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  • valgrind on server process

    - by Pigol
    hi i am new to valgrind. I know how to run valgrind on executable files from command line. But how do you run valgrind on server processes like apache/myqld/traffic server etc .. I want to run valgrind on traffic server (http://incubator.apache.org/projects/trafficserver.html) to detect some memory leaks taking place in the plugin I have written. Any suggestions ? thanks, pigol

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  • Can I make valgrind ignore glibc libraries?

    - by Jack
    Is it possible to tell valgrind to ignore some set of libraries? Specifically glibc libraries.. Actual Problem: I have some code that runs fine in normal execution. No leaks etc. When I try to run it through valgrind, I get core dumps and program restarts/stops. Core usually points to glibc functions (usually fseek, mutex etc). I understand that there might be some issue with incompatible glibc / valgrind version. I tried various valgrind releases and glibc versions but no luck. Any suggestions?

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  • valgrind - ignore glibc functions?

    - by Jack
    Is it possible to tell valgrind to ignore some set of libraries? Specifically glibc libraries.. Actual Problem: I have some code that runs fine in normal execution. No leaks etc. When I try to run it through valgrind, I get core dumps and program restarts/stops. Core usually points to glibc functions (usually fseek, mutex etc). I understand that there might be some issue with incompatible glibc / valgrind version. I tried various valgrind releases and glibc versions but no luck. Any suggestions?

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  • Linux Beginner: Installing Valgrind on a 3.x Kernel

    - by LonelyWebCrawler
    I was reading Learn C the Hard Way when I stumbled upon and followed the instructions for installing Valgrind, the C debugger. However, when I ran ./configure to setup build configurations, I got checking for the kernel version... unsupported (3.0.0-17-generic) configure: error: Valgrind works on kernels 2.4, 2.6 I am running Ubuntu 11.10, on the kernel Linux 3.0.0-17-generic x86_64. The answer may be obvious but I'm not acquainted with Linux: How do I get Valgrind working on my computer? Thanks.

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  • Valgrind 'noise', what does it mean?

    - by Chris Huang-Leaver
    When I used valgrind to help debug an app I was working on I notice a huge about of noise which seems to be complaining about standard libraries. As a test I did this; echo 'int main() {return 0;}' | gcc -x c -o test - Then I did this; valgrind ./test ==1096== Use of uninitialised value of size 8 ==1096== at 0x400A202: _dl_new_object (in /lib64/ld-2.10.1.so) ==1096== by 0x400607F: _dl_map_object_from_fd (in /lib64/ld-2.10.1.so) ==1096== by 0x4007A2C: _dl_map_object (in /lib64/ld-2.10.1.so) ==1096== by 0x400199A: map_doit (in /lib64/ld-2.10.1.so) ==1096== by 0x400D495: _dl_catch_error (in /lib64/ld-2.10.1.so) ==1096== by 0x400189E: do_preload (in /lib64/ld-2.10.1.so) ==1096== by 0x4003CCD: dl_main (in /lib64/ld-2.10.1.so) ==1096== by 0x401404B: _dl_sysdep_start (in /lib64/ld-2.10.1.so) ==1096== by 0x4001471: _dl_start (in /lib64/ld-2.10.1.so) ==1096== by 0x4000BA7: (within /lib64/ld-2.10.1.so) * large block of similar snipped * ==1096== Use of uninitialised value of size 8 ==1096== at 0x4F35FDD: (within /lib64/libc-2.10.1.so) ==1096== by 0x4F35B11: (within /lib64/libc-2.10.1.so) ==1096== by 0x4A1E61C: _vgnU_freeres (vg_preloaded.c:60) ==1096== by 0x4E5F2E4: __run_exit_handlers (in /lib64/libc-2.10.1.so) ==1096== by 0x4E5F354: exit (in /lib64/libc-2.10.1.so) ==1096== by 0x4E48A2C: (below main) (in /lib64/libc-2.10.1.so) ==1096== ==1096== ERROR SUMMARY: 3819 errors from 298 contexts (suppressed: 876 from 4) ==1096== malloc/free: in use at exit: 0 bytes in 0 blocks. ==1096== malloc/free: 0 allocs, 0 frees, 0 bytes allocated. ==1096== For counts of detected errors, rerun with: -v ==1096== Use --track-origins=yes to see where uninitialised values come from ==1096== All heap blocks were freed -- no leaks are possible. You can see the full result here: http://pastebin.com/gcTN8xGp I have two questions; firstly is there a way to suppress all the noise? --show-below-main is set to no by default, but there doesn't appear to be a --show-after-main equivalent.

