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  • Why is VB so popular?

    - by aaaidan
    To me, Visual Basic seems clumsy, ugly, error-prone, and difficult to read. I'll let others explain why. While VB.net has clearly been a huge leap forward for the language in terms of features, I still don't understand why anyone would choose to code in VB over, say, C#. However, I still see (what seems to be) the vast majority of commercial web apps from "MS shops" are built in VB. I could stand corrected on this, but VB still seems more popular than it deserves. Can anyone help answer any (or all) of these questions: Am I missing something with VB? Is it easier to learn, or "friendlier" than C#? Are there features I don't know about? Why is VB/VB.net so frequently used today, especially in web projects?

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  • Should a c# dev switch to VB.net when the team language base is mixed?

    - by jjr2527
    I recently joined a new development team where the language preferences are mixed on the .net platform. Dev 1: Knows VB.net, does not know c# Dev 2: Knows VB.net, does not know c# Dev 3: Knows c# and VB.net, prefers c# Dev 4: Knows c# and VB6(VB.net should be pretty easy to pick up), prefers c# It seems to me that the thought leaders in the .net space are c# devs almost universally. I also thought that some 3rd party tools didn't support VB.net but when I started looking into it I didn't find any good examples. I would prefer to get the whole team on c# but if there isn't any good reason to force the issue aside from preference then I don't think that is the right choice. Are there any reasons I should lead folks away from VB.net?

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  • Addressing a variable in VB

    - by Jeff
    Why doesn't Visual Basic.NET have the addressof operator like C#? In C#, one can int i = 123; int* addr = &i; But VB has no equivalent counter part. It seems like it should be important. UPDATE Since there's some interest, Im copying my response to Strilanc below. The case I ran into didnt necessitate pointers by any means, but I was trying to trouble shoot a unit test that was failing and there was some confusion over whether or not an object being used at one point in the stack was the same object as an object several methods away.

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  • VB.NET IF() Coalesce and “Expression Expected” Error

    - by Jeff Widmer
    I am trying to use the equivalent of the C# “??” operator in some VB.NET code that I am working in. This StackOverflow article for “Is there a VB.NET equivalent for C#'s ?? operator?” explains the VB.NET IF() statement syntax which is exactly what I am looking for... and I thought I was going to be done pretty quickly and could move on. But after implementing the IF() statement in my code I started to receive this error: Compiler Error Message: BC30201: Expression expected. And no matter how I tried using the “IF()” statement, whenever I tried to visit the aspx page that I was working on I received the same error. This other StackOverflow article Using VB.NET If vs. IIf in binding/rendering expression indicated that the VB.NET IF() operator was not available until VS2008 or .NET Framework 3.5.  So I checked the Web Application project properties but it was targeting the .NET Framework 3.5: So I was still not understanding what was going on, but then I noticed the version information in the detailed compiler output of the error page: This happened to be a C# project, but with an ASPX page with inline VB.NET code (yes, it is strange to have that but that is the project I am working on).  So even though the project file was targeting the .NET Framework 3.5, the ASPX page was being compiled using the .NET Framework 2.0.  But why?  Where does this get set?  How does ASP.NET know which version of the compiler to use for the inline code? For this I turned to the web.config.  Here is the system.codedom/compilers section that was in the web.config for this project: <system.codedom>     <compilers>         <compiler language="c#;cs;csharp" extension=".cs" warningLevel="4" type="Microsoft.CSharp.CSharpCodeProvider, System, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089">             <providerOption name="CompilerVersion" value="v3.5" />             <providerOption name="WarnAsError" value="false" />         </compiler>     </compilers> </system.codedom> Keep in mind that this is a C# web application project file but my aspx file has inline VB.NET code.  The web.config does not have any information for how to compile for VB.NET so it defaults to .NET 2.0 (instead of 3.5 which is what I need). So the web.config needed to include the VB.NET compiler option.  Here it is with both the C# and VB.NET options (I copied the VB.NET config from a new VB.NET Web Application project file).     <system.codedom>         <compilers>             <compiler language="c#;cs;csharp" extension=".cs" warningLevel="4" type="Microsoft.CSharp.CSharpCodeProvider, System, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089">                 <providerOption name="CompilerVersion" value="v3.5" />                 <providerOption name="WarnAsError" value="false" />             </compiler>       <compiler language="vb;vbs;visualbasic;vbscript" extension=".vb" warningLevel="4" type="Microsoft.VisualBasic.VBCodeProvider, System, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089">         <providerOption name="CompilerVersion" value="v3.5"/>         <providerOption name="OptionInfer" value="true"/>         <providerOption name="WarnAsError" value="false"/>       </compiler>     </compilers>     </system.codedom>   So the inline VB.NET code on my aspx page was being compiled using the .NET Framework 2.0 when it really needed to be compiled with the .NET Framework 3.5 compiler in order to take advantage of the VB.NET IF() coalesce statement.  Without the VB.NET web.config compiler option, the default is to compile using the .NET Framework 2.0 and the VB.NET IF() coalesce statement does not exist (at least in the form that I want it in).  FYI, there is an older IF statement in VB.NET 2.0 compiler which is why it is giving me the unusual “Expression Expected” error message – see this article for when VB.NET got the new updated version. EDIT (2011-06-20): I had made a wrong assumption in the first version of this blog post.  After a little more research and investigation I was able to figure out that the issue was in the web.config and not with the IIS App Pool.  Thanks to the comment from James which forced me to look into this again.

