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  • Démonstration de l'IntelliTrace de Visual Studio 2010 par Jeff Beehler, chef de produit chez Microso

    Mise à jour du 14.04.2010 par Katleen Démonstration de l'IntelliTrace de Visual Studio 2010 par Jeff Beehler, chef de produit chez Microsoft Jeff BEEHLER, chef de produit monde pour Visual Studio depuis plus de sept ans, nous a fait une démonstration de l'outil de traitement des bugs lors de son passage au siège parisien de Microsoft France. IntelliTrace, une « machine à remonter le temps pour les développeurs et les testeurs », transforme les bogues non reproductibles en souvenirs du passé : cet outil enregistre toute l'historique de l'exécution de l'application et permet la reproduction du bogue signalé. Le testeur peut ainsi résoudre un problème dès sa première apparition. A...

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  • CLSF & CLK 2013 Trip Report by Jeff Liu

    - by jamesmorris
    This is a contributed post from Jeff Liu, lead XFS developer for the Oracle mainline Linux kernel team. Recently, I attended both the China Linux Storage and Filesystem workshop (CLSF), and the China Linux Kernel conference (CLK), which were held in Shanghai. Here are the highlights for both events. CLSF - 17th October XFS update (led by Jeff Liu) XFS keeps rapid progress with a lot of changes, especially focused on the infrastructure/performance improvements as well as  new feature development.  This can be reflected with a sample statistics among XFS/Ext4+JBD2/Btrfs via: # git diff --stat --minimal -C -M v3.7..v3.12-rc4 -- fs/xfs|fs/ext4+fs/jbd2|fs/btrfs XFS: 141 files changed, 27598 insertions(+), 19113 deletions(-) Ext4+JBD2: 39 files changed, 10487 insertions(+), 5454 deletions(-) Btrfs: 70 files changed, 19875 insertions(+), 8130 deletions(-) What made up those changes in XFS? Self-describing metadata(CRC32c). This is a new feature and it contributed about 70% code changes, it can be enabled via `mkfs.xfs -m crc=1 /dev/xxx` for v5 superblock. Transaction log space reservation improvements. With this change, we can calculate the log space reservation at mount time rather than runtime to reduce the the CPU overhead. User namespace support. So both XFS and USERNS can be enabled on kernel configuration begin from Linux 3.10. Thanks Dwight Engen's efforts for this thing. Split project/group quota inodes. Originally, project quota can not be enabled with group quota at the same time because they were share the same quota file inode, now it works but only for v5 super block. i.e, CRC enabled. CONFIG_XFS_WARN, an new lightweight runtime debugger which can be deployed in production environment. Readahead log object recovery, this change can speed up the log replay progress significantly. Speculative preallocation inode tracking, clearing and throttling. The main purpose is to deal with inodes with post-EOF space due to speculative preallocation, support improved quota management to free up a significant amount of unwritten space when at or near EDQUOT. It support backgroup scanning which occurs on a longish interval(5 mins by default, tunable), and on-demand scanning/trimming via ioctl(2). Bitter arguments ensued from this session, especially for the comparison between Ext4 and Btrfs in different areas, I have to spent a whole morning of the 1st day answering those questions. We basically agreed on XFS is the best choice in Linux nowadays because: Stable, XFS has a good record in stability in the past 10 years. Fengguang Wu who lead the 0-day kernel test project also said that he has observed less error than other filesystems in the past 1+ years, I own it to the XFS upstream code reviewer, they always performing serious code review as well as testing. Good performance for large/small files, XFS does not works very well for small files has already been an old story for years. Best choice (maybe) for distributed PB filesystems. e.g, Ceph recommends delopy OSD daemon on XFS because Ext4 has limited xattr size. Best choice for large storage (>16TB). Ext4 does not support a single file more than around 15.95TB. Scalability, any objection to XFS is best in this point? :) XFS is better to deal with transaction concurrency than Ext4, why? The maximum size of the log in XFS is 2038MB compare to 128MB in Ext4. Misc. Ext4 is widely used and it has been proved fast/stable in various loads and scenarios, XFS just need more customers, and Btrfs is still on the road to be a manhood. Ceph Introduction (Led by Li Wang) This a hot topic.  Li gave us a nice introduction about the design as well as their current works. Actually, Ceph client has been included in Linux kernel since 2.6.34 and supported by Openstack since Folsom but it seems that it has not yet been widely deployment in production environment. Their major work is focus on the inline data support to separate the metadata and data storage, reduce the file access time, i.e, a file access need communication twice, fetch the metadata from MDS and then get data from OSD, and also, the small file access is limited by the network latency. The solution is, for the small files they would like to store the data at metadata so that when accessing a small file, the metadata server can push both metadata and data to the client at the same time. In this way, they can reduce the overhead of calculating the data offset and save the communication to OSD. For this feature, they have only run some small scale testing but really saw noticeable improvements. Test environment: Intel 2 CPU 12 Core, 64GB RAM, Ubuntu 12.04, Ceph 0.56.6 with 200GB SATA disk, 15 OSD, 1 MDS, 1 MON. The sequence read performance for 1K size files improved about 50%. I have asked Li and Zheng Yan (the core developer of Ceph, who also worked on Btrfs) whether Ceph is really stable and can be deployed at production environment for large scale PB level storage, but they can not give a positive answer, looks Ceph even does not spread over Dreamhost (subject to confirmation). From Li, they only deployed Ceph for a small scale storage(32 nodes) although they'd like to try 6000 nodes in the future. Improve Linux swap for Flash storage (led by Shaohua Li) Because of high density, low power and low price, flash storage (SSD) is a good candidate to partially replace DRAM. A quick answer for this is using SSD as swap. But Linux swap is designed for slow hard disk storage, so there are a lot of challenges to efficiently use SSD for swap. SWAPOUT swap_map scan swap_map is the in-memory data structure to track swap disk usage, but it is a slow linear scan. It will become a bottleneck while finding many adjacent pages in the use of SSD. Shaohua Li have changed it to a cluster(128K) list, resulting in O(1) algorithm. However, this apporoach needs restrictive cluster alignment and only enabled for SSD. IO pattern In most cases, the swap io is in interleaved pattern because of mutiple reclaimers or a free cluster is shared by all reclaimers. Even though block layer can merge interleaved IO to some extent, but we cannot count on it completely. Hence the per-cpu cluster is added base on the previous change, it can help reclaimer do sequential IO and the block layer will be easier to merge IO. TLB flush: If we're reclaiming one active page, we should first move the page from active lru list to inactive lru list, and then reclaim the page from inactive lru to swap it out. During the process, we need to clear PTE twice: first is 'A'(ACCESS) bit, second is 'P'(PRESENT) bit. Processors need to send lots of ipi which make the TLB flush really expensive. Some works have been done to improve this, including rework smp_call_functiom_many() or remove the first TLB flush in x86, but there still have