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  • How does a programmer who doesn't know how to program get a job ? [closed]

    - by A programmer
    I often read about this and I'm curious: if there programmers who can't program, how did they get a programming job in the first place? They must bring some value to the company they're working for, otherwise they would be fired. I don't think "programmers who don't know how to program" means "bad programmers" in this case ? Even if they are bad programmers, they still know (badly) how to write (bad) programs. So what defines programmers who can't program ?

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  • Why do Programmers Love/Hate Objective-C?

    - by Genericrich
    So I have noticed that there is a lot of animosity towards Objective-C among programmers. What's your take? Is it a vendor lock-in thing against Apple? General antipathy towards Apple? The syntax? What's your view on this? With the advent of the iPhone SDK, Obj-C has gotten a lot more attention lately, and I am curious what people on SO's opinions are. I personally fought the syntax at first but have gotten more and more used to it now. I really like the named arguments. I have some pet peeves with how things are done in Obj-C vs other languages, but I will refrain from comment on them here.

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  • Enabling syntax highlighting for LESS in Programmer's Notepad?

    - by Cody Gray
    When I don't feel like firing up the Visual Studio behemoth, or when I don't have it installed, I always turn to Programmer's Notepad. It's an amazingly light and fast little text editor, with the special advantage that it is completely platform-native and conforms to standard UI conventions. Therefore, please do not suggest that I consider using other text editors. I've already considered and rejected them because they do not use native UI controls. I like Programmer's Notepad, thank you very much. Unfortunately, I've recently begun to learn, use, and love LESS for all of my CSS coding needs, and it appears that Programmer's Notepad is not bundled with a syntax highlighting scheme for LESS. Does anyone know if there is—by chance and good fortune—one already available somewhere on the web that some kind soul has tediously prepared? If not, how can I go about writing one of my own? Is there a way to build on the existing CSS scheme? It's also possible that any code coloring scheme designed for Scintilla-based editors will work, as Programmer's Notepad is based on the Scintilla control. If you know of a LESS highlighting scheme for Scintilla-based editors, and how to use that with Programmer's Notepad, please suggest that as well.

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  • What non-programming books should programmers read?

    - by Charles Roper
    This is a poll asking the Stackoverflow community what non-programming books they would recommend to fellow programmers. Please read the following before posting: Please post only ONE BOOK PER ANSWER. Please search for your recommendation on this page before posting (there are over NINE PAGES so it is advisable to check them all). Many books have already been suggested and we want to avoid duplicates. If you find your recommendation is already present, vote it up or add some commentary. Please elaborate on why you think a given book is worth reading from a programmer's perspective. This poll is now community editable, so you can edit this question or any of the answers. Note: this article is similar and contains other useful suggestions.

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  • Learning about tests for junior programmers

    - by RHaguiuda
    I`m not sure if its okay to ask it on stackoverflow. Ive been reading a log about tests, unit tests, tests frameworks, mocks and so on, but as a junior programmer I dont know anything about tests, not even where to start! Can anyone explain to young programmers about tests, how they`re run, where and what to test, what is unit testing, integration testing, automated tests? How much to test? And more important: how much test is enough? I belive this would be very helpfull. If possible indicate a few books too about these subjects. Thanks

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  • User Interface design books/resources for programmers

    - by mmacaulay
    Hi, I'm going to make my monthly trip to the bookstore soon and I'm kind of interested in learning some user interface and/or design stuff - mostly web related, what are some good books I should look at? One that I've seen come up frequently in the past is Don't Make Me Think, which looks promising. I'm aware of the fact that programmers often don't make great designers, and as such this is more of a potential hobby thing than a move to be a professional designer. I'm also looking for any good web resources on this topic. I subscribed to Jakob Nielsen's Alertbox newsletter, for instance, although it seems to come only once a month or so. Thanks! Somewhat related questions: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/75863/what-are-the-best-resources-for-designing-user-interfaces http://stackoverflow.com/questions/7973/user-interface-design

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  • Best calculator software to help programmers

    - by RHaguiuda
    As a embedded systems programmer I always need to make lots of base conversions (dec to hex, hex to bin and so on...), and I must admit: Windows 7 calculator is a good calc, but too limited in my point of view. I work a lot with communications protocols and it`s common to need some base conversion in this field of knowledge. I`m looking for a calculator software (not a hardware one), to help with base conversions, but it must also support scientific calc. Can anyone help on this? Since this subject is intended to help programmers, I did not ask this in SuperUser.com. Thanks.

