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  • Flash, parameters, security

    - by Quandary
    Hi, I have a question: In Flash, I have the ability to save certain info onto the server. Now the problem is the user needs to be authenticated as admin in order to do so. I can't use sessions, since if you work longer than 20 minutes in the Flash application, the session is gone. The way I see it, I have 2 possibilities: 1. passing a parameter (bIsAdmin) to Flash from the Website. 2. Launch a http-get request, to get this value (bIsAdmin) from an ashx handler on application startup, when the session has not yet exired. In my opinion, both possibilities are not really secure... So, Which one is safer, 1 or 2? Or does anybody have a better idea ? In my opinion, 1 is safer, because with 2, you can just switch a packet tamperer in between, and bang, you're admin, with permission to save (or overwrite, =delete) anything.

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  • Toorcon14

    - by danx
    Toorcon 2012 Information Security Conference San Diego, CA, http://www.toorcon.org/ Dan Anderson, October 2012 It's almost Halloween, and we all know what that means—yes, of course, it's time for another Toorcon Conference! Toorcon is an annual conference for people interested in computer security. This includes the whole range of hackers, computer hobbyists, professionals, security consultants, press, law enforcement, prosecutors, FBI, etc. We're at Toorcon 14—see earlier blogs for some of the previous Toorcon's I've attended (back to 2003). This year's "con" was held at the Westin on Broadway in downtown San Diego, California. The following are not necessarily my views—I'm just the messenger—although I could have misquoted or misparaphrased the speakers. Also, I only reviewed some of the talks, below, which I attended and interested me. MalAndroid—the Crux of Android Infections, Aditya K. Sood Programming Weird Machines with ELF Metadata, Rebecca "bx" Shapiro Privacy at the Handset: New FCC Rules?, Valkyrie Hacking Measured Boot and UEFI, Dan Griffin You Can't Buy Security: Building the Open Source InfoSec Program, Boris Sverdlik What Journalists Want: The Investigative Reporters' Perspective on Hacking, Dave Maas & Jason Leopold Accessibility and Security, Anna Shubina Stop Patching, for Stronger PCI Compliance, Adam Brand McAfee Secure & Trustmarks — a Hacker's Best Friend, Jay James & Shane MacDougall MalAndroid—the Crux of Android Infections Aditya K. Sood, IOActive, Michigan State PhD candidate Aditya talked about Android smartphone malware. There's a lot of old Android software out there—over 50% Gingerbread (2.3.x)—and most have unpatched vulnerabilities. Of 9 Android vulnerabilities, 8 have known exploits (such as the old Gingerbread Global Object Table exploit). Android protection includes sandboxing, security scanner, app permissions, and screened Android app market. The Android permission checker has fine-grain resource control, policy enforcement. Android static analysis also includes a static analysis app checker (bouncer), and a vulnerablity checker. What security problems does Android have? User-centric security, which depends on the user to grant permission and make smart decisions. But users don't care or think about malware (the're not aware, not paranoid). All they want is functionality, extensibility, mobility Android had no "proper" encryption before Android 3.0 No built-in protection against social engineering and web tricks Alternative Android app markets are unsafe. Simply visiting some markets can infect Android Aditya classified Android Malware types as: Type A—Apps. These interact with the Android app framework. For example, a fake Netflix app. Or Android Gold Dream (game), which uploads user files stealthy manner to a remote location. Type K—Kernel. Exploits underlying Linux libraries or kernel Type H—Hybrid. These use multiple layers (app framework, libraries, kernel). These are most commonly used by Android botnets, which are popular with Chinese botnet authors What are the threats from Android malware? These incude leak info (contacts), banking fraud, corporate network attacks, malware advertising, malware "Hackivism" (the promotion of social causes. For example, promiting specific leaders of the Tunisian or Iranian revolutions. Android malware is frequently "masquerated". That is, repackaged inside a legit app with malware. To avoid detection, the hidden malware is not unwrapped until runtime. The malware payload can be hidden in, for example, PNG files. Less common are Android bootkits—there's not many around. What they do is hijack the Android init framework—alteering system programs and daemons, then deletes itself. For example, the DKF Bootkit (China). Android App Problems: no code signing! all self-signed native code execution permission sandbox — all or none alternate market places no robust Android malware detection at network level delayed patch process Programming Weird Machines with ELF Metadata Rebecca "bx" Shapiro, Dartmouth College, NH https://github.com/bx/elf-bf-tools @bxsays on twitter Definitions. "ELF" is an executable file format used in linking and loading executables (on UNIX/Linux-class machines). "Weird machine" uses undocumented computation sources (I think of them as unintended virtual machines). Some examples of "weird machines" are those that: return to weird location, does SQL injection, corrupts the heap. Bx then talked about using ELF metadata as (an uintended) "weird machine". Some ELF background: A compiler takes source code and generates a ELF object file (hello.o). A static linker makes an ELF executable from the object file. A runtime linker and loader takes ELF executable and loads and relocates it in memory. The ELF file has symbols to relocate functions and variables. ELF has two relocation tables—one at link time and another one at loading time: .rela.dyn (link time) and .dynsym (dynamic table). GOT: Global Offset Table of addresses for dynamically-linked functions. PLT: Procedure Linkage Tables—works with GOT. The memory layout of a process (not the ELF file) is, in order: program (+ heap), dynamic libraries, libc, ld.so, stack (which includes the dynamic table loaded into memory) For ELF, the "weird machine" is found and exploited in the loader. ELF can be crafted for executing viruses, by tricking runtime into executing interpreted "code" in the ELF symbol table. One can inject parasitic "code" without modifying the actual ELF code portions. Think of the ELF symbol table as an "assembly language" interpreter. It has these elements: instructions: Add, move, jump if not 0 (jnz) Think of symbol table entries as "registers" symbol table value is "contents" immediate values are constants direct values are addresses (e.g., 0xdeadbeef) move instruction: is a relocation table entry add instruction: relocation table "addend" entry jnz instruction: takes multiple relocation table entries The ELF weird machine exploits the loader by relocating relocation table entries. The loader will go on forever until told to stop. It stores state on stack at "end" and uses IFUNC table entries (containing function pointer address). The ELF weird machine, called "Brainfu*k" (BF) has: 8 instructions: pointer inc, dec, inc indirect, dec indirect, jump forward, jump backward, print. Three registers - 3 registers Bx showed example BF source code that implemented a Turing machine printing "hello, world". More interesting was the next demo, where bx modified ping. Ping runs suid as root, but quickly drops privilege. BF modified the loader to disable the library function call dropping privilege, so it remained as root. Then BF modified the ping -t argument to execute the -t filename as root. It's best to show what this modified ping does with an example: $ whoami bx $ ping localhost -t backdoor.sh # executes backdoor $ whoami root $ The modified code increased from 285948 bytes to 290209 bytes. A BF tool compiles "executable" by modifying the symbol table in an existing ELF executable. The tool modifies .dynsym and .rela.dyn table, but not code or data. Privacy at the Handset: New FCC Rules? "Valkyrie" (Christie Dudley, Santa Clara Law JD candidate) Valkyrie talked about mobile handset privacy. Some background: Senator Franken (also a comedian) became alarmed about CarrierIQ, where the carriers track their customers. Franken asked the FCC to find out what obligations carriers think they have to protect privacy. The carriers' response was that they are doing just fine with self-regulation—no worries! Carriers need to collect data, such as missed calls, to maintain network quality. But carriers also sell data for marketing. Verizon sells customer data and enables this with a narrow privacy policy (only 1 month to opt out, with difficulties). The data sold is not individually identifiable and is aggregated. But Verizon recommends, as an aggregation workaround to "recollate" data to other databases to identify customers indirectly. The FCC has regulated telephone privacy since 1934 and mobile network privacy since 2007. Also, the carriers say mobile phone privacy is a FTC responsibility (not FCC). FTC is trying to improve mobile app privacy, but FTC has no authority over carrier / customer relationships. As a side note, Apple iPhones are unique as carriers have extra control over iPhones they don't have with other smartphones. As a result iPhones may be more regulated. Who are the consumer advocates? Everyone knows EFF, but EPIC (Electrnic Privacy Info Center), although more obsecure, is more relevant. What to do? Carriers must be accountable. Opt-in and opt-out at any time. Carriers need incentive to grant users control for those who want it, by holding them liable and responsible for breeches on their clock. Location information should be added current CPNI privacy protection, and require "Pen/trap" judicial order to obtain (and would still be a lower standard than 4th Amendment). Politics are on a pro-privacy swing now, with many senators and the Whitehouse. There will probably be new regulation soon, and enforcement will be a problem, but consumers will still have some benefit. Hacking Measured Boot and UEFI Dan Griffin, JWSecure, Inc., Seattle, @JWSdan Dan talked about hacking measured UEFI boot. First some terms: UEFI is a boot technology that is replacing BIOS (has whitelisting and blacklisting). UEFI protects devices against rootkits. TPM - hardware security device to store hashs and hardware-protected keys "secure boot" can control at firmware level what boot images can boot "measured boot" OS feature that tracks