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  • Reinstalling a fresh Windows 8 on my new laptop

    - by AlexV
    OK I have a new Dell (Inspiron 15R 5520) laptop that came with Windows 8 pre-installed. I'm really not a fan of pre-installed Windows since they are bundled with tons of softwares I don't want and settings I don't like. I would like to reinstall it myself with a fresh installation. I have bought Windows 8 Pro OEM already for my desktop computer and it came with the usual OEM sticker with the Windows serial on it. Now my new laptop only have a Windows 8 logo sticker on it with no serial on it. After some research it seems it's normal. Now, can I format my laptop and install Windows 8 (not pro) from my Windows 8 Pro OEM DVD? I ask because when I installed Windows 8 Pro it asked for the serial (which was found on the sticker). I'm wondering if the same DVD will detect the serial on the BIOS of my new laptop or I need a special Dell DVD for that?

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  • How can I know which key of Windows Vista corresponds to the upgrade key of Windows 7

    - by js_
    I have two Dell PCs. And each PC has a Windows Vista disc and a Windows 7 upgrade disc which Dell gave me for free. And each disc has a product key. There are 4 product keys in total. I'm going to sell one of the Dell PCs. But unfortunately I don't know which product key of Windows 7 corresponds to which product key of Windows Vista. If I sell the PC with wrong combination of a Windows Vista and a Windows 7, error will occur and I will get in trouble. How can I know which Windows 7 corresponds to which Windows Vista?

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  • In Windows 7, why can't I use perfmon against a remote server?

    - by SomeGuy
    I am on Windows 7 and trying to run perfmon against Windows 2003 and Windows 2008 servers. I am running into the same issue with all remote machines. When creating a data collector set, I specify a domain account that is in the administrators group on the remote machines (and "Performance Log Users" and "Performance Monitor Users" to be safe). On the "Available Counters" screen, When I type in a remote computer name, PerfMon locks up for a good 2-3 minutes before I can add any counters. I can then save the collector set. However, when I save it, the go/stop buttons are disabled if I click the set in the left panel, and missing if I click the Data collector set itself in the right panel. See the screens below. I can run data collector sets against my local machine with no problem. I am opening perfmon with my local account in both scenarios. I also have Remote Registry Service started on each remote machine. What is going on?

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  • Run Explorer in SYSTEM account on Windows Vista or 7 using Sysinternal’s psexec tool?

    - by Rob
    Has anyone been successful at launching an instance of Windows Explorer in the SYSTEM account on Windows Vista or 7? It is possible to do this on XP, but I haven't been able to get it to completely work in Vista or 7. Trying to launch Explorer as SYSTEM into session 1 (my user session) results in Explorer exiting immediately and returning an error code of 1. I can launch Explorer as SYSTEM into session 0 with the following command: psexec -i 0 -s explorer That will create an instance of explorer running as SYSTEM with a taskbar and start menu on the hidden session 0 desktop, but won't let you open a file browser window. If you switch to the hidden session 0 desktop and try to open an Explorer window from there to browse files, the following error message appears: "The server process could not be started because the configured identity is incorrect. Check the username and password." I have set the following registry key to 1 for my user account and the SYSTEM account: \Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Advanced\SeparateProcess There has got to be a way to make this work? If it is not possible, can anyone explain why? -Rob

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  • How to back up non-standard directories in my user profile with Windows Backup?

    - by James Johnston
    I'm using Windows Backup to back up my Win7 Pro laptop. I'd like to use it to back up my complete user profile, but I only see standard profile directories (e.g. C:\Users\JohnstonJ\Documents) in the list. Non-standard ones aren't there (e.g. C:\Users\JohnstonJ\MyCustomDirectory). What's the best way to handle this? The only thing I can think of is to browse under the "Computer" entry and navigate directly to C:\Users\JohnstonJ and check off the entire profile (to get what's in there, and any new directories that come up). But is that going to back up the profile twice? Cause other unforeseen problems given that I checked it off by navigating through the computer, rather than picking it under the "Data Files" category? (e.g. back up temporary file garbage, files in use problems, etc. that the "Data Files" category might be handling better). Looking for solutions that other people use that are known to work well and still uses the Windows Backup software - I don't really want to fuss with 3rd-party backup software. Example - as you can see, I have two directories in my profile that Windows Backup is not offering to back up: "Dropbox" and "New folder": (Link to images album because I don't have enough reputation to directly embed them: http://imgur.com/a/Xyv5u)

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  • Using Windows Explorer, how to find file names starting with a dot (period), in 7 or Vista?

