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  • LastPass Now Monitors Your Accounts for Security Breaches

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    Staying on top of security breaches and how they may or may not affect you is time consuming. Sentry, a new and free addition to the LastPass password management tool, automates the process and notifies you of breaches. In response to all the recent and unfortunate high-profile security breaches LastPass has rolled out Sentry–a tool that monitors breach lists to notify you if your email appears in a list of breached accounts. The lists are supplied by PwnedList, a massive database of security breach data, and securely indexed against your accounts within the LastPass system. If there is a security breach and your email is on the list, you’ll receive an automated email notice indicating which website was compromised and that your email address was one of the positive matches from the breach list. LastPass Sentry is a free feature and, as of yesterday, is automatically activated on all Free, Premium, and Enterprise level accounts. Hit up the link below to read the official announcement. Introducing LastPass Sentry [The LastPass Blog] How To Create a Customized Windows 7 Installation Disc With Integrated Updates How to Get Pro Features in Windows Home Versions with Third Party Tools HTG Explains: Is ReadyBoost Worth Using?

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  • Increase Security by Enabling Two-Factor Authentication on Your Google Account

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    You can easily increase the security of your Google account by enabling two-factor authentication; flip it on today for a free security boost. It’s not a new feature but it’s a feature worth giving a second look. Watch the above video for a quick overview of Google’s two-factor authentication system. Essentially your mobile phone becomes the second authentication tool–you use your password + a code sent to your phone to log into your account. It’s a great way to easily increase the security of your Google account, it’s free, and you can set it so that you only have to validate your home computer once every 30 days. Google Two-Step Verification [via Google+] HTG Explains: When Do You Need to Update Your Drivers? How to Make the Kindle Fire Silk Browser *Actually* Fast! Amazon’s New Kindle Fire Tablet: the How-To Geek Review

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  • The Top Ten Security Top Ten Lists

    - by Troy Kitch
    As a marketer, we're always putting together the top 3, or 5 best, or an assortment of top ten lists. So instead of going that route, I've put together my top ten security top ten lists. These are not only for security practitioners, but also for the average Joe/Jane; because who isn't concerned about security these days? Now, there might not be ten for each one of these lists, but the title works best that way. Starting with my number ten (in no particular order): 10. Top 10 Most Influential Security-Related Movies Amrit Williams pulls together a great collection of security-related movies. He asks for comments on which one made you want to get into the business. I would have to say that my most influential movie(s), that made me want to get into the business of "stopping the bad guys" would have to be the James Bond series. I grew up on James Bond movies: thwarting the bad guy and saving the world. I recall being both ecstatic and worried when Silicon Valley-themed "A View to A Kill" hit theaters: "An investigation of a horse-racing scam leads 007 to a mad industrialist who plans to create a worldwide microchip monopoly by destroying California's Silicon Valley." Yikes! 9. Top Ten Security Careers From movies that got you into the career, here’s a top 10 list of security-related careers. It starts with number then, Information Security Analyst and ends with number one, Malware Analyst. They point out the significant growth in security careers and indicate that "according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the field is expected to experience growth rates of 22% between 2010-2020. If you are interested in getting into the field, Oracle has many great opportunities all around the world.  8. Top 125 Network Security Tools A bit outside of the range of 10, the top 125 Network Security Tools is an important list because it includes a prioritized list of key security tools practitioners are using in the hacking community, regardless of whether they are vendor supplied or open source. The exhaustive list provides ratings, reviews, searching, and sorting. 7. Top 10 Security Practices I have to give a shout out to my alma mater, Cal Poly, SLO: Go Mustangs! They have compiled their list of top 10 practices for students and faculty to follow. Educational institutions are a common target of web based attacks and miscellaneous errors according to the 2014 Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report.    6. (ISC)2 Top 10 Safe and Secure Online Tips for Parents This list is arguably the most important list on my list. The tips were "gathered from (ISC)2 member volunteers who participate in the organization’s Safe and Secure Online program, a worldwide initiative that brings top cyber security experts into schools to teach children ages 11-14 how to protect themselves in a cyber-connected world…If you are a parent, educator or organization that would like the Safe and Secure Online presentation delivered at your local school, or would like more information about the program, please visit here.” 5. Top Ten Data Breaches of the Past 12 Months This type of list is always changing, so it's nice to have a current one here from Techrader.com. They've compiled and commented on the top breaches. It is likely that most readers here were effected in some way or another. 4. Top Ten Security Comic Books Although mostly physical security controls, I threw this one in for fun. My vote for #1 (not on the list) would be Professor X. The guy can breach confidentiality, integrity, and availability just by messing with your thoughts. 3. The IOUG Data Security Survey's Top 10+ Threats to Organizations The Independent Oracle Users Group annual survey on enterprise data security, Leaders Vs. Laggards, highlights what Oracle Database users deem as the top 12 threats to their organization. You can find a nice graph on page 9; Figure 7: Greatest Threats to Data Security. 2. The Ten Most Common Database Security Vulnerabilities Though I don't necessarily agree with all of the vulnerabilities in this order...I like a list that focuses on where two-thirds of your sensitive and regulated data resides (Source: IDC).  1. OWASP Top Ten Project The Online Web Application Security Project puts together their annual list of the 10 most critical web application security risks that organizations should be including in their overall security, business risk and compliance plans. In particular, SQL injection risks continues to rear its ugly head each year. Oracle Audit Vault and Database Firewall can help prevent SQL injection attacks and monitor database and system activity as a detective security control. Did I miss any?