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  • Samsung i780 networking problem

    - by Infinity
    Hello guys! Maybe this is not the right place to ask this, but I give a try for it. Please don't rate it down, just ignore it if you don't like. So I have a Samsung i780 mobile phone and I would like to use the internet through my wireless router. I have connected to it. I got an IP address. My laptop is also connected to the same wireless network and I can ping the mobile phone and I get answer. When I open the internet explorer and enter an address it says that it cannot connect to the internet. I have googled very much, but can't find the problem. What do you think, what is the solution?

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  • Programmers and tech email: Do you actually read all of them?

    - by AdityaGameProgrammer
    Email Alerts, Blog /Forum updates, discussion subscriptions general programming/technology update emails that we often subscribe to.Do you actually read them ? or go direct to the source when you find time. often we might the mail of programmers filled with loads of unread subscription mail from technology they previously were following or worked on or things they wish to follow .some or a majority of these mail just keep on piling up . i personally have few updates that i wish i read but constantly avoid and keep of for latter and finally delete them in effort keep the in box clean. few questions come to mind regarding this Do you keep such mail in separate accounts? Do you read all the mail you have subscribed to? Do you ever unsubscribe to any such email if you aren't reading them? How much do you really value these email. Lastly do you keep your in box clean ? wish to deal with this in a better way.

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  • What are the most common schools of knowledge prevalent in 'great' programmers?

    - by DaveDev
    I asked this question on StackOverflow but it got shot down fairly quickly. It was suggested that I ask it here, so I've copied it from there. Hope that's ok: The question: I think that the 'great' programmers become so mostly from being exposed to and interested in programming from early ages, as well as huge amounts of dedication. Unfortunately I only discovered programming at a later age, and I sometimes feel frustrated with the difficulties I experience in trying to grok some of the more fundamental concepts the 'greats' seem to take for granted.. So my question is in relationt to that, if a 'great' programmer (i.e. top 10%) had to distill his or her knowledge into a few recommendations / books / concepts / suggestions / lessons, what would they be? What does a programmer who's willing to learn need to do to get on the right track towards becoming great? And to be more specific, I don't mean 'what does that person need to do', because the answer is almost invariably, 'practice!'. What I mean is, what does the programmer need to know?

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  • What are the main programmers web sites in other countries?

    - by David
    Looking at the demographics of sites like this one, there seems to be a very heavy US weighing of users. I know there have been discussions about using English as a programmer, but the are some large countries with large programmer bases that must be using localized sites. Countries like Brazil and China, in particular, what sites do programmers go for discussions? Do a lot of the threads link up to English speaking sites like these? In France they obviously prefer their own language, what do the equivalent sites look like? I don't want to turn this into an English language speaking discussion like this one, it's more a general trans-cultural programming curiosity.

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  • What are some good practices when trying to teach declarative programming to imperative programmers?

    - by ChaosPandion
    I offered to do a little bit training in F# at my company and they seemed to show some interest. They are generally VB6 and C# programmers who don't follow programming with too much passion. That being said I feel like it is easier to write correct code when you think in a functional matter so they should definitely get some benefit out of it. Can anyone offer up some advice on how I should approach this? Ideas Don't focus on the syntax, instead focus on how this language and the idioms it promotes can be used. Try and think of examples that are a pain to write in an imperative fashion but translates to elegant code when written in a declarative fashion.

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  • Do programmers at non-software companies need the same things as at software companies?

    - by Michael
    There is a lot of evidence that things like offices, multiple screens, administration rights of your own computer, and being allowed whatever software you want is great for productivity while developing. However, the studies I've seen tend toward companies that sell software. Therefore, keeping the programmers productive is paramount to the company's profitability. However, at companies that produce software simply to support their primary function, programming is merely a support role. Do the same rules apply at a company that only uses the software they produce to support their business, and a lot of a programmer's work is maintainence?

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  • What are the best social places for programmers to interact?

    - by Chevex
    I know this is not really the right place for this type of question, but I figure it will get me started and hopefully won't be closed right off the bat. I love the programming industry a lot, but I don't have many colleagues that aren't introverted and/or anti-social, or self-centered. What are some good places online to find programming friends that I could share my adventures with? I love stack overflow but it is more technical and doesn't really allow you to put up a personal project just for people to see and critique. Any suggestions? A good forum would be great! The only ones I can find are usually full of inexperienced people who just "want" to be a programmer. I'm looking more for a place who's members are already programmers discussing programming topics.

