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  • Windows 8 not booting from DVD while trying to install in a Ubuntu 14.04 system

    - by Tom
    Currently my system runs on Ubuntu 14.04. Yesterday, I deleted and formatted the partition(C drive) as NTFS in which Windows 7 was installed because Windows 7 was not booting for more than a week. I have a Windows 8 disk and it was able to boot from that disk when there was Windows 7 on my system. After the formatting of C drive yesterday, I tried to install Windows 8 by booting from the disk. Unfortunately, this time no booting happened from the disk. So I pressed F2 during the system start up and checked Boot Device Priority, Optical Drive has the first priority there. So why Windows 8 didn't boot from the disk ? I need to install Windows 8 too in my system without doing any damage to Ubuntu 14.04. How can I do it ?

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  • Windows 7 Index Search does not work in Google Drive folder

    - by Joel
    I recently installed Google Drive on my Windows 7 laptop and began syncing all my files a few days ago. All was well until I needed to search for some documents in my local copy of Google Drive using Windows 7 Search feature. Windows did not return any results at all. Weirdly, when I turned off Windows indexing for that folder, it began returning results. I don't mind using windows search w/o the index but sometimes it takes too long to search (especially for keywords inside documents like Word and Excel). It's driving me nuts to the point where I have given up on Windows Search and switched to Google Drive's online search to look for files (not as convenient as I still have to go back go google drive in Windows to locate the folder). Any help appreciated!

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  • Will Windows 7 setup overwrite Windows 8 and Ubuntu boot records?

    - by Jens
    I have Windows 8 and Ubuntu installed, both an the same physical hd (2 partitions). Windows 8 was installed after a format, Ubuntu afterwards. I used EasyBCD to setup the boot records and the boot menu order. I want to install Windows 7 as a third operating system and just add its boot record with EasyBCD. Will there be any unwanted behavior when I install it on a third partition? I already have 100 GB of unallocated space on the disk, though have not yet made the partition. I red on this site that I should install the oldest OS first, but than I would have to do a format and start again from scratch (which I clearly do not want to do). edit: On this site, the opposite is claimed, saying it's also possible to install Windows 7 after Windows 8. However, it will restore a Windows 7 boot menu instead one of Windows 8.

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  • Reinstall Windows on mass computers

    - by user791022
    At work there are about 40 DELL PC's - half of them are Windows Vista and other half are Windows 7. Some of the DELL PC's are 220s and 230s model. If I want to re-install Windows then I can use a Recovery/Recovery disk on any Dell PC's (220s or 230s). It take too long to complete the setup, for example - after re installing the Windows then I need to install the drivers, update windows, install IE9, create default users account and so on. It take about 3 hour to complete setup! I am looking for a solution Where I can create an Image of windows (with driver and completed setup) and then I use same Image it on any PC's at work? If one of the PC need reinstalling - I would like to reinstall via network (LAN) by grabbing the Image? Is there something that before booting into windows - computer check something via network which can download the Image?

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  • Windows Search Indexing SSD

    - by user654628
    I just bought a new SSD (Vertex4 from OCZ, 256G) and installed Windows 8 with it on my laptop. I am not using an external hard drive to keep extra data (paging, temp files etc) because I am using a laptop and do not want to carry it around with me. My question is, if I disable Windows indexer (Windows Search service), does Windows still search files under the search (Windows 7 Start menu search/Metro UI Windows 8 search)? Since the indexer was meant to search for files by indexing them, does this mean that Windows will not search new files? Thanks in advance.

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  • An error occured synchronizing windows with time.windows.com

    - by Killrawr
    Okay so I've tried stopping/registering the win32tm service on this Windows Server 2008 Enterprise Computer. C:\Users\Administrator>net stop w32time The Windows Time service is stopping. The Windows Time service was stopped successfully. C:\Users\Administrator>w32tm /unregister The following error occurred: Access is denied. (0x80070005) C:\Users\Administrator>w32tm /unregister W32Time successfully unregistered. C:\Users\Administrator>w32tm /register W32Time successfully registered. C:\Users\Administrator>net start w32time The Windows Time service is starting. The Windows Time service was started successfully. (Source : http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/winserverDS/thread/9bdfc2cc-4775-4435-8868-57d214e1e3ba/) And I get this error from the Date and Time, Internet Time tab (After also following the steps here). I've even tried the Atomic Time Clock Worldtimeserver and I get the error The following error occurred: The specified module could not be found. (0x8007007E). I've also disabled the Windows Firewall, that might of been blocking the synchronization. I've done a file scan with sfc /scannow that came back with no errors. C:\Users\Administrator>sfc /scannow Beginning system scan. This process will take some time. Beginning verification phase of system scan. Verification 100% complete. Windows Resource Protection did not find any integrity violations. C:\Users\Administrator> But I'm not having much luck. Is there anyway lo possibly solve this? or is the time.windows.com servers unsupported? because the software is from 2008? (I really don't know :/), My ping result to time.windows.com C:\Users\Administrator>ping time.windows.com Pinging time.microsoft.akadns.net [65.55.21.22] with 32 bytes of data: Request timed out. Request timed out. Request timed out. Request timed out. Ping statistics for 65.55.21.22: Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss), And tracert result C:\Users\Administratortracert time.windows.com Tracing route to time.microsoft.akadns.net [65.55.21.24] over a maximum of 30 hops: 1 1 ms <1 ms <1 ms 192.168.1.1 2 32 ms 31 ms 32 ms be2-100.bras1wtc.wlg.vf.net.nz [203.109.129.113] 3 31 ms 32 ms 31 ms be5-100.ppnzwtc01.wlg.vf.net.nz.129.109.203.in-a ddr.arpa [203.109.129.114] 4 31 ms 31 ms 31 ms gi0-2-0-3.ppnzwtc01.wlg.vf.net.nz.180.109.203.in -addr.arpa [203.109.180.210] 5 31 ms 31 ms 30 ms gi0-2-0-3.ppnzwtc02.wlg.vf.net.nz [203.109.180.2 09] 6 167 ms 166 ms 166 ms ip-141.199.31.114.VOCUS.net.au [114.31.199.141] 7 175 ms 175 ms 175 ms microsoft.com.any2ix.coresite.com [206.223.143.1 43] 8 177 ms 180 ms 176 ms xe-7-0-2-0.by2-96c-1a.ntwk.msn.net [207.46.42.17 6] 9 205 ms 205 ms 204 ms xe-10-0-2-0.co1-96c-1b.ntwk.msn.net [207.46.45.3 1] 10 * * * Request timed out. 11 * * * Request timed out. 12 * * * Request timed out. 13 * * * Request timed out. 14 * * * Request timed out. 15 * * * Request timed out. 16 ^C And nslookup C:\Users\Administrator>nslookup time.windows.com Server: UnKnown Address: 192.168.1.1 Non-authoritative answer: Name: time.microsoft.akadns.net Address: 65.55.21.22 Aliases: time.windows.com

