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  • Transformation of Product Management in Telecommunications for Rapid Launch of Next Generation Products

    - by raul.goycoolea
    @font-face { font-family: "Arial"; }@font-face { font-family: "Courier New"; }@font-face { font-family: "Wingdings"; }@font-face { font-family: "Cambria"; }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; }a:link, span.MsoHyperlink { color: blue; text-decoration: underline; }a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed { color: purple; text-decoration: underline; }p.MsoListParagraph, li.MsoListParagraph, div.MsoListParagraph { margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt 36pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; }p.MsoListParagraphCxSpFirst, li.MsoListParagraphCxSpFirst, div.MsoListParagraphCxSpFirst { margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt 36pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; }p.MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle, li.MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle, div.MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle { margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt 36pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; }p.MsoListParagraphCxSpLast, li.MsoListParagraphCxSpLast, div.MsoListParagraphCxSpLast { margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt 36pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }ol { margin-bottom: 0cm; }ul { margin-bottom: 0cm; } The Telecom industry continues to evolve through disruptive products, uncertain markets, shorter product lifecycles and convergence of technologies. Today’s market has moved from network centric to consumer centric and focuses primarily on the customer experience. It has resulted in several product management challenges such as an increased complexity and volume of offerings, creating product variants, accelerating time-to-market, ability to provide multiple product views for varied stakeholders, leveraging OSS intelligence to BSS layer, product co-creation and increasing audit and security concerns for service providers. The document discusses how enterprise product management enabled by PLM-based product catalogue solutions helps to launch next generation products rapidly in the context of the Telecommunication Industry.   1.0.       Introduction   Figure 1: Business Scenario   Modern business demands the launch of complex products in a very short timeframe and effecting changes in the price plan faster without IT intervention. One of the key transformation initiatives companies are focusing on is in the area of product management transformation and operational efficiency improvement. As part of these initiatives, companies are investing in best- in-class COTs-based Product Management solutions developed on industry-wide standards.   The new COTs packages are planned to integrate with existing or new B/OSS systems to provide a strategic end-to-end agile solution for reduced time-to-market and order journey time. In addition, system rationalization is being undertaken to phase out legacy systems and migrate to strategic systems.   2.0.       An Overview of Product Management in Telecom   Product data in telecom is multi- dimensional and difficult to manage. It increased significantly due to the complexity of the product, product offerings on the converged network, increased volume of offerings, bundled offering structures and ever increasing regulatory requirements.   In addition, the shrinking product lifecycle in telecom makes it difficult to manage the dynamic product data. Mergers and acquisitions coupled with organic growth pose major challenges in product portfolio management. It is a roadblock in the journey towards becoming an agile organization.       Figure 2: Complexity in Product Management   Network Technology’ is the new dimension in telecom product management where the same products are realized through different networks i.e., Soiled network to Converged network. Consequently, the product solution is different.     Figure 3: Current Scenario - Pain Points in Product Management   The major business implications arising out of the current scenario are slow time-to-market and an inefficient process that affects innovation.   3.0. Transformation of Next Generation Product Management   Companies must focus on their Product Management Transformation Journey in the areas of:   ·       Management of single truth of product information across the organization/geographies which is currently managed in heterogeneous systems   ·       Management of the Intellectual Property (IP) on the product concept and partnership in the design of discrete components to integrate into the system   ·       Leveraging structured and unstructured product data within the extended enterprise to extract consumer insights and drive innovation   ·       Management of effective operational separation to comply with regulatory bodies   ·       Reuse of existing designs and add relevant features such as value-added services to enable effective product bundling     Figure 4: Next generation needs   PLM-based Enterprise Product Catalogue solutions efficiently address the above requirements and act as an enabler towards product management transformation and rapid product launch.   4.0. PLM-based Enterprise Product Management     Figure 5: PLM-based Enterprise Product Mastering   Enterprise Product Management (EPM) enables the business to manage complex product attributes of data in complex environments. Product Mastering helps create a 'single view' of the product by creating a business-driven, IT-supported environment where a global 'single truth record' is created, managed and reused.   4.1 The Business Case for Telco PLM-based solutions for Enterprise Product Management   ·       Telco PLM-based Product Mastering solutions provide a centralized authoring environment for product definition and control of all product data and rules   ·       PLM packages are designed to support multiple perspectives of product data (ordering perspective, billing perspective, provisioning perspective)   ·       Maintains relationships/links between different elements of the entire product definition   ·       Telco PLM packages are specialized in next generation lifecycle management requirements of products such as revision and state management, test and release management, role management and impact analysis)   ·       Takes into consideration all aspects of OSS product requirements compared to CRM product catalogue solutions where the product data managed is mostly order oriented and transactional     ·       New breed of Telco PLM packages are designed with 'open' standards such as SID and eTOM. They are interoperable, support integration frameworks such as subscription and notification.   ·       Telco PLM packages have developed good collaboration frameworks to integrate suppliers and partners into the product development value chain   4.2 Various Architectures/Approaches for Product Mastering using Telco PLM systems   4. 2.a Single Central Product Management (Mastering) Approach   Figure 6: Single Central Product Management (Master) Approach       This approach is implemented across verticals such as aerospace and automotive. It focuses on a physically centralized product master to which other sources are dependent on. The product definition data (Product bundles, service bundles, price plans, offers and discounts, product configuration rules and market campaigns) is created and maintained physically in a centralized environment. In addition, the product definition/authoring environment is centralized. The existing legacy product definition data available in CRM product catalogue, billing catalogue and the legacy product catalogue is migrated to the centralized PLM-based Enterprise Product Management solution.   Architectural changes must be made in the existing business landscape of applications to create and revise data because the applications have to refer to the central repository for approvals and validation of product configurations. It is achieved by modifying how the applications write data or how the applications can be adapted to use the rules to be managed and published.   Complete product configuration validation will be done in enterprise / central product catalogue and final configuration will be sent to the B/OSS system through the SOA compliant product distribution architecture. The approach/architecture enables greater control in terms of product data management and product data governance.   4.2.b Federated Product Management (Mastering) Architecture     Figure 7: Federated Product Management (Mastering) Architecture   In the federated product mastering approach, the basic unique product definition data (product id, description product hierarchy, basic price plans and simple product design rules) will be centrally created and will be maintained. And, the advanced product definition (Product bundling, promotions, offers & discount plans) will be created in respective down stream OSS systems. The advanced product definition (Product bundling, promotions, offers and discount plans) will be created in respective downstream OSS systems.   For example, basic product definitions such as attributes, product hierarchy and basic price plans will be created and maintained in Enterprise/Central product reference catalogue and distributed to downstream OSS systems. Respective downstream OSS systems build product bundles, promotions, advanced price plans over the basic product definition and master the advanced product definition. Central reference database accesses the respective other source product master data and assembles a point-in-time consolidated view of the product. The approach is typically adapted in some merger and acquisition scenarios where there is a low probability of a central physical authority managing the data. In addition, the migration effort in this case is minimal and there are no big architectural changes to the organization application landscape. However, this approach will not result in better product data management and data governance.   5.0 Customer Scenario – Before EPC deployment   A leading global telecommunications service provider wanted to launch a quad play and triple play service offering in the shortest possible lead time. The service provider was offering Broadband and VoIP services to customers. The company wanted to reuse a majority of the Broadband services and price plans and bundle them with new wireless and IPTV services for quad play and triple play. The challenges in launching the new service offerings were:       Figure 8: Triple Play Plan   ·       Broadband product data was stored in multiple product catalogues (CRM catalogue, Billing catalogue, spread sheets)   ·       Product managers spent a lot of time performing tasks involving duplication or re-keying of data. Manual effort caused errors, cost and time over-runs.   ·       No effective product and price data governance mechanism. Price change issues arising from the lack of data consistency across systems resulted in leakage of customer value and revenue.   ·       Product data had re-usability issues and was not in a structured format. It resulted in uncontrolled product portfolio creation and product management issues.   ·       Lack of enterprise product model resulted into product distribution challenges and thus delays in product launch.   ·       Designers are constrained by existing legacy product management solutions to model product/service requirements and product configuration rules such as upgrading, downgrading and cross selling.    5.1 Customer Scenario - After EPC deployment     Figure 9: SOA-based end-to-end EPC Solution   The company deployed PLM-based Enterprise Product Catalogue solutions to launch quad play service after evaluating various product catalogues. The broadband product offering, service and price data were migrated to the new system, and the product and price plan hierarchy for new offerings were created using the entities defined in the Enterprise Product Model. Supplier product catalogue data such as routers and set up boxes were loaded onto the new solution through SOA-based web service. Price plans and configuration rules were built in the new system. The validated final product configurations were extracted from the product catalogue in a SID format and were distributed to the downstream B/OSS systems through exposed SOA-based web services. The transformations required for the B/OSS system were handled using the transformation layer as part of the solution.   6.0 How PLM enabled Product Management Transformation         Figure 10: Product Management Transformation     PLM-based Product Catalogue Solution helped the customer reduce the product launch cycle time by 30% and enable transformation of Product Management for next generation services.   7.0 Conclusion   On the one hand, the telecom industry is undergoing changes due to disruptions, uncertain product markets and increased complexity of products. On the other hand, the ARPU is decreasing year-on-year. Communications Service Providers are embarking on convergence, bundled service offerings, flexibility to cross-sell and up-sell, introduce new value-added services, leverage Web 2.0 concepts and network capabilities. Consequently, large scale IT transformation initiatives to improve their ARPU supporting network and business transformations are a business imperative. Product Management has become a focus area. Companies are investing in best-in- class COTS solutions to reduce time-to-market, ensure rapid service delivery and improve operational efficiency. An efficient PLM-based enterprise product mastering solution plays a key role in achieving zero touch automation and rapid product launch.   References:   1.     Preston G.Smith, Donald G.Reineristsem, Van Nostrand Reinhold “Developing Products in Half the time”.   2.     John G. Innes, "Achieving Successful Product Change", Pitman Publishing.   3.     D T Pham and R M Setchi (16th Jan, 2001) "Authoring environment for documentation development" University of Wales Cardiff, U.K., Proceedings on Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Vol. 215, Part B.   4.     Oracle Product Hub for Communications:   http://www.oracle.com/us/products/applications/master-data-management/product-hub-082059.html  

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  • Product application - is it a product or product variation

    - by jamesnov
    I'm dealing with a lot of vehicle specific products, and I've been trying to determine whether to convert the variants/fit option into individual products. I currently put the vehicle specific items under a product: Product: Widget Hood Deflectors Option1: 07-11 Silverado/Sierra, SKU1 Option2: 09-11 Ram, SKU2 etc. Take a hood/bug deflector for example. They all share the same description, and specifications for the most part. They look very similar, but the shape/appearance could vary significantly depending on the vehicle it is going on. Another example could be a suspension lift kit. Each one is engineered for a specific vehicle application. What would be the product "Widget Super Duper 4 inch lift kit", or "Widget Jeep 07-11 Super Duper 4 inch lift kit"? If I converted the variants to a product, then I have a lot more products (some so called products or product lines have hundreds of applications), when no vehicle is selected, but if I require a vehicle to be selected, then the product results would be basically the same, and specific for that vehicle. The description would also be longer: Product: Widget Silverado/Sierra 07-11 Hood Deflector With the fit as a variants/option, then I have fewer products, but I could have a huge list of options. Product: Widget Hood Deflectors Options: Fit/Vehicle Am I doing things right by having product applications as variants, or am I treating a product line as a product?

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  • How to write a product definition?

    - by Skarab
    I would like to learn how to write a software product definition. Therefore I am looking for online materials or books, which would help me to learn more about this topic. I would like to learn: what must be in what must not to be in how to make a product definition to sell internally the product finding balance between use case descriptions (the why), and feature descriptions (the how). ... I am aware that it is not something that can learn in 15 minutes but I think such a discussion could help me to have a good start.

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  • Determine which software product a Microsoft Product Key activates

    - by druciferre
    Without a product key being labelled, is there is any way to identify what Microsoft software product a given product key is meant to activate? Let's say for example I had the product key ABCDE-FGHIJ-KLMNO-PQRST-UVWXY, but I had no clue if was meant for Windows 7 Ultimate, Windows 7 Home Premium, Vista Ultimate, or even Office 2010. Does Microsoft (or anyone for that matter) have any kind of tool that I could paste the key into and get a result that identifies the software product the key is meant for (or at least a good estimate)? Note: I have searched and searched many times on the Internet, but the only results I ever find are how to recover a lost product key by using something like Nirsoft ProduKey. This is not what I am looking for.

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  • ??Database Replay Capture????