some arguments here and only parts of works have been pushed to mainline. SWAPIN: Page fault does iodepth=1 sync io, but it's a little waste if only issue a page size's IO. The obvious solution is doing swap readahead. But the current in-kernel swap readahead is arbitary(always 8 pages), and it always doesn't perform well for both random and sequential access workload. Shaohua introduced a new flag for madvise(MADV_WILLNEED) to do swap prefetch, so the changes happen in userspace API and leave the in-kernel readahead unchanged(but I think some improvement can also be done here). SWAP discard As we know, discard is important for SSD write throughout, but the current swap discard implementation is synchronous. He changed it to async discard which allow discard and write run in the same time. Meanwhile, the unit of discard is also optimized to cluster. Misc: lock contention For many concurrent swapout and swapin , the lock contention such as anon_vma or swap_lock is high, so he changed the swap_lock to a per-swap lock. But there still have some lock contention in very high speed SSD because of swapcache address_space lock. Zproject (led by Bob Liu) Bob gave us a very nice introduction about the current memory compression status. Now there are 3 projects(zswap/zram/zcache) which all aim at smooth swap IO storm and promote performance, but they all have their own pros and cons. ZSWAP It is implemented based on frontswap API and it uses a dynamic allocater named Zbud to allocate free pages. Zbud means pairs of zpages are "buddied" and it can only store at most two compressed pages in one page frame, so the max compress ratio is 50%. Each page frame is lru-linked and can do shink in memory pressure. If the compressed memory pool reach its limitation, shink or reclaim happens. It decompress the page frame into two new allocated pages and then write them to real swap device, but it can fail when allocating the two pages. ZRAM Acts as a compressed ramdisk and used as swap device, and it use zsmalloc as its allocator which has high density but may have fragmentation issues. Besides, page reclaim is hard since it will need more pages to uncompress and free just one page. ZRAM is preferred by embedded system which may not have any real swap device. Now both ZRAM and ZSWAP are in driver/staging tree, and in the mm community there are some disscussions of merging ZRAM into ZSWAP or viceversa, but no agreement yet. ZCACHE Handles file page compression but it is removed out of staging recently. From industry (led by Tang Jie, LSI) An LSI engineer introduced several new produces to us. The first is raid5/6 cards that it use full stripe writes to improve performance. The 2nd one he introduced is SandForce flash controller, who can understand data file types (data entropy) to reduce write amplification (WA) for nearly all writes. It's called DuraWrite and typical WA is 0.5. What's more, if enable its Dynamic Logical Capacity function module, the controller can do data compression which is transparent to upper layer. LSI testing shows that with this virtual capacity enables 1x TB drive can support up to 2x TB capacity, but the application must monitor free flash space to maintain optimal performance and to guard against free flash space exhaustion. He said the most useful application is for datebase. Another thing I think it's worth to mention is that a NV-DRAM memory in NMR/Raptor which is directly exposed to host system. Applications can directly access the NV-DRAM via a memory address - using standard system call mmap(). He said that it is very useful for database logging now. This kind of NVM produces are beginning to appear in recent years, and it is said that Samsung is building a research center in China for related produces. IMHO, NVM will bring an effect to current os layer especially on file system, e.g. its journaling may need to redesign to fully utilize these nonvolatile memory. OCFS2 (led by Canquan Shen) Without a doubt, HuaWei is the biggest contributor to OCFS2 in the past two years. They have posted 46 upstream patches and 39 patches have been merged. Their current project is based on 32/64 nodes cluster, but they also tried 128 nodes at the experimental stage. The major work they are working is to support ATS (atomic test and set), it can be works with DLM at the same time. Looks this idea is inspired by the vmware VMFS locking, i.e, http://blogs.vmware.com/vsphere/2012/05/vmfs-locking-uncovered.html CLK - 18th October 2013 Improving Linux Development with Better Tools (Andi Kleen) This talk focused on how to find/solve bugs along with the Linux complexity growing. Generally, we can do this with the following kind of tools: Static code checkers tools. e.g, sparse, smatch, coccinelle, clang checker, checkpatch, gcc -W/LTO, stanse. This can help check a lot of things, simple mistakes, complex problems, but the challenges are: some are very slow, false positives, may need a concentrated effort to get false positives down. Especially, no static checker I found can follow indirect calls (“OO in C”, common in kernel): struct foo_ops { int (*do_foo)(struct foo *obj); } foo->do_foo(foo); Dynamic runtime checkers, e.g, thread checkers, kmemcheck, lockdep. Ideally all kernel code would come with a test suite, then someone could run all the dynamic checkers. Fuzzers/test suites. e.g, Trinity is a great tool, it finds many bugs, but needs manual model for each syscall. Modern fuzzers around using automatic feedback, but notfor kernel yet: http://taviso.decsystem.org/making_software_dumber.pdf Debuggers/Tracers to understand code, e.g, ftrace, can dump on events/oops/custom triggers, but still too much overhead in many cases to run always during debug. Tools to read/understand source, e.g, grep/cscope work great for many cases, but do not understand indirect pointers (OO in C model used in kernel), give us all “do_foo” instances: struct foo_ops { int (*do_foo)(struct foo *obj); } = { .do_foo = my_foo }; foo>do_foo(foo); That would be great to have a cscope like tool that understands this based on types/initializers XFS: The High Performance Enterprise File System (Jeff Liu) [slides] I gave a talk for introducing the disk layout, unique features, as well as the recent changes.   The slides include some charts to reflect the performances between XFS/Btrfs/Ext4 for small files. About a dozen users raised their hands when I asking who has experienced with XFS. I remembered that when I asked the same question in LinuxCon/Japan, only 3 people raised their hands, but they are Chris Mason, Ric Wheeler, and another attendee. The attendee questions were mainly focused on stability, and comparison with other file systems. Linux Containers (Feng Gao) The speaker introduced us that the purpose for those kind of namespaces, include mount/UTS/IPC/Network/Pid/User, as well as the system API/ABI. For the userspace tools, He mainly focus on the Libvirt LXC rather than us(LXC). Libvirt LXC is another userspace container management tool, implemented as one type of libvirt driver, it can manage containers, create namespace, create private filesystem layout for container, Create devices for container and setup resources controller via cgroup. In this talk, Feng also mentioned another two possible new namespaces in the future, the 1st is the audit, but not sure if it should be assigned to user namespace or not. Another is about syslog, but the question is do we really need it? In-memory Compression (Bob Liu) Same as CLSF, a nice introduction that I have already mentioned above. Misc There were some other talks related to ACPI based memory hotplug, smart wake-affinity in scheduler etc., but my head is not big enough to record all those things. -- Jeff Liu