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  • Xbox Music ignores Asus FN media keys in Desktop Mode

    - by Ruud Lenders
    I have an Asus PRO64JQ laptop, and I recently upgraded to Windows 8. The FN keys stopped working, so I tried to install default drivers using the CD that came with my laptop. Unfortunately, the CD does not support Windows 8. Asus Support does not help me either. It seems that Asus does not support Windows 8 on my model, since I can't find it in their list of Windows 8 upgradable models. Also, the support page of my laptop does not allow me to select Windows 8 as OS. That's why I'm asking my question here. I fixed (most of) the FN keys by installing the ATKPackage, and I was happy to find out that the media keys (play/pauze, next, previous) works with the Xbox Music app. But the keys only work in the Metro UI. In Desktop Mode, pressing FN+? (play/pause) starts up Windows Media Player. Disabling Windows Media Player through the control panel stops it from popping up, but Xbox Music still only responds to them in the Metro UI. I remember that I had similar problems when I tried to make these media keys to work with iTunes on Windows 7. The fix there was a small iTunes plug-in. So tell me, do you know how to fix my problem? Thanks.

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  • Customize the Default Screensavers in Windows 7 and Vista

    - by Matthew Guay
    Windows 7 and Vista include a nice set of backgrounds, but unfortunately most of them aren’t configurable by default.  Thanks to a free app and some registry changes, however, you can make the default screensavers uniquely yours! Customize the default screensavers If you’ve ever pressed the Customize button on most of the default screensavers in Windows 7 and Vista, you were probably greeted with this message: A little digging in the registry shows that this isn’t fully correct.  The default screensavers in Vista and 7 do have options you can set, but they’re not obvious.  With the help of an app or some registry tips, you can easily customize the screensavers to be uniquely yours.  Here’s how you can do it with an app or in the registry. Customize Windows Screensavers with System Screensavers Tweaker Download the System Screensavers Tweaker (link below), and unzip the folder.  Run nt6srccfg.exe in the folder to tweak your screensavers.  This application lets you tweak the screensavers’ registry settings graphically, and it works great in all editions of Windows Vista and 7, including x64 versions. Change any of the settings you want in the screensaver tweaker, and click Apply. To preview the changes to your screensaver, open the Screen Saver settings window as normal by right-clicking on the desktop, and selecting Personalize. Click on the Screensaver button on the bottom right. Now, select your modified screensaver, and click Preview to see your changes. You can change a wide variety of settings for the Bubbles, Ribbons, and Mystify screensavers in Windows 7 and Vista, as well as the Aurora screensaver in Windows Vista.  The tweaks to the Bubbles screensaver are especially nice.  Here’s how the Bubbles look without transparency. And, by tweaking a little more, you get a screensaver that looks more like a screen full of marbles. Ribbons and Mystify each have less settings, but still can produce some unique effects.   How’s that for a brilliant screensaver? And, if you want to return your screensavers to their default settings, simply run the System Screensavers Tweaker and select Reset to defaults on any screensaver you wish to reset. Customize Windows Screensavers in the Registry If you prefer to roll up your sleeves and tweak Windows under-the-hood, then here’s how you can customize the screensavers yourself in the Registry.  Type regedit into the search box in the Start menu, browse to the key for each screensaver, and add or modify the DWORD values listed for that screensaver using the Decimal base. Please Note: Tweaking the Registry can be difficult, so if you’re unsure, just use the tweaking application above. Also, you’ll probably want to create a System Restore Point.   Bubbles To edit the Bubbles screensaver, browse to the following in regedit: HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Current Version\Screensavers\Bubbles Now, add or modify the following DWORD values to tweak the screensaver: MaterialGlass – enter 0 for solid or 1 for transparent bubbles Radius – enter a number between 1090000000 and 1130000000; the larger the number, the larger the bubbles’ radius ShowBubbles – enter 0 to show a black background or 1 to show the current desktop behind the bubbles ShowShadows – enter 0 for no shadow or 1 for shadows behind the bubbles SphereDensity – enter a number from 1000000000 to 2100000000; the higher the number, the more bubbles on the screen. TurbulenceNumOctaves – enter a number from 1 to 255; the higher the number, the faster the bubble colors will change. Ribbons To edit the Ribbons screensaver, browse to the following in regedit: HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Current Version\Screensavers\Ribbons Now, add or modify the following DWORD values to tweak the screensaver: Blur – enter 0 to prevent ribbons from fading, or 1 to have them fade away after a few moments. Numribbons – enter a number from 1 to 100; the higher the number, the more ribbons on the screen. RibbonWidth – enter a number from 1000000000 to 1080000000; the higher the number, the thicker the ribbons. Mystify To edit the Mystify screensaver, browse to the following in regedit: HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Current Version\Screensavers\Mystify Now, add or modify the following DWORD values to tweak the screensaver: Blur – enter 0 to prevent lines from fading, or 1 to have them fade away after a few moments. LineWidth – enter a number from 1000000000 to 1080000000; the higher the number, the wider the lines. NumLines – enter a number from 1 to 100; the higher the value, the more lines on the screen. Aurora – Windows Vista only To edit the Aurora screensaver in Windows Vista, browse to the following in regedit: HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Current Version\Screensavers\Aurora Now, add or modify the following DWORD values to tweak the screensaver: Amplitude – enter a value from 500000000 to 2000000000; the higher the value, the slower the motion. Brightness – enter a value from 1000000000 to 1050000000; the higher the value, the brighter the affect. NumLayers – enter a value from 1 to 15; the higher the value, the more aurora layers displayed. Speed – enter a value from 1000000000 to 2100000000; the higher the value, the faster the cycling. Conclusion Although the default screensavers are nice, they can be boring after awhile with their default settings.  But with these tweaks, you can create a variety of vibrant screensavers that should keep your desktop fresh and interesting. Link Download the System Screensavers Tweaker Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Create Icons to Start the Screensaver on Windows 7 or VistaMake Your Windows XP Logon Screen Look Like Windows VistaSpeed up Windows Vista Start Menu Search By Limiting ResultsRoundup: 16 Tweaks to Windows Vista Look & FeelSet XP as the Default OS in a Windows Vista Dual-Boot Setup TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 NachoFoto Searches Images in Real-time Office 2010 Product Guides Google Maps Place marks – Pizza, Guns or Strip Clubs Monitor Applications With Kiwi LocPDF is a Visual PDF Search Tool Download Free iPad Wallpapers at iPad Decor

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  • Cannot turn on "Network Discovery and File Sharing" when Windows Firewall is enabled