    - by Liu Maclean(???)
    Database Replay?11g??????,??workload capture??????????????,???????? ??Workload Capture???????: ???????????????,???????2????,??????,???????????OLTP???????capture 10????1G???? ?????: ????????????????????? ??startup restrict????,?????????? ??capture???restrict?? ????????????? ???????????????: ??scn???????? ???????? ???????? Capture???????????workload????? ???????SYSDBA?SYSOPER????OS?? ????: ?TPCC???capture??????4.5% ????session????64KB??? ???Workload Capture?????????? ????????2?, ??RAC????workload capture  file??????????????,??start_capture????? ????session????64KB???,??????????????workload  capture file????Server Process??????,?????????parse???execution????,Server Process??LOGON?LOGOFF?SQL??????????PGA?,???WCR Capture PG?WCR Capture PGA?,?PGA?????????????????,Server Process???????????WCR???,?????WCR???Server Process??’WCR: capture file IO write’????? ?WCR?????????: SQL> select * from v$version; BANNER -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Oracle Database 11g Enterprise Edition Release 11.2.0.3.0 - 64bit Production PL/SQL Release 11.2.0.3.0 - Production CORE 11.2.0.3.0 Production TNS for Linux: Version 11.2.0.3.0 - Production NLSRTL Version 11.2.0.3.0 - Production SQL> select name from v$event_name where name like '%WCR%'; NAME ---------------------------------------------------------------- WCR: replay client notify WCR: replay clock WCR: replay lock order WCR: replay paused WCR: RAC message context busy WCR: capture file IO write WCR: Sync context busy latch: WCR: sync latch: WCR: processes HT 11g????????WCR???LATCH 1* select name,gets from v$latch where name like '%WCR%' SQL> / NAME GETS ------------------------------ ---------- WCR: kecu cas mem 3 WCR: kecr File Count 37 WCR: MMON Create dir 1 WCR: ticker cache 0 WCR: sync 495 WCR: processes HT 0 WCR: MTS VC queue 0 7 rows selected. ????????????Database Replay Capture????? 1. ????capture dbms_workload_capture.start_capture CREATE OR REPLACE DIRECTORY dbcapture AS '/home/oracle/dbcapture'; execute dbms_workload_capture.start_capture('CAPTURE','DBCAPTURE',default_action=>'INCLUDE'); SQL> select id,name,status,start_time,end_time,connects,user_calls,dir_path from dba_workload_captures where id = (select max(id) from dba_workload_captures) ; ID ---------- NAME -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- STATUS START_TIM END_TIME CONNECTS ---------------------------------------- --------- --------- ---------- USER_CALLS ---------- DIR_PATH -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1 CAPTURE IN PROGRESS 08-DEC-12 11 ID ---------- NAME -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- STATUS START_TIM END_TIME CONNECTS ---------------------------------------- --------- --------- ---------- USER_CALLS ---------- DIR_PATH -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 167 /home/oracle/dbcapture 2. ?? capture file?? [[email protected] dbcapture]$ ls -lR .: total 8 drwxr-xr-x 2 oracle oinstall 4096 Dec 8 07:24 cap drwxr-xr-x 3 oracle oinstall 4096 Dec 8 07:24 capfiles -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 0 Dec 8 07:24 wcr_cap_00001.start ./cap: total 4 -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 91 Dec 8 07:24 wcr_scapture.wmd ./capfiles: total 4 drwxr-xr-x 12 oracle oinstall 4096 Dec 8 07:24 inst1 ./capfiles/inst1: total 40 drwxr-xr-x 2 oracle oinstall 4096 Dec 8 08:31 aa drwxr-xr-x 2 oracle oinstall 4096 Dec 8 07:24 ab drwxr-xr-x 2 oracle oinstall 4096 Dec 8 07:24 ac drwxr-xr-x 2 oracle oinstall 4096 Dec 8 07:24 ad drwxr-xr-x 2 oracle oinstall 4096 Dec 8 07:24 ae drwxr-xr-x 2 oracle oinstall 4096 Dec 8 07:24 af drwxr-xr-x 2 oracle oinstall 4096 Dec 8 07:24 ag drwxr-xr-x 2 oracle oinstall 4096 Dec 8 07:24 ah drwxr-xr-x 2 oracle oinstall 4096 Dec 8 07:24 ai drwxr-xr-x 2 oracle oinstall 4096 Dec 8 07:24 aj ./capfiles/inst1/aa: total 316 -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1762 Dec 8 07:25 wcr_c6cdah0000001.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 16478 Dec 8 07:28 wcr_c6cf1h0000002.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1772 Dec 8 07:29 wcr_c6cjdh0000004.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1535 Dec 8 07:29 wcr_c6cnah0000005.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1821 Dec 8 07:41 wcr_c6cpfh0000007.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1815 Dec 8 07:33 wcr_c6cq6h000000a.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1535 Dec 8 07:34 wcr_c6cxmh000000h.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1427 Dec 8 07:41 wcr_c6cxvh000000j.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1425 Dec 8 07:41 wcr_c6czph000000k.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 2398 Dec 8 07:49 wcr_c6dqfh000000q.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 259321 Dec 8 08:35 wcr_c6du7h000000r.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 0 Dec 8 07:55 wcr_c6f6yh000000t.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 0 Dec 8 08:28 wcr_c6h3qh0000013.rec ./capfiles/inst1/ab: total 0 ./capfiles/inst1/ac: total 0 ./capfiles/inst1/ad: total 0 ./capfiles/inst1/ae: total 0 ./capfiles/inst1/af: total 0 ./capfiles/inst1/ag: total 0 ./capfiles/inst1/ah: total 0 ./capfiles/inst1/ai: total 0 ./capfiles/inst1/aj: total 0 [[email protected] dbcapture]$ cd ./capfiles/inst1/aa [[email protected] aa]$ ls -l total 316 -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1762 Dec 8 07:25 wcr_c6cdah0000001.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 16478 Dec 8 07:28 wcr_c6cf1h0000002.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1772 Dec 8 07:29 wcr_c6cjdh0000004.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1535 Dec 8 07:29 wcr_c6cnah0000005.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1821 Dec 8 07:41 wcr_c6cpfh0000007.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1815 Dec 8 07:33 wcr_c6cq6h000000a.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1535 Dec 8 07:34 wcr_c6cxmh000000h.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1427 Dec 8 07:41 wcr_c6cxvh000000j.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1425 Dec 8 07:41 wcr_c6czph000000k.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 2398 Dec 8 07:49 wcr_c6dqfh000000q.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 259321 Dec 8 08:35 wcr_c6du7h000000r.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 0 Dec 8 07:55 wcr_c6f6yh000000t.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 0 Dec 8 08:28 wcr_c6h3qh0000013.rec [[email protected] aa]$ ls -l |wc -l 14 ???????14??? 3. ??LOGON????Server Process [[email protected] ~]$ sqlplus / as sysdba SQL*Plus: Release 11.2.0.3.0 Production on Sat Dec 8 08:37:40 2012 Copyright (c) 1982, 2011, Oracle. All rights reserved. Connected to: Oracle Database 11g Enterprise Edition Release 11.2.0.3.0 - 64bit Production With the Partitioning, Automatic Storage Management, OLAP, Data Mining and Real Application Testing options ?????wcr?? [[email protected] aa]$ ls -ltr total 316 -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1762 Dec 8 07:25 wcr_c6cdah0000001.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 16478 Dec 8 07:28 wcr_c6cf1h0000002.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1772 Dec 8 07:29 wcr_c6cjdh0000004.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1535 Dec 8 07:29 wcr_c6cnah0000005.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1815 Dec 8 07:33 wcr_c6cq6h000000a.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1535 Dec 8 07:34 wcr_c6cxmh000000h.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1425 Dec 8 07:41 wcr_c6czph000000k.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1427 Dec 8 07:41 wcr_c6cxvh000000j.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1821 Dec 8 07:41 wcr_c6cpfh0000007.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 2398 Dec 8 07:49 wcr_c6dqfh000000q.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 0 Dec 8 07:55 wcr_c6f6yh000000t.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 0 Dec 8 08:28 wcr_c6h3qh0000013.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 259321 Dec 8 08:35 wcr_c6du7h000000r.rec -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 0 Dec 8 08:37 wcr_c6hp4h0000018.rec ??????wcr_c6hp4h0000018.rec ??? SQL> select spid from v$process where addr = ( select paddr from v$session where sid=(select distinct sid from v$mystat)); SPID ------------------------ 14293 ????????????????14293, ???????????????,??????wcr_c6hp4h0000018.rec [[email protected] ~]$ ls -l /proc/14293/fd total 0 lr-x------ 1 oracle oinstall 64 Dec 8 08:39 0 -> /dev/null l-wx------ 1 oracle oinstall 64 Dec 8 08:39 1 -> /dev/null lrwx------ 1 oracle oinstall 64 Dec 8 08:39 10 -> /u01/app/oracle/product/11201/db_1/rdbms/audit/CRMV_ora_14293_1.aud l-wx------ 1 oracle oinstall 64 Dec 8 08:39 11 -> /u01/app/oracle/diag/rdbms/crmv/CRMV/trace/CRMV_ora_14293.trc l-wx------ 1 oracle oinstall 64 Dec 8 08:39 12 -> pipe:[34585895] l-wx------ 1 oracle oinstall 64 Dec 8 08:39 13 -> /u01/app/oracle/diag/rdbms/crmv/CRMV/trace/CRMV_ora_14293.trm l-wx------ 1 oracle oinstall 64 Dec 8 08:39 2 -> /dev/null lr-x------ 1 oracle oinstall 64 Dec 8 08:39 3 -> /dev/null lr-x------ 1 oracle oinstall 64 Dec 8 08:39 4 -> /dev/null lr-x------ 1 oracle oinstall 64 Dec 8 08:39 5 -> /u01/app/oracle/product/11201/db_1/rdbms/mesg/oraus.msb lr-x------ 1 oracle oinstall 64 Dec 8 08:39 6 -> /proc/14293/fd lr-x------ 1 oracle oinstall 64 Dec 8 08:39 7 -> /dev/zero lrwx------ 1 oracle oinstall 64 Dec 8 08:39 8 -> /home/oracle/dbcapture/capfiles/inst1/aa/wcr_c6hp4h0000018.rec lr-x------ 1 oracle oinstall 64 Dec 8 08:39 9 -> pipe:[34585894] ?????lsof?? [[email protected] ~]# lsof|grep wcr_c6hp4h0000018.rec oracle 14293 oracle 8u REG 8,1 0 17629644 /home/oracle/dbcapture/capfiles/inst1/aa/wcr_c6hp4h0000018.rec ????????,??Server Process????WCR REC??,?Server Process LOGON?????? 3.????SQL??: SQL> select 1 from dual; 1 ---------- 1 SQL> / 1 ---------- 1 [[email protected] aa]$ strings wcr_c6hp4h0000018.rec ==»????SQL????, ??????? ??????SQL???,???????????????WCR??????,LOGON???????????SQL????,????????? [[email protected] aa]$ strings wcr_c6hp4h0000018.rec 11.2.0.3.0 *File header info. (Shadow process='14293') D0576B5D710A34F4E043B201A8C0ECFE SYS; NLS_LANGUAGE? AMERICAN> NLS_TERRITORY? AMERICA> NLS_CURRENCY? NLS_ISO_CURRENCY? AMERICA> NLS_NUMERIC_CHARACTERS? NLS_CALENDAR? GREGORIAN> NLS_DATE_FORMAT? DD-MON-RR> NLS_DATE_LANGUAGE? AMERICAN> NLS_CHARACTERSET? AL32UTF8> NLS_SORT? BINARY> NLS_TIME_FORMAT? HH.MI.SSXFF AM> NLS_TIMESTAMP_FORMAT? DD-MON-RR HH.MI.SSXFF AM> NLS_TIME_TZ_FORMAT? HH.MI.SSXFF AM TZR> NLS_TIMESTAMP_TZ_FORMAT? DD-MON-RR HH.MI.SSXFF AM TZR> NLS_DUAL_CURRENCY? NLS_SPECIAL_CHARS? NLS_NCHAR_CHARACTERSET? UTF8> NLS_COMP? BINARY> NLS_LENGTH_SEMANTICS? BYTE> NLS_NCHAR_CONV_EXCP? FALSE (DESCRIPTION=(ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=beq)(PROGRAM=/u01/app/oracle/product/11201/db_1/bin/oracle)(ARGV0=oracleCRMV)(ARGS='(DESCRIPTION=(LOCAL=YES)(ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=beq)))')(DETACH=NO))(CONNECT_DATA=(CID=(PROGRAM=sqlplus)(HOST=mlab2.oracle.com)(USER=oracle)))) ,[email protected] (TNS V1-V3)U tselect spid from v$process where addr = ( select paddr from v$session where sid=(select distinct sid from v$mystat)) ` _ select 1 from dual select 1 from dual ??????????????????? [[email protected] aa]$ strings wcr_c6hp4h0000018.rec 9`9_^B create table vva(t1 int) `:_i :`:_iB `;_^ ;`;_^B create table vva(t1 int) `_i >`>_iB FusC `?_^ ?`?_^B FvWC _begin for i in 1..50000 loop execute immediate 'select 1 from dual where 2='||i; end loop; end; ?SERVER PROCESS LOGOFF ??????? C`E_ B k^2C ????Server Process????parse?execution???WCR??,??????????PGA?,????????????,????????,?????WCR???????????,???????? 4. ?????? SQL> oradebug setmypid Statement processed. SQL> oradebug dump processstate 10; Statement processed. SQL> oradebug tracefile_name /u01/app/oracle/diag/rdbms/crmv/CRMV/trace/CRMV_ora_14293.trc ?processstate ??????????????? WCR: capture file IO write,??Server process??WCR ?? 3: waited for 'SQL*Net message to client' driver id=0x62657100, #bytes=0x1, =0x0 wait_id=139 seq_num=140 snap_id=1 wait times: snap=0.000007 sec, exc=0.000007 sec, total=0.000007 sec wait times: max=infinite wait counts: calls=0 os=0 occurred after 0.934091 sec of elapsed time 4: waited for 'latch: shared pool' address=0x60106b20, number=0x133, tries=0x0 wait_id=138 seq_num=139 snap_id=1 wait times: snap=0.000066 sec, exc=0.000066 sec, total=0.000066 sec wait times: max=infinite wait counts: calls=0 os=0 occurred after 1.180690 sec of elapsed time 5: waited for 'WCR: capture file IO write' =0x0, =0x0, =0x0 wait_id=137 seq_num=138 snap_id=1 wait times: snap=0.000189 sec, exc=0.000189 sec, total=0.000189 sec wait times: max=infinite wait counts: calls=0 os=0 occurred after 3.122783 sec of elapsed time 6: waited for 'WCR: capture file IO write' =0x0, =0x0, =0x0 wait_id=136 seq_num=137 snap_id=1 wait times: snap=0.000191 sec, exc=0.000191 sec, total=0.000191 sec wait times: max=infinite wait counts: calls=0 os=0 occurred after 3.053132 sec of elapsed time 7: waited for 'WCR: capture file IO write' 5.??PGA???? SQL> oradebug dump heapdump 536870917; Statement processed. grep WCR /u01/app/oracle/diag/rdbms/crmv/CRMV/trace/CRMV_ora_14293.trc Chunk 7fb1b606bfc0 sz= 65600 freeable "WCR Capture PG " ds=0x7fb1b6115f90 Chunk 7fb1b6111e18 sz= 4224 freeable "WCR Capture PG " ds=0x7fb1b6115f90 Chunk 7fb1b6112e98 sz= 4184 freeable "WCR Capture PG " ds=0x7fb1b6115f90 Chunk 7fb1b6113ef0 sz= 4224 freeable "WCR Capture PG " ds=0x7fb1b6115f90 Chunk 7fb1b6114f70 sz= 4104 recreate "WCR Capture PG " latch=(nil) Chunk 7fb1b6115f78 sz= 160 freeable "WCR Capture PGA" Chunk 7fb1b6116018 sz= 3248 freeable "WCR Capture PGA" Subheap ds=0x7fb1b6115f90 heap name= WCR Capture PG size= 82336 HEAP DUMP heap name="WCR Capture PG" desc=0x7fb1b6115f90 FIVE LARGEST SUB HEAPS for heap name="WCR Capture PG" desc=0x7fb1b6115f9 PGA???WCR Capture PG ?WCR Capture PGA?freeable or recreate??chunk,???????Server Process???OS Chunk 7fb1b606bfc0 sz= 65600 freeable "WCR Capture PG " ds=0x7fb1b6115f90 sz= 65600=» 64k ??????????64k??,???????????????64k WCR????????????:)! 6.???? ??WCR CAPTURE????????2? SQL> SELECT x.ksppinm NAME, y.ksppstvl VALUE, x.ksppdesc describ 2 FROM SYS.x$ksppi x, SYS.x$ksppcv y 3 WHERE x.inst_id = USERENV ('Instance') 4 AND y.inst_id = USERENV ('Instance') 5 AND x.indx = y.indx 6 AND x.ksppinm in ('_capture_buffer_size','_wcr_control'); NAME VALUE DESCRIB -------------------- -------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------ _wcr_control 0 Oracle internal test WCR parameter used ONLY for testing! _capture_buffer_size 65536 To set the size of the PGA I/O recording buffers ??_capture_buffer_size ??PGA?WCR BUFFER?SIZE,???64k _wcr_control ??WCR?????,?????? ????,??????: 1. ???WCR WORKLOAD CAPTURE???????????,??Server Process????(????)2. ???server process????WCR??3. Server Proess???LOGON?LOGOFF?SQL?????????WCR???4. Server Process????????Immediate mode,????????PGA?(WCR Capture) subheap?,??????????????(timeout?????)5. ????, Server Process????????Immediate mode,?capture????parse??execution??(?????capture???parse?????????????,parse????capture???),?????LOGON?SQL??(???????)??PGA?WCR Capture?????,???????,????????,??tpcc??????4.5%6. ????_capture_buffer_size ??PGA?WCR BUFFER?SIZE,???64k7. WCR Capture?????binrary 2????,?????,????????????????WCR capture file8. WCR: capture file IO write?????Server Process??WCR??

