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  • I don't know C. And why should I learn it?

    - by Stephen
    My first programming language was PHP (gasp). After that I started working with JavaScript. I've recently done work in C#. I've never once looked at low or mid level languages like C. The general consensus in the programming-community-at-large is that "a programmer who hasn't learned something like C, frankly, just can't handle programming concepts like pointers, data types, passing values by reference, etc." I do not agree. I argue that: Because high level languages are easily accessible, more "non-programmers" dive in and make a mess In order to really get anything done in a high level language, one needs to understand the same similar concepts that most proponents of "learn-low-level-first" evangelize about. Some people need to know C; those people have jobs that require them to write low to mid-level code. I'm sure C is awesome, and I'm sure there are a few bad programmers who know C. Why the bias? As a good, honest, hungry programmer, if I had to learn C (for some unforeseen reason), I would learn C. Considering the multitude of languages out there, shouldn't good programmers focus on learning what advances us? Shouldn't we learn what interests us? Should we not utilize our finite time moving forward? Why do some programmers disagree with this? I believe that striving for excellence in what you do is the fundamental deterministic trait between good programmers and bad ones. Does anyone have any real world examples of how something written in a high level language—say Java, Pascal, PHP, or Javascript—truely benefitted from a prior knowledge of C? Examples would be most appreciated.

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  • F# for the C# Programmer

    - by mbcrump
    Are you a C# Programmer and can’t make it past a day without seeing or hearing someone mention F#?  Today, I’m going to walk you through your first F# application and give you a brief introduction to the language. Sit back this will only take about 20 minutes. Introduction Microsoft's F# programming language is a functional language for the .NET framework that was originally developed at Microsoft Research Cambridge by Don Syme. In October 2007, the senior vice president of the developer division at Microsoft announced that F# was being officially productized to become a fully supported .NET language and professional developers were hired to create a team of around ten people to build the product version. In September 2008, Microsoft released the first Community Technology Preview (CTP), an official beta release, of the F# distribution . In December 2008, Microsoft announced that the success of this CTP had encouraged them to escalate F# and it is now will now be shipped as one of the core languages in Visual Studio 2010 , alongside C++, C# 4.0 and VB. The F# programming language incorporates many state-of-the-art features from programming language research and ossifies them in an industrial strength implementation that promises to revolutionize interactive, parallel and concurrent programming. Advantages of F# F# is the world's first language to combine all of the following features: Type inference: types are inferred by the compiler and generic definitions are created automatically. Algebraic data types: a succinct way to represent trees. Pattern matching: a comprehensible and efficient way to dissect data structures. Active patterns: pattern matching over foreign data structures. Interactive sessions: as easy to use as Python and Mathematica. High performance JIT compilation to native code: as fast as C#. Rich data structures: lists and arrays built into the language with syntactic support. Functional programming: first-class functions and tail calls. Expressive static type system: finds bugs during compilation and provides machine-verified documentation. Sequence expressions: interrogate huge data sets efficiently. Asynchronous workflows: syntactic support for monadic style concurrent programming with cancellations. Industrial-strength IDE support: multithreaded debugging, and graphical throwback of inferred types and documentation. Commerce friendly design and a viable commercial market. Lets try a short program in C# then F# to understand the differences. Using C#: Create a variable and output the value to the console window: Sample Program. using System;   namespace ConsoleApplication9 {     class Program     {         static void Main(string[] args)         {             var a = 2;             Console.WriteLine(a);             Console.ReadLine();         }     } } A breeze right? 14 Lines of code. We could have condensed it a bit by removing the “using” statment and tossing the namespace. But this is the typical C# program. Using F#: Create a variable and output the value to the console window: To start, open Visual Studio 2010 or Visual Studio 2008. Note: If using VS2008, then please download the SDK first before getting started. If you are using VS2010 then you are already setup and ready to go. So, click File-> New Project –> Other Languages –> Visual F# –> Windows –> F# Application. You will get the screen below. Go ahead and enter a name and click OK. Now, you will notice that the Solution Explorer contains the following: Double click the Program.fs and enter the following information. Hit F5 and it should run successfully. Sample Program. open System let a = 2        Console.WriteLine a As Shown below: Hmm, what? F# did the same thing in 3 lines of code. Show me the interactive evaluation that I keep hearing about. The F# development environment for Visual Studio 2010 provides two different modes of execution for F# code: Batch compilation to a .NET executable or DLL. (This was accomplished above). Interactive evaluation. (Demo is below) The interactive session provides a > prompt, requires a double semicolon ;; identifier at the end of a code snippet to force evaluation, and returns the names (if any) and types of resulting definitions and values. To access the F# prompt, in VS2010 Goto View –> Other Window then F# Interactive. Once you have the interactive window type in the following expression: 2+3;; as shown in the screenshot below: I hope this guide helps you get started with the language, please check out the following books for further information. F# Books for further reading   Foundations of F# Author: Robert Pickering An introduction to functional programming with F#. Including many samples, this book walks through the features of the F# language and libraries, and covers many of the .NET Framework features which can be leveraged with F#.       Functional Programming for the Real World: With Examples in F# and C# Authors: Tomas Petricek and Jon Skeet An introduction to functional programming for existing C# developers written by Tomas Petricek and Jon Skeet. This book explains the core principles using both C# and F#, shows how to use functional ideas when designing .NET applications and presents practical examples such as design of domain specific language, development of multi-core applications and programming of reactive applications.