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  • Programmers that need a lot of "Outside Help" - Is this bad?

    - by Zanneth
    Does anyone else think it's kind of tacky or poor practice when programmers use an unusual amount of libraries/frameworks to accomplish certain tasks? I'm working with someone on a relatively simple programming project involving geolocation queries. The guy seems like an amateur to me. For the server software, this guy used Python, Django, and a bunch of other crazy libraries ("PostGIS + gdal, geoip, and a few other spatial libraries" he writes) to create it. He wrote the entire program in one method (in views.py, nonetheless facepalm), and it's almost unreadable. Is this bad? Does anyone else think that this is really tacky and amateurish? Am I the only minimalist out there these days?

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  • Could spending time on Programmers.SE or Stack Overflow be substitute of good programming books for a non-beginner?

    - by Atul Goyal
    Could spending time (and actively participating) on Programmers.SE and Stack Overflow help me improve my programming skills any close to what spending time on reading a book like Code Complete 2 (which would otherwise be next in my reading list) will help. Ok, may be the answer to this question for someone who is beginning with programming might be a straight no, but I'd like to add that this question I'm asking in context when the person is familiar with programming languages but wants to improve his programming skills. I was reading this question on SO and also this book has been recommended by many others (including Jeff and Joel). To be more specific, I'd also add that even though I do programming in C, Java, Python,etc but still I'm not happy with my coding skills and reading the review of CC2 I realized I still need to improve a lot. So, basically I want to know what's the best way for me to improve programming skills - spend more time on here/SO or continue with CC2 and may be come here as and when time permits.

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  • How to hide Thinking at Work so that the Non-Programmers don't suspect Slacking?

    - by stesch
    Better programmers than me can write in essays about walking around with a coffee mug and call it programming. And it's perfectly accepted at a place that knows the business. Or see what Gregory House (TV show "House M.D.") does when he is thinking. But what about the other places where you are the only programmer? If you don't stare at boring stuff on the monitor for 8 hours straight, co-workers suspect you being a slacker. Yes, not the managers who see the output. Only the co-workers who see the process and can't relate to this kind of work. Yesterday I had to explain to a trainee of some other profession that software development is like flying. The explanation from the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. I don't think she bought it.

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  • How do you think the industry for programmers is right now? [closed]

    - by Mercfh
    I recall 5-6 years ago there was quite a slump in jobs, but 5-6 years ago I was just starting college so I was oblivious to what was going on, however I had heard about it at many places. And obviously there's the recession that we are in now (although I've been told things have been getting better). So what's the job outlook for programmers right "now"? Good? Bad? Average? When I was looking for a job 2 months ago I "saw" quite a bit of job openings near my city, but that could've just been me living in a lucky "growing" area.

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  • What are the things you can do to maximize your chances of hitting good programmers in the campus?

    - by Graviton
    I'm thinking about approaching my lecturers in my university for student recommendation for me to hire. So far the emails I sent are not very encouraging. The lecturers either coming back to me, saying that they couldn't get good students, or just ignore my mail. I tried to be as polite as I could in the email, so I think it's not etiquette issue that turn them off. Still, I plan to visit my campus. What are the things I can do to maximize your chances of hitting good programmers in the campus? Any experience you can share?

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  • How did programmers resolve their problems before the internet?

    - by 9a3eedi
    When programming, anytime I get stuck, perhaps with a compiler error that doesn't make sense, or from a GUI function that didn't do what I expected, I automatically google my problem, find someone else that faced the same thing, and read what's going on and why I'm getting the problem. Before the internet, how did people handle these situations? People used to read books and manuals more, I know. But books don't explain everything, like the odd compiler problem that you get sometimes, or nothing showing up on your screen despite you clearly writing correct OpenGL code. How did people cope when facing challenges? Did they simply "bash their head" on the wall till they figured it out? Is there something people used to do regularly on the side that gave them the ability to get themselves unstuck more easily? Were libraries/compilers much simpler back then? I've been asking this question because I sometimes feel guilty depending on Google so much when I'm pretty sure programmers before my time were more independent when it comes to facing these matters.