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  • Does Ubuntu generally post timely security updates?

    - by Jo Liss
    Concrete issue: The Oneiric nginx package is at version 1.0.5-1, released in July 2011 according to the changelog. The recent memory-disclosure vulnerability (advisory page, CVE-2012-1180, DSA-2434-1) isn't fixed in 1.0.5-1. If I'm not misreading the Ubuntu CVE page, all Ubuntu versions seem to ship a vulnerable nginx. Is this true? If so: I though there was a security team at Canonical that's actively working on issues like this, so I expected to get a security update within a short timeframe (hours or days) through apt-get update. Is this expectation -- that keeping my packages up-to-date is enough to stop my server from having known vulnerabilities -- generally wrong? If so: What should I do to keep it secure? Reading the Ubuntu security notices wouldn't have helped in this case, as the nginx vulnerability was never posted there.

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  • Lockdown Your Database Security

    - by Troy Kitch
    A new article in Oracle Magazine outlines a comprehensive defense-in-depth approach for appropriate and effective database protection. There are multiple ways attackers can disrupt the confidentiality, integrity and availability of data and therefore, putting in place layers of defense is the best measure to protect your sensitive customer and corporate data. “In most organizations, two-thirds of sensitive and regulated data resides in databases,” points out Vipin Samar, vice president of database security technologies at Oracle. “Unless the databases are protected using a multilayered security architecture, that data is at risk to be read or changed by administrators of the operating system, databases, or network, or hackers who use stolen passwords to pose as administrators. Further, hackers can exploit legitimate access to the database by using SQL injection attacks from the Web. Organizations need to mitigate all types of risks and craft a security architecture that protects their assets from attacks coming from different sources.” Register and read more in the online magazine format.

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  • PHP security regarding login

    - by piers
    I have read a lot about PHP login security recently, but many questions on Stack Overflow regarding security are outdated. I understand bcrypt is one of the best ways of hashing passwords today. However, for my site, I believe sha512 will do very well, at least to begin with. (I mean bcrypt is for bigger sites, sites that require high security, right?) I´m also wonder about salting. Is it necessary for every password to have its own unique salt? Should I have one field for the salt and one for the password in my database table? What would be a decent salt today? Should I join the username together with the password and add a random word/letter/special character combination to it? Thanks for your help!