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  • How to do this in VB 2010 (C# to VB conversion)

    - by user203687
    I would like to have the following to be translated to VB 2010 (with advanced syntaxes) _domainContext.SubmitChanges( submitOperation => { _domainContext.Load<Customer>( _domainContext.GetCustomersQuery(), LoadBehavior.RefreshCurrent, loadOperation => { var results = _domainContext.Customers.Where( entity => !loadOperation.Entities.Contains(entity)).ToList(); results.ForEach( enitity => _domainContext.Customers.Detach(entity)); }, null); }, null); I managed to get the above with other ways (but not using anonymous methods). I would like to see all the advanced syntaxes available in VB 2010 to be applied to the above. Can anyone help me on this? thanks

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  • Would a programmer knowing C# and VB.Net ever choose VB.Net?

    - by Earlz
    Now before someone tells me VB.Net isn't bad like VB was, I know it isn't. But, I've yet to speak to a programmer who is completely content that some project they work on is written in VB.Net. Basically, my question is would a programmer knowing both C# and VB.Net (and all of their team knowing both), would they ever choose VB.Net? And why? All of the VB.Net projects I've seen were written that way only because the programmer that started it(that usually isn't working there anymore) knew VB6(or earlier) and wrote it in VB.Net because of the similar syntax. Is there any advantage to writing a program in VB.Net compared to C#? (hopefully this is appropriate here, SO rejected it within a few minutes)

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  • Is VB Really Case Insensitive?

    - by Otaku
    I'm not trying to start an argument here, but for whatever reason it's typically stated that VB is case insensitive and C languages aren't (and somehow that is a good thing). But here's my question: Where exactly is VB case insensitive? When I type... Dim ss As String Dim SS As String ...into the VS2008 IDE the second one has a warning of "Local variable 'SS' is already declared in the current block". In VBA VBE, it doesn't immediately kick an error, but rather just auto-corrects the case. Am I missing something here with this argument that VB is not case sensitive? (Also, if you know or care to answer, why would that be a bad thing?) EDIT: Why am I even asking this question? I've used VB in many of it's dialects for years now, sometimes as a hobbyist, sometimes for small business-related programs in a workgroup. As of the last 6 months I've been working on a big project, much bigger than I anticipated. Much of the sample source code out there is in C#. I don't have any burning desire to learn C#, but if there are things I'm missing out on that C# offers that VB doesn't (an opposite would be VB.NET offers XML Literals), then I'd like to know more about that feature. So in this case, it's often argued that C languages are case sensitive and that's good and VB is case insensitive and that is bad. I'd like to know A) how exactly is VB case insensitive because every single example in the code editor becomes case sensititive (meaning case gets corrected) whether I want it or not and B) is this compelling enough for me to consider moving to C# if VB.NET case is somehow limiting what I could do with code?

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  • Why is VB so popular? [closed]

    - by aaaidan
    To me, Visual Basic seems clumsy, ugly, error-prone, and difficult to read. I'll let others explain why. While VB.net has clearly been a huge leap forward for the language in terms of features, I still don't understand why anyone would choose to code in VB over, say, C#. However, I still see (what seems to be) the vast majority of commercial web apps from "MS shops" are built in VB. I could stand corrected on this, but VB still seems more popular than it deserves. Can anyone help answer any (or all) of these questions: Am I missing something with VB? Is it easier to learn, or "friendlier" than C#? Are there features I don't know about? Why is VB/VB.net so frequently used today, especially in web projects?