hashes (from BIOS, boot loader, krnel, early drivers). "remote attestation" allows remote validation and control based on policy on a remote attestation server. Microsoft pushing TPM (Windows 8 required), but Google is not. Intel TianoCore is the only open source for UEFI. Dan has Measured Boot Tool at http://mbt.codeplex.com/ with a demo where you can also view TPM data. TPM support already on enterprise-class machines. UEFI Weaknesses. UEFI toolkits are evolving rapidly, but UEFI has weaknesses: assume user is an ally trust TPM implicitly, and attached to computer hibernate file is unprotected (disk encryption protects against this) protection migrating from hardware to firmware delays in patching and whitelist updates will UEFI really be adopted by the mainstream (smartphone hardware support, bank support, apathetic consumer support) You Can't Buy Security: Building the Open Source InfoSec Program Boris Sverdlik, ISDPodcast.com co-host Boris talked about problems typical with current security audits. "IT Security" is an oxymoron—IT exists to enable buiness, uptime, utilization, reporting, but don't care about security—IT has conflict of interest. There's no Magic Bullet ("blinky box"), no one-size-fits-all solution (e.g., Intrusion Detection Systems (IDSs)). Regulations don't make you secure. The cloud is not secure (because of shared data and admin access). Defense and pen testing is not sexy. Auditors are not solution (security not a checklist)—what's needed is experience and adaptability—need soft skills. Step 1: First thing is to Google and learn the company end-to-end before you start. Get to know the management team (not IT team), meet as many people as you can. Don't use arbitrary values such as CISSP scores. Quantitive risk assessment is a myth (e.g. AV*EF-SLE). Learn different Business Units, legal/regulatory obligations, learn the business and where the money is made, verify company is protected from script kiddies (easy), learn sensitive information (IP, internal use only), and start with low-hanging fruit (customer service reps and social engineering). Step 2: Policies. Keep policies short and relevant. Generic SANS "security" boilerplate policies don't make sense and are not followed. Focus on acceptable use, data usage, communications, physical security. Step 3: Implementation: keep it simple stupid. Open source, although useful, is not free (implementation cost). Access controls with authentication & authorization for local and remote access. MS Windows has it, otherwise use OpenLDAP, OpenIAM, etc. Application security Everyone tries to reinvent the wheel—use existing static analysis tools. Review high-risk apps and major revisions. Don't run different risk level apps on same system. Assume host/client compromised and use app-level security control. Network security VLAN != segregated because there's too many workarounds. Use explicit firwall rules, active and passive network monitoring (snort is free), disallow end user access to production environment, have a proxy instead of direct Internet access. Also, SSL certificates are not good two-factor auth and SSL does not mean "safe." Operational Controls Have change, patch, asset, & vulnerability management (OSSI is free). For change management, always review code before pushing to production For logging, have centralized security logging for business-critical systems, separate security logging from administrative/IT logging, and lock down log (as it has everything). Monitor with OSSIM (open source). Use intrusion detection, but not just to fulfill a checkbox: build rules from a whitelist perspective (snort). OSSEC has 95% of what you need. Vulnerability management is a QA function when done right: OpenVas and Seccubus are free. Security awareness The reality is users will always click everything. Build real awareness, not compliance driven checkbox, and have it integrated into the culture. Pen test by crowd sourcing—test with logging COSSP http://www.cossp.org/ - Comprehensive Open Source Security Project What Journalists Want: The Investigative Reporters' Perspective on Hacking Dave Maas, San Diego CityBeat Jason Leopold, Truthout.org The difference between hackers and investigative journalists: For hackers, the motivation varies, but method is same, technological specialties. For investigative journalists, it's about one thing—The Story, and they need broad info-gathering skills. J-School in 60 Seconds: Generic formula: Person or issue of pubic interest, new info, or angle. Generic criteria: proximity, prominence, timeliness, human interest, oddity, or consequence. Media awareness of hackers and trends: journalists becoming extremely aware of hackers with congressional debates (privacy, data breaches), demand for data-mining Journalists, use of coding and web development for Journalists, and Journalists busted for hacking (Murdock). Info gathering by investigative journalists include Public records laws. Federal Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) is good, but slow. California Public Records Act is a lot stronger. FOIA takes forever because of foot-dragging—it helps to be specific. Often need to sue (especially FBI). CPRA is faster, and requests can be vague. Dumps and leaks (a la Wikileaks) Journalists want: leads, protecting ourselves, our sources, and adapting tools for news gathering (Google hacking). Anonomity is important to whistleblowers. They want no digital footprint left behind (e.g., email, web log). They don't trust encryption, want to feel safe and secure. Whistleblower laws are very weak—there's no upside for whistleblowers—they have to be very passionate to do it. Accessibility and Security or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Halting Problem Anna Shubina, Dartmouth College Anna talked about how accessibility and security are related. Accessibility of digital content (not real world accessibility). mostly refers to blind users and screenreaders, for our purpose. Accessibility is about parsing documents, as are many security issues. "Rich" executable content causes accessibility to fail, and often causes security to fail. For example MS Word has executable format—it's not a document exchange format—more dangerous than PDF or HTML. Accessibility is often the first and maybe only sanity check with parsing. They have no choice because someone may want to read what you write. Google, for example, is very particular about web browser you use and are bad at supporting other browsers. Uses JavaScript instead of links, often requiring mouseover to display content. PDF is a security nightmare. Executible format, embedded flash, JavaScript, etc. 15 million lines of code. Google Chrome doesn't handle PDF correctly, causing several security bugs. PDF has an accessibility checker and PDF tagging, to help with accessibility. But no PDF checker checks for incorrect tags, untagged content, or validates lists or tables. None check executable content at all. The "Halting Problem" is: can one decide whether a program will ever stop? The answer, in general, is no (Rice's theorem). The same holds true for accessibility checkers. Language-theoretic Security says complicated data formats are hard to parse and cannot be solved due to the Halting Problem. W3C Web Accessibility Guidelines: "Perceivable, Operable, Understandable, Robust" Not much help though, except for "Robust", but here's some gems: * all information should be parsable (paraphrasing) * if not parsable, cannot be converted to alternate formats * maximize compatibility in new document formats Executible webpages are bad for security and accessibility. They say it's for a better web experience. But is it necessary to stuff web pages with JavaScript for a better experience? A good example is The Drudge Report—it has hand-written HTML with no JavaScript, yet drives a lot of web traffic due to good content. A bad example is Google News—hidden scrollbars, guessing user input. Solutions: Accessibility and security problems come from same source Expose "better user experience" myth Keep your corner of Internet parsable Remember "Halting Problem"—recognize false solutions (checking and verifying tools) Stop Patching, for Stronger PCI Compliance Adam Brand, protiviti @adamrbrand, http://www.picfun.com/ Adam talked about PCI compliance for retail sales. Take an example: for PCI compliance, 50% of Brian's time (a IT guy), 960 hours/year was spent patching POSs in 850 restaurants. Often applying some patches make no sense (like fixing a browser vulnerability on a server). "Scanner worship" is overuse of vulnerability scanners—it gives a warm and fuzzy and it's simple (red or green results—fix reds). Scanners give a false sense of security. In reality, breeches from missing patches are uncommon—more common problems are: default passwords, cleartext authentication, misconfiguration (firewall ports open). Patching Myths: Myth 1: install within 30 days of patch release (but PCI §6.1 allows a "risk-based approach" instead). Myth 2: vendor decides what's critical (also PCI §6.1). But §6.2 requires user ranking of vulnerabilities instead. Myth 3: scan and rescan until it passes. But PCI §11.2.1b says this applies only to high-risk vulnerabilities. Adam says good recommendations come from NIST 800-40. Instead use sane patching and focus on what's really important. From NIST 800-40: Proactive: Use a proactive vulnerability management process: use change control, configuration management, monitor file integrity. Monitor: start with NVD and other vulnerability alerts, not scanner results. Evaluate: public-facing system? workstation? internal server? (risk rank) Decide:on action and timeline Test: pre-test patches (stability, functionality, rollback) for change control Install: notify, change control, tickets McAfee Secure & Trustmarks — a Hacker's Best Friend Jay James, Shane MacDougall, Tactical Intelligence Inc., Canada "McAfee Secure Trustmark" is a website seal marketed by McAfee. A website gets this badge if they pass their remote scanning. The problem is a removal of trustmarks act as flags that you're vulnerable. Easy to view status change by viewing McAfee list on website or on Google. "Secure TrustGuard" is similar to McAfee. Jay and Shane wrote Perl scripts to gather sites from McAfee and search engines. If their certification image changes to a 1x1 pixel image, then they are longer certified. Their scripts take deltas of scans to see what changed daily. The bottom line is change in TrustGuard status is a flag for hackers to attack your site. Entire idea of seals is silly—you're raising a flag saying if you're vulnerable.