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  • pinpointing "conditional jump or move depends on uninitialized value(s)" valgrind message

    - by kamziro
    So I've been getting some mysterious uninitialized values message from valgrind and it's been quite the mystery as of where the bad value originated from. Seems that valgrind shows the place where the unitialised value ends up being used, but not the origin of the uninitialised value. ==11366== Conditional jump or move depends on uninitialised value(s) ==11366== at 0x43CAE4F: __printf_fp (in /lib/tls/i686/cmov/libc-2.7.so) ==11366== by 0x43C6563: vfprintf (in /lib/tls/i686/cmov/libc-2.7.so) ==11366== by 0x43EAC03: vsnprintf (in /lib/tls/i686/cmov/libc-2.7.so) ==11366== by 0x42D475B: (within /usr/lib/libstdc++.so.6.0.9) ==11366== by 0x42E2C9B: std::ostreambuf_iterator<char, std::char_traits<char> > std::num_put<char, std::ostreambuf_iterator<char, std::char_traits<char> > >::_M_insert_float<double>(std::ostreambuf_iterator<char, std::char_traits<char> >, std::ios_base&, char, char, double) const (in /usr/lib/libstdc++.so.6.0.9) ==11366== by 0x42E31B4: std::num_put<char, std::ostreambuf_iterator<char, std::char_traits<char> > >::do_put(std::ostreambuf_iterator<char, std::char_traits<char> >, std::ios_base&, char, double) const (in /usr/lib/libstdc++.so.6.0.9) ==11366== by 0x42EE56F: std::ostream& std::ostream::_M_insert<double>(double) (in /usr/lib/libstdc++.so.6.0.9) ==11366== by 0x81109ED: Snake::SnakeBody::syncBodyPos() (ostream:221) ==11366== by 0x810B9F1: Snake::Snake::update() (snake.cpp:257) ==11366== by 0x81113C1: SnakeApp::updateState() (snakeapp.cpp:224) ==11366== by 0x8120351: RoenGL::updateState() (roengl.cpp:1180) ==11366== by 0x81E87D9: Roensachs::update() (rs.cpp:321) As can be seen, it gets quite cryptic.. especially because when it's saying by Class::MethodX, it sometimes points straight to ostream etc. Perhaps this is due to optimization? ==11366== by 0x81109ED: Snake::SnakeBody::syncBodyPos() (ostream:221) Just like that. Is there something I'm missing? What is the best way to catch bad values without having to resort to super-long printf detective work?

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  • localtime_r supposed to be thread safe, but causing errors in Valgrind DRD

    - by Nik
    I searched google as much as I could but I couldn't find any good answers to this. localtime_r is supposed to be a thread-safe function for getting the system time. However, when checking my application with Valgrind --tool=drd, it consistantly tells me that there is a data race condition on this function. Are the common search results lying to me, or am I just missing something? It doesn't seem efficient to surround each localtime_r call with a mutex, especially if it is supposed to by thread safe in the first place. here is how i'm using it: timeval handlerTime; gettimeofday(&handlerTime,NULL); tm handlerTm; localtime_r(&handlerTime.tv_sec,&handlerTm); Any ideas?

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  • valgrind complains doing a very simple strtok in c

    - by monkeyking
    Hi I'm trying to tokenize a string by loading an entire file into a char[] using fread. For some strange reason it is not always working, and valgrind complains in this very small sample program. Given an input like test.txt first second And the following program #include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <sys/stat.h> //returns the filesize in bytes size_t fsize(const char* fname){ struct stat st ; stat(fname,&st); return st.st_size; } int main(int argc, char *argv[]){ FILE *fp = NULL; if(NULL==(fp=fopen(argv[1],"r"))){ fprintf(stderr,"\t-> Error reading file:%s\n",argv[1]); return 0; } char buffer[fsize(argv[1])]; fread(buffer,sizeof(char),fsize(argv[1]),fp); char *str = strtok(buffer," \t\n"); while(NULL!=str){ fprintf(stderr,"token is:%s with strlen:%lu\n",str,strlen(str)); str = strtok(NULL," \t\n"); } return 0; } compiling like gcc test.c -std=c99 -ggdb running like ./a.out test.txt thanks

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  • understanding valgrind output

    - by sbsp
    Hi, i made a post earlier asking about checking for memory leaks etc, i did say i wasnt to familiar with the terminal in linux but someone said to me it was easy with valgrind i have managed to get it running etc but not to sure what the output means. Glancing over, all looks good to me but would like to run it past you experience folk for confirmation if possible. THe output is as follows ^C==2420== ==2420== HEAP SUMMARY: ==2420== in use at exit: 2,240 bytes in 81 blocks ==2420== total heap usage: 82 allocs, 1 frees, 2,592 bytes allocated ==2420== ==2420== LEAK SUMMARY: ==2420== definitely lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks ==2420== indirectly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks ==2420== possibly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks ==2420== still reachable: 2,240 bytes in 81 blocks ==2420== suppressed: 0 bytes in 0 blocks ==2420== Reachable blocks (those to which a pointer was found) are not shown. ==2420== To see them, rerun with: --leak-check=full --show-reachable=yes ==2420== ==2420== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v ==2420== ERROR SUMMARY: 0 errors from 0 contexts (suppressed: 13 from 8) Is all good here? the only thing concerning me is the still reachable part. Is that ok? Thanks everyone