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  • Implicit casting in VB.NET

    - by Shimmy
    The question is intended for lazy VB programmers. Please. In vb I can do and I won't get any errors. Example 1 Dim x As String = 5 Dim y As Integer = "5" Dim b As Boolean = "True" Example 2 Dim a As EnumType = 4 Dim v As Integer = EnumType.EnumValue Example 3 Private Sub ButtonClick(sender As Object, e As EventArgs) Dim btn As Button = sender End Sub Example 4 Private Sub ButtonClick(sender As Button, e As EventArgs) Dim data As Contact = sender.Tag End Sub If I surely know the expected runtime type, is this 'forbidden' to rely on the vb-language built-in casting? When can I rely? Thanks

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  • how to group by over anonymous type with vb.net linq to object

    - by smoothdeveloper
    I'm trying to write a linq to object query in vb.net, here is the c# version of what I'm trying to achieve (I'm running this in linqpad): void Main() { var items = GetArray( new {a="a",b="a",c=1} , new {a="a",b="a",c=2} , new {a="a",b="b",c=1} ); ( from i in items group i by new {i.a, i.b} into g let p = new{ k = g, v = g.Sum((i)=>i.c)} where p.v > 1 select p ).Dump(); } // because vb.net doesn't support anonymous type array initializer, it will ease the translation T[] GetArray<T>(params T[] values){ return values; } I'm having hard time with either the group by syntax which is not the same (vb require 'identifier = expression' at some places, as well as with the summing functor with 'expression required' ) Thanks so much for your help!

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  • Constructing an object and calling a method without assignment in VB.Net

    - by mdryden
    I'm not entirely sure what to call what C# does, so I haven't had any luck searching for the VB.Net equivalent syntax (if it exists, which I suspect it probably doesn't). In c#, you can do this: public void DoSomething() { new MyHelper().DoIt(); // works just fine } But as far as I can tell, in VB.Net, you must assign the helper object to a local variable or you just get a syntax error: Public Sub DoSomething() New MyHelper().DoIt() ' won't compile End Sub Just one of those curiosity things I run into from day to day working on mixed language projects - often there is a VB.Net equivalent which uses less than obvious syntax. Anyone?

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  • Rewriting VB.NET Lambda experession as a C# statement

    - by ChadD
    I downgraded my app from version 4 of the framework to version 4 and now I want to implement this VB.NET lambda function statement (which works on 3.5) Dim colLambda As ColumnItemValueAccessor = Function(rowItem As Object) General_ItemValueAccessor(rowItem, colName) and rewrite it in C#. This was my attempt: ColumnItemValueAccessor colLambda = (object rowItem) => General_ItemValueAccessor(rowItem, colName); When I did this, I get the following error: Error 14 One or more types required to compile a dynamic expression cannot be found. Are you missing references to Microsoft.CSharp.dll and System.Core.dll? C:\Source\DotNet\SqlSmoke\SqlSmoke\UserControls\ScriptUserControl.cs 84 73 SqlSmoke However, when I downgraded the app from version 4.0 of the framework to 3.5 (because our users only hae 3.5 and don't have rights to install 4.0). when I did this, the reference to "Microsoft.CSharp" was broken. Can I rewrite the VB.NET command in C# using syntax that is valid in C# 3.5 as I was able to in VB.NET? What would the syntax be?

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  • Basic Form Properties and Modality in VB.NET

    Creating your First VB.NET Form 1. Launch Microsoft Visual Basic 2008 Express Edition. If you do not have this program, then you cannot create VB.NET forms. You can read an introductory tutorial on how to install Visual Basic on your computer: http://www.aspfree.com/c/a/VB.NET/Visual-Basic-for-Beginners/ 2. Go to File - gt; New Project. 3. Since you will be creating a form, select Windows Forms Application. 4. Select a name for your form project, e.g. MyFirstForm. 5. Hit OK to get started. 6. You will then see an empty form -- just like an empty canvas when you paint. It looks like th...

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  • wait for the second VB script untill ended from primary VB script

    - by yael
    Hi I have VB script that run second VB script The second VB script ask some questions from the input box My problem is that “MyShell.Run” not wait until SecondVBscript.vbs will ended And the Other VB syntax run immodestly also Need to wait for MyShell.Run process ended and then perform the Other VB syntax How can I do that? Set MyShell = Wscript.CreateObject("WScript.Shell") MyShell.Run " C:\Program Files\SecondVBscript.vbs" Set MyShell = Nothing Other VB syntax

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  • VB.NET How Do I skin a vb.net app

    - by letocypher
    I want to skin a vb.net app I made ive googled some stuff and I've seen skinned vb.net apps. However it seems like any time i try to find someone explaining it its a link to a pay for product. Does anyone have anything useful on this?