    - by Cheeso
    I have a problem similar to this one. Windows Firewall prevents File and Printer sharing from working and Why does File and Printer Sharing keep turning off in Windows 7? I cannot turn on Network Discovery. This is Windows 7 Home Premium, x64. It's a Dell XPS 1340 and Windows came installed from the OEM. This used to work. Now it doesn't. I don't know what has changed. In windows Explorer, the UI looks like this: When I click the yellow panel that says "Click to change...", the panel disappears, then immediately reappears, with exactly the same text. If I go through the control panel "Network and Sharing Center" thing, the UI looks like this: If I tick the box to "turn on network discovery", the "Save Changes" button becomes enabled. If I then click that button, the dialog box just closes, with no message or confirmation. Re-opening the same dialog box shows that Network Discovery has not been turned on. If I turn off Windows Firewall, I can then turn on Network Discovery via either method. The machine is connected to a wireless home network, via a router. The network is marked as "Home Network" in the Network and Sharing Center, which I think corresponds to the "Private" profile in Windows Firewall Advanced Settings app. (Confirm?) The PC is not part of a domain, and has never been part of a domain. The machine is not bridging any networks. There is a regular 100baseT connector but I have the network adapter for that disabled in Windows. Something else that seems odd. Within Windows Firewall Advanced Settings, there are no predefined rules available. If I click the "New Rule...." Action on the action pane, the "Predefined" option is greyed out. like this: In order to attempt to allow the network discovery protocols through on the private network, I hand-coded a bunch of rules, intending to allow the necessary UPnP and WDP protocols supporting network discovery. I copied them from a working Windows 7 Ultimate PC, running on the same network. This did not work. Even with the hand-coded rules, I still cannot turn on Network Discovery. I looked on the interwebs, and the only solution that appears to work is a re-install of Windows. Seriously? If I try netsh advfirewall firewall set rule group="Network Discovery" new enable=Yes ...it says "No rules match the specified criteria" EDIT: by the way, these services are running. DNS Client Function Discovery Resource Publication SSDP Discovery UPnP Device Host in any case, since it works with no firewall, I would assume all necessary services are present and running. The issue is a firewall thing, but I don't know how to diagnose further, or fix it. Q1: Is there a way to definitively insure the correct holes are punched through the Windows Firewall to allow Network Discovery to function? Q2: Should I expect the "predefined" firewall rules to be greyed out? Q3: Why did this change?

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  • How can I create a short cut to a directory on a Windows Phone device?

    - by Mokilok
    When I plug in my Windows mobile it appears in My Computer as a portable device but the data I need regular access to is many sub directories in. Is it possible to create a shortcut or access a path on a mobile device directly? When I open the properties of the folder I want it says the location starts with "Computer\Name of Phone\Phone\". The problem is using that as a path to navigate straight to the files doesn't work. Thanks for your help.

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  • The 20 Most Important Keyboard Shortcuts For Windows PCs

    - by Chris Hoffman
    Keyboard shortcuts are practically essential for using any type of PC. They’ll speed up almost everything you do. But long lists of keyboard shortcuts can quickly become overwhelming if you’re just getting started. This list will cover the most useful keyboard shortcuts that every Windows user should know. If you haven’t used keyboard shortcuts much, these will show you just how useful keyboard shortcuts can be. Windows Key + Search The Windows key is particularly important on Windows 8 — especially before Windows 8.1 — because it allows you to quickly return to the Start screen. On Windows 7, it opens the Start menu. Either way, you can start typing immediately after you press the Windows key to search for programs, settings, and files. For example, if you want to launch Firefox, you can press the Windows key, start typing the word Firefox, and press Enter when the Firefox shortcut appears. It’s a quick way to launch programs, open files, and locate Control Panel options without even touching your mouse and without digging through a cluttered Start menu. You can also use the arrow keys to select the shortcut you want to launch before pressing Enter. Copy, Cut, Paste Copy, Cut, and Paste are extremely important keyboard shortcuts for text-editing. If you do any typing on your computer, you probably use them. These options can be accessed using the mouse, either by right-clicking on selected text or opening the application’s Edit menu, but this is the slowest way to do it. After selecting some text, press Ctrl+C to copy it or Ctrl+X to cut it. Position the cursor where you want the text and use Ctrl+V to paste it. These shortcuts can save you a huge amount of time over using the mouse. Search the Current Page or File To quickly perform a search in the current application — whether you’re in a web browser, PDF viewer, document editor, or almost any other type of application — press Ctrl+F. The application’s search (or “Find”) feature will pop up, and you can instantly start typing a phrase you want to search for. You can generally press Enter to  go to the next appearance of the word or phrase in the document, quickly searching through it for what you’re interested in. Switch Between Applications and Tabs Rather than clicking buttons on your taskbar, Alt+Tab is a very quick way to switch between running applications. Windows orders the list of open windows by the order you accessed them, so if you’re only using two different applications, you can just press Alt+Tab to quickly switch between them. If switching between more than two windows, you’ll have to hold the Alt key and press Tab repeatedly to toggle through the list of open windows. If you miss the window you want, you can always press Alt+Shift+Tab to move through the list in reverse. To move between tabs in an application — such as the browser tabs in your web browser — press Ctrl+Tab. Ctrl+Shift+Tab will move through tabs in reverse. Quickly Print If you’re the kind of person who still prints things, you can quickly open the print window by pressing Ctrl+P. This can be faster than hunting down the Print option in every program you want to print something from. Basic Browser Shortcuts Web browser shortcuts can save you tons of time, too. Ctrl+T is a very useful one, as it will open a new tab with the address bar focused, so you can quickly press Ctrl +T, type a search phrase or web address, and press Enter to go there. To go back or forward while browsing, hold the Ctrl key and press the left or right arrow keys. If you’d just like to focus your web browser’s address bar so you can type a new web address or search without opening a new tab, press Ctrl + L. You can then start typing something and press Enter. Close Tabs and Windows To quickly close the current application, press Alt+F4. This works on the desktop and even in new Windows 8-style applications. To quickly close the current browser tab or document, press Ctrl+W. This will often close the current window if there are no other tabs open. Lock Your Computer When you’re done using your computer and want to step away, you may want to lock it. People won’t be able to log in and access your desktop unless they know your password. You can do this from the Start menu or Start screen, but the fastest way to lock your screen is by quickly pressing Windows Key + L before you get up. Access the Task Manager Ctrl+Alt+Delete will take you to a screen that allows you to quickly launch the Task Manager or perform other operations, such as signing out. This is particularly useful because if can be used to recover from situations where your computer doesn’t appear responsive or isn’t accepting input. For example, if a full-screen game becomes unresponsive, Ctrl+Alt+Delete will often allow you to escape from it and end it via the Task Manager. Windows 8 Shortcuts On Windows 8 PCs, there are other very important keyboard shortcuts. Windows Key + C will open your Charms bar, while Windows Key + Tab will open the new App Switcher. These keyboard shortcuts will allow you to avoid the hot corners, which can be tedious to use with a mouse. On the desktop side, Windows Key + D will take you back to the desktop from anywhere. Windows Key + X will open a special “power user menu” that gives you quick access to options that are hidden in the new Windows 8 interface, including Shut Down, Restart, and Control Panel. If you’re interested in learning more keyboard shortcuts, be sure to check our longer lists of 47 keyboard shortcuts that work in all web browsers and 42+ keyboard shortcuts to speed up text-editing. Image Credit: Jeroen Bennink on Flickr     

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  • Is the location of SSH keys on Windows fixed?