    - by Chris W. Rea
    I've got a MacBook laptop in the house, and when Mac OS X copies files over the network, it often brings along hidden "dot-files" with it. For instance, if I copy "SomeUtility.zip", there will also be copied a hidden ".SomeUtility.zip" file. I consider these OS X dot-files as useless turds of data as far as the rest of my network is concerned, and don't want to leave them on my Windows file server. Let's assume these dot-files will continue to happen. i.e. Think of the issue of getting OS X to stop creating those files, in the first place, to be another question altogether. Rather: How can I use Windows Explorer to find files that begin with a dot / period? I'd like to periodically search my file server and blow them away. I tried searching for files matching ".*" but that yielded – and not unexpectedly – all files and folders. Is there a way to enter more specific search criteria when searching in Windows Explorer? I'm referring to the search box that appears in the upper-right corner of an Explorer window. Please tell me there is a way to escape my query to do what I want? (Failing that, I know I can map a drive letter and drop into a cygwin prompt and use the UNIX 'find' command, but I'd prefer a shiny easy way.)

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  • Using Windows Explorer, how to find file names starting with a dot (period), in 7 or Vista?

    - by Chris W. Rea
    I've got a MacBook laptop in the house, and when Mac OS X copies files over the network, it often brings along hidden "dot-files" with it. For instance, if I copy "SomeUtility.zip", there will also be copied a hidden ".SomeUtility.zip" file. I consider these OS X dot-files as useless turds of data as far as the rest of my network is concerned, and don't want to leave them on my Windows file server. Let's assume these dot-files will continue to happen. i.e. Think of the issue of getting OS X to stop creating those files, in the first place, to be another question altogether. Rather: How can I use Windows Explorer to find files that begin with a dot / period? I'd like to periodically search my file server and blow them away. I tried searching for files matching ".*" but that yielded – and not unexpectedly – all files and folders. Is there a way to enter more specific search criteria when searching in Windows Explorer? I'm referring to the search box that appears in the upper-right corner of an Explorer window. Please tell me there is a way to escape my query to do what I want? (Failing that, I know I can map a drive letter and drop into a cygwin prompt and use the UNIX 'find' command, but I'd prefer a shiny easy way.)

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  • How to do a Windows 7 Image restore to an external drive?

    - by Vaccano
    I have a system that I have done a Windows 7 Image restore on. I would like to migrate that image to a different hard drive. Is there a way to restore the image to an externally connected hard drive? For example: I have 3 hard drives: The first in the source machine (the one I want to copy). The second in a machine that I want to do the work. And the third is not in a machine. It is the target that I want to overwrite with the contents of the first. I boot up a 2nd machine and connect the 3rd hard drive externally (using some cool cables I have). I then use some cool feature of Windows 7 to replace what is on the 3rd hard drive with the windows 7 image of my 1st machine (that is on on my networked backup server). I need to know what the above mentioned "cool feature of windows 7" is, if there is one. And how to use it. Any ideas? Note: that I very much so don't want it to overwrite what is on the 2nd machine/hard drive.

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  • MSMQ on Win2008 R2 won’t receive messages from older clients

    - by Graffen
    Hi all I'm battling a really weird problem here. I have a Windows 2008 R2 server with Message Queueing installed. On another machine, running Windows 2003 is a service that is set up to send messages to a public queue on the 2008 server. However, messages never show up on the server. I've written a small console app that just sends a "Hello World" message to a test queue on the 2008 machine. Running this app on XP or 2003 results in absolutely nothing. However, when I try running the app on my Windows 7 machine, a message is delivered just fine. I've been through all sorts of security settings, disabled firewalls on all machines etc. The event log shows nothing of interest, and no exceptions are being thrown on the clients. Running a packet sniffer (WireShark) on the server reveals only a little. When trying to send a message from XP or 2003 I only see an ICMP error "Port Unreachable" on port 3527 (which I gather is an MQPing packet?). After that, silence. Wireshark shows a nice little stream of packets when I try from my Win7 client (as expected - messages get delivered just fine from Win7). I've enabled MSMQ End2End logging on the server, but only entries from the messages sent from my Win7 machine are appearing in the log. So somehow it seems that messages are being dropped silently somewhere along the route from XP or 2003 to my 2008 server. Does anyone have any clues as to what might be causing this mysterious behaviour? -- Jesper