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  • Do I lose anything by coding in c# and using free online vb.net code convertors?

    - by Gullu
    The company I work for uses vb.net since there are many programmers who moved up from vb6 to vb.net. Basically more vb.net resources in the company for support/maintenance vs c#. I am a c# coder and was wondering if I could just continue coding in c# and just use the many online free c# to vb.net code convertors. That way, I will be more productive and also be more marketable since there are more c# jobs compared to vb.net jobs. I have done vb6 many years ago and I am comfortable debugging vb.net code. It's just the primary coding language. I am more comfortable in c#. Will I lose anything if I use this approach. (code conversion). Based on what i read online the future of vb.net is really "Dim". Please advise. thank you

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  • Automatic Properties, Collection Initializers, and Implicit Line Continuation support with VB 2010

    - by ScottGu
    [In addition to blogging, I am also now using Twitter for quick updates and to share links. Follow me at: twitter.com/scottgu] This is the eighteenth in a series of blog posts I’m doing on the upcoming VS 2010 and .NET 4 release. A few days ago I blogged about two new language features coming with C# 4.0: optional parameters and named arguments.  Today I’m going to post about a few of my favorite new features being added to VB with VS 2010: Auto-Implemented Properties, Collection Initializers, and Implicit Line Continuation support. Auto-Implemented Properties Prior to VB 2010, implementing properties within a class using VB required you to explicitly declare the property as well as implement a backing field variable to store its value.  For example, the code below demonstrates how to implement a “Person” class using VB 2008 that exposes two public properties - “Name” and “Age”:   While explicitly declaring properties like above provides maximum flexibility, I’ve always found writing this type of boiler-plate get/set code tedious when you are simply storing/retrieving the value from a field.  You can use VS code snippets to help automate the generation of it – but it still generates a lot of code that feels redundant.  C# 2008 introduced a cool new feature called automatic properties that helps cut down the code quite a bit for the common case where properties are simply backed by a field.  VB 2010 also now supports this same feature.  Using the auto-implemented properties feature of VB 2010 we can now implement our Person class using just the code below: When you declare an auto-implemented property, the VB compiler automatically creates a private field to store the property value as well as generates the associated Get/Set methods for you.  As you can see above – the code is much more concise and easier to read. The syntax supports optionally initializing the properties with default values as well if you want to: You can learn more about VB 2010’s automatic property support from this MSDN page. Collection Initializers VB 2010 also now supports using collection initializers to easily create a collection and populate it with an initial set of values.  You identify a collection initializer by declaring a collection variable and then use the From keyword followed by braces { } that contain the list of initial values to add to the collection.  Below is a code example where I am using the new collection initializer feature to populate a “Friends” list of Person objects with two people, and then bind it to a GridView control to display on a page: You can learn more about VB 2010’s collection initializer support from this MSDN page. Implicit Line Continuation Support Traditionally, when a statement in VB has been split up across multiple lines, you had to use a line-continuation underscore character (_) to indicate that the statement wasn’t complete.  For example, with VB 2008 the below LINQ query needs to append a “_” at the end of each line to indicate that the query is not complete yet: The VB 2010 compiler and code editor now adds support for what is called “implicit line continuation support” – which means that it is smarter about auto-detecting line continuation scenarios, and as a result no longer needs you to explicitly indicate that the statement continues in many, many scenarios.  This means that with VB 2010 we can now write the above code with no “_” at all: The implicit line continuation feature also works well when editing XML Literals within VB (which is pretty cool). You can learn more about VB 2010’s Implicit Line Continuation support and many of the scenarios it supports from this MSDN page (scroll down to the “Implicit Line Continuation” section to find details). Summary The above three VB language features are but a few of the new language and code editor features coming with VB 2010.  Visit this site to learn more about some of the other VB language features coming with the release.  Also subscribe to the VB team’s blog to learn more and stay up-to-date with the posts they the team regularly publishes. Hope this helps, Scott

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  • I want to turn VB.Net Option Strict On

    - by asjohnson
    I recently found out about strong typing in VB.Net (naturally it was on here, thanks!) and am deciding I should take another step toward being a better programmer. I went from vba macros - VB.Net, because I needed a program that I could automate and I never read anything about strong typing, so I kind of fell into the VB.Net default trap. Now I am looking to turn it on and sort out this whole type thing. I was hoping someone could direct me towards some resources to make this transistion as painless as possible. I have read around some and ctype seems to come up a lot, but past that I am at a bit of a loss. What are the benefits of switching? Is there more to it than just using ctype to cast things? I feel like there is a good article that I have failed to come across and any direction would be great. Would a good approach to be to rewrite a program that is written with option strict off and note differences?