    - by user16654
    I read an article: Determine whether you've already generated SSH keys which says that ssh in Windows, keys are in C:\Documents and Settings\userName\Application Data\SSH\UserKeys\ but I have found the keys to be in C:\Documents and Settings\userName\Application Data.SSH . Is there a setting to determine where to put these keys or am I reading the wrong documentation or what?

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  • How well does Windows 7 MCE support Clear QAM?

    - by Jess Sightler
    How well does Windows 7 MCE support ClearQAM (no-cablecard, no HD), and are there any guidelines for which capture cards work best with it? Also, I have an old laptop with a 2 Ghz Pentium M with 1 GB of RAM. I believe that this will be able to handle 1 stream (as it currently does with non-QAM content under XP MCE. Would it also be able to handle 2 streams?

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  • Am I obligated to install Windows Genuine Advantage Notifications to receive all Microsoft updates?

    - by Pieter
    Do I have to install WGA Notifications to receive all Microsoft updates? I currently don't have it on my hard drive, and I get a notification from Microsoft Update urging me to validate my copy of Windows XP. If I don't validate my copy, I don't get all updates. When I click the link however, I get an ActiveX error message. (Yes, I'm doing this in IE8.) Could this have something to do with my decision not to install WGA Notifications?

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  • windows 7: Can I make it automatically download updates during one period and install them in anothe

    - by askvictor
    When Windows 7 is configured to automatically update at a certain time (say Friday 5pm), is that also when it tries to download updates, or does it pull in the updates throughout the week, and only installs them at the update time? UPDATE: So I actually want the machines to download during one set of times (9am-3pm Mon-Fri), but install during another set of times (e.g. 5pm Friday). Is there a way to achieve this?

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  • Possible to disable smart card PIN change in Windows 7?

    - by bobmagoo
    I'm looking for a way to disable the smart card PIN change ability provided with Windows 7's native minidriver. It doesn't allow us to enforce any PIN complexity requirements such that users could change their PIN to 000000 or blank without any issues so we'd like to disable that ability. I've been googling around and haven't found any way to do this, but perhaps someone has encountered a similar issue and found a resolution? A third party minidriver is the next step, but if we could do it without additional tools I'm all for it.

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  • Why does my Windows Explorer no longer refresh itself?

    - by Markus
    Normally when you do a file operation in Windows Explorer then Explorer refreshes itself. So I delete a file, and it's gone. But since yesterday when I for example delete a file, the file entry doesn't disappear. It only disappears when closing and reopening the folder, or when pressing F5. What could that be?

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  • How to restrict Windows 7 internet data usage while using mobile connection?

    - by Daniel Gehriger
    When I'm travelling I would like to use my iPhone's mobile hotspot feature to provide Internet access for my Windows 7 laptop. However, my mobile data plan has a limit on the amount of data I can use per month, and I would like to restrict Internet access to a few very specific applications (such as a database administration tool and Chrome). Is it possible to create a firewall profile for use with mobile data access? If not, what tools exist that could assist me?

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  • Windows Azure: Import/Export Hard Drives, VM ACLs, Web Sockets, Remote Debugging, Continuous Delivery, New Relic, Billing Alerts and More

