something. gParted screenshot Thanks for help. Sorry for my English.

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  • Add keyboard languages to XP, Vista, and Windows 7

    - by Matthew Guay
    Do you regularly need to type in multiple languages in Windows?  Here we’ll show you the easy way to add and change input languages to your keyboard in XP, Vista, and Windows 7. Windows Vista and 7 come preinstalled with support for viewing a wide variety of languages, so adding an input language is fairly simply.  Adding an input language is slightly more difficult in XP, and requires installing additional files if you need an Asian or Complex script language.  First we show how to add an input language in Windows Vista and 7; it’s basically the same in both versions.  Then, we show how to add a language to XP, and also how to add Complex Script support.  Please note that this is only for adding an input language, which will allow you to type in the language you select.  This does not change your user interface language. Change keyboard language in Windows 7 and Vista It is fairly simple to add or change a keyboard language in Windows 7 or Vista.  In Windows 7, enter “keyboard language” in the Start menu search box, and select “Change keyboards or other input methods”. In Windows Vista, open Control Panel and enter “input language” in the search box and select “Change keyboards or other input methods”.  This also works in Windows 7. Now, click Change Keyboards to add another keyboard language or change your default one. Our default input language is US English, and our default keyboard is the US keyboard layout.  Click Add to insert another input language while still leaving your default input language installed. Here we selected the standard Thai keyboard language (Thai Kedmanee), but you can select any language you want.  Windows offers almost any language you can imagine, so just look for the language you want, select it, and click Ok. Alternately, if you want, you can click Preview to see your layout choice before accepting it.  This is only the default characters, not ones that will be activated with Shift or other keys (many Asian languages use many more characters than English, and require the use of Shift and other keys to access them all).  Once your finished previewing, click close and then press Ok on the previous dialog. Now you will see both of your keyboard languages in the Installed services box.  You can click Add to go back and get more, or move your selected language up or down (to change its priority), or simply click Apply to add the new language. Also, you can now change the default input language from the top menu.  This is the language that your keyboard will start with when you boot your computer.  So, if you mainly use English but also use another language, usually it is best to leave English as your default input language. Once you’ve pressed Apply or Ok, you will see a new icon beside your system tray with the initials of your default input language. If you click it, you can switch between input languages.  Alternately you can switch input languages by pressing Alt+Shift on your keyboard. Some complex languages, such as Chinese, may have extra buttons to change input modes to accommodate their large alphabet. If you would like to change the keyboard shortcut for changing languages, go back to the Input Languages dialog, and select the “Advanced Key Settings” tab.  Here you can change settings for Caps Lock and change or add key sequences to change between languages. Also, the On-Screen keyboard will display the correct keyboard language (here the keyboard is displaying Thai), which can be a helpful reference if your physical keyboard doesn’t have your preferred input language printed on it.  To open this, simply enter “On-Screen keyboard” in the start menu search, or click All Programs>Accessories>On-Screen keyboard. Change keyboard language in Windows XP The process for changing the keyboard language in Windows XP is slightly different.  Open Control Panel, and select “Date, Time, Language, and Regional Options”.   Select “Add other languages”. Now, click Details to add another language.  XP does not include support for Asian and complex languages by default, so if you need to add one of those languages we have details for that below. Click Add to add an input language. Select your desired language from the list, and choose your desired keyboard layout if your language offers multiple layouts.  Here we selected Canadian French with the default layout. Now you will see both of your keyboard languages in the Installed services box.  You can click Add to go back and add more, or move your selected language up or down (to change its priority), or simply click Apply to add the new language. Once you’ve pressed Apply or Ok, you will see a new icon beside your system tray with the initials of your default input language. If you click it, you can switch between input languages.  Alternately you can switch input languages by pressing Alt+Shift on your keyboard. If you would like to change the keyboard shortcut for changing languages, go back to the Input Languages dialog, and click the “Key Settings” button on the bottom of the dialog.  Here you can change settings for Caps Lock and change or add key sequences to change between languages. Add support to XP for Asian and Complex script languages Windows XP does not include support for Asian and Complex script languages by default, but you can easily add them to your computer.  This is useful if you wish to type in one of these languages, or simply want to read text written in these languages, since XP will not display these languages correctly if they are not installed.  If you wish to install Chinese, Japanese, and/or Korean, check the “Install files for East Asian languages” box.  Or, if you need to install a complex script language (including Arabic, Armenian, Georgian, Hebrew, the Indic languages, Thai, and Vietnamese), check the “Install files for complex script and right-to-left languages” box.   Choosing either of these options will open a prompt reminding you that this option will take up more disk space.  Support for complex languages will require around 10Mb of hard drive space, but East Asian language support may require 230 Mb or more free disk space.  Click Ok, and click apply to install your language files. You may have to insert your XP CD into your CD drive to install these files.  Insert the disk, and then click Ok. Windows will automatically copy the files, including fonts for these languages… …and then will ask you to reboot your computer to finalize the settings.  Click Yes, and then reopen the “Add other languages” dialog when your computer is rebooted, and add a language as before.     Now you can add Complex and/or Asian languages to XP, just as above.  Here is the XP taskbar language selector with Thai installed. Conclusion Unfortunately we haven’t found a way to add Asian and complex languages in XP without having an XP disc. If you know of a way, let us know in the comments. (No downloading the XP disc from torrent site answers please) Adding an input language is very important for bilingual individuals, and can also be useful if you simply need to occasionally view Asian or Complex languages in XP.  And by following the correct instructions for your version of Windows, it should be very easy to add, change, and remove input languages. Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Show Keyboard Shortcut Access Keys in Windows VistaKeyboard Ninja: 21 Keyboard Shortcut ArticlesAnother Desktop Cube for Windows XP/VistaThe "Up" Keyboard Shortcut for Windows 7 or Vista ExplorerWhat is ctfmon.exe And Why Is It Running? 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  • Need Help Accessing the Vista Wampserver localhost from Virtual PC 2007 running an XP VM.

