Search Results

Search found 3524 results on 141 pages for 'programmer'.

Page 10/141 | < Previous Page | 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17  | Next Page >

  • sharing life experience

    - by gcc
    I am a student of computer engineering. I have never done any programming before, and as you can understand, I don't know how to study it or how to make my own programs. My English is weak [edited for clarity - ed], and so if you don't like the choices I list, please feel free to provide others. How should I study? How should I learn programming languages? Study completely from a book. Don't study from a book, just try writing code. A mix of the two; study from a book, then try writing code. Study half the book, then write the code by hand on paper. Listed to the teacher, then try to solve general problems (those not from any specific chapter). I have send that question to stackoverflow before when I am at first year. Now, I want to construct webpage to guide fresh students by giving advise of yours and mines.Maybe, you wonder Why I want to construct webpage , I just want help the other student. I am giving a link to that question < http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3389465/how-should-i-study-programming-languagess If you have other advice, feel free. EDIT: This web cite, I think , is constructed to share member's life experience and also I know these experiences is valuable . So I have no right to want your opinion, But I want your opinion / experience even if you think it is not so helpful to other

    Read the article

  • Who does code coverage testing?

    - by Athiruban
    Recently, I was given an opportunity to increase the code coverage in a project based on Java Swing, MySQL and other technologies. They told me to bring the code coverage to 100%, while it was only 45% at the time I joined. I am just starting, not a professional developer, right from the beginning I felt bad even though I write and understand computer programs well. (The developed code contains a lot of technical stuff like Generics and no documentation about the code is available.) Has anyone experienced the same situation before? Please tell who is the right person to do the job.

    Read the article

  • As a Junior Software Engineer should I say that something has been done wrong if I feel so?

    - by Why123
    I recently joined a company and it is my first job. When reading the code base, I felt that the code was not well written. It seemed to me that the code had most of the problems mentioned here and also seemed to have an Anemic Domain Model. There are no unit tests and they don't employ any code quality checking tools like findbugs or pmd. The problem I have is that the code is very difficult to understand. Maybe my conclusions are wrong because I am not that experienced. I need advice on whether to communicate the above facts to a superior or not. If I am to communicate, to whom(Tech Lead, Architect, Product Manager) and how? And if I do communicate will they take it badly since I'm a Junior and has no experience?

    Read the article

  • What if globals make sense?

    - by Greg
    I've got a value that many objects need. For example, a financial application with different investments as objects, and most of them need the current interest rate. I was hoping to encapsulate my "financial environment" as an object, with the interest rate as a property. But, sibling objects that need that value can't get to it. So how do I share values among many objects without over-coupling my design? Obviously I'm thinking about this wrong.

    Read the article

  • Started wrong with a project. Should I start over?

    - by solidsnake
    I'm a beginner web developer (one year of experience). A couple of weeks after graduating, I got offered a job to build a web application for a company whose owner is not much of a tech guy. He recruited me to avoid theft of his idea, the high cost of development charged by a service company, and to have someone young he can trust onboard to maintain the project for the long run (I came to these conclusions by myself long after being hired). Cocky as I was back then, with a diploma in computer science, I accepted the offer thinking I can build anything. I was calling the shots. After some research I settled on PHP, and started with plain PHP, no objects, just ugly procedural code. Two months later, everything was getting messy, and it was hard to make any progress. The web application is huge. So I decided to check out an MVC framework that would make my life easier. That's where I stumbled upon the cool kid in the PHP community: Laravel. I loved it, it was easy to learn, and I started coding right away. My code looked cleaner, more organized. It looked very good. But again the web application was huge. The company was pressuring me to deliver the first version, which they wanted to deploy, obviously, and start seeking customers. Because Laravel was fun to work with, it made me remember why I chose this industry in the first place - something I forgot while stuck in the shitty education system. So I started working on small projects at night, reading about methodologies and best practice. I revisited OOP, moved on to object-oriented design and analysis, and read Uncle Bob's book Clean Code. This helped me realize that I really knew nothing. I did not know how to build software THE RIGHT WAY. But at this point it was too late, and now I'm almost done. My code is not clean at all, just spaghetti code, a real pain to fix a bug, all the logic is in the controllers, and there is little object oriented design. I'm having this persistent thought that I have to rewrite the whole project. However, I can't do it... They keep asking when is it going to be all done. I can not imagine this code deployed on a server. Plus I still know nothing about code efficiency and the web application's performance. On one hand, the company is waiting for the product and can not wait anymore. On the other hand I can't see myself going any further with the actual code. I could finish up, wrap it up and deploy, but god only knows what might happen when people start using it. What do you think I should do?

    Read the article

  • Is it good to review programs with seniors and boss even if it is working fine?

    - by Himanshu
    In my company, before delivery of any project, my boss asks my seniors to review programs written by me or other team members or sometimes boss also sits with us for review. I think it is a good way of getting knowledge, but sometimes when programs are working fine, they don't work same after review and I need to look again into my program. They says that review helps to optimize program and query execution, but can we prefer optimization over actual functioning of program?