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  • The 2012 Gartner-FEI CFO Technology Survey -- Reviewed by Jeff Henley, Oracle Chairman

    - by Di Seghposs
    Jeff Henley and Oracle Business Analytics VP Rich Clayton break down the findings of the 2012 Gartner-FEI CFO Technology Survey.  The survey produced by Gartner gathers CFOs perceptions about technology, trends and planned improvements to operations.  Financial executives and IT professionals can use these findings to align spending and organizational priorities and understand how technology should support corporate performance.    Listen to the webcast with Jeff Henley and Rich Clayton - Watch Now » Download the full report for all the details -   Read the Report »        Key Findings ·        Despite slow economic growth, CFOs expect conservative, steady IT spending. ·        The CFOs role in IT investment has increased again in 2012. ·        The 45% of IT leaders that report to the CFO are more than report to any other executive, and represent an increase of 3%. ·        Business analytics needs technology improvement. ·        CFOs are focused on business analytics and business applications more than on technology. ·        Information, social, cloud and mobile technology trends are on CFOs' radar. ·        Focusing on corporate performance management (CPM) projects, 63% of CFOs plan to upgrade business intelligence (BI), analytics and performance management in 2012. ·        Despite advancements in strategy management technologies, CFOs still focus on lagging key performance indicators (KPIs) only. ·        A pace-layered strategy for applications is needed (92% of CFOs believe IT doesn't provide transformation/differentiation). ·        New applications in financial governance rank high on improving compliance and efficiency.

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  • User Experience Highlights in PeopleSoft and PeopleTools: Direct from Jeff Robbins

    - by mvaughan
    By Kathy Miedema, Oracle Applications User Experience  This is the fifth in a series of blog posts on the user experience (UX) highlights in various Oracle product families. The last posted interview was with Nadia Bendjedou, Senior Director, Product Strategy on upcoming Oracle E-Business Suite user experience highlights. You’ll see themes around productivity and efficiency, and get an early look at the latest mobile offerings coming through these product lines. Today’s post is on the user experience in PeopleSoft and PeopleTools. To learn more about what’s ahead, attend PeopleSoft or PeopleTools OpenWorld presentations.This interview is with Jeff Robbins, Senior Director, PeopleSoft Development. Jeff Robbins Q: How would you describe the vision you have for the user experience of PeopleSoft?A: Intuitive – Specifically, customers use PeopleSoft to help their employees do their day-to-day work, and the UI (user interface) has been helpful and assistive in that effort. If it’s not obvious what they need to do a task, then the UI isn’t working. So the application needs to make it simple for users to find information they need, complete a task, do all the things they are responsible for, and it really helps when the UI just makes sense. Productive – PeopleSoft is a tool used to support people to do their work, and a lot of users are measured by how much work they’re able to get done per hour, per day, etc. The UI needs to help them be as productive as possible, and can’t make them waste time or energy. The UI needs to reflect the type of work necessary for a task -- if it's data entry, the UI needs to assist the user to get information into the system. For analysts, the UI needs help users assess or analyze information in a particular way. Innovative – The concept of the UI being innovative is something we’ve been working on for years. It’s not just that we want to be seen as innovative, the fact is that companies are asking their employees to do more than they’ve ever asked before. More often companies want to roll out processes as employee or manager self-service, where an employee is responsible to review and maintain their own data. So we’ve had to reinvent, and ask,  “How can we modify the ways an employee interacts with our applications so that they can be more productive and efficient – even with tasks that are entirely unfamiliar?”  Our focus on innovation has forced us to design new ways for users to interact with the entire application.Q: How are the UX features you have delivered so far resonating with customers?  A: Resonating very well. We’re hearing tremendous responses from users, managers, decision-makers -- who are very happy with the improved user experience. Many of the individual features resonate well. Some have really hit home, others are better than they used to be but show us that there’s still room for improvement.A couple innovations really stand out; features that have a significant effect on how users interact with PeopleSoft.First, the deployment of PeopleSoft in a way that’s more like a consumer website with the PeopleSoft Home page and Dashboards.  This new approach is very web-centric, where users feel they’re coming to a website rather than logging into an enterprise application.  There’s lots of information from all around the organization collected in a way that feels very familiar to users. In order to do your job, you can come to this web site rather than having to learn how to log into an application and figure out a complicated menu. Companies can host these really rich web sites for employees that are home pages for accessing critical tasks and information. The UI elements of incorporating search into the whole navigation process is another hit. Rather than having to log in and choose a task from a menu, users come to the web site and begin a task by simply searching for data: themselves, another employee, a customer record, whatever.  The search results include the data along with a set of actions the user might take, completely eliminating the need to hunt through a complicated system menu. Search-centric navigation is really sitting well with customers who are trying to deploy an intuitive set of systems. Q: Are any UX highlights more popular than you expected them to be?  A: We introduced a feature called Pivot Grid in the last release, which is a combination of an interactive grid, like an Excel Pivot Table, along with a dynamic visual chart that automatically graphs the data. I wasn’t certain at first how extensively this would be used. It looked like an innovative tool, but it wasn’t clear how it would be incorporated in business process applications. The fact is that everyone who sees Pivot Grids is thrilled with that kind of interactivity.  It reflects the amount of analytical thinking customers are asking employees to do. Employees can’t just enter data any more. They must interact with it, analyze it, and make decisions. Pivot Grids fit into this way of working. Q: What can you tell us about PeopleSoft’s mobile offerings?A: A lot of customers are finding that mobile is the chief priority in their organization.  They tell us they want their employees to be able to access company information from their mobile devices.  Of course, not everyone has the same requirements, so we’re working to make sure we can help our customers accomplish what they’re trying to do.  We’ve already delivered a number of mobile features.  For instance, PeopleSoft home pages, dashboards and workcenters all work well on an iPad, straight out of the box.  We’ve delivered a number of key functions and tasks for mobile workers – those who are responsible for using a mobile device to manage inventory, for example.  Customers tell us they also need a holistic strategy, one that allows their employees to access nearly every task from a mobile device.  While we don’t expect users to do extensive data entry from their smartphone, it makes sense that they have access to company information and systems while away from their desk.  That’s where our strategy is going now.  We plan to unveil a number of new mobile offerings at OpenWorld.  Some will be available then, some shortly after. Q: What else are you working on now that you think is going to be exciting to customers at Oracle OpenWorld?A: Our next release -- the big thing is PeopleSoft 9.2, and we’ll be talking about the huge amount of work that’s gone into the next versions. A new toolset, 8.53, will be coming, and there’s a lot to talk about there, and the next generation of PeopleSoft 9.2.  We have a ton of new stuff coming.Q: What do you want PeopleSoft customers to know? A: We have been focusing on the user experience in PeopleSoft as a very high priority for the last 4 years, and it’s had interesting effects. One thing is that the application is better, more usable.  We’ve made visible improvements. Another aspect is that in customers’ minds, the PeopleSoft brand is being reinvigorated. Customers invested in PeopleSoft years ago, and then they weren’t sure where PeopleSoft was going.  This investment in the UI and overall user experience keeps PeopleSoft current, innovative and fresh.  Customers  are able to take advantage of a lot of new features, even on the older applications, simply by upgrading their PeopleTools. The interest in that ability has been tremendous. Knowing they have a lot of these features available -- right now, that’s pretty huge. There’s been a tremendous amount of positive response, just on the fact that we’re focusing on the user experience. Editor’s note: For more on PeopleSoft and PeopleTools user experience highlights, visit the Usable Apps web site.To find out more about these enhancements at Openworld, be sure to check out these sessions: GEN8928     General Session: PeopleSoft Update and Product RoadmapCON9183     PeopleSoft PeopleTools Technology Roadmap CON8932     New Functional PeopleSoft PeopleTools Capabilities for the Line-of-Business UserCON9196     PeopleSoft PeopleTools Roadmap: Mobile ApplicationsCON9186     Case Study: Delivering a Groundbreaking User Interface with PeopleSoft PeopleTools