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  • Migration & Modernization: Windows/VB6 Apps to ASP.NET HTML5

    - by Visual WebGui
    I would like to invite you to a webinar we are doing in collaboration with Jeffrey S. Hammond , Principal Analyst serving Application Development & Delivery Professionals at Forrester Research. The webinar is free and it will will introduce the substantial changes brought on by the move to Web Applications and Open Web architectures, and the challenges it places on application development shops. We’ll also introduce how we at Gizmox are helping client navigate this mobile shift and evolve existing...(read more)

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  • [GEEK SCHOOL] Network Security 3: Windows Defender and a Malware-Free System

    - by Ciprian Rusen
    In this second lesson we are going to talk about one of the most confusing security products that are bundled with Windows: Windows Defender. In the past, this product has had a bad reputation and for good reason – it was very limited in its capacity to protect your computer from real-world malware. However, the latest version included in Windows 8.x operating systems is much different than in the past and it provides real protection to its users. The nice thing about Windows Defender in its current incarnation, is that it protects your system from the start, so there are never gaps in coverage. We will start this lesson by explaining what Windows Defender is in Windows 7 and Vista versus what it is in Windows 8, and what product to use if you are using an earlier version. We next will explore how to use Windows Defender, how to improve its default settings, and how to deal with the alerts that it displays. As you will see, Windows Defender will have you using its list of quarantined items a lot more often than other security products. This is why we will explain in detail how to work with it and remove malware for good or restore those items that are only false alarms. Lastly, you will learn how to turn off Windows Defender if you no longer want to use it and you prefer a third-party security product in its place and then how to enable it back, if you have changed your mind about using it. Upon completion, you should have a thorough understanding of your system’s default anti-malware options, or how to protect your system expeditiously. What is Windows Defender? Unfortunately there is no one clear answer to this question because of the confusing way Microsoft has chosen to name its security products. Windows Defender is a different product, depending on the Windows operating system you are using. If you use Windows Vista or Windows 7, then Windows Defender is a security tool that protects your computer from spyware. This but one form of malware made out of tools and applications that monitor your movements on the Internet or the activities you make on your computer. Spyware tends to send the information that is collected to a remote server and it is later used in all kinds of malicious purposes, from displaying advertising you don’t want, to using your personal data, etc. However, there are many other types of malware on the Internet and this version of Windows Defender is not able to protect users from any of them. That’s why, if you are using Windows 7 or earlier, we strongly recommend that you disable Windows Defender and install a more complete security product like Microsoft Security Essentials, or third-party security products from specialized security vendors. If you use Windows 8.x operating systems, then Windows Defender is the same thing as Microsoft Security Essentials: a decent security product that protects your computer in-real time from viruses and spyware. The fact that this product protects your computer also from viruses, not just from spyware, makes a huge difference. If you don’t want to pay for security products, Windows Defender in Windows 8.x and Microsoft Security Essentials (in Windows 7 or earlier) are good alternatives. Windows Defender in Windows 8.x and Microsoft Security Essentials are the same product, only their name is different. In this lesson, we will use the Windows Defender version from Windows 8.x but our instructions apply also to Microsoft Security Essentials (MSE) in Windows 7 and Windows Vista. If you want to download Microsoft Security Essentials and try it out, we recommend you to use this page: Download Microsoft Security Essentials. There you will find both 32-bit and 64-bit editions of this product as well versions in multiple languages. How to Use and Configure Windows Defender Using Windows Defender (MSE) is very easy to use. To start, search for “defender” on the Windows 8.x Start screen and click or tap the “Windows Defender” search result. In Windows 7, search for “security” in the Start Menu search box and click “Microsoft Security Essentials”. Windows Defender has four tabs which give you access to the following tools and options: Home – here you can view the security status of your system. If everything is alright, then it will be colored in green. If there are some warnings to consider, then it will be colored in yellow, and if there are threats that must be dealt with, everything will be colored in red. On the right side of the “Home” tab you will find options for scanning your computer for viruses and spyware. On the bottom of the tab you will find information about when the last scan was performed and what type of scan it was. Update – here you will find information on whether this product is up-to-date. You will learn when it was last updated and the versions of the definitions it is using. You can also trigger a manual update. History – here you can access quarantined items, see which items you’ve allowed to run on your PC even if they were identified as malware by Windows Defender, and view a complete list with all the malicious items Windows Defender has detected on your PC. In order to access all these lists and work with them, you need to be signed in as an administrator. Settings – this is the tab where you can turn on the real-time protection service, exclude files, file types, processes, and locations from its scans as well as access a couple of more advanced settings. The only difference between Windows Defender in Windows 8.x and Microsoft Security Essentials (in Windows 7 or earlier) is that, in the “Settings” tab, Microsoft Security Essentials allows you to set when to run scheduled scans while Windows Defender lacks this option.