    - by ScottGu
    Two weeks ago we released a giant set of improvements to Windows Azure, as well as a significant update of the Windows Azure SDK. This morning we released another massive set of enhancements to Windows Azure.  Today’s new capabilities include: Storage: Import/Export Hard Disk Drives to your Storage Accounts HDInsight: General Availability of our Hadoop Service in the cloud Virtual Machines: New VM Gallery, ACL support for VIPs Web Sites: WebSocket and Remote Debugging Support Notification Hubs: Segmented customer push notification support with tag expressions TFS & GIT: Continuous Delivery Support for Web Sites + Cloud Services Developer Analytics: New Relic support for Web Sites + Mobile Services Service Bus: Support for partitioned queues and topics Billing: New Billing Alert Service that sends emails notifications when your bill hits a threshold you define All of these improvements are now available to use immediately (note that some features are still in preview).  Below are more details about them. Storage: Import/Export Hard Disk Drives to Windows Azure I am excited to announce the preview of our new Windows Azure Import/Export Service! The Windows Azure Import/Export Service enables you to move large amounts of on-premises data into and out of your Windows Azure Storage accounts. It does this by enabling you to securely ship hard disk drives directly to our Windows Azure data centers. Once we receive the drives we’ll automatically transfer the data to or from your Windows Azure Storage account.  This enables you to import or export massive amounts of data more quickly and cost effectively (and not be constrained by available network bandwidth). Encrypted Transport Our Import/Export service provides built-in support for BitLocker disk encryption – which enables you to securely encrypt data on the hard drives before you send it, and not have to worry about it being compromised even if the disk is lost/stolen in transit (since the content on the transported hard drives is completely encrypted and you are the only one who has the key to it).  The drive preparation tool we are shipping today makes setting up bitlocker encryption on these hard drives easy. How to Import/Export your first Hard Drive of Data You can read our Getting Started Guide to learn more about how to begin using the import/export service.  You can create import and export jobs via the Windows Azure Management Portal as well as programmatically using our Server Management APIs. It is really easy to create a new import or export job using the Windows Azure Management Portal.  Simply navigate to a Windows Azure storage account, and then click the new Import/Export tab now available within it (note: if you don’t have this tab make sure to sign-up for the Import/Export preview): Then click the “Create Import Job” or “Create Export Job” commands at the bottom of it.  This will launch a wizard that easily walks you through the steps required: For more comprehensive information about Import/Export, refer to Windows Azure Storage team blog.  You can also send questions and comments to the [email protected] email address. We think you’ll find this new service makes it much easier to move data into and out of Windows Azure, and it will dramatically cut down the network bandwidth required when working on large data migration projects.  We hope you like it. HDInsight: 100% Compatible Hadoop Service in the Cloud Last week we announced the general availability release of Windows Azure HDInsight. HDInsight is a 100% compatible Hadoop service that allows you to easily provision and manage Hadoop clusters for big data processing in Windows Azure.  This release is now live in production, backed by an enterprise SLA, supported 24x7 by Microsoft Support, and is ready to use for production scenarios. HDInsight allows you to use Apache Hadoop tools, such as Pig and Hive, to process large amounts of data in Windows Azure Blob Storage. Because data is stored in Windows Azure Blob Storage, you can choose to dynamically create Hadoop clusters only when you need them, and then shut them down when they are no longer required (since you pay only for the time the Hadoop cluster instances are running this provides a super cost effective way to use them).  You can create Hadoop clusters using either the Windows Azure Management Portal (see below) or using our PowerShell and Cross Platform Command line tools: The import/export hard drive support that came out today is a perfect companion service to use with HDInsight – the combination allows you to easily ingest, process and optionally export a limitless amount of data.  We’ve also integrated HDInsight with our Business Intelligence tools, so users can leverage familiar tools like Excel in order to analyze the output of jobs.  You can find out more about how to get started with HDInsight here. Virtual Machines: VM Gallery Enhancements Today’s update of Windows Azure brings with it a new Virtual Machine gallery that you can use to create new VMs in the cloud.  You can launch the gallery by doing New->Compute->Virtual Machine->From Gallery within the Windows Azure Management Portal: The new Virtual Machine Gallery includes some nice enhancements that make it even easier to use: Search: You can now easily search and filter images using the search box in the top-right of the dialog.  For example, simply type “SQL” and we’ll filter to show those images in the gallery that contain that substring. Category Tree-view: Each month we add more built-in VM images to the gallery.  You can continue to browse these using the “All” view within the VM Gallery – or now quickly filter them using the category tree-view on the left-hand side of the dialog.  For example, by selecting “Oracle” in the tree-view you can now quickly filter to see the official Oracle supplied images. MSDN and Supported checkboxes: With today’s update we are also introducing filters that makes it easy to filter out types of images that you may not be interested in. The first checkbox is MSDN: using this filter you can exclude any image that is not part of the Windows Azure benefits for MSDN subscribers (which have highly discounted pricing - you can learn more about the MSDN pricing here). The second checkbox is Supported: this filter will exclude any image that contains prerelease software, so you can feel confident that the software you choose to deploy is fully supported by Windows Azure and our partners. Sort options: We sort gallery images by what we think customers are most interested in, but sometimes you might want to sort using different views. So we’re providing some additional sort options, like “Newest,” to customize the image list for what suits you best. Pricing information: We now provide additional pricing information about images and options on how to cost effectively run them directly within the VM Gallery. The above improvements make it even easier to use the VM Gallery and quickly create launch and run Virtual Machines in the cloud. Virtual Machines: ACL Support for VIPs A few months ago we exposed the ability to configure Access Control Lists (ACLs) for Virtual Machines using Windows PowerShell cmdlets and our Service Management API. With today’s release, you can now configure VM ACLs using the Windows Azure Management Portal as well. You can now do this by clicking the new Manage ACL command in the Endpoints tab of a virtual machine instance: This will enable you to configure an ordered list of permit and deny rules to scope the traffic that can access your VM’s network endpoints. For example, if you were on a virtual network, you could limit RDP access to a Windows Azure virtual machine to only a few computers attached to your enterprise. Or if you weren’t on a virtual network you could alternatively limit traffic from public IPs that can access your workloads: Here is the default behaviors for ACLs in Windows Azure: By default (i.e. no rules specified), all traffic is permitted. When using only Permit rules, all other traffic is denied. When using only Deny rules, all other traffic is permitted. When there is a combination of Permit and Deny rules, all other traffic is denied. Lastly, remember that configuring endpoints does not automatically configure them within the VM if it also has firewall rules enabled at the OS level.  So if you create an endpoint using the Windows Azure Management Portal, Windows PowerShell, or REST API, be sure to also configure your guest VM firewall appropriately as well. Web Sites: Web Sockets Support With today’s release you can now use Web Sockets with Windows Azure Web Sites.  This feature enables you to easily integrate real-time communication scenarios within your web based applications, and is available at no extra charge (it even works with the free tier).  Higher level programming libraries like SignalR and socket.io are also now supported with it. You can enable Web Sockets support on a web site by navigating to the Configure tab of a Web Site, and by toggling Web Sockets support to “on”: Once Web Sockets is enabled you can start to integrate some really cool scenarios into your web applications.  Check out the new SignalR documentation hub on www.asp.net to learn more about some of the awesome scenarios you can do with it. Web Sites: Remote Debugging Support The Windows Azure SDK 2.2 we released two weeks ago introduced remote debugging support for Windows Azure Cloud Services. With today’s Windows Azure release we are extending this remote debugging support to also work with Windows Azure Web Sites. With live, remote debugging support inside of Visual Studio, you are able to have more visibility than ever before into how your code is operating live in Windows Azure. It is now super easy to attach the debugger and quickly see what is going on with your application in the cloud. Remote Debugging of a Windows Azure Web Site using VS 2013 Enabling the remote debugging of a Windows Azure Web Site using VS 2013 is really easy.  Start by opening up your web application’s project within Visual Studio. Then navigate to the “Server Explorer” tab within Visual Studio, and click on the deployed web-site you want to debug that is running within Windows Azure using the Windows Azure->Web Sites node in the Server Explorer.  Then right-click and choose the “Attach Debugger” option on it: When you do this Visual Studio will remotely attach the debugger to the Web Site running within Windows Azure.  The debugger will then stop the web site’s execution when it hits any break points that you have set within your web application’s project inside Visual Studio.  For example, below I set a breakpoint on the “ViewBag.Message” assignment statement within the HomeController of the standard ASP.NET MVC project template.  When I hit refresh on the “About” page of the web site within the browser, the breakpoint was triggered and I am now able to debug the app remotely using Visual Studio: Note above how we can debug variables (including autos/watchlist/etc), as well as use the Immediate and Command Windows. In the debug session above I used the Immediate Window to explore some of the request object state, as well as to dynamically change the ViewBag.Message property.  When we click the the “Continue” button (or press F5) the app will continue execution and the Web Site will render the content back to the browser.  This makes it super easy to debug web apps remotely. Tips for Better Debugging To get the best experience while debugging, we recommend publishing your site using the Debug configuration within Visual Studio’s Web Publish dialog. This will ensure that debug symbol information is uploaded to the Web Site which will enable a richer debug experience within Visual Studio.  You can find this option on the Web Publish dialog on the Settings tab: When you ultimately deploy/run the application in production we recommend using the “Release” configuration setting – the release configuration is memory optimized and will provide the best production performance.  To learn more about diagnosing and debugging Windows Azure Web Sites read our new Troubleshooting Windows Azure Web Sites in Visual Studio guide. Notification Hubs: Segmented Push Notification support with tag expressions In August we announced the General Availability of Windows Azure Notification Hubs - a powerful Mobile Push Notifications service that makes it easy to send high volume push notifications with low latency from any mobile app back-end.  Notification hubs can be used with any mobile app back-end (including ones built using our Mobile Services capability) and can also be used with back-ends that run in the cloud as well as on-premises. Beginning with the initial release, Notification Hubs allowed developers to send personalized push notifications to both individual users as well as groups of users by interest, by associating their devices with tags representing the logical target of the notification. For example, by registering all devices of customers interested in a favorite MLB team with a corresponding tag, it is possible to broadcast one message to millions of Boston Red Sox fans and another message to millions of St. Louis Cardinals fans with a single API call respectively. New support for using tag expressions to enable advanced customer segmentation With today’s release we are adding support for even more advanced customer targeting.  