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  • Protect Data and Save Money? Learn How Best-in-Class Organizations do Both

    - by roxana.bradescu
    Databases contain nearly two-thirds of the sensitive information that must be protected as part of any organization's overall approach to security, risk management, and compliance. Solutions for protecting data housed in databases vary from encrypting data at the application level to defense-in-depth protection of the database itself. So is there a difference? Absolutely! According to new research from the Aberdeen Group, Best-in-Class organizations experience fewer data breaches and audit deficiencies - at lower cost -- by deploying database security solutions. And the results are dramatic: Aberdeen found that organizations encrypting data within their databases achieved 30% fewer data breaches and 15% greater audit efficiency with 34% less total cost when compared to organizations encrypting data within applications. Join us for a live webcast with Derek Brink, Vice President and Research Fellow at the Aberdeen Group, next week to learn how your organization can become Best-in-Class.

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  • Securely sending data from shared hosted PHP script to local MSSQL

    - by user329488
    I'm trying to add data from a webhook (from a web cart) to a local Microsoft SQL Server. It seems like the best route for me is to use a PHP script to listen for new data (POST as json), parse it, then query to add to MSSQL. I'm not familiar with security concerning the connection between the PHP script (which would sit on a shared-host website) and the local MSSQL database. I would just keep the PHP script running on the same localhost (have Apache running on Windows), but the URI for the webhook needs to be publicly accessible. Alternately, I assume that I could just schedule a script from the localhost to check periodically for updates through the web carts API, though the webhooks seem to be more fool-proof for an amateur programmer like myself. What steps can I take to ensure security when using a PHP on a remote, shared-host to connect to MSSQL on my local machine?

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  • Developing payment gateway.

    - by kmaxat
    Hello, I have an idea of developing internet payment gateway similar to PayPal or Webmoney. Since i'm only sophomore at Computer Science, and i've only taken intermediate programming classes, i've no idea where to search for general information about this topic. I do understand that this kind of project is CLEARLY too much to handle for sophomore. Since, it's forum for Pro Webmasters, and probably some of you can point direction of study. What book/source/article would you suggest to read to understand fundamentals of internet payment? What book/source/article would you suggest to read to understand fundamentals internet security? What language is most commonly used for developing payment security of website? I appreciate any help. Thank you.

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  • Spring Security 3.1 xsd and jars mismatch issue