    - by Reg
    (I had posted this on stack overflow but it was suggested there that I post it here instead). I have a Vista laptop on which I'm running wampserver. I have Virtual PC 2007 setup with Windows XP running on the VM. My goal is to be able to use the XP VM to run IE6 to view the localhost in the Vista wampserver. I'm not interested in having the XP VM have any access to the internet -- only to my Vista wampserver's localhost. The vista wampserver works fine. As suggested on a blog I read, I installed the loopback adapter on Vista and I set the loopback to 192.168.21.1 and I set the xp vm ip to 192.168.21.2. I am able to successfully ping the vista-loopback adapter from the xp vm. I've turned the wampserver to "server online", and I've disabled the firewalls in both the vista host and the xp vm. But for some reason, I still can't seem to get the virtual XP to see the localhost on the vista wampserver. I've tried using the vista //name, and I've tried the ip 192.168.21.1 directly and with the port. For whatever its worth, I'm not able to see anything under the XM VM's network places (though I don't know if I'm supposed to be able to see anything). So at this point I'm stuck and I'm still not sure how to get this XP VM to "talk" to my vista wampserver localhost. Any advice on how to fix this problem is much appreciated. Thanks in advance for your help. -R

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  • Install Ubuntu and erase Windows Vista

    - by miguel
    I have an older laptop with a ADA hard disk I can't really buy a new one so I want to erase Windows Vista on my computer and only have Ubuntu so that I can have more space. How do I make it go directly to my blank CD? My Windows Vista is messed up and I can't even get into it. I want to download the new version of Ubuntu while in Ubuntu. I downloaded it but it didn't go directly to the blank CD. I tried to copy all of Ubuntu onto the CD once it was downloaded but it says there was an error while copying. What should I do?

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  • Problem in booting Windows Vista after repairing using a boot repair disk

    - by Pubudu
    Been using Vista and I recently installed Ubuntu 11 in a separate hard disk(in BIOS, this hard disk was set for the 'Boot from' option)..Apart from the partitions used for Ubuntu, there are 2 more partitions(NTFS) in that hard disk..Then I installed Windows 7 on one of those partitions (just to see which Windows operating system I'd like to keep on using, along with Ubuntu)..But after installing Windows 7, the OS selection menu didn't appear anymore and had to fix it using the Boot-Repair-Disk... It kinda worked.. Now the OS selection menu is displayed.. But whenever I select Vista, it boots Windows 7...any thoughts on how to fix this? here's the link to the log generated by boot repair http://paste.debian.net/202691 I'm new to Ubuntu btw..