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  • Messing with the Team

    - by Robert May
    Good Product Owners will help the team be the best that they can be.  Bad product owners will mess with the team and won’t care about the team.  If you’re a product owner, seek to do good and avoid bad behavior at all costs.  Remember, this is for YOUR benefit and you have much power given to you.  Use that power wisely. Scope Creep The product owner has several tools at his disposal to inject scope into an iteration.  First, the product owner can use defects to inject scope.  To do this, they’ll tell the team what functionality that they want to see in a feature.  Then, after the feature is developed, the Product Owner will decide that they don’t really like how the functionality behaves.  To change it, rather than creating a new story, they’ll add a defect.  The functionality is correct, as designed, but the Product Owner doesn’t like it.  By creating the defect, the Product Owner destroys the trust that the team has of the product owner.  They may not be able to count the story, because the Product Owner changed the story in the iteration, and the team then ends up looking like they have low velocity for something over which they have no control.  This is bad.  One way to deal with this is to add “Product Owner Time” to the iteration.  This will slow the velocity, but then the ScrumMaster can tell stake holders that this time is strictly in place to deal with bad behavior of the Product Owner. Another mechanism often used to inject Scope is the concept of directed development.  Outside of planning, stand-ups, or any other meeting, the Product Owner will take a developer aside and ask them to complete a task for them.  This is bad!  The team should be allocating all of their time to development.  If the Product Owner asks for a favor, then time that would normally be used for development will be used for a pet project of the Product Owner and the team will not get credit for this work.  Selfish product owners do this, and I typically see people who were “managers” do this behavior.  Authoritarian command and control development environments also see this happen.  The best thing that can happen is for the team member to report the issue to the ScrumMaster and the ScrumMaster to get very aggressive with management and the Product Owner to try and stop the behavior.  This may result in the ScrumMaster being fired, but if the behavior continues, Scrum is doomed.  This problem is especially bad in cases where the team member’s direct supervisor is the Product Owner.  I don’t recommend that the Product Owner or ScrumMaster have a direct report relationship with team members, since team members need the ability to say no.  To work around this issue, team members need to say no.  If that fails, team members need to add extra time to the iteration to deal with the scope creep injection and accept the lower velocity. As discussed above, another mechanism for injecting scope is by changing acceptance tests after the work is complete.  This is similar to adding defects to change scope and is bad.  To get around, add time for Product Owner uncertainty to the iteration and make sure that stakeholders are aware of the need to add this time because of the Product Owner. Refusing to Prioritize Refusing to prioritize causes chaos for the team.  From the team’s perspective, things that are not important will be worked on while things that the team knows are vital will be ignored.  A poor Product Owner will often pick the stories for the iteration on a whim.  This leads to the team working on many different aspects of the product and results in a lower velocity, since each iteration the team must switch context to the new area of development. The team will also experience confusion about priorities.  In one iteration, Feature X was the highest priority and had to be done.  Then, the following iteration, even though parts of Feature X still need to be completed, no stories to address them will be in the iteration.  However, three iterations later, Feature X will again become high priority. This will cause the team to not trust the Product Owner, and eventually, they’ll stop caring about the features they implement.  They won’t know what is important, so to insulate themselves from the ever changing chaos, they’ll become apathetic to all features.  Team members are some of the most creative people in a company.  By losing their engagement, the company is going to have a substandard product because the passion for the product won’t be in the team. Other signs that the Product Owner refuses to prioritize is that no one outside of the product owner will be consulted on priorities.  Additionally, the product, release, and iteration backlogs will be weak or non-existent. Dealing with this issue is not easy.  This really isn’t something the team can fix, short of taking over the role of Product Owner themselves.  An appeal to the stake holders might work, but only if the Product Owner isn’t a “manager” themselves.  The ScrumMaster needs to protect the team and do what they can to either get the Product Owner to prioritize or have the Product Owner replaced. Managing the Team A Product Owner that is also the “boss” of team members is a Scrum team that is waiting to fail.  If your boss tells you to do something, failing to do that something can cause you to be fired.  The team needs the ability to tell the Product Owner NO.  If the product owner introduces scope creep, the team has a responsibility to tell the Product Owner no.  If the Product Owner tries to get the team to commit to more than they can accomplish in an iteration, the team needs the ability to tell the Product Owner no. If the Product Owner is your boss and determines your pay increases, you’re probably not going to ever tell them no, and Scrum will likely fail.  The team can’t do much in this situation. Another aspect of “managing the team” that often happens is the Product Owner tries to tell the team how to develop the stories that are in the iteration.  This is one reason why I recommend that Product Owners are NOT technical people.  That way, the team can come up with the tasks that are needed to accomplish the stories and the Product Owner won’t know better.  If the Product Owner is technical, the ScrumMaster will need to take great care to protect the team from the ScrumMaster changing how the team thinks they need to implement the stories. Product Owners can also try to manage the team by their body language.  If the team says a task is going to take 6 hours to complete, and the Product Owner disagrees, they will use some kind of sour body language to indicate this disagreement.  In weak teams, this may cause the team to revise their estimate down, which will result in them taking longer than estimated and may result in them missing the iteration.  The ScrumMaster will need to make sure that the Product Owner doesn’t send such messages and that the team ignores them and estimates what they REALLY think it will take to complete the tasks.  Forcing the team to deal with such items in the retrospective can be helpful. Absenteeism The team is completely dependent upon the Product Owner to develop features for the customer.  The Product Owner IS the voice of the customer and without them, the team will lack direction.  Being the Product Owner is a full time job!  If the Product Owner cannot dedicate daily time with the team, a different product owner should be found. The Product Owner needs to attend every stand-up, planning meeting, showcase, and retrospective that the team has.  The team also must be able to have instant communication with the product owner.  They must not be required to schedule meetings to speak with their product owner.  The team must be the highest priority task that the Product Owner has. The best way to work around an absent Product Owner is to appoint a new Product Owner in the team.  This person will be responsible for making the decisions that the Product Owner should be making and to act as the liaison to the absent Product Owner.  If the delegate Product Owner doesn’t have authority to make decisions for the team, Scrum will fail.  If the Product Owner is absent, the ScrumMaster should seek to have that Product Owner replaced by someone who has the time and ability to be a real Product Owner. Making it Personal Too often Product Owners will become convinced that their ideas are the ones that matter and that anyone who disagrees is making a personal attack on them.  Remember that Product Owners will inherently be at odds with many people, simply because they have the need to prioritize.  Others will frequently question prioritization because they only see part of the picture that Product Owners face. Product Owners must have a thick skin and think egos.  If they don’t, they tend to make things personal, which causes them to become emotional and causes them to take actions that can destroy the trust that team members have in the Product Owner. If a Product Owner is making things person, the best thing that team members can do is reassure them that its not personal, but be firm about doing what is best for the Company and for the users.  The ScrumMaster should also spend significant time coaching the Product Owner on how to not react emotionally and how to accept criticism without becoming defensive. Conclusion I’m sure there are other ways that a Product Owner can mess with the team, but these are the most common that I’ve seen.  I would encourage all Product Owners to seek to be a good Product Owner.  If you find yourself behaving in any of the bad product owner ways, change your behavior today!  Your team will thank you. Remember, being Product Owner is very difficult!  Product Owner is one of the most difficult roles in Scrum.  However, it can also be one of the most rewarding roles in Scrum, since Product Owners literally see their ideas brought to life on the computer screen.  Product Owners need to be very patient, even in the face of criticism and need to be willing to make tough decisions on priority, but then not become offended when others disagree with those decisions.  Companies should spend the time needed to find the right product owners for their teams.  Doing so will only help the company to write better software. Technorati Tags: Scrum,Product Owner

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  • The Product Owner

    - by Robert May
    In a previous post, I outlined the rules of Scrum.  This post details one of those rules. Picking a most important part of Scrum is difficult.  All of the rules are required, but if there were one rule that is “more” required that every other rule, its having a good Product Owner.  Simply put, the Product Owner can make or break the project. Duties of the Product Owner A Product Owner has many duties and responsibilities.  I’ll talk about each of these duties in detail below. A Product Owner: Discovers and records stories for the backlog. Prioritizes stories in the Product Backlog, Release Backlog and Iteration Backlog. Determines Release dates and Iteration Dates. Develops story details and helps the team understand those details. Helps QA to develop acceptance tests. Interact with the Customer to make sure that the product is meeting the customer’s needs. Discovers and Records Stories for the Backlog When I do Scrum, I always use User Stories as the means for capturing functionality that’s required in the system.  Some people will use Use Cases, but the same rule applies.  The Product Owner has the ultimate responsibility for figuring out what functionality will be in the system.  Many different mechanisms for capturing this input can be used.  User interviews are great, but all sources should be considered, including talking with Customer Support types.  Often, they hear what users are struggling with the most and are a great source for stories that can make the application easier to use. Care should be taken when soliciting user stories from technical types such as programmers and the people that manage them.  They will almost always give stories that are very technical in nature and may not have a direct benefit for the end user.  Stories are about adding value to the company.  If the stories don’t have direct benefit to the end user, the Product Owner should question whether or not the story should be implemented.  In general, technical stories should be included as tasks in User Stories.  Technical stories are often needed, but the ultimate value to the user is in user based functionality, so technical stories should be considered nothing more than overhead in providing that user functionality. Until the iteration prior to development, stories should be nothing more than short, one line placeholders. An exercise called Story Planning can be used to brainstorm and come up with stories.  I’ll save the description of this activity for another blog post. For more information on User Stories, please read the book User Stories Applied by Mike Cohn. Prioritizes Stories in the Product Backlog, Release Backlog and Iteration Backlog Prioritization of stories is one of the most difficult tasks that a Product Owner must do.  A key concept of Scrum done right is the need to have the team working from a single set of prioritized stories.  If the team does not have a single set of prioritized stories, Scrum will likely fail at your organization.  The Product Owner is the ONLY person who has the responsibility to prioritize that list.  The Product Owner must be very diplomatic and sincerely listen to the people around him so that he can get the priorities correct. Just listening will still not yield the proper priorities.  Care must also be taken to ensure that Return on Investment is also considered.  Ultimately, determining which stories give the most value to the company for the least cost is the most important factor in determining priorities.  Product Owners should be willing to look at cold, hard numbers to determine the order for stories.  Even when many people want a feature, if that features is costly to develop, it may not have as high of a return on investment as features that are cheaper, but not as popular. The act of prioritization often causes conflict in an environment.  Customer Service thinks that feature X is the most important, because it will stop people from calling.  Operations thinks that feature Y is the most important, because it will stop servers from crashing.  Developers think that feature Z is most important because it will make writing software much easier for them.  All of these are useful goals, but the team can have only one list of items, and each item must have a priority that is different from all other stories.  The Product Owner will determine which feature gives the best return on investment and the other features will have to wait their turn, which means that someone will not have their top priority feature implemented first. A weak Product Owner will refuse to do prioritization.  I’ve heard from multiple Product Owners the following phrase, “Well, it’s all got to be done, so what does it matter what order we do it in?”  If your product owner is using this phrase, you need a new Product Owner.  Order is VERY important.  In Scrum, every release is potentially shippable.  If the wrong priority items are developed, then the value added in each release isn’t what it should be.  Additionally, the Product Owner with this mindset doesn’t understand Agile.  A product is NEVER finished, until the company has decided that it is no longer a going concern and they are no longer going to sell the product.  Therefore, prioritization isn’t an event, its something that continues every day.  The logical extension of the phrase “It’s all got to be done” is that you will never ship your product, since a product is never “done.”  Once stories have been prioritized, assigning them to the Release Backlog and the Iteration Backlog becomes relatively simple.  The top priority items are copied into the respective backlogs in order and the task is complete.  The team does have the right to shuffle things around a little in the iteration backlog.  For example, they may determine that working on story C with story A is appropriate because they’re related, even though story B is technically a higher priority than story C.  Or they may decide that story B is too big to complete in the time available after Story A has tasks created, so they’ll work on Story C since it’s smaller.  They can’t, however, go deep into the backlog to pick stories to implement.  The team and the Product Owner should work together to determine what’s best for the company. Prioritization is time consuming, but its one of the most important things a Product Owner does. Determines Release Dates and Iteration Dates Product owners are responsible for determining release dates for a product.  A common misconception that Product Owners have is that every “release” needs to correspond with an actual release to customers.  This is not the case.  In general, releases should be no more than 3 months long.  You  may decide to release the product to the customers, and many companies do release the product to customers, but it may also be an internal release. If a release date is too far away, developers will fall into the trap of not feeling a sense of urgency.  The date is far enough away that they don’t need to give the release their full attention.  Additionally, important tasks, such as performance tuning, regression testing, user documentation, and release preparation, will not happen regularly, making them much more difficult and time consuming to do.  The more frequently you do these tasks, the easier they are to accomplish. The Product Owner will be a key participant in determining whether or not a release should be sent out to the customers.  The determination should be made on whether or not the features contained in the release are valuable enough  and complete enough that the customers will see real value in the release.  Often, some features will take more than three months to get them to a state where they qualify for a release or need additional supporting features to be released.  The product owner has the right to make this determination. In addition to release dates, the Product Owner also will help determine iteration dates.  In general, an iteration length should be chosen and the team should follow that iteration length for an extended period of time.  If the iteration length is changed every iteration, you’re not doing Scrum.  Iteration lengths help the team and company get into a rhythm of developing quality software.  Iterations should be somewhere between 2 and 4 weeks in length.  Any shorter, and significant software will likely not be developed.  Any longer, and the team won’t feel urgency and planning will become very difficult. Iterations may not be extended during the iteration.  Companies where Scrum isn’t really followed will often use this as a strategy to complete all stories.  They don’t want to face the harsh reality of what their true performance is, and looking good is more important than seeking visibility and improving the process and team.  Companies like this typically don’t allow failure.  This is unhealthy.  Failure is part of life and unless we learn from it, we can’t improve.  I would much rather see a team push out stories to the next iteration and then have healthy discussions about why they failed rather than extend the iteration and not deal with the core problems. If iteration length varies, retrospectives become more difficult.  For example, evaluating the performance of the team’s estimation efforts becomes much more difficult if the iteration length varies.  Also, the team must have a velocity measurement.  If the iteration length varies, measuring velocity becomes impossible and upper management no longer will have the ability to evaluate the teams performance.  People external to the team will no longer have the ability to determine when key features are likely to be developed.  Variable iterations cause the entire company to fail and likely cause Scrum to fail at an organization. Develops Story Details and Helps the Team Understand Those Details A key concept in Scrum is that the stories are nothing more than a placeholder for a conversation.  Stories should be nothing more than short, one line statements about the functionality.  The team will then converse with the Product Owner about the details about that story.  The product owner needs to have a very good idea about what the details of the story are and needs to be able to help the team understand those details. Too often, we see this requirement as being translated into the need for comprehensive documentation about the story, including old fashioned requirements documentation.  The team should only develop the documentation that is required and should not develop documentation that is only created because their is a process to do so. In general, what we see that works best is the iteration before a team starts development work on a story, the Product Owner, with other appropriate business analysts, will develop the details of that story.  They’ll figure out what business rules are required, potentially make paper prototypes or other light weight mock-ups, and they seek to understand the story and what is implied.  Note that the time allowed for this task is deliberately short.  The Product Owner only has a single iteration to develop all of the stories for the next iteration. If more than one iteration is used, I’ve found that teams will end up with Big Design Up Front and traditional requirements documents.  This is a waste of time, since the team will need to then have discussions with the Product Owner to figure out what the requirements document says.  Instead of this, skip making the pretty pictures and detailing the nuances of the requirements and build only what is minimally needed by the team to do development.  If something comes up during development, you can address it at that time and figure out what you want to do.  The goal is to keep things as light weight as possible so that everyone can move as quickly as possible. Helps QA to Develop Acceptance Tests In Scrum, no story can be counted until it is accepted by QA.  Because of this, acceptance tests are very important to the team.  In general, acceptance tests need to be developed prior to the iteration or at the very beginning of the iteration so that the team can make sure that the tasks that they develop will fulfill the acceptance criteria. The Product Owner will help the team, including QA, understand what will make the story acceptable.  Note that the Product Owner needs to be careful about specifying that the feature will work “Perfectly” at the end of the iteration.  In general, features are developed a little bit at a time, so only the bit that is being developed should be considered as necessary for acceptance. A weak Product Owner will make statements like “Do it right the first time.”  Not only are these statements damaging to the team (like they would try to do it WRONG the first time . . .), they’re also ignoring the iterative nature of Scrum.  Additionally, a weak product owner will seek to add scope in the acceptance testing.  For example, they will refuse to determine acceptance at the beginning of the iteration, and then, after the team has planned and committed to the iteration, they will expand scope by defining acceptance.  This often causes the team to miss the iteration because scope that wasn’t planned on is included.  There are ways that the team can mitigate this problem.  For example, include extra “Product Owner” time to deal with the uncertainty that you know will be introduced by the Product Owner.  This will slow the perceived velocity of the team and is not ideal, since they’ll be doing more work than they get credit for. Interact with the Customer to Make Sure that the Product is Meeting the Customer’s Needs Once development is complete, what the team has worked on should be put in front of real live people to see if it meets the needs of the customer.  One of the great things about Agile is that if something doesn’t work, we can revisit it in a future iteration!  This frees up the team to make the best decision now and know that if that decision proves to be incorrect, the team can revisit it and change that decision. Features are about adding value to the customer, so if the customer doesn’t find them useful, then having the team make tweaks is valuable.  In general, most software will be 80 to 90 percent “right” after the initial round and only minor tweaks are required.  If proper coding standards are followed, these tweaks are usually minor and easy to accomplish.  Product Owners that are doing a good job will encourage real users to see and use the software, since they know that they are trying to add value to the customer. Poor product owners will think that they know the answers already, that their customers are silly and do stupid things and that they don’t need customer input.  If you have a product owner that is afraid to show the team’s work to real customers, you probably need a different product owner. Up Next, “Who Makes a Good Product Owner.” Followed by, “Messing with the Team.” Technorati Tags: Scrum,Product Owner