    - by kmansoor
    I'm Trying to migrate from spring framework 3.0.5 to 3.1 and spring-security 3.0.5 to 3.1 (not to mention hibernate 3.6 to 4.1). Using Apache IVY. I'm getting the following error trying to start Tomcat 7.23 within Eclipse Helios (among a host of others, however this is the last in the console): org.springframework.beans.factory.BeanDefinitionStoreException: Line 7 in XML document from ServletContext resource [/WEB-INF/focus-security.xml] is invalid; nested exception is org.xml.sax.SAXParseException: Document root element "beans:beans", must match DOCTYPE root "null". org.xml.sax.SAXParseException: Document root element "beans:beans", must match DOCTYPE root "null". my security config file looks like this: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <beans:beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/security" xmlns:beans="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans" xmlns:jdbc="http://www.springframework.org/schema/jdbc" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans-3.1.xsd http://www.springframework.org/schema/security http://www.springframework.org/schema/security/spring-security-3.1.xsd http://www.springframework.org/schema/jdbc http://www.springframework.org/schema/jdbc/spring-jdbc-3.1.xsd"> Ivy.xml looks like this: <dependencies> <dependency org="org.hibernate" name="hibernate-core" rev="4.1.7.Final"/> <dependency org="org.hibernate" name="com.springsource.org.hibernate.validator" rev="4.2.0.Final" /> <dependency org="org.hibernate.javax.persistence" name="hibernate-jpa-2.0-api" rev="1.0.1.Final"/> <dependency org="org.hibernate" name="hibernate-entitymanager" rev="4.1.7.Final"/> <dependency org="org.hibernate" name="hibernate-validator" rev="4.3.0.Final"/> <dependency org="org.springframework" name="spring-context" rev="3.1.2.RELEASE"/> <dependency org="org.springframework" name="spring-web" rev="3.1.2.RELEASE"/> <dependency org="org.springframework" name="spring-tx" rev="3.1.2.RELEASE"/> <dependency org="org.springframework" name="spring-webmvc" rev="3.1.2.RELEASE"/> <dependency org="org.springframework" name="spring-test" rev="3.1.2.RELEASE"/> <dependency org="org.springframework.security" name="spring-security-core" rev="3.1.2.RELEASE"/> <dependency org="org.springframework.security" name="spring-security-web" rev="3.1.2.RELEASE"/> <dependency org="org.springframework.security" name="spring-security-config" rev="3.1.2.RELEASE"/> <dependency org="org.springframework.security" name="spring-security-taglibs" rev="3.1.2.RELEASE"/> <dependency org="net.sf.dozer" name="dozer" rev="5.3.2"/> <dependency org="org.apache.poi" name="poi" rev="3.8"/> <dependency org="commons-io" name="commons-io" rev="2.4"/> <dependency org="org.slf4j" name="slf4j-api" rev="1.6.6"/> <dependency org="org.slf4j" name="slf4j-log4j12" rev="1.6.6"/> <dependency org="org.slf4j" name="slf4j-ext" rev="1.6.6"/> <dependency org="log4j" name="log4j" rev="1.2.17"/> <dependency org="org.testng" name="testng" rev="6.8"/> <dependency org="org.dbunit" name="dbunit" rev="2.4.8"/> <dependency org="org.easymock" name="easymock" rev="3.1"/> </dependencies> I understand (hope) this error is due to a mismatch between the declared xsd and the jars on the classpath. Any pointers will be greatly appreciated.

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  • Standalone firewall + antivirus or combined security tools?

    - by pukipuki
    For years I'm using some antivirus software and different firewall. Now every antiviruses have got some firewall features and there are complete "internet security" complexes... and every firewall get some antivirus functionality and there are "internet security" versions. Firstly, it is hard and sometimes impossible to install and use standalone AV and FW. Sometimes I can't avoid them (i can't install KAV2010 without removing Outpost firewall etc). Secondly, complex solutions have some disbalance. Farewall from famous antivirus-brand is so user-friendly that is not suitable for me (lack of details in Norton Internet Security for example) and antiviruses from famous firewall-brands are still weak, it is proved by tests. What is today best-practices in case of functionality and security?) Some internet-security complex or two standalone applications from different vendors?

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  • Cisco ASA - Enable communication between same security level

    - by Conor
    I have recently inherited a network with a Cisco ASA (running version 8.2). I am trying to configure it to allow communication between two interfaces configured with the same security level (DMZ-DMZ) "same-security-traffic permit inter-interface" has been set, but hosts are unable to communicate between the interfaces. I am assuming that some NAT settings are causing my issue. Below is my running config: ASA Version 8.2(3) ! hostname asa enable password XXXXXXXX encrypted passwd XXXXXXXX encrypted names ! interface Ethernet0/0 switchport access vlan 400 ! interface Ethernet0/1 switchport access vlan 400 ! interface Ethernet0/2 switchport access vlan 420 ! interface Ethernet0/3 switchport access vlan 420 ! interface Ethernet0/4 switchport access vlan 450 ! interface Ethernet0/5 switchport access vlan 450 ! interface Ethernet0/6 switchport access vlan 500 ! interface Ethernet0/7 switchport access vlan 500 ! interface Vlan400 nameif outside security-level 0 ip address XX.XX.XX.10 255.255.255.248 ! interface Vlan420 nameif public security-level 20 ip address 192.168.20.1 255.255.255.0 ! interface Vlan450 nameif dmz security-level 50 ip address 192.168.10.1 255.255.255.0 ! interface Vlan500 nameif inside security-level 100 ip address 192.168.0.1 255.255.255.0 ! ftp mode passive clock timezone JST 9 same-security-traffic permit inter-interface same-security-traffic permit intra-interface object-group network DM_INLINE_NETWORK_1 network-object host XX.XX.XX.11 network-object host XX.XX.XX.13 object-group service ssh_2220 tcp port-object eq 2220 object-group service ssh_2251 tcp port-object eq 2251 object-group service ssh_2229 tcp port-object eq 2229 object-group service ssh_2210 tcp port-object eq 2210 object-group service DM_INLINE_TCP_1 tcp group-object ssh_2210 group-object ssh_2220 object-group service zabbix tcp port-object range 10050 10051 object-group service DM_INLINE_TCP_2 tcp port-object eq www group-object zabbix object-group protocol TCPUDP protocol-object udp protocol-object tcp object-group service http_8029 tcp port-object eq 8029 object-group network DM_INLINE_NETWORK_2 network-object host 192.168.20.10 network-object host 192.168.20.30 network-object host 192.168.20.60 object-group service imaps_993 tcp description Secure IMAP port-object eq 993 object-group service public_wifi_group description Service allowed on the Public Wifi Group. Allows Web and Email. service-object tcp-udp eq domain service-object tcp-udp eq www service-object tcp eq https service-object tcp-udp eq 993 service-object tcp eq imap4 service-object tcp eq 587 service-object tcp eq pop3 service-object tcp eq smtp access-list outside_access_in remark http traffic from outside access-list outside_access_in extended permit tcp any object-group DM_INLINE_NETWORK_1 eq www access-list outside_access_in remark ssh from outside to web1 access-list outside_access_in extended permit tcp any host XX.XX.XX.11 object-group ssh_2251 access-list outside_access_in remark ssh from outside to penguin access-list outside_access_in extended permit tcp any host XX.XX.XX.10 object-group ssh_2229 access-list outside_access_in remark http from outside to penguin access-list outside_access_in extended permit tcp any host XX.XX.XX.10 object-group http_8029 access-list outside_access_in remark ssh from outside to internal hosts access-list outside_access_in extended permit tcp any host XX.XX.XX.13 object-group DM_INLINE_TCP_1 access-list outside_access_in remark dns service to internal host access-list outside_access_in extended permit object-group TCPUDP any host XX.XX.XX.13 eq domain access-list dmz_access_in extended permit ip 192.168.10.0 255.255.255.0 any access-list dmz_access_in extended permit tcp any host 192.168.10.29 object-group DM_INLINE_TCP_2 access-list public_access_in remark Web access to DMZ websites access-list public_access_in extended permit object-group TCPUDP any object-group DM_INLINE_NETWORK_2 eq www access-list public_access_in remark General web access. (HTTP, DNS & ICMP and Email) access-list public_access_in extended permit object-group public_wifi_group any any pager lines 24 logging enable logging asdm informational mtu outside 1500 mtu public 1500 mtu dmz 1500 mtu inside 1500 no failover icmp unreachable rate-limit 1 burst-size 1 no asdm history enable arp timeout 60 global (outside) 1 interface global (dmz) 2 interface nat (public) 1 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 nat (dmz) 1 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 nat (inside) 1 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 static (inside,outside) tcp interface 2229 192.168.0.29 2229 netmask 255.255.255.255 static (inside,outside) tcp interface 8029 192.168.0.29 www netmask 255.255.255.255 static (dmz,outside) XX.XX.XX.13 192.168.10.10 netmask 255.255.255.255 dns static (dmz,outside) XX.XX.XX.11 192.168.10.30 netmask 255.255.255.255 dns static (dmz,inside) 192.168.0.29 192.168.10.29 netmask 255.255.255.255 static (dmz,public) 192.168.20.30 192.168.10.30 netmask 255.255.255.255 dns static (dmz,public) 192.168.20.10 192.168.10.10 netmask 255.255.255.255 dns static (inside,dmz) 192.168.10.0 192.168.0.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 dns access-group outside_access_in in interface outside access-group public_access_in in interface public access-group dmz_access_in in interface dmz route outside 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 XX.XX.XX.9 1 timeout xlate 3:00:00 timeout conn 1:00:00 half-closed 0:10:00 udp 0:02:00 icmp 0:00:02 timeout sunrpc 0:10:00 h323 0:05:00 h225 1:00:00 mgcp 0:05:00 mgcp-pat 0:05:00 timeout sip 0:30:00 sip_media 0:02:00 sip-invite 0:03:00 sip-disconnect 0:02:00 timeout sip-provisional-media 0:02:00 uauth 0:05:00 absolute timeout tcp-proxy-reassembly 0:01:00 dynamic-access-policy-record DfltAccessPolicy http server enable http 192.168.0.0 255.255.255.0 inside no snmp-server location no snmp-server contact snmp-server enable traps snmp authentication linkup linkdown coldstart crypto ipsec security-association lifetime seconds 28800 crypto ipsec security-association lifetime kilobytes 4608000 telnet timeout 5 ssh 192.168.0.0 255.255.255.0 inside ssh timeout 20 console timeout 0 dhcpd dns 61.122.112.97 61.122.112.1 dhcpd auto_config outside ! dhcpd address 192.168.20.200-192.168.20.254 public dhcpd enable public ! dhcpd address 192.168.0.200-192.168.0.254 inside dhcpd enable inside ! threat-detection basic-threat threat-detection statistics host threat-detection statistics access-list no threat-detection statistics tcp-intercept ntp server 130.54.208.201 source public webvpn ! class-map inspection_default match default-inspection-traffic ! ! policy-map type inspect dns preset_dns_map parameters message-length maximum client auto message-length maximum 512 policy-map global_policy class inspection_default inspect dns preset_dns_map inspect ftp inspect h323 h225 inspect h323 ras inspect ip-options inspect netbios inspect rsh inspect rtsp inspect skinny inspect esmtp inspect sqlnet inspect sunrpc inspect tftp inspect sip inspect xdmcp !