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  • How To Quickly Reboot Directly from Windows 7 to XP, Vista, or Ubuntu

    - by The Geek
    One of the biggest annoyances with a dual-boot system is having to wait for your PC to reboot to select the operating system you want to switch to, but there’s a simple piece of software that can make this process easier. This guest article was written by Ryan Dozier from the Doztech tech blog. With a small piece of software called iReboot we can skip the above step all together and instantly reboot into the operating system we want right from Windows. Their description says: “Instead of pressing restart, waiting for Windows to shut down, waiting for your BIOS to post, then selecting the operating system you want to boot into (within the bootloader time-limit!); you just select that entry from iReboot and let it do the rest!” Don’t worry about iReboot reconfiguring  your bootloader or any dual boot configuration you have. iReboot will only boot the selected operating system once and go back to your default settings. Using iReboot iReboot is quick and easy to install. Just download it, link below, run through the setup and select the default configuration. iReboot will automatically figure out what operating systems you have installed and appear in the taskbar. Go over to the taskbar and right click on the iReboot icon and select which operating system you want to reboot into. This method will add a check mark on the operating system you want to boot into. On your next reboot the system will automatically load your choice and skip the Windows Boot Manager. If you want to reboot automatically just select “Reboot on Selection” in the iReboot menu.   To be even more productive, you can install iReboot into each Windows operating system to quickly access the others with a few simple clicks.   iReboot does not work in Linux so you will have to reboot manually. Then wait for the Windows Boot Manager to load and select your operating system.   Conclusion iReboot works on  Windows XP, Windows Vista,  and Windows 7 as well as 64 bit versions of these operating systems. Unfortunately iReboot is only available for Windows but you can still use its functionality in Windows to quickly boot up your Linux machine. A simple reboot in Linux will take you back to Windows Boot Manager. Download iReboot from neosmart.net Editor’s note: We’ve not personally tested this software over at How-To Geek, but Neosmart, the author of the software, generally makes quality stuff. Still, you might want to test it out on a test machine first. If you’ve got any experience with this software, please be sure to let your fellow readers know in the comments. Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Restart the Ubuntu Gnome User Interface QuicklyKeyboard Ninja: 21 Keyboard Shortcut ArticlesTest Your Computer’s Memory Using Windows Vista Memory Diagnostic ToolEnable or Disable UAC From the Windows 7 / Vista Command LineSet Windows as Default OS when Dual Booting Ubuntu TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 Home Networks – How do they look like & the problems they cause Check Your IMAP Mail Offline In Thunderbird Follow Finder Finds You Twitter Users To Follow Combine MP3 Files Easily QuicklyCode Provides Cheatsheets & Other Programming Stuff Download Free MP3s from Amazon

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  • Installed ubuntu over windows vista..cant reinstall windows

    - by Marcuz J Hinojoz
    I recently used the "compress hard drive" option within windows. i got the horid "boot mngr is compressed" after the restart. i tried booting my system back to windows vista but it doesnt read the cd that came with my computer. i tried going into system recovery and going back to a previous date but it didnt work. i kept pressing f8 but nothing. i installed ubuntu(the ubuntu cd worked but windows didnt?) i installed ubuntu so i could atleast get in my computer, and i still wasnt able to install windows from there. my hard drive got reformatted to a ext4? and windows cant install because it doesnt read it? im not sure, but its very frustrating. my computer is a gateway gt5668e windows vista home premium with sp1. im a graphic designer and use programs such as photoshop and cinema 4d to do my projects..i have been at a unfortunate halt with my work and i am really bummed out and dont know what to do... any help?