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  • Valgrind says "stack allocation," I say "heap allocation"

    - by Joel J. Adamson
    Dear Friends, I am trying to trace a segfault with valgrind. I get the following message from valgrind: ==3683== Conditional jump or move depends on uninitialised value(s) ==3683== at 0x4C277C5: sparse_mat_mat_kron (sparse.c:165) ==3683== by 0x4C2706E: rec_mating (rec.c:176) ==3683== by 0x401C1C: age_dep_iterate (age_dep.c:287) ==3683== by 0x4014CB: main (age_dep.c:92) ==3683== Uninitialised value was created by a stack allocation ==3683== at 0x401848: age_dep_init_params (age_dep.c:131) ==3683== ==3683== Conditional jump or move depends on uninitialised value(s) ==3683== at 0x4C277C7: sparse_mat_mat_kron (sparse.c:165) ==3683== by 0x4C2706E: rec_mating (rec.c:176) ==3683== by 0x401C1C: age_dep_iterate (age_dep.c:287) ==3683== by 0x4014CB: main (age_dep.c:92) ==3683== Uninitialised value was created by a stack allocation ==3683== at 0x401848: age_dep_init_params (age_dep.c:131) However, here's the offending line: /* allocate mating table */ age_dep_data->mtable = malloc (age_dep_data->geno * sizeof (double *)); if (age_dep_data->mtable == NULL) error (ENOMEM, ENOMEM, nullmsg, __LINE__); for (int j = 0; j < age_dep_data->geno; j++) { 131=> age_dep_data->mtable[j] = calloc (age_dep_data->geno, sizeof (double)); if (age_dep_data->mtable[j] == NULL) error (ENOMEM, ENOMEM, nullmsg, __LINE__); } What gives? I thought any call to malloc or calloc allocated heap space; there is no other variable allocated here, right? Is it possible there's another allocation going on (the offending stack allocation) that I'm not seeing? You asked to see the code, here goes: /* Copyright 2010 Joel J. Adamson <[email protected]> $Id: age_dep.c 1010 2010-04-21 19:19:16Z joel $ age_dep.c:main file Joel J. Adamson -- http://www.unc.edu/~adamsonj Servedio Lab University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill CB #3280, Coker Hall Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280 This file is part of an investigation of age-dependent sexual selection. This code is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or (at your option) any later version. This software is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the GNU General Public License for more details. You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along with haploid. If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>. */ #include "age_dep.h" /* global variables */ extern struct argp age_dep_argp; /* global error message variables */ char * nullmsg = "Null pointer: %i"; /* error message for conversions: */ char * errmsg = "Representation error: %s"; /* precision for formatted output: */ const char prec[] = "%-#9.8f "; const size_t age_max = AGEMAX; /* maximum age of males */ static int keep_going_p = 1; int main (int argc, char ** argv) { /* often used counters: */ int i, j; /* read the command line */ struct age_dep_args age_dep_args = { NULL, NULL, NULL }; argp_parse (&age_dep_argp, argc, argv, 0, 0, &age_dep_args); /* set the parameters here: */ /* initialize an age_dep_params structure, set the members */ age_dep_params_t * params = malloc (sizeof (age_dep_params_t)); if (params == NULL) error (ENOMEM, ENOMEM, nullmsg, __LINE__); age_dep_init_params (params, &age_dep_args); /* initialize frequencies: this initializes a list of pointers to initial frqeuencies, terminated by a NULL pointer*/ params->freqs = age_dep_init (&age_dep_args); params->by = 0.0; /* what range of parameters do we want, and with what stepsize? */ /* we should go from 0 to half-of-theta with a step size of about 0.01 */ double from = 0.0; double to = params->theta / 2.0; double stepsz = 0.01; /* did you think I would spell the whole word? */ unsigned int numparts = floor(to / stepsz); do { #pragma omp parallel for private(i) firstprivate(params) \ shared(stepsz, numparts) for (i = 0; i < numparts; i++) { params->by = i * stepsz; int tries = 0; while (keep_going_p) { /* each time through, modify mfreqs and mating table, then go again */ keep_going_p = age_dep_iterate (params, ++tries); if (keep_going_p == ERANGE) error (ERANGE, ERANGE, "Failure to converge\n"); } fprintf (stdout, "%i iterations\n", tries); } /* for i < numparts */ params->freqs = params->freqs->next; } while (params->freqs->next != NULL); return 0; } inline double age_dep_pmate (double age_dep_t, unsigned int genot, double bp, double ba) { /* the probability of mating between these phenotypes */ /* the female preference depends on whether the female has the preference allele, the strength of preference (parameter bp) and the male phenotype (age_dep_t); if the female lacks the preference allele, then this will return 0, which is not quite accurate; it should return 1 */ return bits_isset (genot, CLOCI)? 