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  • Who Makes a Good Product Owner

    - by Robert May
    In general, the best product owners are those that care passionately about the customer of the product.  Note that I didn’t say about the product itself.  Actually, people that only care about the product, generally do not make good product owners.  Products only matter in relationship to their customers.  If a product doesn’t provide value to the customer, then the product has no value, no matter what a person might think of the product, and no matter what cool technologies exist inside of the product. A good product owner is also a good negotiator.  They recognize that many different priorities exist inside of a corporation, but that there can be only one list that developers work from.  A good product owner recognizes that its their job to help others around them prioritize (perhaps with a Product Council), but also understand that they alone have the final say about priorities and are willing to make the tough decisions required.  Deciding the priority between two perfectly valid stories is very difficult, especially when the stories are from two different departments! A good product owner is deeply interested in helping the team be successful.  They don’t seek to control the team, but instead seek to understand what the team can do and then work with the team to get the best product possible for the Customer.  A good product owner is never denigrating to team members, ever.  They recognize that such behavior would damage the trust that needs to be present between team members and product owners and will avoid it at all costs. In general, technical people (i.e. former or current developers) make poor product owners.  In their minds, they can’t separate implementation details from user functionality, so their stories end up sounding like implementation details.  For example, “The user enters their username on the password screen” is something that a technical product owner would write.  The proper wording for that story is “A user supplies the system with their credentials.”  Because technical people think different from the rest of the population, they are generally not a good fit. A good product owner is also a good writer.  Writing good stories demands good writing.  The art of persuasion, descriptiveness and just general good grammar are all required.  A good Product Owner must also be well spoken, since most of what will be conveyed will be conveyed with the spoken word, not just written word. A good product owner is a “People Person.”  They like talking to people and are very patient.  They don’t mind having questions repeated or fielding many questions, because they want to make sure that the ideas they’re conveying are properly understood so the customer gets the best product possible.  They are happy to answer any questions a team member may have and invite feedback and criticism of designs and stories, since they want a good product.  They really have little ego that gets in the way of building a great product. All of these qualities can be hard to find, but if you look close enough, you’ll find the right person in your organization.  Product owners can be found anywhere, not just in upper management.  Some of the best product owners are those that are very close to the customer.  In fact, check your customer support staff.  I’d bet that several great product owners are lurking there. Final note about what makes a good product owner.  You’re probably NOT going to find a good product owner in a manager, especially if they consider themselves a “Manager.”  Product owners don’t manage anything but the backlog, so be especially careful if the person you’re selecting for Product Owner is a manager. Up Next, “Messing with the Team.” Technorati Tags: Scrum,Product Owner

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  • Linking Simple product to their page listed under Grouped product in Magento

    - by Yogesh
    I want to add url for each simple product listed under Grouped product in Magento i have changed it with below code in app\design\frontend\blank\default\template\catalog\product\view\type\grouped.phtml but still not work for me it's link but with main group product (Example: Main Grouped product and three simple products Item1 Item2 Item3 but all simple product show same url of ain Grouped product) <td><a href="<?php $_item->getUrlPath() ?>"><?php echo $this->htmlEscape($_item->getName()) ?></a> </td> and this also <td><a href="<?php $_item->getProductUrl() ?>"><?php echo $this->htmlEscape($_item->getName()) ?></a> </td> i am doing any mistek pls. help how and where to change it

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  • Product table, many kinds of product, each product has many parameters

    - by StoneHeart
    Hi, i'm have not much experience in table design. My goal is a product table(s), it must design to fix some requirement below: Support many kind of products (TV, Phone, PC, ...). Each kind of product has different set of parameters like: Phone will have Color, Size, Weight, OS... PC will have CPU, HDD, RAM... Set of parameters must be dynamic. You can add or edit any parameter you like. I don't want make a table for each kind of product. So I need help to find a correct solution. Thanks.

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  • Oracle Product Leader Named a Leader in Gartner MQ for MDM of Product Data Solutions

    - by Mala Narasimharajan
    Gartner recently Oracle as a leader in the MQ report for MDM of Product Data Solutions.  They named Oracle as a leader with the following key points:  Strong MDM portfolio covering multiple data domains, industries and use cases Oracle PDH can be a good fit for Oracle EBS customers and can form part of a multidomain solution: Deep MDM of product data functionality Evolving support for information stewardship For  more information on the report visit Oracle's Analyst Relations blog at  http://blog.us.oracle.com/dimdmar/.  To learn more about Oracle's product information solutions for master data management click here. 

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  • Product Naming Conventions - Does it make sense

    - by NeilHambly
    Maybe it’s just me, but with some of the MS Products being released in 2010 with "2010" in their product name, is the naming of the SQL Server product suite being released with product name that doesn’t make sense, our latest SQL Server Release which is now just about to be released is "SQL Server 2008 R2" My question is do you think this product name is ? Good, Bad or just plain confusing IMHO I think we could have been better placed if this was named "SQL Server 2010"...(read more)

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  • Magento: Getting Product Url's for Products within a Grouped Product

    - by Nathan
    For a grouped product, I would like to display a link to the simple products it is composed of. For example, if I have a grouped product called Dining Set composed of plates, knives, forks, etc. I'd like each of the subproducts to have a link to that subproduct (click plates goes to the Simple Product for plates) <?php foreach ($_associatedProducts as $_item): ?> <tr> <td><?php echo $this->htmlEscape($_item->getName()) ?></td> <td class="a-right"> <?php echo $this->getPriceHtml($_item, true) ?> </td> <?php if ($_product->isSaleable()): ?> <td class="a-center"> <?php if ($_item->isSaleable()) : ?> <a href="<?php $_item->getProductUrl() ?>">View</a> <?php else: ?> <p class="availability"><span class="out-of-stock"><?php echo $this->__('Out of stock.') ?></span></p> <?php endif; ?> </td> <?php endif; ?> </tr> <?php endforeach; ?> This is a code snippet from the grouped.phtml file in app/design/frontend/blank/default/template/catalog/product/view/type/grouped.phtml In particular the line that has $_item-getProductUrl() This does not work, and I don't know the code needed to get the url for this associated product item. If anyone could help here it would be much appreciated. Also, where on earth can I find the method's available (and how they're used) for Products or Categories or $_item and the like? Thanks, Nathan

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  • We're Hiring! - Server and Desktop Virtualization Product Management

    - by adam.hawley
    There is a lot of exciting stuff going on here at Oracle in general but the server and desktop virtualization group in particular is deeply involved in executing on Oracle's strategy for delivering complete hardware-software solutions across the company, so we're expanding our team with several open positions. If you're interested and qualified, then please send us your resume. The three positions in Virtualization Product Management can be found by going here or going to the Employment Opportunities Job Search page, clicking on 'Advanced Search' and typing the job opening numbers (include 'IRC'... see below) in the 'Keywords' field. Click Search. Current openings are... IRC1457623: Oracle VM Product Management IRC1457626: Desktop Virtualization Application Solutions Product Management IRC1473577: Oracle VM Best Practices Implementation Engineer (Product Management) I look forward to hearing from you!

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  • where is this function getting its values from