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  • How to Assign a Static IP Address in XP, Vista, or Windows 7

    - by Mysticgeek
    When organizing your home network it’s easier to assign each computer it’s own IP address than using DHCP. Here we will take a look at doing it in XP, Vista, and Windows 7. If you have a home network with several computes and devices, it’s a good idea to assign each of them a specific address. If you use DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol), each computer will request and be assigned an address every time it’s booted up. When you have to do troubleshooting on your network, it’s annoying going to each machine to figure out what IP they have. Using Static IPs prevents address conflicts between devices and allows you to manage them more easily. Assigning IPs to Windows is essentially the same process, but getting to where you need to be varies between each version. Windows 7 To change the computer’s IP address in Windows 7, type network and sharing into the Search box in the Start Menu and select Network and Sharing Center when it comes up.   Then when the Network and Sharing Center opens, click on Change adapter settings. Right-click on your local adapter and select Properties. In the Local Area Connection Properties window highlight Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) then click the Properties button. Now select the radio button Use the following IP address and enter in the correct IP, Subnet mask, and Default gateway that corresponds with your network setup. Then enter your Preferred and Alternate DNS server addresses. Here we’re on a home network and using a simple Class C network configuration and Google DNS. Check Validate settings upon exit so Windows can find any problems with the addresses you entered. When you’re finished click OK. Now close out of the Local Area Connections Properties window. Windows 7 will run network diagnostics and verify the connection is good. Here we had no problems with it, but if you did, you could run the network troubleshooting wizard. Now you can open the command prompt and do an ipconfig  to see the network adapter settings have been successfully changed.   Windows Vista Changing your IP from DHCP to a Static address in Vista is similar to Windows 7, but getting to the correct location is a bit different. Open the Start Menu, right-click on Network, and select Properties. The Network and Sharing Center opens…click on Manage network connections. Right-click on the network adapter you want to assign an IP address and click Properties. Highlight Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) then click the Properties button. Now change the IP, Subnet mask, Default Gateway, and DNS Server Addresses. When you’re finished click OK. You’ll need to close out of Local Area Connection Properties for the settings to go into effect. Open the Command Prompt and do an ipconfig to verify the changes were successful.   Windows XP In this example we’re using XP SP3 Media Center Edition and changing the IP address of the Wireless adapter. To set a Static IP in XP right-click on My Network Places and select Properties. Right-click on the adapter you want to set the IP for and select Properties. Highlight Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and click the Properties button. Now change the IP, Subnet mask, Default Gateway, and DNS Server Addresses. When you’re finished click OK. You will need to close out of the Network Connection Properties screen before the changes go into effect.   Again you can verify the settings by doing an ipconfig in the command prompt. In case you’re not sure how to do this, click on Start then Run.   In the Run box type in cmd and click OK. Then at the prompt type in ipconfig and hit Enter. This will show the IP address for the network adapter you changed.   If you have a small office or home network, assigning each computer a specific IP address makes it a lot easier to manage and troubleshoot network connection problems. Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Change Ubuntu Desktop from DHCP to a Static IP AddressChange Ubuntu Server from DHCP to a Static IP AddressVista Breadcrumbs for Windows XPCreate a Shortcut or Hotkey for the Safely Remove Hardware DialogCreate a Shortcut or Hotkey to Eject the CD/DVD Drive TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips HippoRemote Pro 2.2 Xobni Plus for Outlook All My Movies 5.9 CloudBerry Online Backup 1.5 for Windows Home Server Nice Websites To Watch TV Shows Online 24 Million Sites Windows Media Player Glass Icons (icons we like) How to Forecast Weather, without Gadgets Outlook Tools, one stop tweaking for any Outlook version Zoofs, find the most popular tweeted YouTube videos

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  • Play Your Favorite DOS Games in XP, Vista, and Windows 7