You can now identify customers that you want to send push notifications to by defining rich tag expressions. With tag expressions, you can now not only broadcast notifications to Boston Red Sox fans, but take that segmenting a step farther and reach more granular segments. This opens up a variety of scenarios, for example: Offers based on multiple preferences—e.g. send a game day vegetarian special to users tagged as both a Boston Red Sox fan AND a vegetarian Push content to multiple segments in a single message—e.g. rain delay information only to users who are tagged as either a Boston Red Sox fan OR a St. Louis Cardinal fan Avoid presenting subsets of a segment with irrelevant content—e.g. season ticket availability reminder to users who are tagged as a Boston Red Sox fan but NOT also a season ticket holder To illustrate with code, consider a restaurant chain app that sends an offer related to a Red Sox vs Cardinals game for users in Boston. Devices can be tagged by your app with location tags (e.g. “Loc:Boston”) and interest tags (e.g. “Follows:RedSox”, “Follows:Cardinals”), and then a notification can be sent by your back-end to “(Follows:RedSox || Follows:Cardinals) && Loc:Boston” in order to deliver an offer to all devices in Boston that follow either the RedSox or the Cardinals. This can be done directly in your server backend send logic using the code below: var notification = new WindowsNotification(messagePayload); hub.SendNotificationAsync(notification, "(Follows:RedSox || Follows:Cardinals) && Loc:Boston"); In your expressions you can use all Boolean operators: AND (&&), OR (||), and NOT (!).  Some other cool use cases for tag expressions that are now supported include: Social: To “all my group except me” - group:id && !user:id Events: Touchdown event is sent to everybody following either team or any of the players involved in the action: Followteam:A || Followteam:B || followplayer:1 || followplayer:2 … Hours: Send notifications at specific times. E.g. Tag devices with time zone and when it is 12pm in Seattle send to: GMT8 && follows:thaifood Versions and platforms: Send a reminder to people still using your first version for Android - version:1.0 && platform:Android For help on getting started with Notification Hubs, visit the Notification Hub documentation center.  Then download the latest NuGet package (or use the Notification Hubs REST APIs directly) to start sending push notifications using tag expressions.  They are really powerful and enable a bunch of great new scenarios. TFS & GIT: Continuous Delivery Support for Web Sites + Cloud Services With today’s Windows Azure release we are making it really easy to enable continuous delivery support with Windows Azure and Team Foundation Services.  Team Foundation Services is a cloud based offering from Microsoft that provides integrated source control (with both TFS and Git support), build server, test execution, collaboration tools, and agile planning support.  It makes it really easy to setup a team project (complete with automated builds and test runners) in the cloud, and it has really rich integration with Visual Studio. With today’s Windows Azure release it is now really easy to enable continuous delivery support with both TFS and Git based repositories hosted using Team Foundation Services.  This enables a workflow where when code is checked in, built successfully on an automated build server, and all tests pass on it – I can automatically have the app deployed on Windows Azure with zero manual intervention or work required. The below screen-shots demonstrate how to quickly setup a continuous delivery workflow to Windows Azure with a Git-based ASP.NET MVC project hosted using Team Foundation Services. Enabling Continuous Delivery to Windows Azure with Team Foundation Services The project I’m going to enable continuous delivery with is a simple ASP.NET MVC project whose source code I’m hosting using Team Foundation Services.  I did this by creating a “SimpleContinuousDeploymentTest” repository there using Git – and then used the new built-in Git tooling support within Visual Studio 2013 to push the source code to it.  Below is a screen-shot of the Git repository hosted within Team Foundation Services: I can access the repository within Visual Studio 2013 and easily make commits with it (as well as branch, merge and do other tasks).  Using VS 2013 I can also setup automated builds to take place in the cloud using Team Foundation Services every time someone checks in code to the repository: The cool thing about this is that I don’t have to buy or rent my own build server – Team Foundation Services automatically maintains its own build server farm and can automatically queue up a build for me (for free) every time someone checks in code using the above settings.  This build server (and automated testing) support now works with both TFS and Git based source control repositories. Connecting a Team Foundation Services project to Windows Azure Once I have a source repository hosted in Team Foundation Services with Automated Builds and Testing set up, I can then go even further and set it up so that it will be automatically deployed to Windows Azure when a source code commit is made to the repository (assuming the Build + Tests pass).  Enabling this is now really easy.  To set this up with a Windows Azure Web Site simply use the New->Compute->Web Site->Custom Create command inside the Windows Azure Management Portal.  This will create a dialog like below.  I gave the web site a name and then made sure the “Publish from source control” checkbox was selected: When we click next we’ll be prompted for the location of the source repository.  We’ll select “Team Foundation Services”: Once we do this we’ll be prompted for our Team Foundation Services account that our source repository is hosted under (in this case my TFS account is “scottguthrie”): When we click the “Authorize Now” button we’ll be prompted to give Windows Azure permissions to connect to the Team Foundation Services account.  Once we do this we’ll be prompted to pick the source repository we want to connect to.  Starting with today’s Windows Azure release you can now connect to both TFS and Git based source repositories.  This new support allows me to connect to the “SimpleContinuousDeploymentTest” respository we created earlier: Clicking the finish button will then create the Web Site with the continuous delivery hooks setup with Team Foundation Services.  Now every time someone pushes source control to the repository in Team Foundation Services, it will kick off an automated build, run all of the unit tests in the solution , and if they pass the app will be automatically deployed to our Web Site in Windows Azure.  You can monitor the history and status of these automated deployments using the Deployments tab within the Web Site: This enables a really slick continuous delivery workflow, and enables you to build and deploy apps in a really nice way. Developer Analytics: New Relic support for Web Sites + Mobile Services With today’s Windows Azure release we are making it really easy to enable Developer Analytics and Monitoring support with both Windows Azure Web Site and Windows Azure Mobile Services.  We are partnering with New Relic, who provide a great dev analytics and app performance monitoring offering, to enable this - and we have updated the Windows Azure Management Portal to make it really easy to configure. Enabling New Relic with a Windows Azure Web Site Enabling New Relic support with a Windows Azure Web Site is now really easy.  Simply navigate to the Configure tab of a Web Site and scroll down to the “developer analytics” section that is now within it: Clicking the “add-on” button will display some additional UI.  If you don’t already have a New Relic subscription, you can click the “view windows azure store” button to obtain a subscription (note: New Relic has a perpetually free tier so you can enable it even without paying anything): Clicking the “view windows azure store” button will launch the integrated Windows Azure Store experience we have within the Windows Azure Management Portal.  You can use this to browse from a variety of great add-on services – including New Relic: Select “New Relic” within the dialog above, then click the next button, and you’ll be able to choose which type of New Relic subscription you wish to purchase.  For this demo we’ll simply select the “Free Standard Version” – which does not cost anything and can be used forever:  Once we’ve signed-up for our New Relic subscription and added it to our Windows Azure account, we can go back to the Web Site’s configuration tab and choose to use the New Relic add-on with our Windows Azure Web Site.  We can do this by simply selecting it from the “add-on” dropdown (it is automatically populated within it once we have a New Relic subscription in our account): Clicking the “Save” button will then cause the Windows Azure Management Portal to automatically populate all of the needed New Relic configuration settings to our Web Site: Deploying the New Relic Agent as part of a Web Site The final step to enable developer analytics using New Relic is to add the New Relic runtime agent to our web app.  We can do this within Visual Studio by right-clicking on our web project and selecting the “Manage NuGet Packages” context menu: This will bring up the NuGet package manager.  You can search for “New Relic” within it to find the New Relic agent.  Note that there is both a 32-bit and 64-bit edition of it – make sure to install the version that matches how your Web Site is running within Windows Azure (note: you can configure your Web Site to run in either 32-bit or 64-bit mode using the Web Site’s “Configuration” tab within the Windows Azure Management Portal): Once we install the NuGet package we are all set to go.  We’ll simply re-publish the web site again to Windows Azure and New Relic will now automatically start monitoring the application Monitoring a Web Site using New Relic Now that the application has developer analytics support with New Relic enabled, we can launch the New Relic monitoring portal to start monitoring the health of it.  We can do this by clicking on the “Add Ons” tab in the left-hand side of the Windows Azure Management Portal.  Then select the New Relic add-on we signed-up for within it.  The Windows Azure Management Portal will provide some default information about the add-on when we do this.  Clicking the “Manage” button in the tray at the bottom will launch a new browser tab and single-sign us into the New Relic monitoring portal associated with our account: When we do this a new browser tab will launch with the New Relic admin tool loaded within it: We can now see insights into how our app is performing – without having to have written a single line of monitoring code.  The New Relic service provides a ton of great built-in monitoring features allowing us to quickly see: Performance times (including browser rendering speed) for the overall site and individual pages.  You can optionally set alert thresholds to trigger if the speed does not meet a threshold you specify. Information about where in the world your customers are hitting the site from (and how performance varies by region) Details on the latency performance of external services your web apps are using (for example: SQL, Storage, Twitter, etc) Error information including call stack details for exceptions that have occurred at runtime SQL Server profiling information – including which queries executed against your database and what their performance was And a whole bunch more… The cool thing about New Relic is that you don’t need to write monitoring code within your application to get all of the above reports (plus a lot more).  The New Relic agent automatically enables the CLR profiler within applications and automatically captures the information necessary to identify these.  This makes it super easy to get started and immediately have a rich developer analytics view for your solutions with very little effort. If you haven’t tried New Relic out yet with Windows Azure I recommend you do so – I think you’ll find it helps you build even better cloud applications.  Following the above steps will help you get started and deliver you a really good application monitoring solution in only minutes. Service Bus: Support for partitioned queues and topics With today’s release, we are enabling support within Service Bus for partitioned queues and topics. Enabling partitioning enables you to achieve a higher message throughput and better availability from your queues and topics. Higher message throughput is achieved by implementing multiple message brokers for each partitioned queue and topic.  The  multiple messaging stores will also provide higher availability. You can create a partitioned queue or topic by simply checking the Enable Partitioning option in the custom create wizard for a Queue or Topic: Read this article to learn more about partitioned queues and topics and how to take advantage of them today. Billing: New Billing Alert Service Today’s Windows Azure update enables a new Billing Alert Service Preview that enables you to get proactive email notifications when your Windows Azure bill goes above a certain monetary threshold that you configure.  This makes it easier to manage your bill and avoid potential surprises at the end of the month. With the Billing Alert Service Preview, you can now create email alerts to monitor and manage your monetary credits or your current bill total.  To set up an alert first sign-up for the free Billing Alert Service Preview.  Then visit the account management page, click on a subscription you have setup, and then navigate to the new Alerts tab that is available: The alerts tab allows you to setup email alerts that will be sent automatically once a certain threshold is hit.  For example, by clicking the “add alert” button above I can setup a rule to send myself email anytime my Windows Azure bill goes above $100 for the month: The Billing Alert Service will evolve to support additional aspects of your bill as well as support multiple forms of alerts such as SMS.  Try out the new Billing Alert Service Preview today and give us feedback. Summary Today’s Windows Azure release enables a ton of great new scenarios, and makes building applications hosted in the cloud even easier. If you don’t already have a Windows Azure account, you can sign-up for a free trial and start using all of the above features today.  Then visit the Windows Azure Developer Center to learn more about how to build apps with it. Hope this helps, Scott P.S. In addition to blogging, I am also now using Twitter for quick updates and to share links. Follow me at: twitter.com/scottgu