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  • Security Pattern to store SSH Keys

    - by Mehdi Sadeghi
    I am writing a simple flask application to submit scientific tasks to remote HPC resources. My application in background talks to remote machines via SSH (because it is widely available on various HPC resources). To be able to maintain this connection in background I need either to use the user's ssh keys on the running machine (when user's have passwordless ssh access to the remote machine) or I have to store user's credentials for the remote machines. I am not sure which path I have to take, should I store remote machine's username/password or should I store user's SSH key pair in database? I want to know what is the correct and safe way to connect to remote servers in background in context of a web application.

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  • Online Password Security Tactics

    - by BuckWoody
    Recently two more large databases were attacked and compromised, one at the popular Gawker Media sites and the other at McDonald’s. Every time this kind of thing happens (which is FAR too often) it should remind the technical professional to ensure that they secure their systems correctly. If you write software that stores passwords, it should be heavily encrypted, and not human-readable in any storage. I advocate a different store for the login and password, so that if one is compromised, the other is not. I also advocate that you set a bit flag when a user changes their password, and send out a reminder to change passwords if that bit isn’t changed every three or six months.    But this post is about the *other* side – what to do to secure your own passwords, especially those you use online, either in a cloud service or at a provider. While you’re not in control of these breaches, there are some things you can do to help protect yourself. Most of these are obvious, but they contain a few little twists that make the process easier.   Use Complex Passwords This is easily stated, and probably one of the most un-heeded piece of advice. There are three main concepts here: ·         Don’t use a dictionary-based word ·         Use mixed case ·         Use punctuation, special characters and so on   So this: password Isn’t nearly as safe as this: [email protected]   Of course, this only helps if the site that stores your password encrypts it. Gawker does, so theoretically if you had the second password you’re in better shape, at least, than the first. Dictionary words are quickly broken, regardless of the encryption, so the more unusual characters you use, and the farther away from the dictionary words you get, the better.   Of course, this doesn’t help, not even a little, if the site stores the passwords in clear text, or the key to their encryption is broken. In that case…   Use a Different Password at Every Site What? I have hundreds of sites! Are you kidding me? Nope – I’m not. If you use the same password at every site, when a site gets attacked, the attacker will store your name and password value for attacks at other sites. So the only safe thing to do is to use different names or passwords (or both) at each site. Of course, most sites use your e-mail as a username, so you’re kind of hosed there. So even though you have hundreds of sites you visit, you need to have at least a different password at each site.   But it’s easier than you think – if you use an algorithm.   What I’m describing is to pick a “root” password, and then modify that based on the site or purpose. That way, if the site is compromised, you can still use that root password for the other sites.   Let’s take that second password: [email protected]   And now you can append, prepend or intersperse that password with other characters to make it unique to the site. That way you can easily remember the root password, but make it unique to the site. For instance, perhaps you read a lot of information on Gawker – how about these:   [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]   If you have lots of sites, tracking even this can be difficult, so I recommend you use password software such as Password Safe or some other tool to have a secure database of your passwords at each site. DO NOT store this on the web. DO NOT use an Office document (Microsoft or otherwise) that is “encrypted” – the encryption office automation packages use is very trivial, and easily broken. A quick web search for tools to do that should show you how bad a choice this is.   Change Your Password on a Schedule I know. It’s a real pain. And it doesn’t seem worth it…until your account gets hacked. A quick note here – whenever a site gets hacked (and I find out about it) I change the password at that site immediately (or quit doing business with them) and then change the root password on every site, as quickly as I can.   If you follow the tip above, it’s not as hard. Just add another number, year, month, day, something like that into the mix. It’s not unlike making a Primary Key in an RDBMS.   [email protected]   Change the site, and then update your password database. I do this about once a month, on the first or last day, during staff meetings. (J)   If you have other tips, post them here. We can all learn from each other on this.

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  • File Upload Forms: Security

    - by Snow_Mac
    SO I'm building an application for uploading files. We're paying scientists to contribute information on pests, diseases and bugs (for Plants). We need the ability to drag and drop a file to upload it. The question becomes since the users will be authicentated and setup by us, will it be necessarcy to include a virus scanner to prevent the uploading and insertition of malicious files. How important is this?

