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  • "Never to forget information" for programmers [closed]

    - by Milan
    Hi there! I'm new to programming and I would like to make a list of most important pieces of knowledge of programming and CS that would be useful no matter what specific programming language I would use in the future. For instance, if I would make this kind of list for Law studies, there would be stuff like Articles of Constitution etc. Those pieces of information I would put in Anki, and repeat it from time to time. Speaking in terms of CS and programming I mean on the most useful: mathematical theorems algorithms (examples of elegant solutions, comparison of two solutions etc.) pieces of code anything else that is vital (and very handy) to have in mind Do you think that making this kind of knowledge list makes sense?

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  • Marketing texts for freelance programmers [closed]

    - by chiborg
    I'm a freelance developer and would like to set up a website that describes my services. When trying to come up with texts for the web site I got a severe case of writers block. I know that I'd like to describe what I do (websites, CMS, web-based applications), the different stages of projects (analysis, contract, prototype, testing, improvement, delivery, payment, etc) and who the target audience is (owners of small to medium businesses). But I have this feeling that there are some rules/tips on how to write such texts and I don't know them - any pointers?

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  • What's the best way of marketing to programmers?

    - by Stuart
    Disclaimer up front - I'm definitely not going to include any links in here - this question isn't part of my marketing! I've had a few projects recently where the end product is something that developers will use. In the past I've been on the receiving end of all sorts of marketing - as a developer I've gotten no end of junk - 1000s of pens, tee-shirts and mouse pads; enough CDs to keep my desk tea-free; some very useful USB keys with some logos I no longer recognise; a small forest's worth of leaflets; a bulging spam folder full of ignored emails, etc... So that's my question - What are good ways to market to developers? And as an aside - are developers the wrong people to target? - since we so often don't have a purchasing budget anyways!

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  • For Programmers familiar with ACM API? Drawing Initials

    - by user71992
    I came across an exercise (in the book "The Art and Science of Java" by Eric Roberts) that requires using only GArc and GLine classes to create a lettering library which draws your initials on the canvas. This should be made independent of the GLabel class. I'd like to know the correct approach to use in solving this problem. I'm not sure what I have so far is good enough (I'm thinking it's too long). The questions requires that I use a good Top-Down approach.

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  • What can programmers learn from the construction industry?

    - by Renesis
    When talking with colleagues about software design and development principles, I've noticed one of the most common sources for analogies is the construction industry. We build software and we consider the design and structure to be the architecture. One of the best ways to learn (or teach) are through analyzing analogies - what other analogies can be drawn from construction? (whether already in common use in software or not). Please provide a description, or your personal experience, regarding how the programming concept is similar to the construction concept. [Credit to Programming concepts taken from the arts and humanities for the idea]

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  • How should programmers handle identity theft?

    - by Craige
    I recently signed up for an iTunes account, and found that somebody had fraudulently used MY email to register their iTunes account. Why Apple did not validate the email address, I will never know. Now I am told that I cannot use my email address to register a new iTunes account, as this email address is linked to an existing account. This got me thinking, as developers, database administrators, technical analysts, and everything in between, how should we handle reports of a fraud account? Experience teaches us never to re-assign identifying credentials. This can break things and/or cause mass confusion, especially in the realm of the web. That is, if we are are needing to reassign an identifying user credential we can very likely break a users bookmark by making a page render data that previously did not exist at that location. So if we have been taught not to re-assign details like these, how should we handle such a case where an account is discovered to be a fraud and the owner of the identity (e-mail or user name) wishes to claim this detail for their account?

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  • Programmers Block ?? [closed]

    - by Robert Ventre
    Possible Duplicate: Is there such a thing as Programmer's block? Has anyone had writers block? Currently, I am trying to get back in to a development role but am struggling to develop any apps. I have a good understanding of VB and OOP. I developed last in the first version of .net studio and also foxpro 9. At the moment I have tried building a customer order app, the form and database have been straight forward but I'm struggling with the nuts and bolts of the application. Should it be a Web or Windows application? Should I use classes/modules? All advice is welcome.

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  • Formalizing programmers errors

    - by Maksee
    Every one of us make errors leading to bugs. Once I wanted to start logging my errors for future analysis, probably mentioning project title, approximate time spent and the most important, the type of error. For example when I copy-pasted a fragment about 'x' and replaced every occurrence of 'x' with 'y' and forgot to replace a tiny piece, this goes to 'copy-paste error'. The usefulness of this approach depends on whether I can formalize my errors at all and probably minimizing the number of types to choose from. Otherwise I would start postponing, ignoring and so on so make this system useless. Are there existing research in this area, probably a known minimum set of errors? Maybe some of you already tried to implement something like this and succeeded/failed?