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  • Tree Node Checked behavior on a TreeView in Compact Framework 3.5 running on Windows Mobile 6.5

    - by Hydroslide
    I have been upgrading an existing .NET Windows Mobile application to use the 3.5 version of the compact framework and to run on Windows Mobile 6.5. I have a form with a TreeView. The TreeView.Checkboxes property is set to true so that each node has a check box. This gives no trouble in all previous versions of Windows Mobile. However, in version 6.5 when you click on a check box it appears to check and then uncheck instantaneously. But it only raises the AfterCheck event once. The only way I can get a check to stick is by double clicking it (which is the wrong behavior). Has anyone seen this behavior? Does anyone know of a workaround for it? I have included a simple test form. Dump this form into a Visual Studio 2008 Smart Device application targeted at Windows Mobile 6 to see what I mean. Public Class frmTree Inherits System.Windows.Forms.Form #Region " Windows Form Designer generated code " Public Sub New() MyBase.new() ' This call is required by the Windows Form Designer. InitializeComponent() ' Add any initialization after the InitializeComponent() call. End Sub 'Form overrides dispose to clean up the component list. <System.Diagnostics.DebuggerNonUserCode()> _ Protected Overrides Sub Dispose(ByVal disposing As Boolean) If disposing AndAlso components IsNot Nothing Then components.Dispose() End If MyBase.Dispose(disposing) End Sub 'Required by the Windows Form Designer Private components As System.ComponentModel.IContainer Friend WithEvents TreeView1 As System.Windows.Forms.TreeView Private mainMenu1 As System.Windows.Forms.MainMenu 'NOTE: The following procedure is required by the Windows Form Designer 'It can be modified using the Windows Form Designer. 'Do not modify it using the code editor. <System.Diagnostics.DebuggerStepThrough()> _ Private Sub InitializeComponent() Dim TreeNode1 As System.Windows.Forms.TreeNode = New System.Windows.Forms.TreeNode("Node0") Dim TreeNode2 As System.Windows.Forms.TreeNode = New System.Windows.Forms.TreeNode("Node2") Dim TreeNode3 As System.Windows.Forms.TreeNode = New System.Windows.Forms.TreeNode("Node3") Dim TreeNode4 As System.Windows.Forms.TreeNode = New System.Windows.Forms.TreeNode("Node4") Dim TreeNode5 As System.Windows.Forms.TreeNode = New System.Windows.Forms.TreeNode("Node1") Dim TreeNode6 As System.Windows.Forms.TreeNode = New System.Windows.Forms.TreeNode("Node5") Dim TreeNode7 As System.Windows.Forms.TreeNode = New System.Windows.Forms.TreeNode("Node6") Dim TreeNode8 As System.Windows.Forms.TreeNode = New System.Windows.Forms.TreeNode("Node7") Me.mainMenu1 = New System.Windows.Forms.MainMenu Me.TreeView1 = New System.Windows.Forms.TreeView Me.SuspendLayout() ' 'TreeView1 ' Me.TreeView1.CheckBoxes = True Me.TreeView1.Location = New System.Drawing.Point(37, 41) Me.TreeView1.Name = "TreeView1" TreeNode2.Text = "Node2" TreeNode3.Text = "Node3" TreeNode4.Text = "Node4" TreeNode1.Nodes.AddRange(New System.Windows.Forms.TreeNode() {TreeNode2, TreeNode3, TreeNode4}) TreeNode1.Text = "Node0" TreeNode6.Text = "Node5" TreeNode7.Text = "Node6" TreeNode8.Text = "Node7" TreeNode5.Nodes.AddRange(New System.Windows.Forms.TreeNode() {TreeNode6, TreeNode7, TreeNode8}) TreeNode5.Text = "Node1" Me.TreeView1.Nodes.AddRange(New System.Windows.Forms.TreeNode() {TreeNode1, TreeNode5}) Me.TreeView1.Size = New System.Drawing.Size(171, 179) Me.TreeView1.TabIndex = 0 ' 'frmTree ' Me.AutoScaleDimensions = New System.Drawing.SizeF(96.0!, 96.0!) Me.AutoScaleMode = System.Windows.Forms.AutoScaleMode.Dpi Me.AutoScroll = True Me.ClientSize = New System.Drawing.Size(240, 268) Me.Controls.Add(Me.TreeView1) Me.Menu = Me.mainMenu1 Me.Name = "frmTree" Me.Text = "frmTree" Me.ResumeLayout(False) End Sub #End Region End Class