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  • Productivity vs Security [closed]

    - by nerijus
    Really do not know is this right place to ask such a questions. But it is about programming in a different light. So, currently contracting with company witch pretends to be big corporation. Everyone is so important that all small issues like developers are ignored. Give you a sample: company VPN is configured so that if you have VPN then HTTP traffic is banned. Bearing this in mind can you imagine my workflow: Morning. Ok time to get latest source. Ups, no VPN. Let’s connect. Click-click. 3 sec. wait time. Ok getting source. Do I have emails? Ups. VPN is on, can’t check my emails. Need to wait for source to come up. Finally here it is! Ok Click-click VPN is gone. What is in my email. Someone reported a bug. Good, let’s track it down. It is in TFS already. Oh, dam, I need VPN. Click-click. Ok, there is description. Yea, I have seen this issue in stachoverflow.com. Let’s go there. Ups, no internet. Click-click. No internet. What? IPconfig… DHCP server kicked me out. Dam. Renew ip. 1..2..3. Ok internet is back. Google: site: stachoverflow.com 3 min. I have solution. Great I love stackoverflow.com. Don’t want to remember days where there was no stackoveflow.com. Ok. Copy paste this like to studio. Dam, studio is stalled, can’t reach files on TFS. Click-click. VPN is back. Get source out, paste my code. Grand. Let’s see what other comments about an issue in stackoverflow.com tells. Hmm.. There is a link. Click. Dammit! No internet. Click-click. No internet. DHCP kicked me out. Dammit. Now it is even worse: this happens 3-4 times a day. After certain amount of VPN connections open\closed my internet goes down solid. Only way to get internet back is reboot. All my browser tabs/SQL windows/studio will be gone. This happened just now when I am typing this. Back to issue I am solving right now: I am getting frustrated - I do not care about better solution for this issue. Let’s do it somehow and forget. This Click-click barrier between internet and TFS kills me… Sounds familiar? You could say there are VPN settings to change. No! This is company laptop, not allowed to do changes. I am very very lucky to have admin privileges on my machine. Most of developers don’t. So just learned to live with this frustration. It takes away 40-60 minutes daily. Tried to email company support, admins. They are too important ant too busy with something that just ignored my little man’s problem. Politely ignored. Question is: Is this normal in corporate world? (Have been in States, Canada, Germany. Never seen this.)

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  • get mysql_real_escape is giving me errors when I try and add security to my website

    - by Mike
    I tried doing this: @ $db = new myConnectDB(); $beerName = mysql_real_escape_string($beerName); $beerID = mysql_real_escape_string($beerID); $brewery = mysql_real_escape_string($brewery); $style = mysql_real_escape_string($style); $userID = mysql_real_escape_string($userID); $abv = mysql_real_escape_string($abv); $ibu = mysql_real_escape_string($ibu); $breweryID = mysql_real_escape_string($breweryID); $icon = mysql_real_escape_string($icon); I get this error: Warning: mysql_real_escape_string() [function.mysql-real-escape-string]: Access denied for user

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  • Windows 8 Promises Less Painful Security Updating

    Earlier this week, a company representative noted that Windows users can look forward to a more streamlined updating process that reduces pesky restarts that often cause interruptions at some of the most inconvenient times. In a MSDN blog post, Windows Update group program manager Farzana Rahman discussed the ways in which automatic updating in Windows 8 will provide an enhanced user experience characterized by minimal interruptions. Rahman acknowledged that the automatic updating process and restarts is one of hot topics that often comes up with Windows due to the untimely interruptions that...

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  • Can HTML injection be a security issue?

    - by tkbx
    I recently came across a website that generates a random adjective, surrounded by a prefix and suffix entered by the user. For example, if the user enters "123" for prefix, and "789" for suffix, it might generate "123Productive789". I've been screwing around with it, and I thought I might try something out: I entered this into the prefix field: <a href="javascript:window.close();">Click</a><hr /> And, sure enough, I was given the link, then an <hr>, then a random adjective. What I'm wondering is, could this be dangerous? There must be many more websites out there that have this issue, are all of them vulnerable to some sort of php injection?

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  • Latest Edition of Security Inside Out Newsletter Now Available

    - by Troy Kitch
    The latest edition of Security Inside Out newsletter is now available. If you don't get this bi-monthly security newsletter in your inbox, then subscribe to get the latest database security news. This bi-monthly edition includes: Q&A: Oracle CSO Mary Ann Davidson on Meeting Tomorrow's Security Threats Oracle Chief Security Officer Mary Ann Davidson shares her thoughts on next-generation security threats.  Read More New Study: Increased Security Spending Still Not Protecting Right Assets Despite widespread belief that database breaches represent the greatest security risk to their business, organizations continue to devote a far greater share of their security resources to network assets rather than database assets, according to a new report issued by CSO and sponsored by Oracle. Read More

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  • Ubuntu's security, Gaming, X server, situation [closed]

    - by ShortCircuit
    Little background story. So when I first heard about the NSA spying on people I wasn't surprised, it also was the reason why I switched to Ubuntu. (Full time) It had it's disadvantages when comparing to Windows and it's AAA games and other stuff. My best friend is somewhat upset about me, using full time Ubuntu, because we play a game named "Dayz (an addon for Arma II)" and WineHQ wasn't of any help. Not to mention that he keeps asking me if WineHQ can run Dayz, but he clearly doesn't understand the situation of WineHQ, that it's free, that you have to be happy with what you got at the moment. (I'm not going to dual boot because, how else is gaming on Ubuntu/Linux going to happen?) But whenever I was in a nasty situation where I could do something so simply on Windows and not/hard on Ubuntu, I always thought "It's almost virus free, It's free, No one is spying on me." My Questions: My English isn't all that good, so could some one simplify/explain what the hell is going on the below standing link? Ubuntu Spyware: What to Do? https://www.gnu.org/philosophy/ubuntu-spyware.html When will gaming on Linux/Ubuntu be a real thing? I've heard that the X server's code is a mess and that Wayland will replace X server. When/will this come reality? (I might have understood this wrong.)

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  • Nginx and Google Appengine Reverse Proxy Security

    - by jmq
    The scenario is that I have a Google compute node running Nginx as a reverse proxy to the google appengine. The appengine is used to service REST calls from an single page application (SPA). HTTPS is used to the Nginx front end from the Internet. Do I also need to make the traffic from the Nginx reverse proxy to the appengine secure by turning on HTTPS on the appengine? I would like to avoid the overhead of HTTPS between the proxy and the backend. My thinking was that once the traffic has arrived at Nginx encrypted, decrypted in Nginx, and then sent via the reverse proxy inside of Google's infrastructure it would be secure. Is it safe in this case to not use HTTPS?

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  • Where to Perform Authentication in REST API Server?

    - by David V
    I am working on a set of REST APIs that needs to be secured so that only authenticated calls will be performed. There will be multiple web apps to service these APIs. Is there a best-practice approach as to where the authentication should occur? I have thought of two possible places. Have each web app perform the authentication by using a shared authentication service. This seems to be in line with tools like Spring Security, which is configured at the web app level. Protect each web app with a "gateway" for security. In this approach, the web app never receives unauthenticated calls. This seems to be the approach of Apache HTTP Server Authentication. With this approach, would you use Apache or nginx to protect it, or something else in between Apache/nginx and your web app? For additional reference, the authentication is similar to services like AWS that have a non-secret identifier combined with a shared secret key. I am also considering using HMAC. Also, we are writing the web services in Java using Spring. Update: To clarify, each request needs to be authenticated with the identifier and secret key. This is similar to how AWS REST requests work.