    - by Matthew Guay
    Want to take a trip down memory lane with old school DOS games?  D-Fend Reloaded makes it easy for you to play your favorite DOS games directly on XP, Vista, and Windows 7. D-Fend Reloaded is a great frontend for DOSBox, the popular DOS emulator.  It lets you install and run many DOS games and applications directly from its interface without ever touching a DOS prompt.  It works great on XP, Vista, and Windows 7 32 & 64-bit versions.   Getting Started Download D-Fend Reloaded (link below), and install with the default settings.  You don’t need to install DOSBox, as D-Fend Reloaded will automatically install all the components you need to run DOS games on Windows. D-Fend Reloaded can also be installed as a portable application, so you can run it from a flash drive on any Windows computer by selecting User defined installation. Then select Portable mode installation. Once D-Fend Reloaded is installed, you can go ahead and open the program. Then simply click “Accept all settings” to apply the default settings.   D-Fend is now ready to run all of your favorite DOS games. Installing DOS Games and Applications: To install a DOS game or application, simply drag-and-drop a zip file of the app into D-Fend Reloaded’s window.  D-Fend Reloaded will automatically extract the program… Then will ask you to name the application and choose where to store it — by default it uses the name of the DOS app. Now you’ll see a new entry for the app you just installed.  Simply double-click to run it.   D-Fend will remind you that you can switch out of fullscreen mode by pressing Alt+Enter, and can also close the DOS application by pressing Ctrl+F9.  Press Ok to run the program. Here we’re running Ms. PacPC, a remake of the classic game Ms. Pac-Man, in full-screen mode.  All features work automatically, including sound, and you never have to setup anything from DOS command line — it just works. Here it’s in windowed mode running on Windows 7. Please note that your color scheme may change to Windows Basic while running DOS applications. You can run DOS application just as easily.  Here’s Word 5.5 running in in DOSBox through D-Fend Reloaded… Game Packs: Want to quickly install many old DOS freeware and trial games?  D-Fend Reloaded offers several game packs that let you install dozens of DOS games with only four clicks…just download and run the game pack installer of your choice (link below). Now you’ve got a selection of DOS games to choose from. Here’s a group of poor lemmings walking around … in Windows 7. Conclusion D-Fend Reloaded gives you a great way to run your favorite DOS games and applications directly from XP, Vista, and Windows 7.  Give it a try, and relive your DOS days from the comfort of your Windows desktop. What were some of your favorite DOS games and applications? Leave a comment and let us know. Links Download D-Fend Reloaded Download DOS game packs for D-Fend Reloaded Download Ms. Pac-PC Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Friday Fun: Get Your Mario OnFriday Fun: Go Retro with PacmanThursday’s Pre-Holiday Lazy Links RoundupFriday Fun: Five More Time Wasting Online GamesFriday Fun: Holiday Themed Games TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 PCmover Professional The Growth of Citibank Quickly Switch between Tabs in IE Windows Media Player 12: Tweak Video & Sound with Playback Enhancements Own a cell phone, or does a cell phone own you? Make your Joomla & Drupal Sites Mobile with OSMOBI Integrate Twitter and Delicious and Make Life Easier

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  • Fix MBR from installed Windows Vista

    - by Danilo
    Hi guys, I have a quite strange problem. I had a system with Vista and Ubuntu installed. We always use Vista and Ubuntu was something we really did not need. BUT: to boot, GRUB was used (I guess grub2). Now, while being in Vista I cancelled the Ubuntu partition and with it also GRUB. Now the system does not boot anymore. I tried to reinstall Ubuntu, but I had some problems with the CD. At the moment, when the system boots I get into the GRUB shell. From there, I am able to boot Windows Vista with some commands like this ones: grub> title windows rootnoverify (hd0,msdos3) chainloader +1 boot Now the question is: if I am able to boot in Windows Vista with this trick, is it possible to fix the MBR from inside the installed windows Vista with some command/tool of Vista itself? I shall probably mention that we are not interested in double boot at the moment. We only want Vista to start. I can sum up the question like this: is there a way to fix the MBR from the installed version on Windows Vista, considering that GRUB is at the moment installed? I hope I was clear enough. Thanks for your help.

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  • Windows Vista Update Now Wont Boot Up

    - by thatryan
    My friend just updated her Windows Vista to service pack 1, or tried to. Now it wont boot up. Just black screen, some errors etc. I tried googling it and lots of people had this problem it seems. Anyone find a fix for it? I read somewhere I believe that Microsoft said to delete some files, Nvidia maybe? But I can not find that again, I forgot the exact error code I searched for before. Does anyone know what I am talking about? LOL Thanks guys.