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  • WCF service and security

    - by Gaz83
    Been building a WP7 app and now I need it to communicate to a WCF service I made to make changes to an SQL database. I am a little concerned about security as the user name and password for accessing the SQL database is in the App.Config. I have read in places that you can encrypt the user name and password in the config file. As the username and password is never exposed to the clients connected to the WCF service, would security in my situation be much of a problem? Just in case anyone suggests a method of security, I do not have SSL on my web server.

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  • Roll Your Own DIY Solar-Powered Security Camera Setup

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    If you’re looking to set up a security camera without running power or video lines, this solar-powered version combines a cheap Wi-Fi cam with a home-rolled solar setup to provide surveillance without wires. Courtesy of Reddit user CheapGuitar, the setup combines a dirt cheap off-brand Wi-Fi security camera, a Tupperware container spray painted black, some old camping solar panels, and a battery into a security camera that checks in as long as it’s in range of a Wi-Fi router or repeater. Hit up the link below to check out the build guide. Solar Powered Camera [via Hack A Day] HTG Explains: What Is Windows RT & What Does It Mean To Me? HTG Explains: How Windows 8′s Secure Boot Feature Works & What It Means for Linux Hack Your Kindle for Easy Font Customization

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  • What is the difference between Row Level Security and RPD security?

    - by Jeffrey McDaniel
    Row level security (RLS) is a feature of Oracle Enterprise Edition database. RLS enforces security policies on the database level. This means any query executed against the database will respect the specific security applied through these policies. For P6 Reporting Database, these policies are applied during the ETL process. This gives database users the ability to access data with security enforcement even outside of the Oracle Business Intelligence application. RLS is a new feature of P6 Reporting Database starting in version 3.0. This allows for maximum security enforcement outside of the ETL and inside of Oracle Business Intelligence (Analysis and Dashboards). Policies are defined against the STAR tables based on Primavera Project and Resource security. RLS is the security method of Oracle Enterprise Edition customers. See previous blogs and P6 Reporting Database Installation and Configuration guide for more on security specifics. To allow the use of Oracle Standard Edition database for those with a small database (as defined in the P6 Reporting Database Sizing and Planning guide) an RPD with non-RLS is also available. RPD security is enforced by adding specific criteria to the physical and business layers of the RPD for those tables that contain projects and resources, and those fields that are cost fields vs. non cost fields. With the RPD security method Oracle Business Intelligence enforces security. RLS security is the default security method. Additional steps are required at installation and ETL run time for those Oracle Standard Edition customers who use RPD security. The RPD method of security enforcement existed from P6 Reporting Database 2.0/P6 Analytics 1.0 up until RLS became available in P6 Reporting Database 3.0\P6 Analytics 2.0.

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  • WCF Security Transport Security Questions

    - by shyneman
    I'm writing a set of WCF services that rely on transport security with Windows Authentication using the trusted subsystem model. However, I want to perform authorization based on the original client user that initiated the request (e.g. a user from a website with a username/password). I'm planning to achieve this by adding the original user's credentials in the header before the client sends the message and then the service will use the supplied credentials to authorize the user. So I have a few questions about this implementation: 1) using transport security with windows auth, I do NOT need to worry about again encrypting the passed credentials to ensure the validity... WCF automatically takes care of this - is this correct? 2) how does this implementation prevent a malicious service, running under some windows account within the domain, to send a message tagged with spoofed credentials. for e.g. a malicious service replaces the credentials with an Admin user to do something bad? Thanks for any help.