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  • Seeking a free Lint for C which programmers will *want* to use

    - by Mawg
    When I try to persuade others to Lint their code I always get excuses - too difficult to set up, too difficult to understand, false positives, etc (most of which translates to too lazy, too stupid or too afraid of new things). Is there any way that I can make Linting easier? We code in C using Netbeans. Can I incorporate Splint into Netbeans? I did find a Splint GUI which was quite good, but there was no way to lint a directory tree. Any ideas? Thanks in advance

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  • What is the advantage of a programmers VM apart from portability

    - by user619818
    I can understand the benefits of Java running on a JVM. Portability. Nice simple reason. But I have always been puzzled as to why Microsoft brought out their own version of a JVM - .NET. C# is supposed to be a fine language (haven't used myself) but could Microsoft have launched product to use native. ie to generate an exe? My colleague is learning F#. The reason it has to be a language which runs on .NET is because the Microsoft Lync API which will be used is only available on .NET. ie there is no C API for Lync. A cynical view may be that the reason is vendor lockin. F# will only run on a Microsoft platform (or C# for that matter) and so program is locked in. But maybe I am missing some other benefit of a VM platform?

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  • Color scheme for programmers

    - by seler
    Recently I've discovered Solarized. It's supposed to reduce eye-fatigue and after using it for a while i must say it's true. When I switched back to my old colors they were damn to bright. I don't really like the colors in Solarized theme but I'm astonished by the effect it has on my eyes. I'm wondering if there are other themes designed with such a precision for wide range of IDEs (and even terminal colors!). Another example is Zenburn

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  • Is it okay for programmers to be given the task of outlining database requirements?

    - by L'Ingenu
    In my current job, dba's and programmers are divided in tasks. Any code that needs to be written in procedures dba's write, and programmers do only application code. The strange thing is that whenever a task needs to be defined/specced, programmers get the task, and we have to define all the procedures needed and what they should return. Is this a common practice in software development? Are programmers generally the ones tasked with building requirements for the database side?

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  • Linux needs to do more for programmers

    <b>Cyber Cynic: </b>"Much as I hate to admit it, Microsoft does some things better, much better, than Linux. Number one with a bullet is how Microsoft helps programmers and ISVs (independent software vendors). MSDN (Microsoft Software Developer Network) is a wonderful online developer resource. Linux has had nothing to compare."

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  • How can you explain "beautiful code" to a non-programmer?

    - by Daniel Vandersluis
    When speaking with a non-programmer friend, I happened to mention the concept of "beautiful code" and she wanted to understand what that meant, but I was at a bit of a loss as to how to explain it to someone who would have no context whatsoever. When all code looks like gibberish to someone anyways, how can you explain what makes one piece of code prettier than another? Analogies could be useful too.

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  • how non-programmer become developer

    - by Sarang
    Every year there are different types of freshers getting recruited. But, our IT field is not only limited to IT Engineers & Computer Engineers. It is full of all different types of engineers. What is a way an engineer can be a proper developer ? I am asking this because, whatever engineering the student gone for, one can be shifted to IT development if he/she has some particular qualities within. What are those quelities required to be in a developer or required to be implemented to be developer ?

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  • How long would it take to learn Python?

    - by Josh
    Hi all I have decided to take the time out after work to learn Python. Python appeals to me because at work (Web and eLearning Company), I have to follow out very repetitive tasks like delete all these tags, rename all these tasks and even more advanced repetive tasks. Additionally it would be good for me to get an understanding of Python first because of its fairly easy to learn syntax. How long would it take to learn the basics and go through these tutorials on Python (+ the Python tutorial)? I will only be spending 1 hour or so on it in the afternoons. http://openbookproject.net/thinkcs/python/english2e/index.html I have told my piano teacher I would like to take a month of learning piano to do this would this be adequate time? After this I may choose to learn PHP, because that is mainly what we use for web development at work. Thanks Josh

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  • What are you telling yourself if you can't understand new concept, paradigm, feature ... ?

    - by Freshblood
    Programming always required to learn new concepts, paradigms, features and technologies and I always have been failed at first attempt to understand new concept what i encounter. I start to blame and humiliate myself without remember before how i understood new concept which i hadn't understand it before. I can hardly stop to tell myself "why i cant understand ? Am i stupid or idiot ? Yes, i am stuppiiddddd!!!" What your inner voice tells if you can not understand new concept after spend long time till been tired or hopeless ? How do you handle your self-esteem in such situations ?