    Read the article

  • Is not being paid for training normal?

    - by user23838
    I'm a recent college graduate, and I recently had a interview with a company for an entry-level programming job. The company told me that they require two months of unpaid training for all entry level programmers. The reason given was that since they are providing free training, there wouldn't be any compensation. Is this normal? Update For others junior developers looking at this: Don't go for these type of scams. This was my first interview. I interview with 10 other companies around the area and got about 9 job offers from them. I worked for a fortune 50 company for 9 months with good pay and recently found a better opportunity for even better pay and better work. I guess moral is to be patient and have confidence in yourself.

    Read the article

  • how to really master a programming language

    - by cprogcr
    I know that learning a language, you can simply buy a book, follow the examples, and whenever possible try the exercises. But what I'm really looking is how to master the language once you've learned it. Now I know that experience is one major factor, but what about learning the internals of the language, what is the underlying structure, etc. There are articles out there saying read this book, read that book, make this game and that game. But to me this doesn't mean to master a language. I want to be able to read other people's code and understand it, no matter how hard that is. To understand when to use a function and when another, etc etc. The list could go on and on but I believe I've made the point. :) And finally, take whatever language as an example if needed, though best would be if C was taken as an example.

    Read the article

  • Is the phrase "never reinvent the wheel" suitable for students?

    - by Gnijuohz
    I find myself constantly running into this expression "don't reinvent the wheel" or "never reinvent the wheel" when I ask some questions on SO. They tell you to use some frameworks or existing packages. I know where this attitude is coming from since it's unwise to waste time on something others have already solved. Or it that so? As a student, I find by using some code others wrote to solve my problem I can't learn as much as I'd like to, and I gain less insight. And sometimes I think that phrase is mainly for working programmers facing deadlines and not for students like me. Is it that bad to "reinvent the wheel"? Maybe I'm thinking it wrong? Maybe there is a way I can avoid reinventing the wheel and at the same time learn a lot?

    Read the article

  • Open Source Projects for Beginning Coders?

    - by MattDMo
    After working as a molecular biologist at the bench for many years, I lost my job last year and am thinking about a career change. I've been using open-source software and doing Linux system administration since the mid 90s, and have written/improved some small shell/Perl/PHP scripts, and am very comfortable building from source, but never progressed to creating non-trivial programs de novo. I want to move to actually learning real programming skills and contributing back to the community, with the possible eventual goal of getting into bioinformatics as a career in the future. I'm a stay-at-home dad now, so I have some time on my hands. I've done a lot of research on languages, and have settled on Python as my major focus for now. I'm set up on GitHub, but haven't forked anything yet. I've looked around OpenHatch some, but nothing really grabbed me. I've heard the advice to work on what you use/love, but that category is so broad that I'm having trouble finding any one thing to get started on. What are your suggestions for getting started? How do you pick a project that will welcome your (possibly amateurish) help? With a fairly limited skill set, how do you find a request that you can handle? What are common newbie mistakes to avoid? Any other advice?

    Read the article

  • How should I approach learning programming languages?

    - by gcc
    I am a student of computer engineering. I have never done any programming before, and as you can understand, I don't know how to study it or how to make my own programs. My English is weak [edited for clarity - ed], and so if you don't like the choices I list, please feel free to provide others. How should I study? How should I learn programming languages? Study completely from a book. Don't study from a book, just try writing code. A mix of the two; study from a book, then try writing code. Study half the book, then write the code by hand on paper. Listed to the teacher, then try to solve general problems (those not from any specific chapter). I have send that question to stackoverflow before when I am at first year. Now, I want to construct webpage to guide fresh students by giving advise of yours and mines.Maybe, you wonder Why I want to construct webpage , I just want help the other student. I am giving a link to that question < http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3389465/how-should-i-study-programming-languagess If you have other advice, feel free. EDIT: This web cite, I think , is constructed to share member's life experience and also I know these experiences is valuable . So I have no right to want your opinion, But I want your opinion / experience even if you think it is not so helpful to other

    Read the article

  • Learning Java with a simple project

    - by phodu_insaan
    As i remember the time when i was learning PHP, it was suggested to build a simple blog or a forum after reading the language fundamentals. I was told/read that this would cover everything that I would need to learn about PHP from a beginners book. This advice was out there in a number of places, and after following and working with PHP it seems quite good advice. Now, i am learning Java and reading the book "Thinking in Java" by Bruce Eckel. I wonder if there is any such set of similar, small projects that I could take up, that would cover all the essentials and most of what is covered in the book.

    Read the article

  • How can I know if programming is right for me?

    - by user66414
    I have an IT background and was pretty confident until an opportunity came up at work to go into programming(C#). I have never programmed before this, and the software I am programming for is a program I have never used before (a 3D modeling software). It has been 6 months since then and I feel like giving up. I didn't get much training... about 3 weeks of training spread out over the last 6 months. I think I would be good at programming but this experience is kinda making me rethink my decision. I'm not sure if it's just me, or if this frustration is normal. How can I tell if programming is right for me?