1.0 - exp (-bp * age_dep_t) + ba: 1.0; } inline double age_dep_trait (int age, unsigned int genot, double by) { /* return the male trait, a function of the trait locus, age, the age-dependent scaling parameter (bx) and the males condition genotype */ double C; double T; /* get the male's condition genotype */ C = (double) bits_popcount (bits_extract (0, CLOCI, genot)); /* get his trait genotype */ T = bits_isset (genot, CLOCI + 1)? 1.0: 0.0; /* return the trait value */ return T * by * exp (age * C); } int age_dep_iterate (age_dep_params_t * data, unsigned int tries) { /* main driver routine */ /* number of bytes for female frequencies */ size_t geno = data->age_dep_data->geno; size_t genosize = geno * sizeof (double); /* female frequencies are equal to male frequencies at birth (before selection) */ double ffreqs[geno]; if (ffreqs == NULL) error (ENOMEM, ENOMEM, nullmsg, __LINE__); /* do not set! Use memcpy (we need to alter male frequencies (selection) without altering female frequencies) */ memmove (ffreqs, data->freqs->freqs[0], genosize); /* for (int i = 0; i < geno; i++) */ /* ffreqs[i] = data->freqs->freqs[0][i]; */ #ifdef PRMTABLE age_dep_pr_mfreqs (data); #endif /* PRMTABLE */ /* natural selection: */ age_dep_ns (data); /* normalized mating table with new frequencies */ age_dep_norm_mtable (ffreqs, data); #ifdef PRMTABLE age_dep_pr_mtable (data); #endif /* PRMTABLE */ double * newfreqs; /* mutate here */ /* i.e. get the new frequency of 0-year-olds using recombination; */ newfreqs = rec_mating (data->age_dep_data); /* return block */ { if (sim_stop_ck (data->freqs->freqs[0], newfreqs, GENO, TOL) == 0) { /* if we have converged, stop the iterations and handle the data */ age_dep_sim_out (data, stdout); return 0; } else if (tries > MAXTRIES) return ERANGE; else { /* advance generations */ for (int j = age_max - 1; j < 0; j--) memmove (data->freqs->freqs[j], data->freqs->freqs[j-1], genosize); /* advance the first age-class */ memmove (data->freqs->freqs[0], newfreqs, genosize); return 1; } } } void age_dep_ns (age_dep_params_t * data) { /* calculate the new frequency of genotypes given additive fitness and selection coefficient s */ size_t geno = data->age_dep_data->geno; double w[geno]; double wbar, dtheta, ttheta, dcond, tcond; double t, cond; /* fitness parameters */ double mu, nu; mu = data->wparams[0]; nu = data->wparams[1]; /* calculate fitness */ for (int j = 0; j < age_max; j++) { int i; for (i = 0; i < geno; i++) { /* calculate male trait: */ t = age_dep_trait(j, i, data->by); /* calculate condition: */ cond = (double) bits_popcount (bits_extract(0, CLOCI, i)); /* trait-based fitness term */ dtheta = data->theta - t; ttheta = (dtheta * dtheta) / (2.0 * nu * nu); /* condition-based fitness term */ dcond = CLOCI - cond; tcond = (dcond * dcond) / (2.0 * mu * mu); /* calculate male fitness */ w[i] = 1 + exp(-tcond) - exp(-ttheta); } /* calculate mean fitness */ /* as long as we calculate wbar before altering any values of freqs[], we're safe */ wbar = gen_mean (data->freqs->freqs[j], w, geno); for (i = 0; i < geno; i++) data->freqs->freqs[j][i] = (data->freqs->freqs[j][i] * w[i]) / wbar; } } void age_dep_norm_mtable (double * ffreqs, age_dep_params_t * params) { /* this function produces a single mating table that forms the input for recombination () */ /* i is female genotype; j is male genotype; k is male age */ int i,j,k; double norm_denom; double trait; size_t geno = params->age_dep_data->geno; for (i = 0; i < geno; i++) { double norm_mtable[geno]; /* initialize the denominator: */ norm_denom = 0.0; /* find the probability of mating and add it to the denominator */ for (j = 0; j < geno; j++) { /* initialize entry: */ norm_mtable[j] = 0.0; for (k = 0; k < age_max; k++) { trait = age_dep_trait (k, j, params->by); norm_mtable[j] += age_dep_pmate (trait, i, params->bp, params->ba) * (params->freqs->freqs)[k][j]; } norm_denom += norm_mtable[j]; } /* now calculate entry (i,j) */ for (j = 0; j < geno; j++) params->age_dep_data->mtable[i][j] = (ffreqs[i] * norm_mtable[j]) / norm_denom; } } My current suspicion is the array newfreqs: I can't memmove, memcpy or assign a stack variable then hope it will persist, can I? rec_mating() returns double *.