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  • Pair programming business logic with a non-IT person

    - by user1598390
    Have you have any experience in which a non-IT person works with a programmer during the coding process? It's like pair programming, but one person is a non-IT person that knows a lot about the business, maybe a process engineer with math background who knows how things are calculated and can understand non-idiomatic, procedural code. I've found that some procedural, domain-specific languages like PL/SQL are quite understandable by non-IT engineers. These person end up being co-authors of the code and guarantee the correctness of formulas, factors etc. I've found this kind of pair programming quite productive, this kind of engineer user feel they are also "owners" and "authors" of the code and help minimize misunderstanding in the communication process. They even help design the test cases. Is this practice common ? Does it have a name ? Have you had similar experiences ?

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  • As a programmer, should I know low and high-level programming languages?

    - by job
    I been contacted to do some work remote controlling LEDs displays over TCP/IP, but my experience and preparation is mostly about high-level programming language. I said that to the person who contact me about the work and he told me that: "if you call yourself a programmer you should know all these things" Should a programmer really know the details of low-level programming? Or can I treat it as a black box concept, as theoretical knowledge but not necessarily doing it or implementing low level language solutions, having in mind that low-level programming is not my expertise?

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  • Why do business analysts and project managers get higher salaries than programmers? [closed]

    - by jpartogi
    We have to admit that programming is much more difficult than creating documentation or even creating Gantt chart and asking progress to programmers. So for us that are naives, knowing that programming is generally more difficult, why do business analysts and project managers get higher salary than programmers? What is it that makes their job a high paying job when even at most times programmers are the ones that go home late? UPDATE Excuse my ignorance, from some of the response it seems that the reason why BAs and PMs gets higher salary because they are the ones that usually responsible for the mess programmers make. But at the end of the day, it is programmers that get their hands dirty to fix the mess and work harder. So it still does not make sense.

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  • How to explain to a layperson the variance in programmer rates?

    - by Matt McCormick
    I recently talked to a guy that is looking for developers to build a product idea. He mentioned he has received interest from people but the rates have varied from $20-120/hr. This project he estimates should take 3-6 months and since he is non-technical, he is confused why there can be so much variance. I understand how I would choose someone but I am a developer and can gauge other people's work. How can I explain to him (in a non-biased way, if possible, as I will apply as well) about the variance in rates? Is there any good analogy that would help?

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  • How can a non-technical person learn to write a spec for small projects?

    - by Joseph Turian
    How can a non-technical person learn to write specs for small projects? A friend of mine is trying to outsource some development on a statistics project. In particular, he does a lot of work in excel, and wants to outsource the creation of scripts to do what he now does by hand. However, my friend is extremely non-technical. He is poor at writing technical specs. When he does write a spec, it is written the way you would describe doing something in excel (go to this cell and then copy the value to that cell). It is also overly verbose, and does examples several times. I'm not sure if he properly describes corner cases. The first project he outsourced was a failure. I think he overdescribed some details, but underdescribed corner cases. That and/or the coder he hired didn't think through the corner cases and ask appropriate questions. I'm not sure. I got on IM with him and it took me half an hour to dig out a description that should have taken five minutes or less to describe. I wrote the scripts for him at the end, but didn't examine why his process with the coder failed. He has asked me for help. However, I refuse to get involved, because taking his spec and translating it into clear requirements is 10x more work than executing on a clearly written spec. What is the right way for him to learn? Are there resources he could use? Are there ways he can learn from small, low-pressure practice projects with coders? Most of his scripts are statistical and data processing oriented. e.g. take this column and run an average over it. Remove these rows under these conditions. So the challenge is different than spec'ing a web app.

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  • How to explain to non-technical person why the task will take much longer then they think?

    - by Mag20
    Almost every developer has to answer questions from business side like: Why is going to take 2 days to add this simple contact form? When developer estimates this task, they may divide it into steps: make some changes to Database optimize DB changes for speed add front end HTML write server side code add validation add client side javascript use unit tests make sure SEO is setup is working implement email confirmation refactor and optimize the code for speed ... These maybe hard to explain to non-technical person, who basically sees the whole task as just putting together some HTML and creating a table to store the data. To them it could be 2 hours MAX. So is there a better way to explain why the estimate is high to non-developer?

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