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  • How to Boost Your Mouse Pointing Accuracy in Windows

    - by The Geek
    Whether you are doing graphics/web design work or just taking screenshots, it’s often very difficult to move the mouse precisely enough to select pixels the way you’d like. Here’s a couple of ways to make it better. There’s a number of methods you can use, from configuring the default mouse settings, to enabling Mouse Keys to move the mouse pointer with the keyboard, or my favorite: Using the Precision Booster feature in IntelliPoint. Image by Rufus Latest Features How-To Geek ETC How to Use the Avira Rescue CD to Clean Your Infected PC The Complete List of iPad Tips, Tricks, and Tutorials Is Your Desktop Printer More Expensive Than Printing Services? 20 OS X Keyboard Shortcuts You Might Not Know HTG Explains: Which Linux File System Should You Choose? HTG Explains: Why Does Photo Paper Improve Print Quality? Ubuntu Font Family Now Available for Download Oh No! WikiLeaks Published Santa Claus’s Naughty List [Video] Remember the Milk Now Supports HTTPS Encryption for the Entire Session MTCrypt Is an Efficient Front End for Mounting TrueCrypt Volumes 10 Things You Should Do with Your New Android Phone Walking Through the Park on a Snowy Night Wallpaper

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  • Transformation of Client/Server application to Windows Azure

    - by Visual WebGui
    Overview The economics of IT is changing rapidly, and organizations are searching to widen and secure availability of their systems and at the same time lower costs. The cloud concept was introduced to allow an IT consumption model where there is always as much computing power as needed when needed ('on-demand') and without having to invest in connectivity, servers, database access, storage space, CPU power and other infrastructure needs, just as we consume electricity. Running your systems on Microsoft...(read more)

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  • 8 tips for your Windows Store apps

    - by nmarun
    1. Use Basic page than a blank template For a good number of your tasks, you probably need a Basic page. For starters, this page gives you the bare-bones required – a ‘Go back’ button and a placeholder for the applcation name. This page also contains the VisualState for Snapped view, so you don’t have to handle it in code. When you choose to add a basic page to an empty solution, you’ll get a prompt like below. Clicking on yes, adds some of the following files: LayoutAwarePage – handles GoBack and...(read more)

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  • What directories do the different Application SpecialFolders point to in WindowsXP and Windows Vista

    - by Thorsten Lorenz
    Namely I have: Environment.SpecialFolder.ApplicationData Environment.SpecialFolder.CommonApplicationData Environment.SpecialFolder.LocalApplicationData I am unclear as to were these point to in Windows XP and/or Windows Vista. What I found so far is that the ApplicationData points to the ApplicationData Folder for the current user in XP and the roaming application data folder in Vista. I would also like to know if there are general guidelines on when to use which.

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  • How To Run XP Mode in VirtualBox on Windows 7 (sort of)