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  • multiple valgrind errors: Conditional jump or move depends on uninitialised value(s)

    - by Hristo
    I'm running valgrind and I'm getting the following error (this is not the only one): ==21743== Conditional jump or move depends on uninitialised value(s) ==21743== at 0x4A06509: index (mc_replace_strmem.c:164) ==21743== by 0x33B7CBB3CD: gaih_inet (in /lib64/libc-2.5.so) ==21743== by 0x33B7CBD629: getaddrinfo (in /lib64/libc-2.5.so) ==21743== by 0x401A5F: tunnelURL (proxy.c:336) ==21743== by 0x40142A: client_thread (proxy.c:194) ==21743== by 0x33B8806616: start_thread (in /lib64/libpthread-2.5.so) ==21743== by 0x33B7CD3C2C: clone (in /lib64/libc-2.5.so) My tunnelURL() function looks like this: char * tunnelURL(char *url) { char * a = strstr(url, "//"); a += 2; char * path = strstr(a, "/"); char host[256]; strncpy (host, a, strlen(a)-strlen(path)); /* * The following is courtesy of Beej's Guide */ int status; int proxySocketFD; struct addrinfo hints; struct addrinfo *servinfo; // will point to the results memset(&hints, 0, sizeof(hints)); // make sure the struct is empty hints.ai_family = AF_INET; // don't care IPv4 or IPv6 hints.ai_socktype = SOCK_STREAM; // TCP stream sockets hints.ai_flags = AI_PASSIVE; // fill in my IP for me if ((status = getaddrinfo(host, "80", &hints, &servinfo)) != 0) { perror("getaddrinfo() fail"); exit(1); } // create socket if ((proxySocketFD = socket(servinfo->ai_family, servinfo->ai_socktype, servinfo->ai_protocol)) == -1) { perror("proxy socket() fail"); exit(1); } // connect if (connect(proxySocketFD, servinfo->ai_addr, servinfo->ai_addrlen) != 0) { printf("connect() fail"); exit(1); } // construct request char request[strlen(path) + strlen(host) + 26]; sprintf(request, "GET %s HTTP/1.1\r\nHost: %s\r\n\r\n", path, host); printf("%s", request); // send request send(proxySocketFD, request, strlen(request), 0); // receive response int i = 0; int amntRecvd = 0; char *pageContentBuffer = (char*) malloc(4096 * sizeof(char)); while ((amntRecvd = recv(proxySocketFD, pageContentBuffer + i, 4096, 0)) > 0) { i += amntRecvd; realloc(pageContentBuffer, i * 4096 * sizeof(char)); } // close proxy socket close(proxySocketFD); // deallocate memory freeaddrinfo(servinfo); return pageContentBuffer; } Line 336 corresponds to the if statement with the getaddrinfo() function call. I'm not really sure what I haven't initialized. The string I'm passing in "should" be already set... I'm printing it out just fine. I also get another error corresponding to the same line of code: ==21743== Use of uninitialised value of size 8 ==21743== at 0x33B7D05816: __nscd_cache_search (in /lib64/libc-2.5.so) ==21743== by 0x33B7D0438B: nscd_gethst_r (in /lib64/libc-2.5.so) ==21743== by 0x33B7D04B26: __nscd_gethostbyname2_r (in /lib64/libc-2.5.so) ==21743== by 0x33B7CE9F5E: [email protected]@GLIBC_2.2.5 (in /lib64/libc-2.5.so) ==21743== by 0x33B7CBC522: gaih_inet (in /lib64/libc-2.5.so) ==21743== by 0x33B7CBD629: getaddrinfo (in /lib64/libc-2.5.so) ==21743== by 0x401A5F: tunnelURL (proxy.c:336) ==21743== by 0x40142A: client_thread (proxy.c:194) ==21743== by 0x33B8806616: start_thread (in /lib64/libpthread-2.5.so) ==21743== by 0x33B7CD3C2C: clone (in /lib64/libc-2.5.so) Any ideas as to what might becausing this? This is written in C btw... Thanks, Hristo

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  • gethostbyname() and valgrind

    - by Samantha
    Hello, I keep getting this error whenever I call gethostbyname() in my C code. ==7983== Invalid read of size 1 ==7983== at 0x412AB2C: ____strtoul_l_internal (strtol_l.c:298) ==7983== by 0x412A46F: strtoul (strtol.c:110) ==7983== by 0x41D427E: inet_aton (inet_addr.c:143) ==7983== by 0x41D8FF3: __nss_hostname_digits_dots (digits_dots.c:144) ==7983== by 0x41DD0F9: gethostbyname (getXXbyYY.c:109) ==7983== by 0x804BE6F: connexion_function (in ***************) ==7983== by 0x8049A8F: main (in ***************) Any ideas ? Thanks,

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  • How to detect segmentation fault details using Valgrind?