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  • Exceptional DBA 2011 Jeff Moden on why you should enter in 2012

    - by RedAndTheCommunity
    My "reign" as the Red Gate Exceptional DBA is almost over and I was asked to say a few words about this wonderful award. Having been one of those folks that shied away from entering the contest during the first 3 years of the award, I thought I'd spend the time encouraging DBAs of all types to enter. Winning this award has some obvious benefits. You win a trip to PASS including money towards your flight, paid hotel stay, and, of course, paid admission. You win a wonderful bundle of software from Red Gate to make your job as a DBA a whole lot easier. You also win some pretty incredible notoriety for your resume. After all, it's not everyone who wins a worldwide contest. To date, there are only 4 of us in the world who have won this award. You could be number 5! For me, all of that pales in comparison to what I found out during the entry process. I'm very confident in my skills, but I'm also humble. It was suggested to me that I enter the contest when it first started. I just couldn't bring myself to nominate myself. When the 2011 nomination period opened up, several people again suggested that I enter, so I swallowed hard and asked several co-workers to have a look at the online nomination form and, if they thought me worthy, to write a nomination for me. I won't bore you with the details, but what they wrote about me was one of the most incredible rewards that I could ever have hoped to receive. I had no idea of the impact that I'd made on my co-workers. Even if I hadn't made it to the top 5 for the award, I had already won something very near and dear that no one can ever top. "Even if I hadn't made it to the top 5 for the award, I had already won something very near and dear that no one can ever top." There's only one named winner and 4 "runners up" in this competition every year but don't let that discourage you. Enter this competition. Even if you work in the proverbial "Mom'n'Pop" shop, get your boss and the people you work with directly to nominate you. Even if you don't make it to the top 5, you might just find out that you're more of a winner than you think. If you're too proud to ask them, then take the time to nominate yourself instead of shying away like I did for the first 3 years. You work hard as a DBA and, as David Poole once said, if you're the first person that people ask for help rather than one of the last, then you're probably an Exceptional DBA. It's time to stand up and be counted! Win or lose, the entry process can be a huge reward in itself. It was for me. Thank you, Red Gate, for giving me such a wonderful opportunity. Thanks for listening folks and for all that you do as DBAs. As 'Red Green' says, "We're all in this together and I'm pullin' for ya". --Jeff Moden Red Gate Exceptional DBA 2011

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  • Exceptional DBA 2011 Jeff Moden on why you should enter in 2012

    - by Red and the Community
    My "reign" as the Red Gate Exceptional DBA is almost over and I was asked to say a few words about this wonderful award. Having been one of those folks that shied away from entering the contest during the first 3 years of the award, I thought I’d spend the time encouraging DBAs of all types to enter. Winning this award has some obvious benefits. You win a trip to PASS including money towards your flight, paid hotel stay, and, of course, paid admission. You win a wonderful bundle of software from Red Gate to make your job as a DBA a whole lot easier. You also win some pretty incredible notoriety for your resume. After all, it’s not everyone who wins a worldwide contest. To date, there are only 4 of us in the world who have won this award. You could be number 5! For me, all of that pales in comparison to what I found out during the entry process. I’m very confident in my skills, but I’m also humble. It was suggested to me that I enter the contest when it first started. I just couldn’t bring myself to nominate myself. When the 2011 nomination period opened up, several people again suggested that I enter, so I swallowed hard and asked several co-workers to have a look at the online nomination form and, if they thought me worthy, to write a nomination for me. I won’t bore you with the details, but what they wrote about me was one of the most incredible rewards that I could ever have hoped to receive. I had no idea of the impact that I’d made on my co-workers. Even if I hadn’t made it to the top 5 for the award, I had already won something very near and dear that no one can ever top. “Even if I hadn’t made it to the top 5 for the award, I had already won something very near and dear that no one can ever top.” There’s only one named winner and 4 "runners up" in this competition every year but don’t let that discourage you. Enter this competition. Even if you work in the proverbial "Mom’n'Pop" shop, get your boss and the people you work with directly to nominate you. Even if you don’t make it to the top 5, you might just find out that you’re more of a winner than you think. If you’re too proud to ask them, then take the time to nominate yourself instead of shying away like I did for the first 3 years. You work hard as a DBA and, as David Poole once said, if you’re the first person that people ask for help rather than one of the last, then you’re probably an Exceptional DBA. It’s time to stand up and be counted! Win or lose, the entry process can be a huge reward in itself. It was for me. Thank you, Red Gate, for giving me such a wonderful opportunity. Thanks for listening folks and for all that you do as DBAs. As ‘Red Green’ says, "We’re all in this together and I’m pullin’ for ya". –Jeff Moden Red Gate Exceptional DBA 2011