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  • USB External HDD NOT spinning down on Windows Vista / Windows 7

    - by Deepak
    I have 3 external 2.5" USB HDDs - all from different manufacturers and with different capacities. I also have access to multiple Windows Vista / Windows 7 / Windows XP computers. My problem is that with the Windows Vista and Windows 7 computers, the external USB drives DO NOT spin down when I do "Safely remove hardware". Windows will tell me that I can safely remove the device, but I can see (and feel the rotations of the disk when I touch the casing) that the disks are still spinning and NEVER spin down. They also never go into their suspended state (which is generally signaled with a slow flashing of the activity LED). However, with Windows XP, when I do "Safely remove hardware", I can see that the drives do indeed spin down without any issues and go into their respective suspended states. I notice that this behaviour is consistent across all my 3 drives and on different hardware. Has anybody else noticed the same issues? Is there any way we can have the same behaviour as Windows XP on Windows Vista and 7, because I feel on the long run, disconnecting the drives while they are still spinning will have a negative effect on their life span. Thanks, Deepak.

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  • Can't get past bootcamp Windows logo, freezes immediately after picking boot partition -- Windows 7

    - by cksubs
    Hi, I had a fine install of Windows 7 alongside Snow Leopard. I had a power outage, and Windows restarted. When I booted via the "Hold Option" sceen, it started hanging at the grayscale "Windows logo" (squares) that comes up after picking the Windows drive from the bootcamp loader (the Windows version of the grayscale Apple logo when OS X loads). I think this happened once before, and installing rEFIt helped. I did that, but it continued to hang at the same point. I finally got fed up with it and erased the Windows partition via Disk Utility. I then reinstalled Windows 7 x64 from DVD to the fresh partition. Seemed fine. Ran Windows Update then restarted. FFFFFFFFF. Hangs in the same place. What can I do? Like I said, I already have rEFIt installed. Booting the Windows 7 install CD results in the same infinite loading error. I don't have a spare Snow Leopard disk handy.

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  • Windows 7 won't boot from any bootloader except for Windows Boot Manager after partition resize

    - by user2468327
    I have a triple boot system on a single SSD: OSX, Windows 7, and Ubuntu. I use Chimera (basically another version of Chameleon) as my bootloader. Usually I can boot all 3 OSs without any issue, but after using GParted to make my Ubuntu partition 2 Gigs larger, Windows 7 throws me an error when trying to boot to it from either Chimera or Grub. The error is consistently: `0xc000000e can't find \Boot\BCD" (slightly paraphrased). However, I can still get into Windows by selecting Windows Boot Manager from the boot options in my BIOS. I've already tried several known fixes for similar issues, including bootrec /rebuildbcd (and variations), and BootRec.exe/fixMBR + BootRec.exe/fixBoot. I've also tried Chkdsk. At best this has made it so Windows 7 boots on its own by default (making me have to reinstall Chimera and change back my boot settings in the BIOS). At worst this made it so Windows won't boot period. Now I'm back full circle where I started. A detail that might be useful is that bootrec /rebuildbcd says that the number of found Windows installations is 0. I'm fairly certain that I don't have a hybrid MBR. Mainly because I have a UEFI BIOS, and with that, it appears each OS can support a GPT. So it would kind of pointless to have and deal with. I may be wrong though, I couldn't find any way of finding out for sure online. However, I know for sure that the version of Windows I have installed is the UEFI version, as well as every partition tool I've used to look at my boot drive tells me it's GPT. How do I get it back so I can boot Windows 7 through another bootloader so I don't have to manually select it in the BIOS? Preferably without a reinstall.

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