    Read the article

  • Passing variables from PHP to C++

    - by Alex
    I’m new to this so I’m sorry if my question is trivial. I have the following situation: I need to call a program from PHP and pass some vars and/or sets of key-value pairs to it. Now, my question is: how do I pass these vars, through arguments to the called function (e.g. exec("/path/to/program flag1 flag2 [key1=A,key2=B]");)? Or is there a better method to achieve this? Somebody suggested me to write them into a txt file and pass the path to it to as an argument instead (e.g. exec("/path/to/program path_to_txt_file);), but I’m not to excited about this method.

    Read the article

  • Which of these courses are the hardest and why?

    - by DSL Client
    Which of these courses are the hardest and why? What should I watch out for? Probability and Statistics for Computer Science Introduction to Software Engineering Data Structures and Algorithms Operating Systems Introduction to Theoretical Computer Science System Hardware Advanced Program Design with C++ Information Systems Security Computer Architecture Databases Web Programming Computer Graphics Digital System Design

    Read the article

  • Is programming for me?

    - by user66414
    I have an IT background and was pretty confident until an opportunity came up at work to go into programming(C#). I have never programmed before this. Plus the software I am programming for is a program I have never used before(a 3D modeling software). It has been 6 months..I feel like giving up. Not much training...about 3 weeks of training spread out over the last 6 months. I think I would be good at programming but this experience has kinda making me rethink my decision. Is it me or am I right to be frustrated?

    Read the article

  • How best to deal with the frustration that you encounter at the beginning of learning to code [closed]

    - by coderboy
    I am right now a newbie on the job learning to code in Cocoa . In the beginning I decided that I would try and understand everything I was doing . But right now I just feel like a clueless wizard chanting some spells . Its all just a matter of googling the right incantation . Frequently getting stuck and having to google for answers is proving to be a major demotivator for me . I know that this will get better over time but still I feel that somewhere , somehow I'm just approaching things the wrong way . I sit there stumped and then finally just look at sample code from Apple and I go Wow ! This is so logical and well structured ! . But just reading it is not going to get me to that level . So I would like to know , how do you guys approach learning something new . Do you read the whole documentation first , or do you read sample code or maybe its just about making lots of small programs first ?

    Read the article

  • How can I figure out if programming is right for me? [closed]

    - by user66414
    I have an IT background and was pretty confident until an opportunity came up at work to go into programming(C#). I have never programmed before this, and the software I am programming for is a program I have never used before (a 3D modeling software). It has been 6 months since then and I feel like giving up. I didn't get much training... about 3 weeks of training spread out over the last 6 months. I think I would be good at programming but this experience is kinda making me rethink my decision. I'm not sure if it's just me, or if this frustration is normal. How can I tell if programming is right for me?

    Read the article

  • C# to develop Android app

    - by opt
    I am learning C# and I'm wondering if there is the potential to develop an Android app that satisfy the need that I'm going to explain. I would basically need an app that, when launched retrieves some data from a webpage (i.e. realtime stock prices), trim the xml to find the data i need and store this value into a variable. Then some calculation is performed on this data and the result is sent via email. It is already possible to launch an app automatically based on some conditions (e.g. every 5 minutes) by using the software Tasker. It is actually also possible to retrieve the data from a webpage and save to a Tasker variable or to a txt file somewhere in the phone (or Dropbox/Box...). But I would like to do that directly via an app so that everything is done "internally" once the app is launched. If that's possible, how should I proceed? Is there any good reference I can use to address my need?

    Read the article

  • Python readability hints for a Java programmer

    - by Samuel Carrijo
    I'm a java programmer, but now entering the "realm of python" for some stuff for which Python works better. I'm quite sure a good portion of my code would look weird for a Python programmer (e.g. using parenthesis on every if). I know each language has its own conventions and set of "habits". So, from a readability standpoint what are conventions and practices which is "the way to go" in Java, but are not really the "pythonic way" to do stuff?

    Read the article

  • Surprise for a programmer on Birthday

    - by penelope
    Help! My boyfriend's birthday is next month. Since he is a programmer, I'd love to make him a cake with the code for "happy birthday" (and perhaps something awesome) written in icing on top. Not being a programmer myself, I have no idea where to begin. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

    Read the article

  • what it is Sharepoint ? Main advantages for programmer

    - by netmajor
    Hey, For some time i see that employers demand from programmers knowing Sharepoint, but I have problem with understand what it is :/ But today I was at IT training, and main guy told something like that:" Sharepoint is platform for commit code for programmer, control of version etc..." It is true? It looks like SVN tool... Can someone explain me what advantages it have for c# programmer? Thanks ;)

    Read the article

  • Last words of a ??? programmer

    - by Peter
    What will the last words of some kind of programmer be? Like: LW of a Perl programmer: I don't have to write documentation. The source is formatted so well, I can read it anytime later... or Im just going to write a regular expression to find this, then I'm done...

    Read the article

< Previous Page | 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17  | Next Page >