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  • Exceptional DBA 2011 Jeff Moden on why you should enter in 2012

    - by RedAndTheCommunity
    My "reign" as the Red Gate Exceptional DBA is almost over and I was asked to say a few words about this wonderful award. Having been one of those folks that shied away from entering the contest during the first 3 years of the award, I thought I'd spend the time encouraging DBAs of all types to enter. Winning this award has some obvious benefits. You win a trip to PASS including money towards your flight, paid hotel stay, and, of course, paid admission. You win a wonderful bundle of software from Red Gate to make your job as a DBA a whole lot easier. You also win some pretty incredible notoriety for your resume. After all, it's not everyone who wins a worldwide contest. To date, there are only 4 of us in the world who have won this award. You could be number 5! For me, all of that pales in comparison to what I found out during the entry process. I'm very confident in my skills, but I'm also humble. It was suggested to me that I enter the contest when it first started. I just couldn't bring myself to nominate myself. When the 2011 nomination period opened up, several people again suggested that I enter, so I swallowed hard and asked several co-workers to have a look at the online nomination form and, if they thought me worthy, to write a nomination for me. I won't bore you with the details, but what they wrote about me was one of the most incredible rewards that I could ever have hoped to receive. I had no idea of the impact that I'd made on my co-workers. Even if I hadn't made it to the top 5 for the award, I had already won something very near and dear that no one can ever top. "Even if I hadn't made it to the top 5 for the award, I had already won something very near and dear that no one can ever top." There's only one named winner and 4 "runners up" in this competition every year but don't let that discourage you. Enter this competition. Even if you work in the proverbial "Mom'n'Pop" shop, get your boss and the people you work with directly to nominate you. Even if you don't make it to the top 5, you might just find out that you're more of a winner than you think. If you're too proud to ask them, then take the time to nominate yourself instead of shying away like I did for the first 3 years. You work hard as a DBA and, as David Poole once said, if you're the first person that people ask for help rather than one of the last, then you're probably an Exceptional DBA. It's time to stand up and be counted! Win or lose, the entry process can be a huge reward in itself. It was for me. Thank you, Red Gate, for giving me such a wonderful opportunity. Thanks for listening folks and for all that you do as DBAs. As 'Red Green' says, "We're all in this together and I'm pullin' for ya". --Jeff Moden Red Gate Exceptional DBA 2011

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  • Looking for more details about "Group varint encoding/decoding" presented in Jeff's slides

    - by Mickey Shine
    I noticed that in Jeff's slides "Challenges in Building Large-Scale Information Retrieval Systems", which can also be downloaded here: http://research.google.com/people/jeff/WSDM09-keynote.pdf, a method of integers compression called "group varint encoding" was mentioned. It was said much faster than 7 bits per byte integer encoding (2X more). I am very interested in this and looking for an implementation of this, or any more details that could help me implement this by myself. I am not a pro and new to this, and any help is welcome!

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  • Google Rules for Retail

    - by David Dorf
    In the book What Would Google Do?, Jeff Jarvis outlines ten "Google Rules" that define how Google acts.  These rules help define how Web 2.0 businesses operate today and into the future.  While there's a chapter in the book on applying these rules to the retail industry, it wasn't very in-depth.  So I've decided to more directly apply the rules to retail, along with some notable examples of success.  The table below shows Jeff's Google Rule, some Industry Examples, and New Retailer Rules that I created. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} table.MsoTableGrid {mso-style-name:"Table Grid"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-priority:59; mso-style-unhide:no; border:solid black 1.0pt; mso-border-themecolor:text1; mso-border-alt:solid black .5pt; mso-border-themecolor:text1; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-border-insideh:.5pt solid black; mso-border-insideh-themecolor:text1; mso-border-insidev:.5pt solid black; mso-border-insidev-themecolor:text1; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Google Rule Industry Examples New Retailer Rule New Relationship Your worst customer is your friend; you best customer is your partner Newegg.com lets manufacturers respond to customer comments that are critical of the product, and their EggXpert site lets customers help other customers. Listen to what your customers are saying about you.  Convert the critics to fans and the fans to influencers. New Architecture Join a network; be a platform Tesco and BestBuy released APIs for their product catalogs so third-parties could create new applications. Become a destination for information. New Publicness Life is public, so is business Zappos and WholeFoods founders are prolific tweeters/bloggers, sharing their opinions and connecting to customers.  It's not always pretty, but it's genuine. Be transparent.  Share both your successes and failures with your customers. New Society Elegant organization Wet Seal helps their customers assemble outfits and show them off to each other.  Barnes & Noble has a community site that includes a bookclub. Communities of your customers already exist, so help them organize better. New Economy Mass market is dead; long live the mass of niches lululemon found a niche for yoga inspired athletic wear.  Threadless uses crowd-sourcing to design short-runs of T-shirts. Serve small markets with niche products. New Business Reality Decide what business you're in When Lowes realized catering to women brought the men along, their sales increased. Customers want experiences to go with the products they buy. New Attitude Trust the people and listen In 2008 Starbucks launched MyStartbucksIdea to solicit ideas from their customers. Use social networks as additional data points for making better merchandising decisions. New Ethic Be honest and transparent; don't be evil Target is giving away reusable shopping bags for Earth Day.  Kohl's has outfitted 67 stores with solar arrays. Being green earns customers' respect and lowers costs too. New Speed Life is live H&M and Zara keep up with fashion trends. Be prepared to pounce on you customers' fickle interests. New Imperatives Encourage, enable and protect innovation 1-800-Flowers was the first do sales in Facebook and an early adopter of mobile commerce.  The Sears Personal Shopper mobile app finds products based on a photo. Give your staff permission to fail so innovation won't be stifled. Jeff will be a keynote speaker at Crosstalk, our upcoming annual user conference, so I'm looking forward to hearing more of his perspective on retail and the new economy.