    - by Matthew Guay
    A few weeks ago we showed you how to run XP Mode on a Windows 7 computer without Hardware Virtualization using VMware. Some of you have been asking if it can be done in Virtual Box as well. The answer is “Yes!” and here we’ll show you how. Editor Update: Apparently there isn’t a way to activate XP Mode through VirtualBox using this method. You will however, be able to run it for 30 days. We have a new updated article on how to Install XP Mode with VirtualBox Using the VMLite Plugin.   Earlier we showed you how to run XP mode on windows 7 machines without hardware virtualization capability. Since then, a lot of you have been asking to a write up a tutorial about doing the same thing using VirtualBox.  This makes it another great way to run XP Mode if your computer does not have hardware virtualization.  Here we’ll see how to import the XP Mode from Windows 7 Professional, Enterprise, or Ultimate into VirtualBox so you can run XP in it for free. Note: You need to have Windows 7 Professional or above to use XP Mode in this manner. In our tests we were able to get it to run on Home Premium as well, but you’ll be breaking Windows 7 licensing agreements. Getting Started First, download and install XP Mode (link below).  There is no need to download Virtual PC if your computer cannot run it, so just download the XP Mode from the link on the left. Install XP mode; just follow the default prompts as usual. Now, download and install VirtualBox 3.1.2 or higher(link below).  Install as normal, and simply follow the default prompts. VirtualBox may notify you that your network connection will be reset during the installation.  Press Yes to continue. During the install, you may see several popups asking you if you wish to install device drivers for USB and Network interfaces.  Simply click install, as these are needed for VirtualBox to run correctly. Setup only took a couple minutes, and doesn’t require a reboot. Setup XP Mode in VirtualBox: First we need to copy the default XP Mode so VirtualBox will not affect the original copy.  Browse to C:\Program Files\Windows XP Mode, and copy the file “Windows XP Mode base.vhd”.  Paste it in another folder of your choice, such as your Documents folder. Once you’ve copied the file, right-click on it and click Properties. Uncheck the “Read-only” box in this dialog, and then click Ok. Now, in VirtualBox, click New to create a new virtual machine. Enter the name of your virtual machine, and make sure the operating system selected is Windows XP. Choose how much memory you want to allow the virtual machine to use.  VirtualBox’ default is 192 Mb ram, but for better performance you can select 256 or 512Mb. Now, select the hard drive for the virtual machine.  Select “Use existing hard disk”, then click the folder button to choose the XP Mode virtual drive. In this window, click Add, and then browse to find the copy of XP Mode you previously made. Make sure the correct virtual drive is selected, then press Select. After selecting the VHD your screen should look like the following then click Next. Verify the settings you made are correct. If not, you can go back and make any changes. When everything looks correct click Finish. Setup XP Mode Now, in VirtualBox, click start to run XP Mode. The Windows XP in this virtual drive is not fully setup yet, so you will have to go through the setup process.   If you didn’t uncheck the “Read-only” box in the VHD properties before, you may see the following error.  If you see it, go back and check the file to makes sure it is not read-only. When you click in the virtual machine, it will capture your mouse by default.  Simply press the right Ctrl key to release your mouse so you can go back to using Windows 7.  This will only be the case during the setup process; after the Guest Additions are installed, the mouse will seamlessly move between operating systems. Now, accept the license agreement in XP.   Choose your correct locale and keyboard settings. Enter a name for your virtual XP, and an administrative password. Check the date, time, and time zone settings, and adjust them if they are incorrect.  The time and date are usually correct, but the time zone often has to be corrected. XP will now automatically finish setting up your virtual machine, and then will automatically reboot. After rebooting, select your automatic update settings. You may see a prompt to check for drivers; simply press cancel, as all the drivers we need will be installed later with the Guest Additions. Your last settings will be finalized, and finally you will see your XP desktop in VirtualBox. Please note that XP Mode may not remain activated after importing it into VirtualBox. When you activate it, use the key that is located at C:\Program Files\Windows XP Mode\key.txt.  Note: During our tests we weren’t able to get the activation to go through. We are looking into the issue and will have a revised article showing the correct way to get XP Mode in VirutalBox working correctly soon.    Now we have one final thing to install – the VirtualBox Guest Additions.  In the VirtualBox window, click “Devices” and then select “Install Guest Additions”. This should automatically launch in XP; if it doesn’t, click Start, then My Computer, and finally double-click on the CD drive which should say VirtualBox Guest Additions. Simply install with the normal presets. You can select to install an experimental 3D graphics driver if you wish to try to run games in XP in VirtualBox; however, do note that this is not fully supported and is currently a test feature. You may see a prompt informing you that the drivers have not passed Logo testing; simply press “Continue Anyway” to proceed with the installation.   When installation has completed, you will be required to reboot your virtual machine. Now, you can move your mouse directly from Windows XP to Windows 7 without pressing Ctrl. Integrating with Windows 7 Once your virtual machine is rebooted, you can integrate it with your Windows 7 desktop.  In the VirtualBox window, click Machine and then select “Seamless Mode”.   In Seamless mode you’ll have the XP Start menu and taskbar sit on top of your Windows 7 Start and Taskbar. Here we see XP running on Virtual Box in Seamless Mode. We have the old XP WordPad sitting next to the new Windows 7 version of WordPad. Another view of everything running seamlessly together on the same Windows 7 desktop. Hover the pointer over the XP taskbar to pull up the Virtual Box menu items. You can exit out of Seamless Mode from the VirtualBox menu or using “Ctrl+L”. Then you go back to having it run separately on your desktop again. Conclusion Running XP Mode in a Virtual Machine is a great way to experience the feature on computers without Hardware Virtualization capabilities. If you prefer VMware Player, then you’ll want to check out our articles on how to run XP Mode on Windows 7 machines without Hardware Virtualization, and how to create an XP Mode for Windows 7 Home Premium and Vista. Download VirtualBox Download XP Mode Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Install XP Mode with VirtualBox Using the VMLite PluginUsing Windows 7 or Vista Compatibility ModeMake Safari Stop Crashing Every 20 Seconds on Windows VistaForce Windows 7 / Vista to Boot Into Safe Mode Without Using the F8 KeyHow To Run Chrome OS in VirtualBox TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 PCmover Professional Enable Check Box Selection in Windows 7 OnlineOCR – Free OCR Service Betting on the Blind Side, a Vanity Fair article 30 Minimal Logo Designs that Say More with Less LEGO Digital Designer – Free Create a Personal Website Quickly using Flavors.me