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  • Security updates for all supported versions of SQL Server

    - by AaronBertrand
    It's patch Tuesday! [ UPDATE June 19 : Please see my follow-up post about this security update.] Today Microsoft released a security bulletin covering several issues that could potentially affect SQL Server; these exploits include remote code execution, denial of service, information disclosure and elevation of privilege. You should test these patches on all machines running SQL Server, including those running only client tools (e.g. Management Studio or Management Studio Express). The updates affect...(read more)

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  • Latest Security Inside Out Newsletter Now Available

    - by Troy Kitch
    The September/October edition of the Security Inside Out Newsletter is now available. Learn about Oracle OpenWorld database security sessions, hands on labs, and demos you'll want to attend, as well as frequently asked question about Label-Based Access Controls in Oracle Database 11g. Subscriber here for the bi-monthly newsletter.  ...and if you haven't already done so, join Oracle Database on these social networks: Twitter Facebook LinkedIn Google+ 

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  • Security Updates Available for SQL Server 2008, 2008 R2, 2012, 2014

    - by AaronBertrand
    If you are running 2008 SP3, 2008 R2 SP2, 2012 SP1 (SP2 is not affected, RTM is no longer supported), or 2014, you'll want to check out Security Bulletin MS14-044 for details on a denial of service / privilege escalation issue that has been patched: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/security/MS14-044 For SQL Server 2012 and SQL Server 2014, I've blogged about recent builds and recommendations here: http://blogs.sqlsentry.com/team-posts/latest-builds-sql-server-2012/ http://blogs.sqlsentry.com/team-posts/latest-builds-sql-server-2014...(read more)

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  • Security programming jobs

    - by Mike Smith
    I am a student, about to finish my undergraduate in Computer Science in about a year. I am very interested in computer/network security, but I also love programming. Is there a job or subfield that is a fusion of both? I have programmed everything from games to barcode readers to web bots, and I know for sure that I want to do some kind of programming, but ideally I would like to do some kind of software development involving computer security. Any advice would be appreciated.

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  • Live Security Talk Webcast: Security Best Practices for Design and Deployment on Windows Azure (Leve

    Developing secure applications and services in the cloud requires knowledge of the threat landscape specific to the cloud provider. The key is understanding threat mitigations implemented by the cloud architecture versus those that are the responsibility of the developer. Register for this exciting live webcast to learn about the threats that are specific to the cloud and how the Windows Azure architecture deals with these threats. We also cover how to use built-in Windows Azure security features...Did you know that DotNetSlackers also publishes .net articles written by top known .net Authors? We already have over 80 articles in several categories including Silverlight. Take a look: here.

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  • Windows 8 Security Flaws

    A Feeling of Complacency The amount of hype coming out of the Microsoft camp concerning Windows 8's enhanced security features is pretty high. With an improved Windows Defender integrated into the upcoming operating system, some users may feel that they will have adequate protection against malware and other threats. While the improved protection is a plus, this does not mean that other trusted programs should be avoided, as it is somewhat lazy to believe that Microsoft's integrated protection in Windows 8 will provide all the security that is necessary. Careless Web Surfing The internet of...

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  • Spring Security HTTP Basic Authentication

    - by Raspayu
    Hi people! I am trying to do a really simple basic authentication with Spring Security. I have configured properly the namespace, and there are no Exceptions in the server. In my "servlet.xml" I have got the next for Spring Security: <security:http> <security:http-basic></security:http-basic> <security:intercept-url method="POST" pattern="/**" access="ROLE_USER" /> </security:http> <security:authentication-manager alias="authenticationManager"> <security:authentication-provider> <security:user-service> <security:user name="cucu" password="tas" authorities="ROLE_USER" /> <security:user name="bob" password="bobspassword" authorities="ROLE_USER" /> </security:user-service> </security:authentication-provider> </security:authentication-manager> It nearly all goes perfect: the methods that are not POST doesn't prompt any login form, and the POST method prompt it. The problem is, that nor "cucu", neither "bob" can login there. Can anyone see what am I doing wrong? Thanks in advance! ;-)

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  • Security in a private web service