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  • Way in over my head! (Dealing with better programmers)

    - by darkman
    I've just been hired to be part of a group that is developing in C++. Before, I've been coding on and off at my job for the past 11 years (some C, some Fortran, some C++). The coding I've done was mostly maintaining and adding new features to one of our systems. The code, being 10 years old, did not contain all the modern C++ stuff. Lo and behold, my new job is filled with programmers with 5-10 years experience of pure coding and they all use the most modern aspects of C++ (C++11, template, lambda, etc, etc). They are expecting someone with that same experience... Well, I've been working for 15 years total but when I looked at their code, I couldn't understand half of it! :-| Anyone been in that situation? What would you recommend?

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  • When good programmers go bad!

    - by Ed Bloom
    Hi, I'm a team lead/dev who manages a team of 10 programmers. Most of them are hard working talented guys. But of late, I've got this one person who while highly talented and has delivered great work for me in the past, has just become completely unreliable. It's not his ability - that is not in question - he's proven that many times. He just looks bored now. Is blatantly not doing much work (despite a LOT of pressure being put on the team to meet tight deadlines etc.) He just doesn't seem to care and looks bored. I'm partially guilty for not having addressed this before now - I was afraid to have to lose a talented guy given the workload I've got on. But at this stage it's becoming a problem and affecting those around him. Can anyone spare their thoughts or words of wisdom on how I should go about dealing this. I want the talented AND motivated guy back. Otherwise he's gonna have to go. Thanks, Ed

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  • Are we DELPHI, VCL or Pascal programmers?

    - by José Eduardo
    i´ve been a delphi database programmer since D2. Now i´m facing some digital imaging and 3D challenges that make me to start study OpenGL, DirectX, Color Spaces and so on. I´m really trying but nobody seems to use Delphi for this kind of stuff, just the good-old-paycheck Database programming. ok, i know that we have some very smart guys behind some clever components, some of this open-source. Is there any PhotoShop, Blender, Maya, Office, Sonar, StarCraft, Call of Dutty written in Delphi? Do i have to learn C++ to have access to zillions of books about that kind of stuff? What is the fuzz/hype behind this: int *varName = &anhoterThing? Why pointers seems to be the holy graal to this apps? I´ve downloaded MSVC++ Express and start to learn some WPF and QT integration, and i think: "Man, Delphi does this kind of stuff, with less code, less headaches, since the wheels were invented" This lead my mind to the following... Do you ever tried to write a simple notepad program using just notepad and dcc32 in Pascal/Delphi? if so embarcadero could make our beloved pascal compiler free, and sell just the ide, the vcl, the customer support ... and back to the question: Are we DELPHI, VCL or Pascal programmers?

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  • Do programmers need a union?

    - by James A. Rosen
    In light of the acrid responses to the intellectual property clause discussed in my previous question, I have to ask: why don't we have a programmers' union? There are many issues we face as employees, and we have very little ability to organize and negotiate. Could we band together with the writers', directors', or musicians' guilds, or are our needs unique? Has anyone ever tried to start one? If so, why did it fail? (Or, alternatively, why have I never heard of it, despite its success?) later: Keith has my idea basically right. I would also imagine the union being involved in many other topics, including: legal liability for others' use/misuse of our work, especially unintended uses evaluating the quality of computer science and software engineering higher education programs -- unlike many other engineering disciplines, we are not required to be certified on receiving our Bachelor's degrees evangelism and outreach -- especially to elementary school students certification -- not doing it, but working with the companies like ISC(2) and others to make certifications meaningful and useful continuing education -- similar to previous conferences -- maintain a go-to list of organizers and other resources our members can use I would see it less so as a traditional trade union, with little emphasis on: pay -- we tend to command fairly good salaries outsourcing and free trade -- most of use tend to be pretty free-market oriented working conditions -- we're the only industry with Aeron chairs being considered anything like "standard"

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  • How do I find/make programming friends?

    - by Anton
    I recently got my first programming internship and was extremely excited to finally be able to talk with and interact with fellow programmers. I had this assumption that I would find a bunch of like minded individuals who enjoyed programming and other aspects of geek culture. Unfortunately, I find myself working with normal people who program for a living and never discuss or show interest in programming outside of their work. It is incredibly disappointing, because I do think one of the best ways to progress in life and as a programmer is to talk about what you enjoy with others and to build bonds with people who enjoy similar things. So how do I go about finding/making programmer friends?

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