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  • How To Run XP Mode in VirtualBox on Windows 7 (sort of)

    - by Matthew Guay
    A few weeks ago we showed you how to run XP Mode on a Windows 7 computer without Hardware Virtualization using VMware. Some of you have been asking if it can be done in Virtual Box as well. The answer is “Yes!” and here we’ll show you how. Editor Update: Apparently there isn’t a way to activate XP Mode through VirtualBox using this method. You will however, be able to run it for 30 days. We have a new updated article on how to Install XP Mode with VirtualBox Using the VMLite Plugin.   Earlier we showed you how to run XP mode on windows 7 machines without hardware virtualization capability. Since then, a lot of you have been asking to a write up a tutorial about doing the same thing using VirtualBox.  This makes it another great way to run XP Mode if your computer does not have hardware virtualization.  Here we’ll see how to import the XP Mode from Windows 7 Professional, Enterprise, or Ultimate into VirtualBox so you can run XP in it for free. Note: You need to have Windows 7 Professional or above to use XP Mode in this manner. In our tests we were able to get it to run on Home Premium as well, but you’ll be breaking Windows 7 licensing agreements. Getting Started First, download and install XP Mode (link below).  There is no need to download Virtual PC if your computer cannot run it, so just download the XP Mode from the link on the left. Install XP mode; just follow the default prompts as usual. Now, download and install VirtualBox 3.1.2 or higher(link below).  Install as normal, and simply follow the default prompts. VirtualBox may notify you that your network connection will be reset during the installation.  Press Yes to continue. During the install, you may see several popups asking you if you wish to install device drivers for USB and Network interfaces.  Simply click install, as these are needed for VirtualBox to run correctly. Setup only took a couple minutes, and doesn’t require a reboot. Setup XP Mode in VirtualBox: First we need to copy the default XP Mode so VirtualBox will not affect the original copy.  Browse to C:\Program Files\Windows XP Mode, and copy the file “Windows XP Mode base.vhd”.  Paste it in another folder of your choice, such as your Documents folder. Once you’ve copied the file, right-click on it and click Properties. Uncheck the “Read-only” box in this dialog, and then click Ok. Now, in VirtualBox, click New to create a new virtual machine. Enter the name of your virtual machine, and make sure the operating system selected is Windows XP. Choose how much memory you want to allow the virtual machine to use.  VirtualBox’ default is 192 Mb ram, but for better performance you can select 256 or 512Mb. Now, select the hard drive for the virtual machine.  Select “Use existing hard disk”, then click the folder button to choose the XP Mode virtual drive. In this window, click Add, and then browse to find the copy of XP Mode you previously made. Make sure the correct virtual drive is selected, then press Select. After selecting the VHD your screen should look like the following then click Next. Verify the settings you made are correct. If not, you can go back and make any changes. When everything looks correct click Finish. Setup XP Mode Now, in VirtualBox, click start to run XP Mode. The Windows XP in this virtual drive is not fully setup yet, so you will have to go through the setup process.   If you didn’t uncheck the “Read-only” box in the VHD properties before, you may see the following error.  If you see it, go back and check the file to makes sure it is not read-only. When you click in the virtual machine, it will capture your mouse by default.  Simply press the right Ctrl key to release your mouse so you can go back to using Windows 7.  This will only be the case during the setup process; after the Guest Additions are installed, the mouse will seamlessly move between operating systems. Now, accept the license agreement in XP.   Choose your correct locale and keyboard settings. Enter a name for your virtual XP, and an administrative password. Check the date, time, and time zone settings, and adjust them if they are incorrect.  