    - by Oni
    I am developing a web site and a web service for a small on-line game. Technically, I'll be using Express (node.js) and MongoDB+Redis for the databases. This the structure I came up with: One Express server that will server as the Web Service. This will connect to the databases. One Express server that will provide the web site. It will connect to the Web Service to retrieve and push the information. iOS and Android application will be able to interact with the WebService. Taking into account: It is a small game. The information transferred is not critical. There will NOT be third party applications. At least for the moment. My concern is about which level of security I should use in each of the scenarios: Security of the user playing through web browser Security of the applications and the Web Server connecting to the WS. I have take a look at the different options and: OAuth and/or Https is too much for this scenario, isn't it? Will be a good option to hash the user and password with MD5(or similar) and some salt? I would like to get some directions and investigate by my own rather than getting a response like "you should you use this node.js module..." Thanks in advance,

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  • TDE Tablespace Encryption 11.2.0.1 Certified with EBS 12

    - by Steven Chan
    Oracle Advanced Security is an optional licenced Oracle 11g Database add-on.  Oracle Advanced Security Transparent Data Encryption (TDE) offers two different features:  column encryption and tablespace encryption.  11.2.0.1 TDE Column encryption was certified with E-Business Suite 12 as part of our overall 11.2.0.1 database certification.  As of today, 11.2.0.1 TDE Tablespace encryption is now certified with Oracle E-Business Suite Release 12. What is Transparent Data Encryption (TDE) ? Oracle Advanced Security Transparent Data Encryption (TDE) allows you to protect data at rest. TDE helps address privacy and PCI requirements by encrypting personally identifiable information (PII) such as Social Security numbers and credit card numbers. TDE is completely transparent to existing applications with no triggers, views or other application changes required. Data is transparently encrypted when written to disk and transparently decrypted after an application user has successfully authenticated and passed all authorization checks. Authorization checks include verifying the user has the necessary select and update privileges on the application table and checking Database Vault, Label Security and Virtual Private Database enforcement policies.

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  • Address Regulatory Mandates for Data Encryption Without Changing Your Applications

    - by Troy Kitch
    The Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard, US state-level data breach laws, and numerous data privacy regulations worldwide all call for data encryption to protect personally identifiable information (PII). However encrypting PII data in applications requires costly and complex application changes. Fortunately, since this data typically resides in the application database, using Oracle Advanced Security, PII can be encrypted transparently by the Oracle database without any application changes. In this ISACA webinar, learn how Oracle Advanced Security offers complete encryption for data at rest, in transit, and on backups, along with built-in key management to help organizations meet regulatory requirements and save money. You will also hear from TransUnion Interactive, the consumer subsidiary of TransUnion, a global leader in credit and information management, which maintains credit histories on an estimated 500 million consumers across the globe, about how they addressed PCI DSS encryption requirements using Oracle Database 11g with Oracle Advanced Security. Register to watch the webinar now.

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  • SQLAuthority News – Wireless Router Security and Attached Devices – Complex Password

    - by pinaldave
    In the last four days (April 21-24), I have received calls from friends who told me that they have got strange emails from me. To my surprise, I did not send them any emails. I was not worried until my wife complained that she was not able to find one of the very important folders containing our daughter’s photo that is located in our shared drive. This was alarming in my par, so I started a search around my computer’s folders. Again, please note that I am by no means a security expert. I checked my entire computer with virus and spyware, and strangely, there I found nothing. I tried to think what can cause this happening. I suddenly realized that there was a power outage in my area for about two hours during the days I have mentioned. Back then, my wireless router needed to be reset, and so I did. I had set up my WPA-PSK [TKIP] + WPA2-PSK [AES] very well. My key was very simple ( ‘SQLAuthority1′), and I never thought of changing it. (It is now replaced with a very complex one). While checking the Attached Devices, I found out that there was another very strange computer name and IP attached to my network. And so as soon as I found out that there is strange device attached to my computer, I shutdown my local network. Afterwards, I reconfigured my wireless router with a more complex security key. Since I created the complex password, I noticed that the user is no more connecting to my machine. Subsequently, I figured out that I can also set up Access Control List. I added my networked computer to that list as well. When I tried to connect from an external laptop which was not in the list but with a valid security key, I was not able to access the network, neither able to connect to it. I wasn’t also able to connect using a remote desktop, so I think it was good. If you have received any nasty emails from me (from my gmail account) during the afore-mentioned days, I want to apologize. I am already paying for my negligence of not putting a complex password; by way of losing the important photos of my daughter. I have already checked with my client, whose password I saved in SSMS, so there was no issue at all. In fact, I have decided to never leave any saved password of production server in my SSMS. Here is the tip SQL SERVER – Clear Drop Down List of Recent Connection From SQL Server Management Studio to clean them. I think after doing all this, I am feeling safe right now. However, I believe that safety is an illusion of many times. I need your help and advice if there is anymore I can do to stop unauthorized access. I am seeking advice and help through your comments. Reference : Pinal Dave (http://www.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Security, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQLAuthority News, T SQL, Technology