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  • Are you a good or bad programmer?

    - by Eli
    Hi All, I see a lot of questions on SO that are asked about 'good' programmers vs 'bad' programmers. For example, what is a good/bad programmer, how to tell a good/bad programmer, what to do about a bad programmer on a team, how to hire a good programmer. I know it's pretty easy to apply the words to other people, but I find myself wondering if anyone out there would actually define THEMSELVES in a Boolean fashion like this, rather than "good in some areas, weak in others..." I'm not asking as an either/or where you have to be one or the other, but as a 'both' - are you a good or bad programmer? If so (either one), why? Please note this isn't meant to be argumentative, or to define good/bad practices, etc. I just want to know how many people think they are good, bad, or neither out there.

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  • Are highly capable programmers paid more than their managers?

    - by Fun Mun Pieng
    I know a lot of programmers are paid less than their managers by significant amounts, as highlighted there. How often is it that a programmer gets paid more than his manager? Or phrased different how many programmers are paid more than their managers? Personally, I know of one case. I'm asking to see how common is the case. When I say "manager", I mean anyone further up their organization hierarchy.

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  • is good for one year experince Java Developer to do VB.NET development?

    - by tanghao
    I'm a java programmer with around one and half years experience. Recently my boss wants me to develop an excel add-in with VB.NET in next a few months or maybe I have to be fully in charge of this add-in in the further. It makes me quite nervous right now because I am really not sure what this VB.NET development experience could mean to me in the further as I am not so sure if it's good to diverse my experience in current stage. Any one could give some helps and suggestions?

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  • Wpf vs WinForms for a vb programmer? [closed]

    - by Jeroen
    I am asked by a client to develop an application that is basically a screen on which the user can choose several items to pass the time (used in holding cells in mental hospitals for example). The baisc idea is as follows: TV (choosing this will provide the user with a number of TV streams from the interweb) Radio (...) Games (serveral flash games, also from the interweb) Music (play local music or streams) Draw something (not the game) Create an email Choose lighting settings for the room etc. etc. I am torn between WinForms and WPF for this project. It seems that WPF is the way to go since there is quite a bit of rich media involved but I have a 15 year VB background. The project obviously has a dead line and certain budget that I cannot cross and if I can avoid starting from scratch with some thing that will be nice. Is WPF worth it in this particular case or can I use WinForms with the incorperation of WPF controls? I would very much like to hear your thoughts/comments/suggestions!

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  • how non-programmer become developer

    - by Sarang
    Every year there are different types of freshers getting recruited. But, our IT field is not only limited to IT Engineers & Computer Engineers. It is full of all different types of engineers. What is a way an engineer can be a proper developer ? I am asking this because, whatever engineering the student gone for, one can be shifted to IT development if he/she has some particular qualities within. What are those quelities required to be in a developer or required to be implemented to be developer ?

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  • Learning computer architecture as a programmer

    - by Samaursa
    I typically run across gurus at SO and other places (instructors, book authors etc.) that would say something along the lines "This will cause alignment issues" or other low level tidbits. I want to learn about all these tidbits that are relevant to programming. Now usually when I see low level books (computer architecture books for example) they are too low level and geared towards people whose primary area of interest is computer architecture and not software design. Do you have recommendations for books that go through low-level stuff that is relevant to programmers?