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  • security update in centos, which way is it?

    - by user119720
    Recently something have been bothered with my mind regarding my linux CentOS box.My client have been asking to set up a CentOS machine in their environment which works as server. One of their requirement is to make sure that the set up is to be as secure as possible. Mostly have been covered except the security update inside CentOS. So my question are as follows: 1.. How to apply the latest security,patches or bug fixes in CentOS? When doing some research, I've been told that we can update the security of CentOS by running yum install yum-security but after install this plug in,seems there is no output for this method.Its like this command is not working anymore. 2.. Can i update the security patches through rpm packages? I couldn't find any site that can download the security patches,enhancement or bug fixes for CentOS.But I know that CentOS have been releasing these update through their CentOS announcement here It just it lack of documentation on how to apply these update into my CentOS installation. For now the only way that I know is to run yum update I am hoping that someone can help me to clarify these matter.Thanks.

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  • CentOS security for lazy admins

    - by Robby75
    I'm running CentOS 5.5 (basic LAMP with Parallels Power Panel and Plesk) and have thus far neglected security (because it's not my full-time job, there is always something more important on my todo-list). My server does not contain any secret data and also no lives depend on it - Basically what I want is to make sure it does not become part of a botnet, that is "good enough" security in my case. Anyway, I don't want to become a full-time paranoid admin (like constantly watching and patching everything because of some obscure problem), I also don't care about most security problems like DOS attacks or problems that only exist when using some arcane settings. I'm in search of a "happy medium", for example a list of known important problems in the default installation of CentOS 5.5 and/or a list of security problems that have actually been exploited - not the typical endless list of buffer overflows that "maybe" a problem in some special case. The problem that I have with the usually recommended approaches (joining mailing lists, etc.) is that the really important problems (something where an exploit exists, that is exploitable in a common setup and where the attacker can do something really useful - i.e. not a DOS) are completely and utterly swamped by millions of tiny security alerts that surely are important for high-security servers, but not for me. Thanks for all suggestions!

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  • Filtering Security Logs by User and Logon Type

    - by Trido
    I have been asked to find out when a user has logged on to the system in the last week. Now the audit logs in Windows should contain all the info I need. I think if I search for Event ID 4624 (Logon Success) with a specific AD user and Logon Type 2 (Interactive Logon) that it should give me the information I need, but for the life of my I cannot figure out how to actually filter the Event Log to get this information. Is it possible inside of the Event Viewer or do you need to use an external tool to parse it to this level? I found http://nerdsknowbest.blogspot.com.au/2013/03/filter-security-event-logs-by-user-in.html which seemed to be part of what I needed. I modified it slightly to only give me the last 7 days worth. Below is the XML I tried. <QueryList> <Query Id="0" Path="Security"> <Select Path="Security">*[System[(EventID=4624) and TimeCreated[timediff(@SystemTime) &lt;= 604800000]]]</Select> <Select Path="Security">*[EventData[Data[@Name='Logon Type']='2']]</Select> <Select Path="Security">*[EventData[Data[@Name='subjectUsername']='Domain\Username']]</Select> </Query> </QueryList> It only gave me the last 7 days, but the rest of it did not work. Can anyone assist me with this? EDIT Thanks to the suggestions of Lucky Luke I have been making progress. The below is my current query, although as I will explain it isn't returning any results. <QueryList> <Query Id="0" Path="Security"> <Select Path="Security"> *[System[(EventID='4624')] and System[TimeCreated[timediff(@SystemTime) &lt;= 604800000]] and EventData[Data[@Name='TargetUserName']='john.doe'] and EventData[Data[@Name='LogonType']='2'] ] </Select> </Query> </QueryList> As I mentioned, it wasn't returning any results so I have been messing with it a bit. I can get it to produce the results correctly until I add in the LogonType line. After that, it returns no results. Any idea why this might be? EDIT 2 I updated the LogonType line to the following: EventData[Data[@Name='LogonType'] and (Data='2' or Data='7')] This should capture Workstation Logons as well as Workstation Unlocks, but I still get nothing. I then modify it to search for other Logon Types like 3, or 8 which it finds plenty of. This leads me to believe that the query works correctly, but for some reason there are no entries in the Event Logs with Logon Type equalling 2 and this makes no sense to me. Is it possible to turn this off?

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  • What is the Everyone built-in windows security group called in Portuguese?

    - by JohnLBevan
    I'm attempting to setup share permissions on a Brazilian server and wish to give Everyone read only access. However, the server's language is Brazilian (Portuguese), and it looks like the security groups' names have been translated. Does anyone know what this group is called in Portuguese? Is there an easy way to access this group which is not language sensitive (e.g. some constant value, such as the SID (S-1-1-0) which can always be used, regardless of locale settings)? http://support.microsoft.com/kb/243330. NB: I tried using this SID, but on its own it did not work - though perhaps I need to format it in some way?

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  • Auto blocking attacking IP address