    - by user295189
    I have the JS file below that I am working on and I have a need to know this specific function pg.getRecord_Response = function(){ } within the file. I need to know where are the values are coming from in this function for example arguments[0].responseText? I am new to javascript so any help will be much appreciated. Thanks var pg = new Object(); var da = document.body.all; // ===== - EXPRESS BUILD [REQUEST] - ===== // pg.expressBuild_Request = function(){ var n = new Object(); n.patientID = request.patientID; n.encounterID = request.encounterID; n.flowSheetID = request.flowSheetID; n.encounterPlan = request.encounterPlan; n.action = "/location/diagnosis/dsp_expressBuild.php"; n.target = popWinCenterScreen("/common/html/empty.htm", 619, 757, ""); myLocationDB.PostRequest(n); } // ===== - EXPRESS BUILD [RESPONSE] - ===== // pg.expressBuild_Response = function(){ pg.records.showHiddenRecords = 0; pg.loadRecords_Request(arguments.length ? arguments[0] : 0); } // ===== - GET RECORD [REQUEST] - ===== // pg.getRecord_Request = function(){ if(pg.records.lastSelected){ pg.workin(true); pg.record.recordID = pg.records.lastSelected.i; var n = new Object(); n.noheaders = 1; n.recordID = pg.record.recordID; myLocationDB.Ajax.Post("/location/diagnosis/get_record.php", n, pg.getRecord_Response); } else { pg.buttons.btnOpen.disable(true); } } // ===== - GET RECORD [RESPONSE] - ===== // pg.getRecord_Response = function(){ //alert(arguments[0].responseText); if(arguments.length && arguments[0].responseText){ alert(arguments[0].responseText); // Refresh PQRI grid when encounter context if(request.encounterID && window.parent.frames['main']){ window.parent.frames['main'].pg.loadQualityMeasureRequest(); } var rec = arguments[0].responseText.split(pg.delim + pg.delim); if(rec.length == 20){ // validate record values rec[0] = parseInt(rec[0]); rec[3] = parseInt(rec[3]); rec[5] = parseInt(rec[5]); rec[6] = parseInt(rec[6]); rec[7] = parseInt(rec[7]); rec[8] = parseInt(rec[8]); rec[9] = parseInt(rec[9]); rec[10] = parseInt(rec[10]); rec[11] = parseInt(rec[11]); rec[12] = parseInt(rec[12]); rec[15] = parseInt(rec[15]); // set record state pg.recordState = { recordID: pg.record.recordID, codeID: rec[0], description: rec[2], assessmentTypeID: rec[3], type: rec[4], onsetDateYear: rec[5], onsetDateMonth: rec[6], onsetDateDay: rec[7], onsetDateIsApproximate: rec[8], resolveDateYear: rec[9], resolveDateMonth: rec[10], resolveDateDay: rec[11], resolveDateIsApproximate: rec[12], commentsCount: rec[15], comments: rec[16] } // set record view pg.record.code.codeID = pg.recordState.codeID; pg.record.code.value = rec[1]; pg.record.description.value = rec[2]; for(var i=0; i<pg.record.type.options.length; i++){ if(pg.record.type.options[i].value == rec[4]){ pg.record.type.selectedIndex = i; break; } } for(var i=0; i<pg.record.assessmentType.options.length; i++){ if(pg.record.assessmentType.options[i].value == rec[3]){ pg.record.assessmentType.selectedIndex = i; break; } } if(rec[5]){ if(rec[6] && rec[7]){ pg.record.onsetDateType.selectedIndex = 0; pg.record.onsetDate.value = rec[6] + "/" + rec[7] + "/" + rec[5]; pg.record.onsetDate.format(); } else { pg.record.onsetDateType.selectedIndex = 1; pg.record.onsetDateMonth.selectedIndex = rec[6]; for(var i=0; i<pg.record.onsetDateYear.options.length; i++){ if(pg.record.onsetDateYear.options[i].value == rec[5]){ pg.record.onsetDateYear.selectedIndex = i; break; } } if(rec[8]) pg.record.chkOnsetDateIsApproximate.checked = true; } } else { pg.record.onsetDateType.selectedIndex = 2; } if(rec[9]){ if(rec[10] && rec[11]){ pg.record.resolveDateType.selectedIndex = 0; pg.record.resolveDate.value = rec[10] + "/" + rec[11] + "/" + rec[9]; pg.record.resolveDate.format(); } else { pg.record.resolveDateType.selectedIndex = 1; pg.record.resolveDateMonth.selectedIndex = rec[10]; for(var i=0; i<pg.record.resolveDateYear.options[i].length; i++){ if(pg.record.resolveDateYear.options.value == rec[9]){ pg.record.resolveDateYear.selectedIndex = i; break; } } if(rec[12]) pg.record.chkResolveDateIsApproximate.checked = true; } } else { pg.record.resolveDateType.selectedIndex = 2; } pg.record.lblCommentCount.innerHTML = rec[15]; pg.record.comments.value = rec[16]; pg.record.lblUpdatedBy.innerHTML = "* Last updated by " + rec[13] + " on " + rec[14]; pg.record.lblUpdatedBy.title = "Updated by: " + rec[13] + "\nUpdated on: " + rec[14]; pg.record.linkedNotes.setData(rec[18]); pg.record.linkedOrders.setData(rec[19]); pg.record.updates.setData(rec[17]); return; } } alert("An error occured while attempting to retrieve\ndetails for record #" + pg.record.recordID + ".\n\nPlease contact support if this problem persists.\nWe apologize for the inconvenience."); pg.hideRecordView(); } // ===== - HIDE COMMENTS VIEW - ===== // pg.hideCommentsView = function(){ pg.recordComments.style.left = ""; pg.recordComments.disabled = true; pg.recordComments.comments.value = ""; pg.record.disabled = false; pg.record.style.zIndex = 5500; } // ===== - HIDE code SEARCH - ===== // pg.hidecodeSearch = function(){ pg.codeSearch.style.left = ""; pg.codeSearch.disabled = true; pg.record.disabled = false; pg.record.style.zIndex = 5500; } // ===== - HIDE RECORD - ===== // pg.hideRecord = function(){ if(arguments.length){ pg.loadRecords_Request(); } else if(pg.records.lastSelected){ var n = new Object(); n.recordTypeID = 11; n.patientID = request.patientID; n.recordID = pg.records.lastSelected.i; n.action = "/location/hideRecord/dsp_hideRecord.php"; n.target = popWinCenterScreen("/common/html/empty.htm", 164, 476); myLocationDB.PostRequest(n); } } // ===== - HIDE RECORD VIEW - ===== // pg.hideRecordView = function(){ pg.record.style.left = ""; pg.record.disabled = true; // reset record grids pg.record.updates.state = "NO_RECORDS"; pg.record.linkedNotes.state = "NO_RECORDS"; pg.record.linkedOrders.state = "NO_RECORDS"; // reset linked record tabs pg.record.tabs[0].click(); pg.record.tabs[1].disable(true); pg.record.tabs[2].disable(true); pg.record.tabs[1].all[1].innerHTML = "Notes"; pg.record.tabs[2].all[1].innerHTML = "Orders"; // reset record state pg.recordState = null; // reset record view pg.record.recordID = 0; pg.record.code.value = ""; pg.record.code.codeID = 0; pg.record.description.value = ""; pg.record.type.selectedIndex = 0; pg.record.assessmentType.selectedIndex = 0; pg.record.onsetDateType.selectedIndex = 0; pg.record.chkOnsetDateIsApproximate.checked = false; pg.record.resolveDateType.selectedIndex = 0; pg.record.chkResolveDateIsApproximate.checked = false; pg.record.lblCommentCount.innerHTML = 0; pg.record.comments.value = ""; pg.record.lblUpdatedBy.innerHTML = ""; pg.record.lblUpdatedBy.title = ""; pg.record.updateComment = ""; pg.recordComments.comments.value = ""; pg.record.active = false; pg.codeSearch.newRecord = true; pg.blocker.className = ""; pg.workin(false); } // ===== - HIDE UPDATE VIEW - ===== // pg.hideUpdateView = function(){ pg.recordUpdate.style.left = ""; pg.recordUpdate.disabled = true; pg.recordUpdate.type.value = ""; pg.recordUpdate.onsetDate.value = ""; pg.recordUpdate.description.value = ""; pg.recordUpdate.resolveDate.value = ""; pg.recordUpdate.assessmentType.value = ""; pg.record.disabled = false; pg.record.btnViewUpdate.setState(); pg.record.style.zIndex = 5500; } // ===== - INIT - ===== // pg.init = function(){ var tab = 1; pg.delim = String.fromCharCode(127); pg.subDelim = String.fromCharCode(1); pg.blocker = da.blocker; pg.hourglass = da.hourglass; pg.pageContent = da.pageContent; pg.blocker.shim = da.blocker_shim; pg.activeTip = da.activeTip; pg.activeTip.anchor = null; pg.activeTip.shim = da.activeTip_shim; // PAGE TITLE pg.pageTitle = da.pageTitle; // TOTAL RECORDS pg.totalRecords = da.totalRecords[0]; // START RECORD pg.startRecord = da.startRecord[0]; pg.startRecord.onchange = function(){ pg.records.startRecord = this.value; pg.loadRecords_Request(); } // RECORD PANEL pg.recordPanel = myLocationDB.RecordPanel(pg.pageContent.all.recordPanel); for(var i=0; i<pg.recordPanel.buttons.length; i++){ if(pg.recordPanel.buttons[i].orderBy){ pg.recordPanel.buttons[i].onclick = pg.sortRecords; } } // RECORDS GRIDVIEW pg.records = pg.recordPanel.all.grid; alert(pg.recordPanel.all.grid); pg.records.sortOrder = "DESC"; pg.records.lastExpanded = null; pg.records.attachEvent("onrowclick", pg.record_click); pg.records.orderBy = pg.recordPanel.buttons[0].orderBy; pg.records.attachEvent("onrowmouseout", pg.record_mouseOut); pg.records.attachEvent("onrowdblclick", pg.getRecord_Request); pg.records.attachEvent("onrowmouseover", pg.record_mouseOver); pg.records.attachEvent("onstateready", pg.loadRecords_Response); // BUTTON - TOGGLE HIDDEN RECORDS pg.btnHiddenRecords = myLocationDB.Custom.ImageButton(3, 751, 19, 19, "/common/images/hide.gif", 1, 1, "", "", da.pageContent); pg.btnHiddenRecords.setTitle("Show hidden records"); pg.btnHiddenRecords.onclick = pg.toggleHiddenRecords; pg.btnHiddenRecords.setState = function(){ this.disable(!pg.records.totalHiddenRecords); } // code SEARCH SUBWIN pg.codeSearch = da.subWin_codeSearch; pg.codeSearch.newRecord = true; pg.codeSearch.searchType = "code"; pg.codeSearch.searchFavorites = true; pg.codeSearch.onkeydown = function(){ if(window.event && window.event.keyCode && window.event.keyCode == 113){ if(pg.codeSearch.searchType == "DESCRIPTION"){ pg.codeSearch.searchType = "code"; pg.codeSearch.lblSearchType.innerHTML = "ICD-9 Code"; } else { pg.codeSearch.searchType = "DESCRIPTION"; pg.codeSearch.lblSearchType.innerHTML = "Description"; } pg.searchcodes_Request(); } } // SEARCH TYPE pg.codeSearch.lblSearchType = pg.codeSearch.all.lblSearchType; // SEARCH STRING pg.codeSearch.searchString = pg.codeSearch.all.searchString; pg.codeSearch.searchString.tabIndex = 1; pg.codeSearch.searchString.onfocus = function(){ this.select(); } pg.codeSearch.searchString.onblur = function(){ this.value = this.value.trim(); } pg.codeSearch.searchString.onkeydown = function(){ if(window.event && window.event.keyCode && window.event.keyCode == 13){ pg.searchcodes_Request(); } } // -- "SEARCH" pg.codeSearch.btnSearch = pg.codeSearch.all.btnSearch; pg.codeSearch.btnSearch.tabIndex = 2; pg.codeSearch.btnSearch.disable = myLocationDB.Disable; pg.codeSearch.btnSearch.onclick = pg.searchcodes_Request; pg.codeSearch.btnSearch.baseTitle = "Search diagnosis codes"; pg.codeSearch.btnSearch.setState = function(){ pg.codeSearch.btnSearch.disable(pg.codeSearch.searchString.value.trim().length < 2); } pg.codeSearch.searchString.onkeyup = pg.codeSearch.btnSearch.setState; // START RECORD / TOTAL RECORDS pg.codeSearch.startRecord = pg.codeSearch.all.startRecord; pg.codeSearch.totalRecords = pg.codeSearch.all.totalRecords; pg.codeSearch.startRecord.onchange = function(){ pg.codeSearch.records.startRecord = this.value; pg.searchcodes_Request(); } // RECORD PANEL pg.codeSearch.recordPanel = myLocationDB.RecordPanel(pg.codeSearch.all.recordPanel); pg.codeSearch.recordPanel.buttons[0].onclick = pg.sortcodeResults; pg.codeSearch.recordPanel.buttons[1].onclick = pg.sortcodeResults; // DATA GRIDVIEW pg.codeSearch.records = pg.codeSearch.all.grid; pg.codeSearch.records.orderBy = "code"; pg.codeSearch.records.attachEvent("onrowdblclick", pg.updatecode); pg.codeSearch.records.attachEvent("onstateready", pg.searchcodes_Response); // BUTTON - "CANCEL" pg.codeSearch.btnCancel = pg.codeSearch.all.btnCancel; pg.codeSearch.btnCancel.tabIndex = 4; pg.codeSearch.btnCancel.onclick = pg.hidecodeSearch; pg.codeSearch.btnCancel.title = "Close this search area"; // SEARCH FAVORITES / ALL pg.codeSearch.optSearch = myLocationDB.InputButton(pg.codeSearch.all.optSearch); pg.codeSearch.optSearch[0].onclick = function(){ if(pg.codeSearch.searchFavorites){ pg.codeSearch.searchString.focus(); } else { pg.codeSearch.searchFavorites = true; pg.searchcodes_Request(); } } pg.codeSearch.optSearch[1].onclick = function(){ if(pg.codeSearch.searchFavorites){ pg.codeSearch.searchFavorites = false; pg.searchcodes_Request(); } else { pg.codeSearch.searchString.focus(); } } // -- "USE SELECTED" pg.codeSearch.btnUseSelected = pg.codeSearch.all.btnUseSelected; pg.codeSearch.btnUseSelected.tabIndex = 3; pg.codeSearch.btnUseSelected.onclick = pg.updatecode; pg.codeSearch.btnUseSelected.disable = myLocationDB.Disable; pg.codeSearch.btnUseSelected.baseTitle = "Use the selected diagnosis code"; pg.codeSearch.btnUseSelected.setState = function(){ pg.codeSearch.btnUseSelected.disable(!pg.codeSearch.records.lastSelected); } pg.codeSearch.records.attachEvent("onrowclick", pg.codeSearch.btnUseSelected.setState); // RECORD STATE pg.recordState = null; // RECORD SUBWIN pg.record = da.subWin_record; pg.record.recordID = 0; pg.record.active = false; pg.record.updateComment = ""; // -- TABS pg.record.tabs = myLocationDB.TabCollection( pg.record.all.tab, function(){ if(pg.record.tabs[0].all[0].checked){ pg.record.btnOpen.style.display = "none"; pg.record.chkSelectAll.hitArea.style.display = "none"; pg.record.btnSave.style.display = "block"; pg.record.lblUpdatedBy.style.display = "block"; pg.record.pnlRecord_shim.style.display = "none"; } else { pg.record.pnlRecord_shim.style.display = "block"; pg.record.btnSave.style.display = "none"; pg.record.lblUpdatedBy.style.display = "none"; pg.record.btnOpen.setState(); pg.record.btnOpen.style.display = "block"; if(pg.record.tabs[2].all[0].checked){ pg.record.chkSelectAll.hitArea.style.display = "none"; //pg.record.btnViewLabs.setState(); //pg.record.btnViewLabs.style.display = "block"; } else { pg.record.chkSelectAll.setState(); pg.record.chkSelectAll.hitArea.style.display = "block"; //pg.record.btnViewLabs.style.display = "none"; } } } ); pg.record.tabs[1].disable(true); pg.record.tabs[2].disable(true); pg.record.pnlRecord_shim = pg.record.all.pnlRecord_shim; pg.record.code = pg.record.all.code; pg.record.code.codeID = 0; pg.record.code.tabIndex = -1; // -- CHANGE code pg.record.btnChangecode = myLocationDB.Custom.ImageButton(6, 107, 22, 22, "/common/images/edit.gif", 2, 2, "", "", pg.record.all.pnlRecord); pg.record.btnChangecode.tabIndex = 1; pg.record.btnChangecode.onclick = pg.showcodeSearch; pg.record.btnChangecode.title = "Change the diagnosis code for this problem"; pg.record.description = pg.record.all.description; pg.record.description.tabIndex = 2; pg.record.type = pg.record.all.type; pg.record.type.tabIndex = 3; pg.record.assessmentType = pg.record.all.assessmentType; pg.record.assessmentType.tabIndex = 9; // ONSET DATE pg.record.onsetDateType = pg.record.all.onsetDateType; pg.record.onsetDateType.tabIndex = 4; pg.record.onsetDateType.onchange = pg.record.onsetDateType.setState = function(){ switch(this.selectedIndex){ case 1: // PARTIAL pg.record.chkOnsetDateIsApproximate.disable(false); pg.record.onsetDate.style.visibility = "hidden"; pg.record.onsetDateUnknown.style.visibility = "hidden"; pg.record.onsetDate.datePicker.style.visibility = "hidden"; pg.record.onsetDateMonth.style.visibility = "visible"; pg.record.onsetDateYear.style.visibility = "visible"; break; case 2: // UNKNOWN pg.record.chkOnsetDateIsApproximate.disable(true); pg.record.onsetDate.style.visibility = "hidden"; pg.record.onsetDateYear.style.visibility = "hidden"; pg.record.onsetDateMonth.style.visibility = "hidden"; pg.record.onsetDate.datePicker.style.visibility = "hidden"; pg.record.onsetDateUnknown.style.visibility = "visible"; break; default: // "WHOLE" pg.record.chkOnsetDateIsApproximate.disable(true); pg.record.onsetDateMonth.style.visibility = "hidden"; pg.record.onsetDateYear.style.visibility = "hidden"; pg.record.onsetDateUnknown.style.visibility = "hidden"; pg.record.onsetDate.style.visibility = "visible"; pg.record.onsetDate.datePicker.style.visibility = "visible"; break; } } pg.record.onsetDate = myLocationDB.Custom.DateInput(30, 364, 80, pg.record.all.pnlRecord, 1, 1, 0, params.todayDate, 1); pg.record.onsetDate.tabIndex = 5; pg.record.onsetDate.style.textAlign = "LEFT"; pg.record.onsetDate.calendar.style.zIndex = 6000; pg.record.onsetDate.datePicker.style.left = "448px"; pg.record.onsetDate.setDateRange(params.birthDate, params.todayDate); pg.record.onsetDateYear = pg.record.all.onsetDateYear; pg.record.onsetDateYear.tabIndex = 6; pg.record.onsetDateMonth = pg.record.all.onsetDateMonth pg.record.onsetDateMonth.tabIndex = 7; pg.record.onsetDateUnknown = pg.record.all.onsetDateUnknown; pg.record.onsetDateUnknown.tabIndex = 8; pg.record.chkOnsetDateIsApproximate = myLocationDB.InputButton(pg.record.all.chkOnsetDateIsApproximate); pg.record.chkOnsetDateIsApproximate.setTitle("Onset date is approximate"); pg.record.chkOnsetDateIsApproximate.disable(true); // RESOLVE DATE pg.record.lblResolveDate = pg.record.all.lblResolveDate; pg.record.resolveDateType = pg.record.all.resolveDateType; pg.record.resolveDateType.tabIndex = 10; pg.record.resolveDateType.lastSelectedIndex = 0; pg.record.resolveDateType.setState = function(){ switch(this.selectedIndex){ case 1: // PARTIAL pg.record.chkResolveDateIsApproximate.disable(false); pg.record.resolveDate.style.visibility = "hidden"; pg.record.resolveDateUnknown.style.visibility = "hidden"; pg.record.resolveDate.datePicker.style.visibility = "hidden"; pg.record.resolveDateMonth.style.visibility = "visible"; pg.record.resolveDateYear.style.visibility = "visible"; break; case 2: // UNKNOWN pg.record.chkResolveDateIsApproximate.disable(true); pg.record.resolveDate.style.visibility = "hidden"; pg.record.resolveDateYear.style.visibility = "hidden"; pg.record.resolveDateMonth.style.visibility = "hidden"; pg.record.resolveDate.datePicker.style.visibility = "hidden"; pg.record.resolveDateUnknown.style.visibility = "visible"; break; default: // "WHOLE" pg.record.chkResolveDateIsApproximate.disable(true); pg.record.resolveDateMonth.style.visibility = "hidden"; pg.record.resolveDateYear.style.visibility = "hidden"; pg.record.resolveDateUnknown.style.visibility = "hidden"; pg.record.resolveDate.style.visibility = "visible"; pg.record.resolveDate.datePicker.style.visibility = "visible"; break; } } pg.record.resolveDateType.onchange = function(){ this.lastSelectedIndex = this.selectedIndex; this.setState(); } pg.record.resolveDate = myLocationDB.Custom.DateInput(55, 364, 80, pg.record.all.pnlRecord, 1, 1, 0, params.todayDate, 1); pg.record.resolveDate.tabIndex = 11; pg.record.resolveDate.style.textAlign = "LEFT"; pg.record.resolveDate.calendar.style.zIndex = 6000; pg.record.resolveDate.datePicker.style.left = "448px"; pg.record.resolveDate.setDateRange(params.birthDate, params.todayDate); pg.record.resolveDate.setState = function(){ if(pg.record.assessmentType.value == 15){ pg.record.chkResolveDateIsApproximate.disable(pg.record.resolveDateType.value != "PARTIAL"); pg.record.resolveDate.disabled = false; pg.record.lblResolveDate.disabled = false; pg.record.resolveDateType.selectedIndex = pg.record.resolveDateType.lastSelectedIndex; pg.record.resolveDateType.setState(); pg.record.resolveDate.datePicker.disable(false); pg.record.resolveDateType.disabled = false; pg.record.resolveDateYear.disabled = false; pg.record.resolveDateMonth.disabled = false; pg.record.resolveDateUnknown.disabled = false; } else { pg.record.resolveDate.datePicker.disable(true); pg.record.chkResolveDateIsApproximate.disable(true); pg.record.resolveDateType.selectedIndex = 2; pg.record.resolveDateType.setState(); pg.record.resolveDate.disabled = true; pg.record.lblResolveDate.disabled = true; pg.record.resolveDateType.disabled = true; pg.record.resolveDateYear.disabled = true; pg.record.resolveDateMonth.disabled = true; pg.record.resolveDateUnknown.disabled = true; } } pg.record.assessmentType.onchange = pg.record.resolveDate.setState; pg.record.resolveDateYear = pg.record.all.resolveDateYear; pg.record.resolveDateYear.tabIndex = 11; pg.record.resolveDateMonth = pg.record.all.resolveDateMonth pg.record.resolveDateMonth.tabIndex = 12; pg.record.resolveDateUnknown = pg.record.all.resolveDateUnknown; pg.record.resolveDateUnknown.tabIndex = 13; pg.record.chkResolveDateIsApproximate = myLocationDB.InputButton(pg.record.all.chkResolveDateIsApproximate); pg.record.chkResolveDateIsApproximate.setTitle("Resolve date is approximate"); pg.record.chkResolveDateIsApproximate.disable(true); // -- UPDATES pg.record.updates = pg.record.all.pnlUpdates.all.grid; pg.record.lblUpdateCount = pg.record.all.lblUpdateCount; pg.record.updates.attachEvent("onstateready", pg.showRecordView); pg.record.updates.attachEvent("onrowdblclick", pg.showUpdateView); // -- "VIEW SELECTED" pg.record.btnViewUpdate = myLocationDB.PanelButton(pg.record.all.btnViewUpdate); pg.record.btnViewUpdate.setTitle("View details for the selected problem update"); pg.record.btnViewUpdate.onclick = pg.showUpdateView; pg.record.btnViewUpdate.setState = function(){ pg.record.btnViewUpdate.disable(!pg.record.updates.lastSelected); } pg.record.updates.attachEvent("onrowclick", pg.record.btnViewUpdate.setState); // -- COMMENTS pg.record.comments = pg.record.all.comments; pg.record.pnlComments = pg.record.all.pnlComments; pg.record.lblCommentCount = pg.record.all.lblCommentCount; // -- UPDATE COMMENTS pg.record.btnUpdateComments = myLocationDB.PanelButton(pg.record.all.btnUpdateComments); pg.record.btnUpdateComments.onclick = pg.showCommentView; pg.record.btnUpdateComments.title = "Update this record's comments"; // -- LINKED NOTES pg.record.linkedNotes = pg.record.all.linkedNotes.all.grid; pg.record.linkedNotes.attachEvent("onrowclick", pg.linkedRecordClick); pg.record.linkedNotes.attachEvent("onrowdblclick", pg.openLinkedNote); pg.record.linkedNotes.attachEvent("onstateready", pg.setLinkedNotes_Count); // -- LINKED ORDERS pg.record.linkedOrders = pg.record.all.linkedOrders.all.grid; pg.record.linkedOrders.attachEvent("onrowclick", pg.linkedRecordClick); pg.record.linkedOrders.attachEvent("onrowdblclick", pg.openLinkedOrder); pg.record.linkedOrders.attachEvent("onstateready", pg.setLinkedOrders_Count); // -- "CLOSE" pg.record.btnClose = pg.record.all.btnClose; pg.record.btnClose.tabIndex = 15; pg.record.btnClose.onclick = pg.hideRecordView; pg.record.btnClose.title = "Close this record panel"; // -- LAST UPDATED BY pg.record.lblUpdatedBy = pg.record.all.lblUpdatedBy; // -- "SELECT ALL" pg.record.chkSelectAll = myLocationDB.InputButton(pg.record.all.chkSelectAll); pg.record.chkSelectAll.onclick = function(){ if(pg.record.tabs[1].all[0].checked){ if(pg.record.chkSelectAll.checked){ pg.record.linkedNotes.selectAll(); } else { pg.record.linkedNotes.deselectAll(); } } else { if(pg.record.chkSelectAll.checked){ pg.record.linkedOrders.selectAll(); } else { pg.record.linkedOrders.deselectAll(); } } pg.record.btnOpen.setState(); //pg.record.btnViewLabs.setState(); } pg.record.chkSelectAll.setState = function(){ if(pg.record.tabs[1].all[0].checked){ pg.record.chkSelectAll.checked = pg.record.linkedNotes.selectedRows.length == pg.record.linkedNotes.rows.length; } else { pg.record.chkSelectAll.checked = pg.record.linkedOrders.selectedRows.length == pg.record.linkedOrders.rows.length; } } // -- "OPEN SELECTED" pg.record.btnOpen = pg.record.all.btnOpenSelected; pg.record.btnOpen.tabIndex = 14; pg.record.btnOpen.disable = myLocationDB.Disable; pg.record.btnOpen.title = "Open the selected record"; pg.record.btnOpen.onclick = function(){ if(pg.record.tabs[1].all[0].checked){ pg.openLinkedNote(); } else if(pg.record.tabs[2].all[0].checked){ pg.openLinkedOrder(); } else { pg.record.btnOpen.disable(true); } } pg.record.btnOpen.setState = function(){ if(pg.record.tabs[1].all[0].checked){ pg.record.btnOpen.disable(!pg.record.linkedNotes.lastSelected); } else if(pg.record.tabs[2].all[0].checked){ pg.record.btnOpen.disable(pg.record.linkedOrders.selectedRows.length != 1); } else { pg.record.btnOpen.disable(true); } } // -- "SAVE" pg.record.btnSave = pg.record.all.btnSave; pg.record.btnSave.tabIndex = 14; pg.record.btnSave.onclick = pg.updateRecord_Request; pg.record.btnSave.title = "Save changes to this record"; // RECORD UPDATE SUBWIN pg.recordUpdate = da.subWin_update; pg.recordUpdate.lblUpdatedBy = pg.recordUpdate.all.lblUpdatedBy; pg.recordUpdate.lblUpdateDTS = pg.recordUpdate.all.lblUpdateDTS; pg.recordUpdate.type = pg.recordUpdate.all.type; pg.recordUpdate.onsetDate = pg.recordUpdate.all.onsetDate; pg.recordUpdate.description = pg.recordUpdate.all.description; pg.recordUpdate.resolveDate = pg.recordUpdate.all.resolveDate; pg.recordUpdate.assessmentType = pg.recordUpdate.all.assessmentType; // -- "CLOSE" pg.recordUpdate.btnClose = pg.recordUpdate.all.btnClose; pg.recordUpdate.btnClose.tabIndex = 1; pg.recordUpdate.btnClose.onclick = pg.hideUpdateView; pg.recordUpdate.btnClose.title = "Close this sub-window"; // COMMENTS SUBWIN pg.recordComments = da.subWin_comments; pg.recordComments.comments = pg.recordComments.all.updateComments; pg.recordComments.comment