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  • New Rules of Retail

    - by David Dorf
    I've been on vacation and preparing for Crosstalk, so its been a while since I've posted. I've seen the agenda, and I can assure you Crosstalk will be lots of fun. In addition to hearing from lots of retailers, we'll also be doing a little bowling and racing on the track. I'll be around for the sessions, the ORUG meetings, and our Customer Advisory Board so please be sure to say hello. I also just completed a white paper based on a previous blog posting which in turn was based on learnings from reading What Would Google Do? For each of Jarvis' ten rules, I discuss the concept in the context of retail and provide real-world examples. No mention of products or sales pitches at all. You can download the paper here. It will put you in the right frame of mind for hearing Jeff Jarvis speak at Crosstalk. For those that can't make it, I'll post some highlights afterwards.

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  • Learning to Grow

    - by jack.flynn
    A Conversation with Ted Simpson of HEUG A great place to revisit Oracle OpenWorld year round is OracleWebVideo on YouTube. Oracle Magazine Senior Editor Jeff Erickson sat down with Ted Simpson at last year's Oracle OpenWorld to find out how the Higher Education Users Group (HEUG) is helping hundreds of member institutions and thousands of individuals across the globe meet the technological challenges in colleges and universities. Simpson joined HEUG back when it was a PeopleSoft special interest group. Now that higher education institutions have expanded into IT infrastructures the size of global corporations or small municipalities, his user group has also been challenged by growth.

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  • Le département américain de la défense adopte agile et la méthode Scrum, sous les conseils de Jeff Sutherland, inventeur de Scrum

    Le département américain de la défense adopte agile et la méthode Scrum Sous les conseils de Jeff Sutherland inventeur de ScrumAgile séduit de plus en plus de professionnels de l'IT, après son adoption par Microsoft c'est au tour du puissant département américain de la défense (DoD), qui passera d'un modèle en cascade à un modèle agile basé sur la méthode Scrum, sous les conseils avisés du docteur Jeff Sutherland, inventeur de la méthode et actuel PDG de Scrum Inc.A l'origine de cette initiative,...

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  • Social Network Stalking

    - by David Dorf
    Think about this: By reading this blog, you and I are connected. We have this blog and its topics in common, so there's a chance we have other things in common as well. In any relationship there is a degree of trust and influence. If you trust me, at least in terms of particular subjects, then I have some influence over you. If I buy an iPad, then there's an opportunity for me to influence your possible purchase of an over-hyped tablet that you don't really need. So what could a retailer do with this? Retailers that have fans and followers should assume that the friends of those fans and followers are more susceptible to their marketing efforts. If I'm a fan of Apple, then Apple will be more successful marketing to my friends than marketing to random people. Intuitively that makes sense, at least to me. Companies like 33Across and Pursway are already putting this theory into practice, and achieving some interesting results. Jeff Jarvis, who by-the-way is speaking at CrossTalk this year, has been discussing the power of influencers in social networks. In his blog he rails against marketers and says "messages and influence aren't the future of marketing; conversations and relationships are." Valuable messages will be passed on because they are valuable, not because someone has the power to exert influence. True enough, but that won't stop the efforts underway to leverage social networks for more targeted advertising. From a business perspective, this sounds like a goldmine to me; on a personal level, it's a bit creepy.

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  • They Wrote The Book On It

    - by steve.diamond
    First of all, an apology to you all for my not posting this yesterday, when I should have. For those of you bloggers out there, you know the difference between "Save" and "Preview." But I temporarily forgot it. Nevertheless, while I'm not impressed with this mishap, I'm blown away by the initiative three of my colleagues have taken. Jeff Saenger, Tim Koehler, and Louis Peters, recently wrote a book, "Oracle CRM On Demand Deployment Guide." Not only that, they got this book PUBLISHED. These guys know their stuff. They have worked in the CRM industry for many years. And trust me, they command a lot of respect inside this organization. In the words of Louis Peters (who posted this verbiage yesterday on LinkedIn), "We've assembled all the best practices and lessons learned over the past six years working with CRM On Demand. The book covers a range of topics - working with SaaS-based applications, planning and executing a successful rollout, designing elegant and high-performing applications, and working effectively with Oracle. We even included several sample designs based on successful real-world deployments. Our main target audience is the CRM On Demand project team - sponsors, project managers, administrators, developers - really anyone planning, implementing or maintaining the application." Now these guys don't know it, but I'll be interviewing one of them and including audio excerpts of that conversation right here next Wednesday. In the meantime, if you want to learn more about successful CRM deployments in general, and working with Oracle CRM On Demand in particular, you should check out this book.

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  • Why are marketing employees, product managers, etc. deserving of their own office, yet programmers are jammed in a room as many as possible?

    - by TheImirOfGroofunkistan
    I don't understand why many (many) companies treat software developers like they are assembly line workers making widgets. Joel Spolsky has a great example of the problems this creates: With programmers, it's especially hard. Productivity depends on being able to juggle a lot of little details in short term memory all at once. Any kind of interruption can cause these details to come crashing down. When you resume work, you can't remember any of the details (like local variable names you were using, or where you were up to in implementing that search algorithm) and you have to keep looking these things up, which slows you down a lot until you get back up to speed. Here's the simple algebra. Let's say (as the evidence seems to suggest) that if we interrupt a programmer, even for a minute, we're really blowing away 15 minutes of productivity. For this example, lets put two programmers, Jeff and Mutt, in open cubicles next to each other in a standard Dilbert veal-fattening farm. Mutt can't remember the name of the Unicode version of the strcpy function. He could look it up, which takes 30 seconds, or he could ask Jeff, which takes 15 seconds. Since he's sitting right next to Jeff, he asks Jeff. Jeff gets distracted and loses 15 minutes of productivity (to save Mutt 15 seconds). Now let's move them into separate offices with walls and doors. Now when Mutt can't remember the name of that function, he could look it up, which still takes 30 seconds, or he could ask Jeff, which now takes 45 seconds and involves standing up (not an easy task given the average physical fitness of programmers!). So he looks it up. So now Mutt loses 30 seconds of productivity, but we save 15 minutes for Jeff. Ahhh! Quote Link More Spolsky on Offices Why don't managers and owner's see this?

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  • Why do marketing employees get their own office, yet programmers are jammed in a room as many as possible?