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  • Troubleshooting VC++ DLL in VB.Net

    - by Jolyon
    I'm trying to make a solution in Visual Studio that consists of a VC++ DLL and a VB.Net application. To figure this out, I created a VC++ Class Library project, with the following code (I removed all the junk the wizard creates): mathfuncs.cpp: #include "MathFuncs.h" namespace MathFuncs { double MyMathFuncs::Add(double a, double b) { return a + b; } } mathfuncs.h: using namespace System; namespace MathFuncs { public ref class MyMathFuncs { public: static double Add(double a, double b); }; } This compiles quite happily. I can then add a VC++ console project to the solution, add a reference to the original project for this new project, and call it as follows: test.cpp: using namespace System; int main(array<System::String ^> ^args) { double a = 7.4; int b = 99; Console::WriteLine("a + b = {0}", MathFuncs::MyMathFuncs::Add(a, b)); return 0; } This works just fine, and will build to test.exe and mathsfuncs.dll. However, I want to use a VB.Net project to call the DLL. To do this, I add a VB.Net project to the solution, make it the startup project, and add a reference to the original project. Then, I attempt to use it as follows: MsgBox(MathFuncs.MyMathFuncs.Add(1, 2)) However, when I run this code, it gives me an error: "Could not load file or assembly 'MathFuncsAssembly, Version=0.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null' or one of its dependencies. An attempt was made to load a program with an incorrect format." Do I need to expose the method somehow? I'm using Visual Studio 2008 Professional.

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  • jQuery + Perl CGI to vb.net transition

    - by user1257458
    I've been developing oracle database-heavy "web applications" forever by building my html by hand, adding some jquery to handle ajax requests (html inserts for forms processing etc), and always did my server side stuff in perl cgi. I really love how easy it is to read some form input, execute some select statements through dbi (SO EASY), and generate HTML to be inserted by the jquery request. That's a web application to me. However, my new boss builds everything in visual studio 2010, vb.net, usually webforms. So, for work reasons, I now need to start developing in vb.net so it can be collectively maintained, and I'm just seeking advice on where to start learning/how to approach this. I know I could at least learn ASP.net and VB.net, and create a webform, have it read parameters, return HTML, etc. which would allow me to use my previously written HTML and client-side scripts (jQuery). Although- since we're moving heavily to mobile applications I really need to reduce client-side processing load. Is there any advantage to my boss' method? Thanks a ton.

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  • Translating delegate usage from C# to VB

    - by Homeliss
    ContactManager.PostSolve += PostSolve; I am having a problem converting this piece of code from C# to VB.NET. ContactManager.PostSolve is a delegate. I tried the following but it doesn't work, it says PostSolve is not an event of ContactManager: AddHandler ContactManager.PostSolve, AddressOf PostSolve The following works, but this only allows me to have one handler for the delegate: ContactManager.PostSolve = new PostSolveDelegate(AddressOf PostSolve) Is there a way for me to do the same thing in VB that was done in the first piece of code? Thanks!

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  • ASP.Net 2.0 VB WebSite Project "Type 'Exception' is not defined"

    - by AtlSteve
    All of a sudden our VB ASP.Net 2.0 WebSite Project started complaining that Exception was not defined. I have discovered that if I add "Imports System" to the header, or explicitly use System.Exception that it works, but this error permeates a lot of other System descendants like the Data namespace, and the DateTime object. We have hundreds and hundreds of pages, so adding Imports System to all of them not only would be time consuming, but it seems like a band-aid fix to the problem. I have checked the Project-Property Pages-References, and the web.config file, and the assembly is imported into the project, it is just not being "Auto Imported" into the Class Files like it USUALLY is. Note this does not JUST affect CodeBehind, but All className.vb files. I would like to fix this problem, but more importantly would like to understand what could cause the System namespace to all of a sudden stop being auto imported. There is obviously some file change that caused this, as my co-worker started seeing the problem this morning after he did a Full-Get on the project. MORE: The Web.Config file located in the Windows\Microsoft.Net...\Config\Web.Config file does have the , and System is added. Adding the tags, and adding System to the LOCAL web.config did nothing to mitigate the problem. Any help would be appreciated. First SO Question, so I hope I was descriptive enough.

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