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  • The Complementary Roles of PLM and PIM

    - by Ulf Köster
    Oracle Product Value Chain Solutions (aka Enterprise PLM Solutions) are a comprehensive set of product management solutions that work together to provide Oracle customers with a broad array of capabilities to manage all aspects of product life: innovation, design, launch, and supply chain / commercialization processes beyond the capabilities and boundaries of traditional engineering-focused Product Lifecycle Management applications. They support companies with an integrated managed view across the product value chain: From Lab to Launch, From Farm to Fork, From Concept to Product to Customer, From Product Innovation to Product Design and Product Commercialization. Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) represents a broad suite of software solutions to improve product-oriented business processes and data. PLM success stories prove that PLM helps companies improve time to market, increase product-related revenue, reduce product costs, reduce internal costs and improve product quality. As a maturing suite of enterprise solutions, PLM is still evolving to realize the promise it can provide across all facets of a business and all phases of the product lifecycle. The vision for PLM includes everything from gathering early requirements for a product through multiple stages of the product lifecycle from product design, through commercialization and eventual product retirement or replacement. In discrete or process industries, PLM is typically more focused on Product Definition as items with respect to the technical view of a material or part, including specifications, bills of material and manufacturing data. With Agile PLM, this is specifically related to capabilities addressing Product Collaboration, Governance and Compliance, Product Quality Management, Product Cost Management and Engineering Collaboration. PLM today is mainly addressing key requirements in the early product lifecycle, in engineering changes or in the “innovation cycle”, and primarily adds value related to product design, development, launch and engineering change process. In short, PLM is the master for Product Definition, wherever manufacturing takes place. Product Information Management (PIM) is a product suite that has evolved in parallel to PLM. Product Information Management (PIM) can extend the value of PLM implementations by providing complementary tools and capabilities. More relevant in the area of Product Commercialization, the vision for PIM is to manage product information throughout an enterprise and supply chain to improve product-related knowledge management, information sharing and synchronization from multiple data sources. PIM success stories have shown the ability to provide multiple benefits, with particular emphasis on reducing information complexity and information management costs. Product Information in PIM is typically treated as the commercial view of a material or part, including sales and marketing information and categorization. PIM collects information from multiple manufacturing sites and multiple suppliers into its repository, but also provides integration tools to push the information back out to the other systems, serving as an active central repository with the aim to provide a holistic view on any product sold by a company (hence the name “Product Hub”). In short, PIM is the master of commercial Product Information. So PIM is quickly becoming mandatory because of its value in optimizing multichannel selling processes and relationships with customers, as you can see from the following table: Viewpoint PLM Current State PIM Key Benefits PIM adds to PLM Product Lifecycle Primarily R&D Front end Innovation Cycle Change process Primarily commercial / transactional state of lifecycle Provides a seamless information flow from design and manufacturing through the ultimate selling and servicing of products Data Primarily focused on “item” vs. “product” data Product structures Specifications Technical information Repository for all product information. Reaches out to entire enterprise and its various silos of product information and descriptions Provides a “trusted source” of accurate product information to the internal organization and trading partners Data Lifecycle Repository for all design iterations Historical information Released, current information, with version management and time stamping Provides a single location to track and audit historical product information Communication PLM release finished product to ERP PLM is the master for Product Definition Captures information from disparate sources, including in-house data stores Recognizes the reality of today’s data “mess” across information silos Provides the ability to package product information to its audience in the desired, relevant format to meet their exacting business requirements Departmental R&D Manufacturing Quality Compliance Procurement Strategic Marketing Focus on Marketing and Sales Gathering information from other Departments, multiple sites, multiple suppliers A singular enterprise solution that leverages existing information silos and data stores Supply Chain Multi-site internal collaboration Supplier collaboration Customer collaboration Works with customers, exchanges / data pools, and trading partners to provide relevant product information packaged the way the customer desires Provides ability to provide trading partners and internal customers with information in a manner they desire, continuously Tools Data Management Collaboration Innovation Management Cleansing Synchronization Hub functions Consistent, clean and complete commercial product information The goals of both PLM and PIM, put simply, are to help companies make more profit from their products. PLM and PIM solutions can be easily added as they share some of the same goals, while coming from two different perspectives: the definition of the product and the commercialization of the product. Both can serve as a form of product “system of record”, but take different approaches to delivering value. Oracle Product Value Chain solutions offer rich new strategies for executives to collectively leverage Agile PLM, Product Data Hub, together with Enterprise Data Quality for Products, and other industry leading Oracle applications to achieve further incremental value, like Oracle Innovation Management. This is unique on the market today.