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  • Windows vista shows ISO file as ZIP!

    - by Nedish
    When I download the ISO file my system shows the file as a zip file and not an ISO. I have tried to burn the file as an image to a DVD but my laptop will not bootup from the CD. Settting in the BIOS are ok so I guess the problem is with the ISO file or the way i burned the CD. I have follwed the instructions on the site for downloading and burning an ISO image to CD so I guess that my problem is with the file association in windows Vista. Any ideas and suggestrions welcome Thanks

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  • How to Add Control Panel to “My Computer” in Windows 7 or Vista

    - by The Geek
    Back in the Windows XP days, you could easily add Control Panel to My Computer with a simple checkbox in the folder view settings. Windows 7 and Vista don’t make this quite as easy, but there’s still a way to get it back. To make this tweak, we’ll be doing a quick registry hack, but there’s a downloadable version provided as well. Manual Registry Tweak to Add Control Panel Open up regedit.exe through the start menu search or run box, and then browse down to the following key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\MyComputer\NameSpace Now that you’re there, you’ll need to right-click and create a new key… If you want to add the regular Control Panel view, with the categories, you’ll need to use one GUID as the name of the key. If you want the icon view instead, you can use the other key. Here they are: Category View:  {26EE0668-A00A-44D7-9371-BEB064C98683} Icon View: {21EC2020-3AEA-1069-A2DD-08002B30309D} Once you’re done, it should look like this: Now over in the Computer view, just hit the F5 key to refresh the panel, and you should see the new icon pop up in the list: Now when you click on the icon you’ll be taken to Control Panel. If you didn’t know how to change the view before, you can use the drop-down box on the right-hand side to switch between Category and icon view. Downloadable Registry Hack Rather than deal with manual registry editing, you can simply download the file, extract it, and then either double-click on the AddCategoryControlPanel.reg to add the Category view icon, or AddIconControlPanel.reg to add the other icon. There’s an uninstall script provided for each. Download ControlPanelMyComputer Registry Hack from howtogeek.com Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Disable User Account Control (UAC) the Easy Way on Win 7 or VistaHow To Figure Out Your PC’s Host Name From the Command PromptRestore Missing Desktop Icons in Windows 7 or VistaNew Vista Syntax for Opening Control Panel Items from the Command-lineAdd Registry Editor to Control Panel TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 Have Fun Editing Photo Editing with Citrify Outlook Connector Upgrade Error Gadfly is a cool Twitter/Silverlight app Enable DreamScene in Windows 7 Microsoft’s “How Do I ?” Videos Home Networks – How do they look like & the problems they cause

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  • Under kvm, Vista guest OS install halts on black screen

    - by Isaac Sutherland
    I am using kvm on my ubuntu-server-10.04 amd64 dual core PC. I am trying to install a Windows Vista guest OS. The installation proceeds properly until the system reboot halfway into the installation process, at which point it stops on a black screen and CPU usage goes to near zero. I created the vm with virt-install as follows: virt-install -n vista --connect qemu:///system -r 1024 -vcpus 2 \ --os-type windows --os-variant vista \ --virt-type kvm --accelerate \ -c /dev/sr0 \ --disk path=/dev/main/vista-hd \ --network bridge=br0 \ --vnc --noautoconsole Where /dev/sr0 is the physical drive with the vista installation DVD, and /dev/main/vista-hd is a 20-GB lvm logical volume I created. A number of people seem to have had success installing vista under KVM, but I haven't been able to determine what is causing my problem. Ideas anyone?