The time and date are usually correct, but the time zone often has to be corrected. XP will now automatically finish setting up your virtual machine, and then will automatically reboot. After rebooting, select your automatic update settings. You may see a prompt to check for drivers; simply press cancel, as all the drivers we need will be installed later with the Guest Additions. Your last settings will be finalized, and finally you will see your XP desktop in VirtualBox. Please note that XP Mode may not remain activated after importing it into VirtualBox. When you activate it, use the key that is located at C:\Program Files\Windows XP Mode\key.txt.  Note: During our tests we weren’t able to get the activation to go through. We are looking into the issue and will have a revised article showing the correct way to get XP Mode in VirutalBox working correctly soon.    Now we have one final thing to install – the VirtualBox Guest Additions.  In the VirtualBox window, click “Devices” and then select “Install Guest Additions”. This should automatically launch in XP; if it doesn’t, click Start, then My Computer, and finally double-click on the CD drive which should say VirtualBox Guest Additions. Simply install with the normal presets. You can select to install an experimental 3D graphics driver if you wish to try to run games in XP in VirtualBox; however, do note that this is not fully supported and is currently a test feature. You may see a prompt informing you that the drivers have not passed Logo testing; simply press “Continue Anyway” to proceed with the installation.   When installation has completed, you will be required to reboot your virtual machine. Now, you can move your mouse directly from Windows XP to Windows 7 without pressing Ctrl. Integrating with Windows 7 Once your virtual machine is rebooted, you can integrate it with your Windows 7 desktop.  In the VirtualBox window, click Machine and then select “Seamless Mode”.   In Seamless mode you’ll have the XP Start menu and taskbar sit on top of your Windows 7 Start and Taskbar. Here we see XP running on Virtual Box in Seamless Mode. We have the old XP WordPad sitting next to the new Windows 7 version of WordPad. Another view of everything running seamlessly together on the same Windows 7 desktop. Hover the pointer over the XP taskbar to pull up the Virtual Box menu items. You can exit out of Seamless Mode from the VirtualBox menu or using “Ctrl+L”. Then you go back to having it run separately on your desktop again. Conclusion Running XP Mode in a Virtual Machine is a great way to experience the feature on computers without Hardware Virtualization capabilities. If you prefer VMware Player, then you’ll want to check out our articles on how to run XP Mode on Windows 7 machines without Hardware Virtualization, and how to create an XP Mode for Windows 7 Home Premium and Vista. Download VirtualBox Download XP Mode Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Install XP Mode with VirtualBox Using the VMLite PluginUsing Windows 7 or Vista Compatibility ModeMake Safari Stop Crashing Every 20 Seconds on Windows VistaForce Windows 7 / Vista to Boot Into Safe Mode Without Using the F8 KeyHow To Run Chrome OS in VirtualBox TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 PCmover Professional Enable Check Box Selection in Windows 7 OnlineOCR – Free OCR Service Betting on the Blind Side, a Vanity Fair article 30 Minimal Logo Designs that Say More with Less LEGO Digital Designer – Free Create a Personal Website Quickly using Flavors.me

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  • Windows Server Backup "Reading Data; please wait..."

    - by Reafidy
    On windows Server 2008 R2 I have recently added the windows server backup (WSB) feature. Opening WSB I get the message "Reading Data; please wait...". This message fails to go away, even after leaving the server for over 12 hours. I also notice in the task manager that svchost.exe (username: networkservice) is using all available processing power. So I terminated that process and then WSB comes on-line. However after restarting the server and WSB the issue reoccurs. WSB also fails to recognize my store-in-go flash drive (2gb). What is the underlying problem here?