    - by Davit Siradeghyan
    Hi all I have a std::map< std::string, std::string which initialized with some API call. When I'm trying to use this map I'm getting segmentation fault. How can I detect invalid code or what is invalid or any detail which can help me to fix problem? Code looks like this: std::map< std::string, std::string> cont; some_func( cont ); // getting parameter by reference and initialize it std::cout << cont[ "some_key" ] << '\n'; // getting segmentation fault here

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  • How can I get valgrind to tell me the address of each non-freed block of memory?

    - by James
    Valgrind tells me function xxx allocated memory which was not freed. Fine. It's proving more difficult than usual to trace however. To this end I have created numerous: #ifdef DEBUG fprintf(stderr, "something happening:%lx\n", (unsigned long)ptr); #endif So I just need to match these ptr addresses that are displayed with the addresses of non-freed memory. How can I get valgrind to tell me the address of each non-freed block of memory?

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  • Setting default path in Unix

    - by eSKay
    I just installed valgrind on my Fedora12 machine. $ valgrind // 1 $ valgrind: Command not found. //error $ /usr/local/bin/valgrind // 2 works fine My $PATH has /usr/local/bin in it. Is there something else that I need to do to make 1 work?

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  • Using Valgrind tool how can I detect which object trying to access 0x0 address ?

    - by Davit Siradeghyan
    I have this output when trying to debug Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault 0x43989029 in std::string::compare (this=0x88fd430, [email protected]) at /home/devsw/tmp/objdir/i686-pc-linux-gnu/libstdc++-v3/include/bits/char_traits.h:253 253 { return memcmp(__s1, __s2, __n); } Current language: auto; currently c++ Using valgrind I getting this output ==12485== Process terminating with default action of signal 11 (SIGSEGV) ==12485== Bad permissions for mapped region at address 0x0 ==12485== at 0x1: (within path_to_my_executable_file/executable_file)

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  • Is valgrind crazy or is this is a genuine std map iterator memory leak?

    - by Alberto Toglia
    Well, I'm very new to Valgrind and memory leak profilers in general. And I must say it is a bit scary when you start using them cause you can't stop wondering how many leaks you might have left unsolved before! To the point, as I'm not an experienced in c++ programmer, I would like to check if this is certainly a memory leak or is it that Valgrind is doing a false positive? typedef std::vector<int> Vector; typedef std::vector<Vector> VectorVector; typedef std::map<std::string, Vector*> MapVector; typedef std::pair<std::string, Vector*> PairVector; typedef std::map<std::string, Vector*>::iterator IteratorVector; VectorVector vv; MapVector m1; MapVector m2; vv.push_back(Vector()); m1.insert(PairVector("one", &vv.back())); vv.push_back(Vector()); m2.insert(PairVector("two", &vv.back())); IteratorVector i = m1.find("one"); i->second->push_back(10); m2.insert(PairVector("one", i->second)); m2.clear(); m1.clear(); vv.clear(); Why is that? Shouldn't the clear command call the destructor of every object and every vector? Now after doing some tests I found different solutions to the leak: 1) Deleting the line i-second-push_back(10); 2) adding a delete i-second; after it's been used. 3) Deleting the second vv.push_back(Vector()); and m2.insert(PairVector("two", &vv.back())); statements. Using solution 2) makes Valgring print: 10 allocs, 11 frees Is that OK? As I'm not using new why should I delete? Thanks, for any help!

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  • C++'s std::string pools, debug builds? std::string and valgrind problems

    - by Den.Jekk
    Hello, I have a problem with many valgrind warnings about possible memory leaks in std::string, like this one: 120 bytes in 4 blocks are possibly lost in loss record 4,192 of 4,687 at 0x4A06819: operator new(unsigned long) (vg_replace_malloc.c:230) by 0x383B89B8B0: std::string::_Rep::_S_create(unsigned long, unsigned long, std::allocator<char> const&) (in /usr/lib64/libstdc++.so.6.0.8) by 0x383B89C3B4: (within /usr/lib64/libstdc++.so.6.0.8) by 0x383B89C4A9: std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >::basic_string(char const*, unsigned long, std::allocator<char> const&) (in /usr/lib64/libstdc++.so.6.0.8) I'm wondering: does std::string (GCC 4.1.2) use any memory pools? if so, is there any way to disable the pools (in form of a debug build etc.)? Regards, Den

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  • Can't install Eclipse Valgrind plugin