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  • Add the Recycle Bin to Start Menu in Windows 7

    - by Matthew Guay
    Have you ever tried to open the Recycle Bin by searching for “recycle bin” in the Start menu search, only to find nothing?  Here’s a quick trick that will let you find the Recycle Bin directly from your Windows Start menu search. The Start menu search may be the best timesaver ever added to Windows.  In fact, we use it so much that it seems painful to manually search for a program when using Windows XP or older versions of Windows.  You can easily find files, folders, programs and more through the Start menu search in both Vista and Windows 7. However, one thing you cannot find is the recycle bin; if you enter this in the start menu search it will not find it. Here’s how to add the Recycle Bin to your Start menu search. What to do To access the Recycle Bin from the Start menu search, we need to add a shortcut to the start menu.  Windows includes a personal Start menu folder, and an All Users start menu folder which all users on the computer can see.  This trick only works in the personal Start menu folder. Open up an Explorer window (Simply click the Computer link in the start menu), click the white part of the address bar, and, enter the following (substitute your username for your_user_name) and hit Enter. C:\Users\your_user_name\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu Now, right-click in the folder, select New, and then click Shortcut. In the location box, enter the following: explorer.exe shell:RecycleBinFolder When you’ve done this, click Next. Now, enter a name for the shortcut.  You can enter Recycle Bin like the standard shortcut, or you could name it something else such as Trash…if that’s easier for you to remember.  Click Finish when your done. By default it will have a folder icon.  Let’s switch that to the standard Recycle Bin icon.  Right-click on the new shortcut and click Properties. Click Change Icon… Type the following in the “Look for icons in this file:” box, and press the Enter key on your keyboard: %SystemRoot%\system32\imageres.dll Now, scroll and find the Recycle Bin icon and click Ok. Click Ok in the previous dialog, and now your Recycle Bin shortcut has the correct icon.   You can even have multiple shortcuts with different names, so when you searched either Recycle Bin or Trash it would come up in the Start menu.  To do that, simply repeat these directions, and enter another name of your choice at the prompt.  Here we have both a Recycle Bin and a Trash icon. Now, when you enter Recycle Bin (or trash, depending on what you chose) in your Start menu search, you will see it at the top of your Start menu.  Simply press Enter or click on the icon to open the Recycle Bin.   This trick will work in Windows Vista too!  Simply follow these same directions, and you can add the Recycle Bin to your Vista Start menu and find it via search. This is a simple trick, but may make it  much easier for you to open your Recycle Bin directly from your Windows Vista or 7 Start menu search.  If you’re using Windows 7, you can also check out our directions on how to Add the Recycle Bin to the Taskbar in Windows 7. Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Hide, Delete, or Destroy the Recycle Bin Icon in Windows 7 or VistaDisable Deletion of the Recycle Bin in Windows VistaHide the Recycle Bin Icon Text on Windows VistaAdd the Recycle Bin to the Taskbar in Windows 7Resize the Recycle Bin in XP TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 PCmover Professional StockFox puts a Lightweight Stock Ticker in your Statusbar Explore Google Public Data Visually The Ultimate Excel Cheatsheet Convert the Quick Launch Bar into a Super Application Launcher Automate Tasks in Linux with Crontab Discover New Bundled Feeds in Google Reader

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  • I have installed Ubuntu 12.04, now my Windows Vista doesn't boot

    - by andraz
    I have a Windows Vista computer. And I've installed Ubuntu 12.04 on it. But now, when I boot my device it doesn't ask me which OS I want to choose, instead it just boots in Ubuntu. Please help me! I don't know what to do... :/ P.S.: I've created a partition with the Ubuntu installer. My hard disk drive is 250 gb (there around) and the partition is 30gb big... P.S.S.: It's very important because is my mom's computer and there are some very important files on it... :(

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  • Windows Server 2003 can't see Vista machine

    - by Django Reinhardt
    Hi there, I've got a real PITA problem that I'm sure has a really simple solution. I have a Windows Server 2003 machine that needs to be able to see the network name of a Vista box - but refuses to. It can see the Vista box (and even access its shared folder) if I enter the Vista box's IP address. Problem is: SQL Server refuses to do Replication with anything other than the "actual server name". That means that the 2003 machine needs to be able to connect through the Vista machines network name... not just its IP address. I'm guessing it's a simple incompatibility between OS's, but I'm sure there's got to be a simple way of fixing it. Note: Yes, the Vista machine can connect to 2003 machine, no problem. And other machines in the office can connect to both the Vista machine and 2003 (they have more recent OS's). Thanks for any help!