    - by dong
    This is to share my PowerShell code online. I original asked this question on MSDN forum (or TechNet?) here: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/winserversecurity/thread/f950686e-e3f8-4cf2-b8ec-2685c1ed7a77 In short, this is trying to find attacking IP address then add it into Firewall block rule. So I suppose: 1, You are running a Windows Server 2008 facing the Internet. 2, You need to have some port open for service, e.g. TCP 21 for FTP; TCP 3389 for Remote Desktop. You can see in my code I’m only dealing with these two since that’s what I opened. You can add further port number if you like, but the way to process might be different with these two. 3, I strongly suggest you use STRONG password and follow all security best practices, this ps1 code is NOT for adding security to your server, but reduce the nuisance from brute force attack, and make sys admin’s life easier: i.e. your FTP log won’t hold megabytes of nonsense, your Windows system log will not roll back and only can tell you what happened last month. 4, You are comfortable with setting up Windows Firewall rules, in my code, my rule has a name of “MY BLACKLIST”, you need to setup a similar one, and set it to BLOCK everything. 5, My rule is dangerous because it has the risk to block myself out as well. I do have a backup plan i.e. the DELL DRAC5 so that if that happens, I still can remote console to my server and reset the firewall. 6, By no means the code is perfect, the coding style, the use of PowerShell skills, the hard coded part, all can be improved, it’s just that it’s good enough for me already. It has been running on my server for more than 7 MONTHS. 7, Current code still has problem, I didn’t solve it yet, further on this point after the code. :)    #Dong Xie, March 2012  #my simple code to monitor attack and deal with it  #Windows Server 2008 Logon Type  #8: NetworkCleartext, i.e. FTP  #10: RemoteInteractive, i.e. RDP    $tick = 0;  "Start to run at: " + (get-date);    $regex1 = [regex] "192\.168\.100\.(?:101|102):3389\s+(\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+)";  $regex2 = [regex] "Source Network Address:\t(\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+)";    while($True) {   $blacklist = @();     "Running... (tick:" + $tick + ")"; $tick+=1;    #Port 3389  $a = @()  netstat -no | Select-String ":3389" | ? { $m = $regex1.Match($_); `    $ip = $m.Groups[1].Value; if ($m.Success -and $ip -ne "10.0.0.1") {$a = $a + $ip;} }  if ($a.count -gt 0) {    $ips = get-eventlog Security -Newest 1000 | Where-Object {$_.EventID -eq 4625 -and $_.Message -match "Logon Type:\s+10"} | foreach { `      $m = $regex2.Match($_.Message); $ip = $m.Groups[1].Value; $ip; } | Sort-Object | Tee-Object -Variable list | Get-Unique    foreach ($ip in $a) { if ($ips -contains $ip) {      if (-not ($blacklist -contains $ip)) {        $attack_count = ($list | Select-String $ip -SimpleMatch | Measure-Object).count;        "Found attacking IP on 3389: " + $ip + ", with count: " + $attack_count;        if ($attack_count -ge 20) {$blacklist = $blacklist + $ip;}      }      }    }  }      #FTP  $now = (Get-Date).AddMinutes(-5); #check only last 5 mins.     #Get-EventLog has built-in switch for EventID, Message, Time, etc. but using any of these it will be VERY slow.  $count = (Get-EventLog Security -Newest 1000 | Where-Object {$_.EventID -eq 4625 -and $_.Message -match "Logon Type:\s+8" -and `              $_.TimeGenerated.CompareTo($now) -gt 0} | Measure-Object).count;  if ($count -gt 50) #threshold  {     $ips = @();     $ips1 = dir "C:\inetpub\logs\LogFiles\FPTSVC2" | Sort-Object -Property LastWriteTime -Descending `       | select -First 1 | gc | select -Last 200 | where {$_ -match "An\+error\+occured\+during\+the\+authentication\+process."} `        | Select-String -Pattern "(\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+)" | select -ExpandProperty Matches | select -ExpandProperty value | Group-Object `        | where {$_.Count -ge 10} | select -ExpandProperty Name;       $ips2 = dir "C:\inetpub\logs\LogFiles\FTPSVC3" | Sort-Object -Property LastWriteTime -Descending `       | select -First 1 | gc | select -Last 200 | where {$_ -match "An\+error\+occured\+during\+the\+authentication\+process."} `        | Select-String -Pattern "(\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+)" | select -ExpandProperty Matches | select -ExpandProperty value | Group-Object `        | where {$_.Count -ge 10} | select -ExpandProperty Name;     $ips += $ips1; $ips += $ips2; $ips = $ips | where {$_ -ne "10.0.0.1"} | Sort-Object | Get-Unique;         foreach ($ip in $ips) {       if (-not ($blacklist -contains $ip)) {        "Found attacking IP on FTP: " + $ip;        $blacklist = $blacklist + $ip;       }     }  }        #Firewall change <# $current = (netsh advfirewall firewall show rule name="MY BLACKLIST" | where {$_ -match "RemoteIP"}).replace("RemoteIP:", "").replace(" ","").replace("/255.255.255.255",""); #inside $current there is no \r or \n need remove. foreach ($ip in $blacklist) { if (-not ($current -match $ip) -and -not ($ip -like "10.0.0.*")) {"Adding this IP into firewall blocklist: " + $ip; $c= 'netsh advfirewall firewall set rule name="MY BLACKLIST" new RemoteIP="{0},{1}"' -f $ip, $current; Invoke-Expression $c; } } #>    foreach ($ip in $blacklist) {    $fw=New-object –comObject HNetCfg.FwPolicy2; # http://blogs.technet.com/b/jamesone/archive/2009/02/18/how-to-manage-the-windows-firewall-settings-with-powershell.aspx    $myrule = $fw.Rules | where {$_.Name -eq "MY BLACKLIST"} | select -First 1; # Potential bug here?    if (-not ($myrule.RemoteAddresses -match $ip) -and -not ($ip -like "10.0.0.*"))      {"Adding this IP into firewall blocklist: " + $ip;         $myrule.RemoteAddresses+=(","+$ip);      }  }    Wait-Event -Timeout 30 #pause 30 secs    } # end of top while loop.   Further points: 1, I suppose the server is listening on port 3389 on server IP: 192.168.100.101 and 192.168.100.102, you need to replace that with your real IP. 2, I suppose you are Remote Desktop to this server from a workstation with IP: 10.0.0.1. Please replace as well. 3, The threshold for 3389 attack is 20, you don’t want to block yourself just because you typed your password wrong 3 times, you can change this threshold by your own reasoning. 4, FTP is checking the log for attack only to the last 5 mins, you can change that as well. 5, I suppose the server is serving FTP on both IP address and their LOG path are C:\inetpub\logs\LogFiles\FPTSVC2 and C:\inetpub\logs\LogFiles\FPTSVC3. Change accordingly. 6, FTP checking code is only asking for the last 200 lines of log, and the threshold is 10, change as you wish. 7, the code runs in a loop, you can set the loop time at the last line. To run this code, copy and paste to your editor, finish all the editing, get it to your server, and open an CMD window, then type powershell.exe –file your_powershell_file_name.ps1, it will start running, you can Ctrl-C to break it. This is what you see when it’s running: This is when it detected attack and adding the firewall rule: Regarding the design of the code: 1, There are many ways you can detect the attack, but to add an IP into a block rule is no small thing, you need to think hard before doing it, reason for that may include: You don’t want block yourself; and not blocking your customer/user, i.e. the good guy. 2, Thus for each service/port, I double check. For 3389, first it needs to show in netstat.exe, then the Event log; for FTP, first check the Event log, then the FTP log files. 3, At three places I need to make sure I’m not adding myself into the block rule. –ne with single IP, –like with subnet.   Now the final bit: 1, The code will stop working after a while (depends on how busy you are attacked, could be weeks, months, or days?!) It will throw Red error message in CMD, don’t Panic, it does no harm, but it also no longer blocking new attack. THE REASON is not confirmed with MS people: the COM object to manage firewall, you can only give it a list of IP addresses to the length of around 32KB I think, once it reaches the limit, you get the error message. 2, This is in fact my second solution to use the COM object, the first solution is still in the comment block for your reference, which is using netsh, that fails because being run from CMD, you can only throw it a list of IP to 8KB. 3, I haven’t worked the workaround yet, some ideas include: wrap that RemoteAddresses setting line with error checking and once it reaches the limit, use the newly detected IP to be the list, not appending to it. This basically reset your block rule to ground zero and lose the previous bad IPs. This does no harm as it sounds, because given a certain period has passed, any these bad IPs still not repent and continue the attack to you, it only got 30 seconds or 20 guesses of your password before you block it again. And there is the benefit that the bad IP may turn back to the good hands again, and you are not blocking a potential customer or your CEO’s home pc because once upon a time, it’s a zombie. Thus the ZEN of blocking: never block any IP for too long. 4, But if you insist to block the ugly forever, my other ideas include: You call MS support, ask them how can we set an arbitrary length of IP addresses in a rule; at least from my experiences at the Forum, they don’t know and they don’t care, because they think the dynamic blocking should be done by some expensive hardware. Or, from programming perspective, you can create a new rule once the old is full, then you’ll have MY BLACKLIST1, MY  BLACKLIST2, MY BLACKLIST3, … etc. Once in a while you can compile them together and start a business to sell your blacklist on the market! Enjoy the code! p.s. (PowerShell is REALLY REALLY GREAT!)

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