    - by h4rp0
    I'm trying to install Valgrind (0.4.0) plugin in Eclipse from technology.linuxtools Update Site (http://download.eclipse.org/technology/linuxtools/update) but I get the following error: Cannot complete the request. See the details. Cannot find a solution satisfying the following requirements org.eclipse.swt [3.4.1.v3449c]. According to "About plugins", my Eclipse has version 3.4.2 installed. Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks

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  • "Use of uninitialised value" despite of memset

    - by Framester
    Hi there, I allocate a 2d array and use memset to fill it with zeros. #include<stdio.h> #include<string.h> #include<stdlib.h> void main() { int m=10; int n =10; int **array_2d; array_2d = (int**) malloc(m*sizeof(int*)); if(array_2d==NULL) { printf("\n Could not malloc 2d array \n"); exit(1); } for(int i=0;i<m;i++) { ((array_2d)[i])=malloc(n*sizeof(int)); memset(((array_2d)[i]),0,sizeof(n*sizeof(int))); } for(int i=0; i<10;i++){ for(int j=0; j<10;j++){ printf("(%i,%i)=",i,j); fflush(stdout); printf("%i ", array_2d[i][j]); } printf("\n"); } } Afterwards I use valgrind [1] to check for memory errors. I get following error: Conditional jump or move depends on uninitialised value(s) for line 24 (printf("%i ", array_2d[i][j]);). I always thought memset is the function to initialize arrays. How can I get rid off this error? Thanks! Valgrind output: ==3485== Memcheck, a memory error detector ==3485== Copyright (C) 2002-2009, and GNU GPL'd, by Julian Seward et al. ==3485== Using Valgrind-3.5.0-Debian and LibVEX; rerun with -h for copyright info ==3485== Command: ./a.out ==3485== (0,0)=0 (0,1)===3485== Use of uninitialised value of size 4 ==3485== at 0x409E186: _itoa_word (_itoa.c:195) ==3485== by 0x40A1AD1: vfprintf (vfprintf.c:1613) ==3485== by 0x40A8FFF: printf (printf.c:35) ==3485== by 0x8048724: main (playing_with_valgrind.c:39) ==3485== ==3485== ==3485== ---- Attach to debugger ? --- [Return/N/n/Y/y/C/c] ---- ==3485== Conditional jump or move depends on uninitialised value(s) ==3485== at 0x409E18E: _itoa_word (_itoa.c:195) ==3485== by 0x40A1AD1: vfprintf (vfprintf.c:1613) ==3485== by 0x40A8FFF: printf (printf.c:35) ==3485== by 0x8048724: main (playing_with_valgrind.c:39) [1] valgrind --tool=memcheck --leak-check=yes --show-reachable=yes --num-callers=20 --track-fds=yes --db-attach=yes ./a.out [gcc-cmd] gcc -std=c99 -lm -Wall -g3 playing_with_valgrind.c

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  • calling calloc - memory leak valgrind

    - by Mike
    The following code is an example from the NCURSES menu library. I'm not sure what could be wrong with the code, but valgrind reports some problems. Any ideas... ==4803== 1,049 (72 direct, 977 indirect) bytes in 1 blocks are definitely lost in loss record 25 of 36 ==4803== at 0x4C24477: calloc (vg_replace_malloc.c:418) ==4803== by 0x400E93: main (in /home/gerardoj/a.out) ==4803== ==4803== LEAK SUMMARY: ==4803== definitely lost: 72 bytes in 1 blocks ==4803== indirectly lost: 977 bytes in 10 blocks ==4803== possibly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks ==4803== still reachable: 64,942 bytes in 262 blocks Source code: #include <curses.h> #include <menu.h> #define ARRAY_SIZE(a) (sizeof(a) / sizeof(a[0])) #define CTRLD 4 char *choices[] = { "Choice 1", "Choice 2", "Choice 3", "Choice 4", "Choice 5", "Choice 6", "Choice 7", "Exit", } ; int main() { ITEM **my_items; int c; MENU *my_menu; int n_choices, i; ITEM *cur_item; /* Initialize curses */ initscr(); cbreak(); noecho(); keypad(stdscr, TRUE); /* Initialize items */ n_choices = ARRAY_SIZE(choices); my_items = (ITEM **)calloc(n_choices + 1, sizeof(ITEM *)); for (i = 0; i < n_choices; ++i) { my_items[i] = new_item(choices[i], choices[i]); } my_items[n_choices] = (ITEM *)NULL; my_menu = new_menu((ITEM **)my_items); /* Make the menu multi valued */ menu_opts_off(my_menu, O_ONEVALUE); mvprintw(LINES - 3, 0, "Use <SPACE> to select or unselect an item."); mvprintw(LINES - 2, 0, "<ENTER> to see presently selected items(F1 to Exit)"); post_menu(my_menu); refresh(); while ((c = getch()) != KEY_F(1)) { switch (c) { case KEY_DOWN: menu_driver(my_menu, REQ_DOWN_ITEM); break; case KEY_UP: menu_driver(my_menu, REQ_UP_ITEM); break; case ' ': menu_driver(my_menu, REQ_TOGGLE_ITEM); break; case 10: { char temp[200]; ITEM **items; items = menu_items(my_menu); temp[0] = '\0'; for (i = 0; i < item_count(my_menu); ++i) if(item_value(items[i]) == TRUE) { strcat(temp, item_name(items[i])); strcat(temp, " "); } move(20, 0); clrtoeol(); mvprintw(20, 0, temp); refresh(); } break; } } free_item(my_items[0]); free_item(my_items[1]); free_menu(my_menu); endwin(); }