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  • Variant Management– Which Approach fits for my Product?

    - by C. Chadwick
    Jürgen Kunz – Director Product Development – Oracle ORACLE Deutschland B.V. & Co. KG Introduction In a difficult economic environment, it is important for companies to understand the customer requirements in detail and to address them in their products. Customer specific products, however, usually cause increased costs. Variant management helps to find the best combination of standard components and custom components which balances customer’s product requirements and product costs. Depending on the type of product, different approaches to variant management will be applied. For example the automotive product “car” or electronic/high-tech products like a “computer”, with a pre-defined set of options to be combined in the individual configuration (so called “Assembled to Order” products), require a different approach to products in heavy machinery, which are (at least partially) engineered in a customer specific way (so-called “Engineered-to Order” products). This article discusses different approaches to variant management. Starting with the simple Bill of Material (BOM), this article presents three different approaches to variant management, which are provided by Agile PLM. Single level BOM and Variant BOM The single level BOM is the basic form of the BOM. The product structure is defined using assemblies and single parts. A particular product is thus represented by a fixed product structure. As soon as you have to manage product variants, the single level BOM is no longer sufficient. A variant BOM will be needed to manage product variants. The variant BOM is sometimes referred to as 150% BOM, since a variant BOM contains more parts and assemblies than actually needed to assemble the (final) product – just 150% of the parts You can evolve the variant BOM from the single level BOM by replacing single nodes with a placeholder node. The placeholder in this case represents the possible variants of a part or assembly. Product structure nodes, which are part of any product, are so-called “Must-Have” parts. “Optional” parts can be omitted in the final product. Additional attributes allow limiting the quantity of parts/assemblies which can be assigned at a certain position in the Variant BOM. Figure 1 shows the variant BOM of Agile PLM. Figure 1 Variant BOM in Agile PLM During the instantiation of the Variant BOM, the placeholders get replaced by specific variants of the parts and assemblies. The selection of the desired or appropriate variants is either done step by step by the user or by applying pre-defined configuration rules. As a result of the instantiation, an independent BOM will be created (Figure 2). Figure 2 Instantiated BOM in Agile PLM This kind of Variant BOM  can be used for „Assembled –To-Order“ type products as well as for „Engineered-to-Order“-type products. In case of “Assembled –To-Order” type products, typically the instantiation is done automatically with pre-defined configuration rules. For „Engineered- to-Order“-type products at least part of the product is selected manually to make use of customized parts/assemblies, that have been engineered according to the specific custom requirements. Template BOM The Template BOM is used for „Engineered-to-Order“-type products. It is another type of variant BOM. The engineer works in a flexible environment which allows him to build the most creative solutions. At the same time the engineer shall be guided to re-use existing solutions and it shall be assured that product variants of the same product family share the same base structure. The template BOM defines the basic structure of products belonging to the same product family. Let’s take a gearbox as an example. The customer specific configuration of the gearbox is influenced by several parameters (e.g. rpm range, transmitted torque), which are defined in the customer’s requirement document.  Figure 3 shows part of a Template BOM (yellow) and its relation to the product family hierarchy (blue).  Figure 3 Template BOM Every component of the Template BOM has links to the variants that have been engineeried so far for the component (depending on the level in the Template BOM, they are product variants, Assembly Variant or single part variants). This library of solutions, the so-called solution space, can be used by the engineers to build new product variants. In the best case, the engineer selects an existing solution variant, such as the gearbox shown in figure 3. When the existing variants do not fulfill the specific requirements, a new variant will be engineered. This new variant must be compliant with the given Template BOM. If we look at the gearbox in figure 3  it must consist of a transmission housing, a Connecting Plate, a set of Gears and a Planetary transmission – pre-assumed that all components are must have components. The new variant will enhance the solution space and is automatically available for re-use in future variants. The result of the instantiation of the Template BOM is a stand-alone BOM which represents the customer specific product variant. Modular BOM The concept of the modular BOM was invented in the automotive industry. Passenger cars are so-called „Assembled-to-Order“-products. The customer first selects the specific equipment of the car (so-called specifications) – for instance engine, audio equipment, rims, color. Based on this information the required parts will be determined and the customer specific car will be assembled. Certain combinations of specification are not available for the customer, because they are not feasible from technical perspective (e.g. a convertible with sun roof) or because the combination will not be offered for marketing reasons (e.g. steel rims with a sports line car). The modular BOM (yellow structure in figure 4) is defined in the context of a specific product family (in the sample it is product family „Speedstar“). It is the same modular BOM for the different types of cars of the product family (e.g. sedan, station wagon). The assembly or single parts of the car (blue nodes in figure 4) are assigned at the leaf level of the modular BOM. The assignment of assembly and parts to the modular BOM is enriched with a configuration rule (purple elements in figure 4). The configuration rule defines the conditions to use a specific assembly or single part. The configuration rule is valid in the context of a type of car (green elements in figure 4). Color specific parts are assigned to the color independent parts via additional configuration rules (grey elements in figure 4). The configuration rules use Boolean operators to connect the specifications. Additional consistency rules (constraints) may be used to define invalid combinations of specification (so-called exclusions). Furthermore consistency rules may be used to add specifications to the set of specifications. For instance it is important that a car with diesel engine always is build using the high capacity battery.  Figure 4 Modular BOM The calculation of the car configuration consists of several steps. First the consistency rules (constraints) are applied. Resulting from that specification might be added automatically. The second step will determine the assemblies and single parts for the complete structure of the modular BOM, by evaluating the configuration rules in the context of the current type of car. The evaluation of the rules for one component in the modular BOM might result in several rules being fulfilled. In this case the most specific rule (typically the longest rule) will win. Thanks to this approach, it is possible to add a specific variant to the modular BOM without the need to change any other configuration rules.  As a result the whole set of configuration rules is easy to maintain. Finally the color specific assemblies respective parts will be determined and the configuration is completed. Figure 5 Calculated Car Configuration The result of the car configuration is shown in figure 5. It shows the list of assemblies respective single parts (blue components in figure 5), which are required to build the customer specific car. Summary There are different approaches to variant management. Three different approaches have been presented in this article. At the end of the day, it is the type of the product which decides about the best approach.  For „Assembled to Order“-type products it is very likely that you can define the configuration rules and calculate the product variant automatically. Products of type „Engineered-to-Order“ ,however, need to be engineered. Nevertheless in the majority of cases, part of the product structure can be generated automatically in a similar way to „Assembled to Order“-tape products.  That said it is important first to analyze the product portfolio, in order to define the best approach to variant management.

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  • Vitality of Product Information Management Showcased at OpenWorld 2012

    - by Mala Narasimharajan
     By Sachin Patel Can you hear the countdown clock ticking!! OpenWorld 2012 is almost here and as I write this Oracle is buzzing with fresh new ideas and solutions that will be showcased this year. What an exciting time for all of us to be in midst of a digital revolution. Whether it is Apple fans clamoring to find every new feature that has been added to the iPhone 5 or a startup launching a new digital thermostat (has anyone looked at the new one from Nest ), product information is a vital for companies to grow and compete in this cut-throat market. Customer today struggle to aggregate and enrich this product data from the myriad of systems they have in place to run their businesses and operations. Having a product information strategy is paramount to align your sales channels and operations with the most accurate and upto date product data. We have a number of sessions this year at OpenWorld where you can gain more insight into how Oracle’s next generation of Fusion Applications, in this case Fusion Product Hub can provide you with a solution to streamline and get control of your Product Master Data. Enabling Trusted Enterprise Product Data with Oracle Fusion Product HubTuesday, October 2nd 11:45 am, Moscone West 2022 Join me Sachin Patel, Director of Product Strategy and Milan Bhatia, VP of Development as we discuss how you can enable trusted product master data in your enterprise. In this session we plan to cover the challenges companies face today in mastering product data. The discussion will also include how Fusion Product Hub brings new and innovative features to empower your product data owners to create a holistic and rich product definition that can be leveraged across your enterprise. We will also be joined by Pawel Fidelus from Fideltronik an Early Adopter for Fusion Product Hub who will showcase their plans to implement Fusion Product Hub and the value it will bring to Fideltronik Multichannel Fulfillment Excellence in Direct-to-Consumer Market Thursday, October 4th, 12:45 am, Moscone West 2024 Do you have multiple order capture systems? Do you have difficulty in fulfilling orders for your customers across various channels and suppliers? Mark Carson, Director, Fusion DOO and Brad Kerr, Director, AGSS will be showcasing the Fusion Distributed Order Orchestration solution and how companies can orchestrate orders from multiple order capture systems and route them to the appropriate fulfillment system. Sachin Patel, Director Product Strategy for Product MDM will highlight the business pain points in consolidating and commercializing data from a Multi Channel Commerce point of view and how Fusion Product Hub helps in allowing you to provide a single source of truth to drive a singular and rich customer experience. Oracle Fusion Supply Chain Management: Customer Adoption and Experiences                                                Wednesday, October 3rd 10:15 am, Moscone West 2003 This is a great session to attend to learn about how Fusion Supply Chain Management and Fusion Product Hub Early Adopters, including Boeing and Fideltronik are leveraging Fusion Applications to improve their Supply Chain operations. Have a great OpenWorld and see you soon!!

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  • Best Practices To Build a Product Registration System?

    - by Volomike
    What are some practices I should use in a product registration system I'm building? I likely can't stop all malicious hacking, but I'd like to slow them down a great deal. (Note, I know only PHP.) I'm talking about things like encrypting traffic, testing the encryption from hacking like a man-in-the-middle attack, etc. The other concern I have is that this needs to work on most PHP5-based web hosting environments, which may not have mcrypt installed.

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  • .htaccess file size causes 500 Internal Server Error