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  • What are some topics you'd like to see covered in an 'Introduction to Network Security' book?

    - by seth.vargo
    I'm trying to put together a list of topics in Network Security and prioritize them accordingly. A little background on the book - we are trying to gear the text towards college students, as an introduction to security, and toward IT professionals who have recently been tasked with securing a network. The idea is to create a book that covers the most vital and important parts of securing a network with no assumptions. So, if you were a novice student interested in network security OR an IT professional who needed a crash course on network security, what topics do you feel would be of the upmost importance in such a text?

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  • Spring Security RememberMe Services with Session Cookie

    - by Jarrod
    I am using Spring Security's RememberMe Services to keep a user authenticated. I would like to find a simple way to have the RememberMe cookie set as a session cookie rather than with a fixed expiration time. For my application, the cookie should persist until the user closes the browser. Any suggestions on how to best implement this? Any concerns on this being a potential security problem? The primary reason for doing so is that with a cookie-based token, any of the servers behind our load balancer can service a protected request without relying on the user's Authentication to be stored in an HttpSession. In fact, I have explicitly told Spring Security to never create sessions using the namespace. Further, we are using Amazon's Elastic Load Balancing, and so sticky sessions are not supported. NB: Although I am aware that as of Apr. 08, Amazon now supports sticky sessions, I still do not want to use them for a handful of other reasons. Namely that the untimely demise of one server would still cause the loss of sessions for all users associated with it. http://aws.amazon.com/about-aws/whats-new/2010/04/08/support-for-session-stickiness-in-elastic-load-balancing/

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  • Oracle for PCI-DSS Security Webcast

    - by Alex Blyth
    Thanks to everyone who attended the Oracle for PCI-DSS security webcast today. It was good to see how the products we talked about last week can be used to address the PCI standard requirements. A big thanks to Chris Pickett for presenting a great session and running us through a very cool demo showing how the data is protected through out its life. The replay of the session can be downloaded here. Slides and be down loaded here. Oracle for PCI-DSS Security Compliance View more presentationsfrom Oracle Australia. Next week we resume our regular schedule with Andrew Clarke taking us through Oracle Application Express (APEX) - one of the best kept secrets in the Oracle Database. Enroll for this session here (and now :) ) Till next week Cheers Alex

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  • security stuff's

    - by raghu.yadav
    http://fmwdocs.us.oracle.com/doclibs/fmw/E10285_01/appslib7/web.1111/b31974/adding_security.htm#BGBGJEAH At design time, JDeveloper saves all policy store and identity store changes in a single file for the entire application. In the development environment, this is the jazn-data.xml file. After you configure the jazn-data.xml file using the editors, you can run the application in Integrated WebLogic Server and the contents of the policy store will be added to the domain-level store, the system-jazn-data.xml file, while the test users will be migrated to the embedded LDAP server that Integrated WebLogic Server uses for its identity store. The domain-level store allows you to test the security implementation by logging on as test users that you have created. looks like above part did went well with me, apart from following all instruction provided in doc, I need to create users from adminconsole in security-realms-Users and Groups sections to successfully login to pages.

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