    - by TheImirOfGroofunkistan
    I don't understand why many (many) companies treat software developers like they are assembly line workers making widgets. Joel Spolsky has a great example of the problems this creates: With programmers, it's especially hard. Productivity depends on being able to juggle a lot of little details in short term memory all at once. Any kind of interruption can cause these details to come crashing down. When you resume work, you can't remember any of the details (like local variable names you were using, or where you were up to in implementing that search algorithm) and you have to keep looking these things up, which slows you down a lot until you get back up to speed. Here's the simple algebra. Let's say (as the evidence seems to suggest) that if we interrupt a programmer, even for a minute, we're really blowing away 15 minutes of productivity. For this example, lets put two programmers, Jeff and Mutt, in open cubicles next to each other in a standard Dilbert veal-fattening farm. Mutt can't remember the name of the Unicode version of the strcpy function. He could look it up, which takes 30 seconds, or he could ask Jeff, which takes 15 seconds. Since he's sitting right next to Jeff, he asks Jeff. Jeff gets distracted and loses 15 minutes of productivity (to save Mutt 15 seconds). Now let's move them into separate offices with walls and doors. Now when Mutt can't remember the name of that function, he could look it up, which still takes 30 seconds, or he could ask Jeff, which now takes 45 seconds and involves standing up (not an easy task given the average physical fitness of programmers!). So he looks it up. So now Mutt loses 30 seconds of productivity, but we save 15 minutes for Jeff. Ahhh! Quote Link More Spolsky on Offices Why don't managers and owner's see this?

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  • How can I transfer files to a Kindle Fire with a Micro-USB cable?

    - by Jeff
    I'm running Ubuntu 11.10, and when I connect my Kindle Fire to my computer via micro usb, it is not recognized automatically. Other usb devices, such as my ipod and digital camera, are recognized just fine. It does not appear to be a usb power issue, since the Kindle Fire wakes up from sleeping when it is plugged in. I never get the message on the Kindle telling me it is ready to accept files from the computer, though. Here are the last 15 lines of dmesg after plugging the kindle in: [email protected]:~$ dmesg | tail -n 15 [45918.269671] ieee80211 phy0: wl_ops_bss_info_changed: arp filtering: enabled true, count 1 (implement) [45929.072149] wlan0: no IPv6 routers present [46743.224217] usb 1-1: new high speed USB device number 5 using ehci_hcd [46743.364623] scsi8 : usb-storage 1-1:1.0 [46744.366102] scsi 8:0:0:0: Direct-Access Amazon Kindle 0001 PQ: 0 ANSI: 2 [46744.366356] scsi: killing requests for dead queue [46744.372494] scsi: killing requests for dead queue [46744.384510] scsi: killing requests for dead queue [46744.392348] scsi: killing requests for dead queue [46744.392731] scsi: killing requests for dead queue [46744.396853] scsi: killing requests for dead queue [46744.397214] scsi: killing requests for dead queue [46744.400795] scsi: killing requests for dead queue [46744.401589] sd 8:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg2 type 0 [46744.407520] sd 8:0:0:0: [sdb] Attached SCSI removable disk And here are my mounted filesystems: [email protected]:~$ df Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on /dev/sda1 298594984 174663712 108763480 62% / udev 1407684 4 1407680 1% /dev tmpfs 566924 896 566028 1% /run none 5120 0 5120 0% /run/lock none 1417308 300 1417008 1% /run/shm /home/jeff/.Private 298594984 174663712 108763480 62% /home/jeff I should note that, since I got Dropbox working on my Kindle, the usb is no longer strictly necessary, but as a matter of principle I'd love to get it working.

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  • Podcast Show Notes: Evolving Enterprise Architecture

    - by Bob Rhubart
    Back in March Oracle ACE Directors Mike van Alst (IT-Eye) and Jordan Braunstein (Visual Integrator Consulting) and Oracle product manager Jeff Davies participated in an ArchBeat virtual meet-up. The resulting conversation quickly turned to the changing nature of enterprise architecture and the various forces driving that change. All four parts of that wide-ranging conversation are now available. Listen to Part 1 Listen to Part 2 Listen to Part 3 Listen to Part 4 As you’ll hear, Mike, Jordan, and Jeff bring unique perspectives and opinions to this very lively conversation. These are three very sharp, very experienced guys, as and you might expect, they don’t always walk in lock-step when it comes to EA. You can learn more about Mike, Jordan, and Jeff – and share your opinions with them -- through the links below: Mike van Alst Blog | Twitter | LinkedIn | Business |Oracle Mix | Oracle ACE Profile Jordan Braunstein Blog | Twitter | LinkedIn | Business | Oracle Mix | Oracle ACE Profile Jeff Davies Homepage | Blog | LinkedIn | Oracle Mix (Also check out Jeff’s book: The Definitive Guide to SOA: Oracle Service Bus) Up Next Next week’s program features highlights from the panel discussion at the Oracle Technology Architect Day event held in Anaheim, CA on May 19. You’ll hear from Oracle ACE Directors Basheer Khan and Floyd Teter, Oracle virtualization expert and former Sun Microsystems principal engineer Jeff Savit, Oracle security analyst Geri Born, and event MC Ralf Dossman, Director of SOA and Middleware in Oracle’s Enterprise Solutions Group. Stay tuned: RSS

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  • SQL SERVER – Service Broker and CAP_CPU_PERCENT – Limiting SQL Server Instances to CPU Usage