    - by moobot
    As soon as my .htaccess goes over approx 8410 bytes, I get a 500 Internal Server Error. I don't think this is due to a bad redirect, as I have experimented with redirects in the .htaccess and then with just text that is commented out #. (no actual commands in the .htaccess file) Is there anything obvious that can cause this? Update: The site is on WordPress. Here are the redirects I was originally trying to add: RewriteEngine On ## 301 Redirects of old URLs to new # 301 Redirect 1 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^accesseries/underlay/prod_37\.html$ /product-category/accessories/underlays? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 2 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^accessories/acoustic-underlay/prod_29\.html$ /product/acoustic-underlay/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 3 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^accessories/cat_4\.html$ /product-category/accessories/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 4 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^-bamboo-flooring/accessories/cat_8\.html$ /product-category/accessories/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 5 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^-bamboo-flooring/bamboo-floor/natural-strandwoven-bamboo-semi-gloss-wide-board-135mm-click/prod_151\.html$ /product/natural-strand-woven-bamboo-semi-gloss-wide-board-135mm-click/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 6 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^-bamboo-flooring/bamboo-floor/strandwoven-chocolate-135mm-bamboo-flooring/prod_174\.html$ /product/strand-woven-chocolate-135mm-bamboo-flooring/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 7 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^-bamboo-flooring/bamboo-floor/strand-woven-kempas-bamboo-flooring/prod_173\.html$ /product/strand-woven-kempas-bamboo-flooring/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 8 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^-bamboo-flooring/bamboo-floor/strandwoven-walnut-wired-135mm-bamboo-flooring/prod_176\.html$ /product/strand-woven-walnut-wired-135mm-bamboo-flooring/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 9 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^-bamboo-flooring/cat_7\.html$ /product-category/bamboo-floor/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 10 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^-bamboo-installation/info_8\.html$ /bamboo-installation/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 11 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=cart$ [NC] RewriteRule ^cart\.php$ /cart/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 12 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^contact-us/info_2\.html$ /contact-us/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 13 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^faqs/info_9\.html$ /faqs/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 14 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^-floating-timber-floor/black-butt-engineered-floating-timber/prod_213\.html$ /product/black-butt-engineered-floating-timber/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 15 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^-floating-timber-floor/doussie-engineered-floating-timber/prod_208\.html$ /product/doussie-engineered-floating-timber/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 16 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^-floating-timber-floor/smoked-oak-engineered-floating-timber/prod_217\.html$ /product/smoked-oak-engineered-floating-timber/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 17 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=thanks$ [NC] RewriteRule ^index\.php$ http://www.xxxxxxxxxx.com/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 18 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=viewCat&catId=13$ [NC] RewriteRule ^index\.php$ /product-category/samples/bamboo-flooring-samples/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 19 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=viewCat&catId=18$ [NC] RewriteRule ^index\.php$ /product/bamboo-plastic-composite/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 20 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=viewCat&catId=2$ [NC] RewriteRule ^index\.php$ /product-category/bamboo-floor/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 21 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=viewCat&catId=20$ [NC] RewriteRule ^index\.php$ /products/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 22 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=viewCat&catId=3$ [NC] RewriteRule ^index\.php$ /product-category/floating-timber-floor/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 23 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=viewCat&catId=5$ [NC] RewriteRule ^index\.php$ /product-category/laminate-flooring/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 24 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=viewCat&catId=6$ [NC] RewriteRule ^index\.php$ /product-category/accessories/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 25 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=viewCat&catId=saleItems$ [NC] RewriteRule ^index\.php$ /product-category/clearance-sale/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 26 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=viewDoc&docId=3$ [NC] RewriteRule ^index\.php$ /faqs/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 27 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=viewDoc&docId=4$ [NC] RewriteRule ^index\.php$ /faqs/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 28 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=viewProd&productId=137$ [NC] RewriteRule ^index\.php$ /product/laminate-flooring-goustein-wood/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 29 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=viewProd&productId=164$ [NC] RewriteRule ^index\.php$ /product/modern-black-brushed-finish-strand-woven-flooring/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 30 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=viewProd&productId=165$ [NC] RewriteRule ^index\.php$ /product/lime-wash-strand-woven-bamboo-flooring/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 31 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=viewProd&productId=168$ [NC] RewriteRule ^index\.php$ /product/country-bark/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 32 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=viewProd&productId=173$ [NC] RewriteRule ^index\.php$ /product-category/bamboo-floor/14mm-bamboo-flooring/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 33 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=viewProd&productId=178$ [NC] RewriteRule ^index\.php$ /product/blue-gum-136-floating-timber/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 34 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=viewProd&productId=199$ [NC] RewriteRule ^index\.php$ /product/jarrah-laminate-floor-sample/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 35 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=viewProd&productId=205$ [NC] RewriteRule ^index\.php$ /product/elm-12mm-laminate-floor-sample/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 36 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=viewProd&productId=209$ [NC] RewriteRule ^index\.php$ /product/iroko-engineered-floating-timber/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 37 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=viewProd&productId=222$ [NC] RewriteRule ^index\.php$ /product/european-oak-engineered-floating-timber-sample/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 38 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=viewProd&productId=236$ [NC] RewriteRule ^index\.php$ /product/black-forest-5mm-vinyl-flooring/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 39 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=viewProd&productId=65$ [NC] RewriteRule ^index\.php$ /product/stair-nose/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 40 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^act=viewProd&productId=83$ [NC] RewriteRule ^index\.php$ /product/laminate-flooring-warm-teak/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 41 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^-laminate-flooring/12mm-laminate-flooring/blackbutt/prod_156\.html$ /product/blackbutt-12mm-laminate-floor/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 42 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^-laminate-flooring/12mm-laminate-flooring/tasmanian-oak/prod_171\.html$ /product/tasmanian-oak/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 43 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^-laminate-flooring/8-3mm-laminate-flooring/laminate-flooring-warm-teak/prod_8\.html$ /product/laminate-flooring-warm-teak/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 44 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^-laminate-flooring/accessories/cat_6\.html$ /product-category/accessories/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 45 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^-laminate-flooring/cat_5\.html$ /product-category/laminate-flooring/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 46 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^-laminate-flooring/country-classic-12mm-laminate/cat_19\.html$ /product-category/laminate-flooring/12mm-country-classic-laminate-floor/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 47 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^-laminate-installation/info_7\.html$ /laminate-installation/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 48 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^privacy-policy/info_4\.html$ /faqs/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 49 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^-quotation-request/info_5\.html$ /quotation-request/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 50 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^rainbow-flooring/cat_16\.html$ /product-category/rainbow-flooring/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 51 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^rainbow-flooring/walnut-rainbow-flooring/prod_112\.html$ /product/walnut-rainbow-flooring/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 52 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^samples/12mm-laminate-floor-samples/kempas-laminate-floor-sample/prod_195\.html$ /product/kempas-laminate-floor-sample/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 53 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^samples/12mm-laminate-floor-samples/spotted-gum-laminate-floor-sample/prod_196\.html$ /product/spotted-gum-laminate-floor-sample/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 54 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^samples/12mm-laminate-floor-samples/tasmanian-oak-laminate-floor-sample/prod_197\.html$ /product/tasmanian-oak-laminate-floor-sample/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 55 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^samples/bamboo-flooring-samples/cat_13\.html$ /product-category/samples/bamboo-flooring-samples/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 56 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^samples/bamboo-flooring-samples/rosewood-strandwoven-bamboo-floor-135mm-click-sample/prod_191\.html$ /product/rosewood-strand-woven-bamboo-floor-135mm-click-sample/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 57 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^samples/cat_9\.html$ /samples/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 58 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^samples/floating-timber-floor-samples/iroko-engineered-floating-timber-floor-sample/prod_223\.html$ /product/iroko-engineered-floating-timber-floor-sample/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 59 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^samples/floating-timber-floor-samples/jarrah-engineered-floating-timber-sample/prod_224\.html$ /product/jarrah-engineered-floating-timber-sample/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 60 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^samples/floating-timber-floor-samples/merbau-engineered-floating-timber-sample/prod_226\.html$ /product/merbau-engineered-floating-timber-sample/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 61 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^samples/floating-timber-floor-samples/spotted-gum-engineered-floating-timber-sample/prod_228\.html$ /product/spotted-gum-engineered-floating-timber-sample/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 62 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^samples/floating-timber-floor-samples/sydney-blue-gum-engineered-floating-timber-sample/prod_220\.html$ /product/sydney-blue-gum-engineered-floating-timber-sample/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 63 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^shop\.php/-laminate-flooring/accessories/laminate-flooring-accessories-click-stairnose/prod_251\.html$ /product/stair-nose/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 64 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^shop\.php/-laminate-flooring/country-classic-12mm-laminate/country-classic-polar-white/prod_243\.html$ /product/country-classic-polar-white/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 65 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^shop\.php/samples/12mm-laminate-floor-samples/country-classic-polar-white/prod_244\.html$ /product/country-classic-polar-white-sample/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 66 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^shop\.php/samples/12mm-laminate-floor-samples/rustic-oak-12mm-laminate-floor/prod_248\.html$ /product/rustic-oak-12mm-laminate-floor-sample/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 67 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^shop\.php/samples/vinyl-flooring-samples/cat_25\.html$ /product-category/samples/vinyl-flooring-samples/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 68 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^shop\.php/vinyl-flooring/cat_24\.html$ /product-category/vinyl-floor/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 69 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^solardeck-tiles/cat_22\.html$ /product-category/solardeck-tiles/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 70 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^solardeck-tiles/solardeck-tiles/prod_206\.html$ /product/solardeck-tiles/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect 71 RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^terms-conditions/info_3\.html$ /faqs/? [R=301,NE,NC,L] I'm getting errors like this in my log: Invalid command 'aminate-flooring/tasmanian-oak/prod_171\\.html$', perhaps misspelled or defined by a module not included in the server configuration, referer: http://www.xxxxxxxx.com/laminate-installation/ Invalid command ',NE,NC,L]', perhaps misspelled or defined by a module not included in the server configuration Invalid command ',L]#', perhaps misspelled or defined by a module not included in the server configuration

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  • Windows product key is valid but wont activate

    - by pnongrata
    Last month, I needed to install Windows XP (Pro Version 2002 SP3) from a Reinstallation CD a co-worker gave me, and with a product key the IT team told me to use. Everything installed successfully and I have been using the XP machine for the last 30 days without any problems; however it kept reminding me to activate Windows, and of course, I never did (laziness). It now has me locked out of my machine and won't let me log in until I activate it. So I proceed to the Activation Screen which asks me: Do you want to activate Windows now? I choose "Yes, let's activate Windows over the Internet now.", and click the Next button. It now asks me: Do you want to register while you are activating Windows? I choose "No, I don't want to register now; let's just activate Windows.", and click the Next button. I now see the following screen: Notice how the title reads "Unauthorized product key", and how there are only 3 buttons: Telephone Remind me later Retry Please note that the Retry button is disabled until I enter the full product key that IT gave me, then it enables. However, at no point in time do I see a Next button, indicating that the product key was valid/successful. So instead, I just click the Retry button, and the screen refreshes, this time with a different title Incorrect product key Could something be wrong with the Windows XP reinstallation CD (do they "expire" after a certain amount of time, etc.)? Or is this the normal/typical workflow for what happens when you just have a bad product key? I ask because, after this happened I emailed IT and they supplied me whether several other product keys to try. But every time its the same result, same thing happening over again and again. So I guess it's possible that IT has given me several bad keys, but it's more likely something else is going on here. Any thoughts or ways to troubleshoot? Thanks in advance!

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  • Canonicalization of single, small pages like reviews or product categories [SEO]

    - by Valorized
    In general I pretty much like the idea of canonicalization. And in most cases, Google explains possible procedures in a clear way. For example: If I have duplicates because of parameters (eg: &sort=desc) it's clear to use the canonical for the site, provided the within the head-tag. However I'm wondering how to handle "small - no to say thin content - sites". What's my definition of a small site? An Example: On one of my main sites, we use a directory based url-structure. Let's see: example.com/ (root) example.com/category-abc/ example.com/category-abc/produkt-xy/ Moreover we provide on page, that includes all products example.com/all-categories/ (lists all products the same way as in the categories) In case of reviews, we use a similar structure: example.com/reviews/product-xy/ shows all review for one certain product example.com/reviews/product-xy/abc-your-product-is-great/ shows one certain review example.com/reviews/ shows all reviews for all products (latest first) Let's make it even more complicated: On every product site, there are the latest 2 reviews at the end of the page. So you see, a lot of potential duplicates. Q1: Should I create canonicals for a: example.com/category-abc/ to example.com/all-categories/ b: example.com/reviews/product-xy/abc-your-product-is-great/ to example.com/reviews/product-xy/ or to example.com/review/ or none of them? Q2: Can I link the collection of categories (all-categories/) and collection of all reviews (reviews/ and reviews/product-xy/) to the single category respectively to the single review. Example: example.com/reviews/ includes - let's say - 100 reviews. Can I somehow use a markup that tells search engines: "Hey, wait, you are now looking at a collection of 100 reviews - do not index this collection, you should rather prefer indexing every single review as a single page!". In HTML it might be something like that (which - of course - does not work, it's only to show you what I mean): <div class="review" rel="canonical" href="http://example.com/reviews/product-xz/abc-your-product-is-great/">HERE GOES THE REVIEW</div> Reason: I don't think it is a great user experience if the user searches for "your product is great" and lands on example.com/reviews/ instead of example.com/reviews/product-xy/abc-your-product-is-great/. On the first site, he will have to search and might stop because of frustration. The second result, however, might lead to a conversion. The same applies for categories. If the user is searching for category-Z, he might land on the all-categories page and he has to scroll down to the (last) category, to find what he searched for (Z). So what's best practice? What should I do? Thank you for your help!

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  • Canonicalization of single, small pages like reviews or product categories

    - by Valorized
    In general I pretty much like the idea of canonicalization. And in most cases, Google explains possible procedures in a clear way. For example: If I have duplicates because of parameters (eg: &sort=desc) it's clear to use the canonical for the site, provided the within the head-tag. However I'm wondering how to handle "small - no to say thin content - sites". What's my definition of a small site? An Example: On one of my main sites, we use a directory based url-structure. Let's see: example.com/ (root) example.com/category-abc/ example.com/category-abc/produkt-xy/ Moreover we provide on page, that includes all products example.com/all-categories/ (lists all products the same way as in the categories) In case of reviews, we use a similar structure: example.com/reviews/product-xy/ shows all review for one certain product example.com/reviews/product-xy/abc-your-product-is-great/ shows one certain review example.com/reviews/ shows all reviews for all products (latest first) Let's make it even more complicated: On every product site, there are the latest 2 reviews at the end of the page. So you see, a lot of potential duplicates. Q1: Should I create canonicals for a: example.com/category-abc/ to example.com/all-categories/ b: example.com/reviews/product-xy/abc-your-product-is-great/ to example.com/reviews/product-xy/ or to example.com/review/ or none of them? Q2: Can I link the collection of categories (all-categories/) and collection of all reviews (reviews/ and reviews/product-xy/) to the single category respectively to the single review. Example: example.com/reviews/ includes - let's say - 100 reviews. Can I somehow use a markup that tells search engines: "Hey, wait, you are now looking at a collection of 100 reviews - do not index this collection, you should rather prefer indexing every single review as a single page!". In HTML it might be something like that (which - of course - does not work, it's only to show you what I mean): <div class="review" rel="canonical" href="http://example.com/reviews/product-xz/abc-your-product-is-great/"> HERE GOES THE REVIEW</div> Reason: I don't think it is a great user experience if the user searches for "your product is great" and lands on example.com/reviews/ instead of example.com/reviews/product-xy/abc-your-product-is-great/. On the first site, he will have to search and might stop because of frustration. The second result, however, might lead to a conversion. The same applies for categories. If the user is searching for category-Z, he might land on the all-categories page and he has to scroll down to the (last) category, to find what he searched for (Z). So what's best practice? What should I do?

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  • Best practice while marking a bug as resolved with Bugzilla (versioning of product and components)

    - by Vincent B.
    I am wondering what is the best way to handle the situation of marking a bug as resolved and providing a version of component/product in which this fix can be found. Context For a project I am working on, we are using Bugzilla for issue tracking, and we have the following: A product "A" with a version number like vA.B.C.D, This product "A" have the following components: Component "C1" with a version number like vA.B.C.D, Component "C2" with a version number like vA.B.C.D, Component "C3" with a version number like vA.B.C.D. Internally we keep track of which component versions have been used to generate the product A version vA.B.C.D. Example: Product "A" version v1.0.0.0 has been produced from component "C1" v1.0.0.3, component "C2" v1.3.0.0 and component "C3" v2.1.3.5. And Product "A" version v1.0.1.0 has been produced from component "C1" v1.0.0.4, component "C2" v1.3.0.0 and component "C3" v2.1.3.5. Each component is a SVN repository. The person in charge of generating the product "A" have only access to the different components tags folder in SVN, and not the trunk of each component repository. Problem Now the problem is the following, when a bug is found in the product "A", and that the bug is related to Component "C1", the version of product "A" is chosen (e.g. v1.0.0.0), and this version allow the developer to know which version of component "C1" has the bug (here it will be v1.0.0.3). A bug report is created. Now let's say that the developer responsible for component "C1" corrects the bug, then when the bug seems to be fixed and after some test and validation, the developer generates a new tag for component "C1", with the version v1.0.0.4. At this time, the developer of component "C1" needs to update the bug report, but what is the best to do: Mark the bug as resolved/fixed and add a comment saying "This bug has been fixed in the tags v1.0.0.4 of C1 component" ? Keep the bug as assigned, add a comment saying "This bug has been fixed in the tags v1.0.0.4 of C1 component, update this bug status to resolved for the next version of the product that will be generated with the newest version (v1.0.0.4 of C1)" ? Another possible way to deal with this problem. Right now the problem is that when a product component CX is fixed, it is not sure in which future version of the product A it will be included, so it is for me not possible to say in which version of the product it will be solved, but it is possible to say in which version of the Component CX it has been solved. So when do we need to mark a bug as solved, when the product A version include the fixed version of CX, or only when CX component has been fixed ? Thanks for your personal feedback and ideas about this !

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  • Oracle Product Hub: Customer Perspectives at the OpenWorld

    - by Mala Narasimharajan
     By Rohit Tandon The Oracle Product Hub (OPH) Product Strategy team will be hosting a customer session dedicated to OPH at Oracle Openworld. Oracle Product Information Management strategy team will have the pleasure to present this session with Motorola Mobility Solutions.  . In this session, you will hear how Motorola Solutions utilizes OPH to meet their IT and business needs. Arif Girniwala, (MDM Lead, Motorola) and Chirag Jariwala (Manager, Deloitte Consulting) will cover the following topics amongst others: How does Motorola Solutions decide on what is Product Master Data for their enterprise? What are the Data Governance structures, Users, User roles, User Security etc. within Motorola Solutions?  How does Motorola Solutions integrate, synchronize and leverage OPH with Agile PLM?       4.  What is the Oracle Product Hub strategy and roadmap (Speaker - Sachin Patel, Director Oracle Product Hub Strategy)       5.  What are the implementation best practices for Oracle Product Hub (Speaker - Srikant Bevara, Sr. Manager, Oracle   Product Hub product management) If you're interested in hearing more about the above then I recommend attending this session: Customer Perspectives: Master Product Data: Strategies for Effective Product Information Management with Motorola Mobility Solutions (CON8834) Tuesday October, 2nd 10:15am - 11:15am Moscone West - 3001 We hope to see you at OOW 2012 and stay in touch via our future blogs!  For a list of all Oracle MDM sessions click here. 

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