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  • C# books for the experienced programmer

    - by Michael Dmitry Azarkevich
    So I've been programming in C# for 3 years now (been programming in various languages for 3 years before that as well) and most of the stuff I learned I pieced together on the internet. The thing is, I want to understand C# more formally and in depth and so would like to get some books on the subjects. Any books you'd recommend? Also, I've heard good things about "C# 4.0 in a Nutshell", "Pro C# 2010 and the .NET 4 Platform" and "CLR via C#". What do you think of these? (The people at stackoverflow told me to take it here. Please, Please tell me I'm in the right place this time)

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  • Useful certifications for a young programmer

    - by Alain
    As @Paddyslacker elegantly stated in Are certifications worth it? The main purpose of certifications is to make money for the certifying body. I am a fairly young developer, with only an undergraduate degree, and my job is (graciously) offering to sponsor some professional development of my choice (provided it can be argued that it will contribute to the quality of work I do for them). A search online offers a slew of (mostly worthless) certifications one can attain. I'm wondering if there are any that are actually recognized in the (North American) industry as an asset. My local university promoted CIPS (I.S.P., ITCP) at the time I was graduating, but for all I can tell it's just the one that happened to get its foot in the door. It's certainly money grubbing - with a $205 a year fee. So are there any such certifications that provide useful credentials? To better define 'useful' - would it benefit full time developers, or is it only something worth while to the self-employed? Would any certifications lead me to being considered for higher wages, or can that only be achieved with more experience and an higher-level degree?

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  • Should "closed as duplicate" software programming be extreme or functional? [migrated]

    - by Web Developer
    I'm a web developer loving this site for it's potential, and it's Coffee look . I was reading a great question, that is this: click here and noticed 8 moderators tagged it as DUPLICATED! The question was closed! Obviously it isn't and I'm going to explain why if needed but it can be seen: the question is unique, is the case/story of a young who have SPECIFIC experience with C++ , VB and Assembler and asking, knowing this specifications an answer (It is not a general question like "hey I'm young can I do the programmer??") Let me know your opinion! do you think this question should or should not be closed? And let's think about also the people not only the "data" and "cases covered" ... do you think this is important too? or is better to keep a place where people doesn't count?

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  • When you are expecting a promoting, do you prefer an technical or administrative job? [closed]

    - by Darf Zon
    As a programmer, they offered me an upgrade as project manager, but my feeling is that I can have a more effective contribution in a technical role that in one administrative. When should I accept the promotion? Generally speaking, I think that people should do what they love and what they like to do, from the time you are offered a promotion to someone is because he has been doing a great job today, and certainly learn new things in the new position and obviously have a better financial remuneration, but if it really is something you do not like do not good that post. That's my opinion.

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  • Surviving MATLAB and R as a Hardcore Programmer

    - by dsimcha
    I love programming in languages that seem geared towards hardcore programmers. (My favorites are Python and D.) MATLAB is geared towards engineers and R is geared towards statisticians, and it seems like these languages were designed by people who aren't hardcore programmers and don't think like hardcore programmers. I always find them somewhat awkward to use, and to some extent I can't put my finger on why. Here are some issues I have managed to identify: (Both): The extreme emphasis on vectors and matrices to the extent that there are no true primitives. (Both): The difficulty of basic string manipulation. (Both): Lack of or awkwardness in support for basic data structures like hash tables and "real", i.e. type-parametric and nestable, arrays. (Both): They're really, really slow even by interpreted language standards, unless you bend over backwards to vectorize your code. (Both): They seem to not be designed to interact with the outside world. For example, both are fairly bulky programs that take a while to launch and seem to not be designed to make simple text filter programs easy to write. Furthermore, the lack of good string processing makes file I/O in anything but very standard forms near impossible. (Both): Object orientation seems to have a very bolted-on feel. Yes, you can do it, but it doesn't feel much more idiomatic than OO in C. (Both): No obvious, simple way to get a reference type. No pointers or class references. For example, I have no idea how you roll your own linked list in either of these languages. (MATLAB): You can't put multiple top level functions in a single file, encouraging very long functions and cut-and-paste coding. (MATLAB): Integers apparently don't exist as a first class type. (R): The basic builtin data structures seem way too high level and poorly documented, and never seem to do quite what I expect given my experience with similar but lower level data structures. (R): The documentation is spread all over the place and virtually impossible to browse or search. Even D, which is often knocked for bad documentation and is still fairly alpha-ish, is substantially better as far as I can tell. (R): At least as far as I'm aware, there's no good IDE for it. Again, even D, a fairly alpha-ish language with a small community, does better. In general, I also feel like MATLAB and R could be easily replaced by plain old libraries in more general-purpose langauges, if sufficiently comprehensive libraries existed. This is especially true in newer general purpose languages that include lots of features for library writers. Why do R and MATLAB seem so weird to me? Are there any other major issues that you've noticed that may make these languages come off as strange to hardcore programmers? When their use is necessary, what are some good survival tips? Edit: I'm seeing one issue from some of the answers I've gotten. I have a strong personal preference, when I analyze data, to have one script that incorporates the whole pipeline. This implies that a general purpose language needs to be used. I hate having to write a script to "clean up" the data and spit it out, then another to read it back in a completely different environment, etc. I find the friction of using MATLAB/R for some of my work and a completely different language with a completely different address space and way of thinking for the rest to be a huge source of friction. Furthermore, I know there are glue layers that exist, but they always seem to be horribly complicated and a source of friction.