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  • A error about "Address 0x0 is not stack'd, malloc'd or (recently) free'd" in c program under linux

    - by MaiTiano
    There is a piece of my program: height = atoi(argv[3]); width = atoi(argv[2]); sprintf(seqName,"%s", argv[1]); // strcpy(seqName, argv[1]); After compiling it, a exe file test is generated, then I use Valgrind to check it. Then I got the following message, however I cannot understand what it tends to tell me. Can anyone provide some kind help, Thanks. 1 contexts (suppressed: 13 from 8) 1 contexts (suppressed: 13 from 8) [email protected]:~/work/dsr_analysis$ valgrind --tool=memcheck --leak-check=yes ./test ==28940== Memcheck, a memory error detector ==28940== Copyright (C) 2002-2009, and GNU GPL'd, by Julian Seward et al. ==28940== Using Valgrind-3.6.0.SVN-Debian and LibVEX; rerun with -h for copyright info ==28940== Command: ./test ==28940== ==28940== Invalid read of size 1 ==28940== at 0x40260CA: strcpy (mc_replace_strmem.c:311) ==28940== by 0x804A5C6: main (me_search.c:1428) ==28940== Address 0x0 is not stack'd, malloc'd or (recently) free'd ==28940== ==28940== ==28940== Process terminating with default action of signal 11 (SIGSEGV) ==28940== Access not within mapped region at address 0x0 ==28940== at 0x40260CA: strcpy (mc_replace_strmem.c:311) ==28940== by 0x804A5C6: main (me_search.c:1428) ==28940== If you believe this happened as a result of a stack ==28940== overflow in your program's main thread (unlikely but ==28940== possible), you can try to increase the size of the ==28940== main thread stack using the --main-stacksize= flag. ==28940== The main thread stack size used in this run was 8388608. ==28940== ==28940== HEAP SUMMARY: ==28940== in use at exit: 0 bytes in 0 blocks ==28940== total heap usage: 0 allocs, 0 frees, 0 bytes allocated ==28940== ==28940== All heap blocks were freed -- no leaks are possible ==28940== ==28940== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v ==28940== ERROR SUMMARY: 1 errors from 1 contexts (suppressed: 13 from 8)1 contexts (suppressed: 13 from 8) 1 contexts (suppressed: 13 from 8)

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  • daynamic 2d array in c++ and memory leaks

    - by SepiDev
    Hi guys, i wrote this code, it runs ok, but when i check it under Valgrind it catches 2 problems, since i can not interpret valgrind's messages i will appreciate if anyone explain me more and tell me where is the problem!!! here is the code: #include <iostream> #define width 70000 #define height 10000 using namespace std; int main(void) { int** pint; pint = new int*[height]; for(int i = 0; i < height; i++) pint[i] = new int[width]; for(int i = 0; i < height; i++){ delete[] pint[i]; pint[i] = NULL; } delete[] pint; pint = NULL; return 1; }

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  • Constructor and Destructor of a singleton object called twice

    - by Bikram990
    I'm facing a problem in singleton object in c++. Here is the explanation: Problem info: I have a 4 shared libraries (say libA.so, libB.so, libC.so, libD.so) and 2 executable binary files each using one another shared library( say libE.so) which deals with files. The purpose of libE.so is to write data into a file and if the executable restarts or size of file exceeds a certain limit it is zipped and a new file is created with time stamp in name. It is using singleton object. It exports a handler class for getting and using singleton. Compressing only happens in the above said two cases. The user/loader executable can specify the starting name of file only no other control is provided by handler class. libA.so, libB.so, libC.so and libD.so have almost same behavior. They all have a class and declare and object of an handler which gets the instance of the singleton in libE.so and uses it for further purpose. All these libraries are linked to two executable binary files. If only one of the two executable runs then its fine, But if both executable runs one after other then the file of the first started executable gets compressed. Debug info: The constructor and destructor of the singleton object is called twice.(for each executable) The object of singleton is a static object and never deleted. The executable is not able to exit/return gives: glibc detected * (exe1 or exe2): double free or corruption (!prev): some_addr * Running with binaries valgrind gives that the above error is due to the destructor of the singleton object. Thanks

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