    - by pinaldave
    I have mentioned several times on this blog that the best part of blogging is the questions I receive from readers. They are often very interesting. The questions from readers give me a good idea what other readers might be thinking as well. After reading my earlier article Simple Example to Configure Resource Governor – Introduction to Resource Governor – I received an email from a reader and we exchanged a few emails. After exchanging emails we both figured out what is going on. It was indeed interesting and reader suggested to that I should blog about it.  I asked for permission to publish his name but he does not like the attention so we will just call him Jeff. I have converted our emails into chat for easy consumption. Jeff: Your script does not work at all. I think either there is a bug in SQL Server. Pinal: Would you please explain in detail? Jeff: Your code does not limit the CPU usage? Pinal: How did you measure it? Jeff: Well, we have third party tools for it but let us say I have limited the resources for Reporting Services and used your script described in your blog. After that I ran only reporting service workload the CPU is still used more than 100% and it is not limited to 30% as described in your script. Clearly something is wrong somewhere. Pinal: Did you say you ONLY ran reporting server load? Jeff: Yeah, to validate I ran ONLY reporting server load and CPU did not throttle at 30% as per your script. Pinal: Oh! I get it here is the answer - CAP_CPU_PERCENT = 30. Use it. Jeff: What is that, I think your earlier script says it will throttle the Reporting Service workload and Application/OLTP workload and balance it. Pinal: Exactly, that is correct. Jeff: You need to write more in email buddy! Just like your blogs, your answers do not make sense! No Offense! Pinal: Hmm…feedback well taken. Let me try again. In SQL Server 2012 there are a few enhancements with regards to SQL Server Resource Governor. One of the enhancement is how the resources are allocated. Let me explain you with examples. Configuration: [Read Earlier Post] Reporting Workload: MIN_CPU_PERCENT=0, MAX_CPU_PERCENT=30 Application/OLTP Workload: MIN_CPU_PERCENT=50, MAX_CPU_PERCENT=100 Example 1: If there is only Reporting Workload on the server: SQL Server will not limit usage of CPU to only 30% workload but SQL Server instance will use all available CPU (if needed). In another word in this scenario it will use more than 30% CPU. Example 2: If there is Reproting Workload and heavy Application/OLTP workload: SQL Server will allocate a maximum of 30% CPU resources to Reporting Workload and allocate remaining resources to heavy application/OLTP workload. The reason for this enhancement is for better utilization of the resources. Let us think, if there is only single workload, which we have limited to max CPU usage to 30%. The other unused available CPU resources is now wasted. In this situation SQL Server allows the workload to use more than 30% resources leading to overall improved/optimized performance. However, in the case of multiple workload where lots of resources are needed the limits specified in MAX_CPU_PERCENT are acknowledged. Example 3: If there is a situation where the max CPU workload has to be enforced: This is a very interesting scenario, in the case when the max CPU workload has to be enforced irrespective of the workload and enhanced algorithm, the keyword CAP_CPU_PERCENT is essential. It specifies a hard cap on the CPU bandwidth that all requests in the resource pool will receive. It will never let CPU usage for reporting workload to go over 30% in our case. You can use the key word as follows: -- Creating Resource Pool for Report Server CREATE RESOURCE POOL ReportServerPool WITH ( MIN_CPU_PERCENT=0, MAX_CPU_PERCENT=30, CAP_CPU_PERCENT=40, MIN_MEMORY_PERCENT=0, MAX_MEMORY_PERCENT=30) GO Notice that there is MAX_CPU_PERCENT=30 and CAP_CPU_PERCENT=40, what it means is that when SQL Server Instance is under heavy load under different workload it will use the maximum CPU at 30%. However, when the SQL Server instance is not under workload it will go over the 30% limit. However, as CAP_CPU_PERCENT is set to 40, it will not go over 40% in any case by limiting the usage of CPU. CAP_CPU_PERCENT puts a hard limit on the resources usage by workload. Jeff: Nice Pinal, you should blog about it. [A day passes by] Pinal: Jeff, it is done! Click here to read it. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology Tagged: Service Broker

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  • hierachical query to return final row

    - by jeff
    I have a hierarchical query that doesn't return an expected row (employee badge = 444). TABLE: hr_data badge fname supervisor_badge 111 Jeff 222 222 Joe 333 333 John 444 444 Tom 444 SQL: SELECT CONNECT_BY_ISCYCLE As IC, badge, fname, supervisor_badge FROM hr_data START WITH badge = '111' CONNECT BY NOCYCLE badge = PRIOR supervisor_badge What is Returned: IC badge fname supervisor_badge 0 111 Jeff 222 0 222 Joe 333 1 333 John 444 What is Expected: IC badge fname supervisor_badge 0 111 Jeff 222 0 222 Joe 333 **0** 333 John 444 **1** 444 Tom 444 How can I get this query to return the employee Tom and then stop?

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  • Podcast Show Notes: Evolving Enterprise Architecture

    - by Bob Rhubart
    The latest series of ArchBeat podcast programs grew out of another virtual meet-up, held on March 11. As with previous meet-ups, I sent out a general invitation to the roster of previous ArchBeat panelists to join me on Skype to talk about whatever topic comes up. For this event, Oracle ACE Directors Mike van Alst and Jordan Braunstein  showed up, along with Oracle product manager Jeff Davies.  The result was an impressive and wide-ranging discussion on the evolution of Enterprise Architecture, the role of technology in EA, the impact of social computing, and challenge of having three generations of IT people at work in the enterprise – each with different perspectives on technology. Mike, Jordan, and Jeff talked for more than an hour, and the conversation was so good that slicing and dicing it to meet the time constraints for these podcasts has been a challenge. The first two segments of the conversation are now available. Listen to Part 1 Listen to Part 2 Part 3 will go live next week, and an unprecedented fourth segment will follow. These guys have strong opinions, and while there is common ground, they don’t always agree. But isn’t that what a community is all about? I suspect that you’ll have questions and comments after listening, so I encourage you to reach out to Mike, Jordan, and Jeff  via the following links: Mike van Alst Blog | Twitter | LinkedIn | Business |Oracle Mix | Oracle ACE Profile Jordan Braunstein Blog | Twitter | LinkedIn | Business | Oracle Mix | Oracle ACE Profile Jeff Davies Homepage | Blog | LinkedIn | Oracle Mix (Also check out Jeff’s book: The Definitive Guide to SOA: Oracle Service Bus)   Coming Soon ArchBeat’s microphones were there for the panel discussions at the recent Oracle Technology Network Architect Days in Dallas and Anaheim. Excerpts from those conversations will be available soon. Stay tuned: RSS Technorati Tags: oracle,otn,enterprise architecture,podcast. arch2arch,archbeat del.icio.us Tags: oracle,otn,enterprise architecture,podcast. arch2arch,archbeat

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  • Setup mod-rewrite

    - by Publiccert
    I'm trying to setup mod-rewrite for a few servers. The code lives in /home/jeff/www/upload/application/ However, this is what's happening. It appears to be a problem with mod-rewrite since it's appending code.py to the beginning of the directory: The requested URL /code.py/home/jeff/www/upload/application/ was not found on this server. Here are the rules. Which one is the culprit? WSGIScriptAlias / /home/jeff/www/upload/application Alias /static /home/jeff/www/upload/public_html <Directory /home/jeff/www/upload/application> SetHandler wsgi-script Options ExecCGI FollowSymLinks </Directory> AddType text/html .py <Location /> RewriteEngine on RewriteBase / RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/static RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^(/.*)+code.py/ RewriteRule ^(.*)$ code.py/$1 [PT] </Location> </VirtualHost>

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