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  • Should Swing knowledge be required from Java programmers?

    - by Anto
    Swing is an integral part of the Java API. It is also the most popular GUI framework for Java. I still wonder, should every Java programmer still know, or at least be pretty familiar with, Swing (possibly excluding web developers)? There are alternatives (e.g. SWT), but they are not very widely used (compared to Swing). What do you think about requiring Swing knowledge from Java programmers? If such knowledge is important, to what degree? Are the basics enough or not? The reason I wonder is because I really don't like Swing but wonder if I still should brush up my skills in it. I'm able to create simple GUIs in it, but I would definitely not say that I know Swing well.

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  • Weekly technology meeting?

    - by Mag20
    I am thinking of introducing weekly technology meeting where programmers working on the same project can discuss things like: current status of the project on technical side technology backlog. Things that we may have skipped because of deadlines but now coming back to bite us. technology constraints that are limiting developers from being productive new and emerging technologies that may apply to the project Basically looking at the project from programmer's perspective, not the business side. - What would be some good guidelines for a meeting like this? How long should the meeting last? Is weekly too often? Should we time-limit each topic? What kinda of topics are good for a meeting like this and which ones are bad? Is 10 people too many? ...

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  • Health problem of a programmer

    - by gunbuster363
    Hi all, I've been annoyed by this fingers ache for quite a long time, my fingers ache because of too much mouse clicking during office hour plus play games after work. I forget game for a while and my fingers are getting better, but still my right pointing finger would feel pressure when I click the mouse. I haven't go to a doctor because I afraid the fee would be high and he would just suggest me too get rest for the fingers, also, I don't know what kind of doctor should I go and see. My fingers get less pressure if I use my expensive deathadder ( what a shame, I bought this for gaming, but now I use it for rest ) at home because its buttons are softer, however I cannot have such expensive mouse at my office because I am afraid people would steal it. I use some trick when I am using the mouse such as single-click open a file, adding more shortcuts at desktop for common jobs, do you guys have some other tips for me? Thank you.

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  • Algorithms and Programmer's day-to-day job

    - by Lior Kogan
    As of July 10, 2012, Stack Overflow contains 3,345,864 questions, out of which 20,840 questions are tagged as "Algorithm" - this is less than 0.6% ! I find it disturbing. Many programmers have several years of academic education in computer science / software engineering. Most of them are smart... When asked, most would say that they love algorithms. Computer programming is generally about solving problems using algorithms... Yet, only 1 of 160 questions is tagged as algorithm related. What does it say about our profession?

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  • Programmer desk: L-shaped (corner) or rectangular? [closed]

    - by GoodEnough
    I'm thinking about switching my L-shaped desk for a rectangular one, but since I can't try before actually buying the desk, I'd like to know what other people think about the matter. Is it simply a matter of preference? What are the pros and cons of each type of desk? Also, I'm guessing a rather deep desk is necessary (I was thinking over 70cm/27''). Btw, I'm aware of this question, but it doesn't talk about this specific point. Same question on StackOverflow for anyone interested in an answer.

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  • From physics to Java programmer?

    - by inovaovao
    I'm a physics phd with little actual programming experience. I've always liked programming and played around with Basic and Pascal (also VB and Delphi) as a teen, but the largest actual project I completed was an assignement for the introductory computer science class in university where I wrote a nice little program (about 1500 lines of pascal) to display functions of 2 variables in 3D. I've had also a couple other projects of a few hundred lines range, but during my phd I didn't have (or take) the time to program more (string theory is hard guys!), beside playing around with ruby. Now I've decided that I'm more interested in programming than in physics and started to learn Java (hoping to pass the certification exam next week) and OO design. Still, I have trouble deciding on what to focus next (Java EE? Web development? algorithms and C programming?) in order to maximize my employement chances. Bear in mind that I'm aiming (mostly) at the swedish job market and that I'm 30 years old. So for the questions: Do you think that I have any chances to start and make a career in IT and programming coming from physics? What would be the best strategy to maximize my value in the field? Do you have suggestions as to where my physics background might be useful?