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  • Couldn't dual boot Vista and Centos 5.4

    - by jack sparrow
    Hi all, Today I have installed Centos 5.4 with dual boot with Vista. Everything was fine, but after testing Centos 5.4, when I tried to load Vista, it did not load. After selecting vista from grub menu, it shows the following message: rootnoverify (hd0, 1) chainloader +1 No bootmgr found I googled and try to fix the boot but failed, Then I restart my machine, boot with vista cd and in rescue option, restore my bootmgr by typing bootrec /fixmbr What happened after that, I can load at vista now, but no grub menu shows :P It seems the Centos went totally invisible. I am using dual booting Ubuntu 9.10 and vista in my laptop and its working fine and with no error from the beginning. But installed Centos for one of my project needs and I need it running asap. So I am feeling very helpless. Please help me anyone out there. I know there are many people knows how to fix it. Please help me.. Thanks in advance.

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  • Connecting to a Vista shared folder from Windows 7

    - by Olivier Lalonde
    I have 2 computers: one is on Vista and the other one is on Windows 7. I made a shared folder on my vista computer and tried adding it from my windows 7 computer. I keep getting the following message when trying to click on my Vista computer from my Windows 7: Windows cannot access \\COMPUTER-NAME You do not have permission to access \\COMPUTER-NAME. Contact your network administrator to request access. How do you access a Vista shared drive from Windows 7 ?

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  • CheckPoint SecuRemote / SecureClient on Vista 64

    - by cliff.meyers
    According to this page, CheckPoint's SecuRemote client is not supported on Vista 64: https://supportcenter.checkpoint.com/supportcenter/portal?eventSubmit%5FdoGoviewsolutiondetails=&solutionid=sk36681 Unfortunately in working with the systems team they will not confirm if the other two clients (SSL Network Extender or Endpoint Connect) are supported by their environment. Does anyone know if it would be possible to do the following? Install VMware Workstation on my Vista 64 system (host) install a Vista 32-bit OS in a virtual machine (guest) Install SecuRemote VPN client within the guest (Vista 32) Get my Vista 64 machine (host) to use the VPN connection from the guest Any other ideas are more than welcome.

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  • Set up ad hoc wireless connection between Windows Vista and Mac OS X

    - by Skarab
    I have the following problem - Windows Vista does not connect to adhoc wireless network created on my Macbook. I have tried to create secured (with 40 bit key) and unsecured network but Windows Vista still has problems to connect. Windows VISTA informs me -- after 5 minutes of attempts - that setting up the connection -- with my adhoc network -- took too much time. My question: do I need to configure some settings on Vista to connect it to my Macbook? Maybe it is a problem with DHCP? Edited: I have tried the other way: http://superuser.com/questions/202890/set-up-an-adhoc-network-in-windows-vista-to-connect-to-and-share-the-internet-con

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  • CheckPoint SecuRemote / SecureClient on Vista 64

    - by cliff.meyers
    According to this page, CheckPoint's SecuRemote client is not supported on Vista 64: https://supportcenter.checkpoint.com/supportcenter/portal?eventSubmit%5FdoGoviewsolutiondetails=&solutionid=sk36681 Unfortunately in working with the systems team they will not confirm if the other two clients (SSL Network Extender or Endpoint Connect) are supported by their environment. Does anyone know if it would be possible to do the following? Install VMware Workstation on my Vista 64 system (host) install a Vista 32-bit OS in a virtual machine (guest) Install SecuRemote VPN client within the guest (Vista 32) Get my Vista 64 machine (host) to use the VPN connection from the guest Any other ideas are more than welcome.

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  • Set up ad hoc wireless connection between Windows Vista and Mac OS X

    - by Skarab
    I have the following problem - Windows Vista does not connect to adhoc wireless network created on my Macbook. I have tried to create secured (with 40 bit key) and unsecured network but Windows Vista still has problems to connect. Windows VISTA informs me -- after 5 minutes of attempts - that setting up the connection -- with my adhoc network -- took too much time. My question: do I need to configure some settings on Vista to connect it to my Macbook? Maybe it is a problem with DHCP? Edited: I have tried the other way: http://superuser.com/questions/202890/set-up-an-adhoc-network-in-windows-vista-to-connect-to-and-share-the-internet-con

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