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  • InstallShield 2010 - 1603 Fatal Error [Windows Installer] (Windows 7 Only)

    - by gtas
    Hi all, I created an MSI InstalScript Project where i deploy a web based (ASP.NET) precompiled project copying the files during installation in the \inetpub\wwwroot\projectnamefolder, creating an AppPool and the virtual dir of course in the IIS. The setup works great in windows XP Pro (SP3 i used). But soon as i try in Windows 7 (tried Ultimate and Home Premium) i get a -1603 Fatal Error during installation...Windows Installer Help (MSI.chm) or MSDN for more info.... Dying to fix this... [Edit] I think error occurs when trying to create the Application in the IIS. [FIXED] Enable 32 Bit Apllications needs to be true when creating Application Pools through InstallShield in a 64 bit OS!

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  • Does the Win XP/7 dual boot "missing restore points" problem apply to systems with separate hard disks for each O/S?

    - by Robert Oschler
    I'm in the process of installing Windows 7/64 on a system with Windows XP/32 on it. During my research, I read about a problem that occurs in the dual boot scenario where Windows XP deletes Windows 7's restore points when it accesses the Windows 7 volume: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/926185 I found a workaround but it seems pretty painful since it appears to involve using the registry to make the Windows 7 volume appear invisible or "offline" to Windows XP, making sharing disk data between the two O/S annoying since you have to use something like an external storage device to get it done: http://www.vistax64.com/tutorials/127417-system-restore-points-stop-xp-dual-boot-delete.html I was wondering if this problem only occurs with systems that have both O/S installed on the same physical hard drive (in different partitions)? In my case, I will have each O/S on a completely separate physical hard drive. Any other tips would be appreciated. -- roschler

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  • Windows Server Backup - Can I restore to a particular revision?

    - by hamlin11
    I'm using Windows Server Backup in Windows Server 2008 to do a scheduled daily backup to a dedicated hard-drive on the server. I noticed that under "All backups" it says I have 45 copies. Does this mean that I can restore to any revision of my data upon system failure? If the answer is yes, then I don't have to worry about taking monthly or weekly snapshots of my data. I'm concerned about a data corruption event occurring that working its way into my backups... then not having a clean snapshot to go back to. Thanks!

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  • Windows 2008 Standard upgrade to Windows 2008 Enterprise failure

    - by Archit Baweja
    Sidestory, I was in the process of setting up a second Exchange 2010 server for DAG support, when I realized that my box needed Windows 2008 Enterprise edition. The box currently has Windows 2008 Standard Windows update including SP2 Exchange 2010 with CAS, HT, Mailbox roles Domain Services role File Services role. When I try to upgrade to Windows 2008 Enterprise, I initially got a "your current version of windows is more recent than the intallation media", something to that effect. My first guess was it may be SP2 related, so I uninstalled SP2, restarted and tried again. This time it gave me an error to the effect Windows could not configure one or more windows components. Please restart and try the update again. This was at the last stage of the Windows 2008 Enterprise install when it says "Completing installation". So I removed Domain Services role (including demoting it as a DC). However I get the same error again. Anyone see something like this before and have any suggestions? Also , is there a log file the windows upgrade program spits out that I can consult to see what component exactly is interfering? Update 1 Based on some googling I finally found the setup log file, and it seems that Windows setup had an issue determining the .Net 3.0 "feature" being installed or uninstalled. So based of of a win7/vista technet article I'm going to retry the upgrade after removing the .Net 3.0 feature.

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  • Appearance of a WPF ListView under Windows Vista and Windows XP is not the same

    - by rem
    In a WPF application I have a ListView: <ListView Name="ItemSelList" ItemsSource="{Binding ItemColl}" SelectionChanged="ItemSelList_SelectionChanged"> <ListView.View> <GridView> <GridViewColumn Header="Date" Width="90" DisplayMemberBinding="{Binding Date}"/> <GridViewColumn Header="Time" Width="90" DisplayMemberBinding="{Binding Time}"/> <GridViewColumn Header="Description" Width="250" DisplayMemberBinding="{Binding Description}"/> </GridView> </ListView.View> </ListView> When running application under Windows Vista, everything is OK. When running under Windows XP - the default font size of ListView's rows is too small and rows of the ListView don't change color when user hovers with a mouse over them. How to do so that ListView appearance under Windows XP is the same as under Vista?

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