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  • What are the options for setting up a UNIX environment to learn C using Kernighan and Richie's The C Programming Language?

    - by ssbrewster
    I'm a novice programmer and have been experimenting with Javascript, jQuery and PHP but felt I wasn't getting a real depth of understanding of what I was doing. So, after reading Joel Spolsky's response to a question on this site (which I can't find now!), I took it back to basics and read Charles Petzold's 'Code' and am about to move onto Kernighan and Richie's The C Programming Language. I want to learn this in a UNIX environment but only have access to a Windows system. I have Ubuntu 12.04 running on a virtualised machine via VMWare Player, and done some coding in the terminal. Is using a Linux distro the only option for programming in a UNIX environment on Windows? And what are the next steps to start programming in C in UNIX and where do I get a compiler from?

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  • Programmer + Drugs =? [closed]

    - by sytycs
    I just read this quote from Steve Jobs: "Doing LSD was one of the two or three most important things I have done in my life." Now I'm wondering: Has there ever been a study where programmers have been given drugs to see if they could produce "better" code? Is there a programming concept, which originated from people who where drug-users? Do you know of a piece of code, which was written by someone under the influence? EDIT So I did a little more research and it turns out Dennis R. Wier actually documented how he took LSD to wrap his head around a coding project: "At one point in the project I could not get an overall viewpoint for the operation of the entire system. It really was too much for my brain to keep all the subtle aspects and processing nuances clear so I could get a processing and design overview. After struggling with this problem for a few weeks, I decided to use a little acid to see if it would enable a breakthrough, because otherwise, I would not be able to complete the project and be certain of a consistent overall design"[1] There is also an interesting article on wired about Kevin Herbet, who used LSD to solve tough technical problems and chemist Kary Mullis even said "...that LSD had helped him develop the polymerase chain reaction that helps amplify specific DNA sequences." [2]

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  • Is it ok to become junior at 27? [closed]

    - by Dvole
    I'm having a computer unrelated job right now, but I want to become a programmer, I have some objective-c and iOS knowledge, studying hard in my free time, etc. I'm looking into getting a junior iOS developer position. It will probably pay half what I earn in my current job, and I am not sure if I will like that. But I am really tired of my job and want to get experience in this field. Also, working as iOS developer is great position, since they are in great demand. My country is Russia. What do you think? Or Should I just do it in my free time, get some programs out in Appstore and look for better position? What would you do?

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  • Be a better programmer or an irreplacable employee?

    - by mahen23
    Before I worked for a web development company, I asked a lot of questions of friends who were working as developers for tips about being good at your job. One answer I got was: "Always make the employers beg for your competencies. Prove to them that you are the best and you cannot be replaced. While keeping the status quo, hold your employers hostage where if one day they remove your from the job or task, no one else will be able to do your job." How true is this statement?

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  • Daylight saving time: Annoying and pointless [closed]

    - by polemon
    Daylight saving time is a big annoyance for me. Not just from the standpoint, that I never know when we set our clocks an hour ahead or an hour back. Setting the clock ahead or back disturbs my time organization, and is responsible for my bad mood around that day. From the standpoint of a programmer, it's no less annoying. you always have to check whether it isn't "that date" in the year, when you have to work with local time. I hear people have the same views on this that I have. also, I don't see any benefits from it. The supposedly added "extra hour" of sunlight; I don't feel that. In case you live in a region where daylight savings is observed (like in Germany, where I live), please tell me how you manage the annoyances that come with it, and (if possible) how to get rid of it, once and for all...

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  • Are there opportunities working as full-time paid programmer for Non-profit organizations

    - by Rick
    Some recent events in my life have made me want to contribute more to causes I believe in rather than just working for a profit-driven company. I have been thinking that if I could find a non-profit organization that I like and believe in then I might feel more fulfilled working for them. I have a decent amount of web development experience and currently work as a Java / Spring web developer. I realize the compensation wouldn't have the same "ceiling" potential as for-profit but am wondering if its possible to get at least something close to a market rate for work as I am planning to start a family sometime soon and still need a legitimate income. If anyone has any knowledge or experience about this sort of thing would be happy to hear from you. EDIT: Without getting in to too much personal detail, I have a relative who recently passed away who suffered from a mental illness so while it doesn't have to be an organization specifically dedicated to this, I am hoping to work for something along these lines at least where there is more of a social cause rather than just working on an open-source project whose only cause is the advancement of technology.

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