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  • Woes of a Junior Developer - is it possible to not be cut out for programming?

    - by user575158
    (Let me start off by asking - please be gentle, I know this is subjective, but it's meant to incite discussion and provide information for others. If needed it can be converted to community wiki.) I recently was hired as a junior developer at a company I really like. I started out in the field doing QA and transitioned into more and more development work, which is what I really want to end up doing. I enjoy it, but more and more I am questioning whether I am really any good at it or not. Part of this is still growing into the junior developer role, I know, but how much? What are junior developers to expect, what should they be doing and not doing? What can I do to improve and show my company I am serious about this opportunity? I hate that I am costing them time by getting up to speed. I've been told by others that companies make investments in Junior devs and don't expect them to pay off for a while, but how much of this is true? There's got to be a point when it's apparent whether the investment will pay off or not. So far I've been trying to ask as many questions I can, but I've you've been obsessing over a simple problem for some time and the others know that, there comes a time when it's pretty embarrassing to have to get help after struggling so long. I've also tried to be as open to suggestion as possible and work with others to try to refactor my code, but sometimes this can be hard clashing with various team members' personal opinions (being told by someone to write it one way, and then having someone else make you rewrite it). I often get over-stressed and judge myself too harshly, but I just don't want to have to struggle the rest of my life trying to get things work if I just don't have the talent. In your experience, is programming something that almost everyone can learn, or something that some people just don't get? Do others feel this way, or did you feel that way when starting out? It scares me that I have no other job skills should I be unsuited for having the skills necessary to code well.

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  • Hiring a Junior Developer, What should I ask?

    - by Jeremy
    We are currently hiring a junior developer to help me out, as I have more projects than I can currently manage. I have never hired anyone who wasn't a friend or at least an acquaintance. I have a phone interview with the only applicant that actually stood out to me (on paper), but I have never done this before. Our projects are all high scalability, data intensive web applications that process millions of transactions an hour, across multiple servers and clients. To be language/stack specific, we use ASP.Net MVC2, WebForms and C# 4, MSSQL 2008 R2, all running atop Windows Server 2008 R2 What should I ask him? How should I structure the phone call?

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  • Dangerous programming

    - by benhowdle89
    Ok, i'm talking pure software/web, i'm not on about code to power Life Support machines or NASA rockets. In terms of software/web development what is the most dangerous single piece of code someone could put into a program (say if they had a grudge against a client/employee) In PHP, the first thing that comes to mind is some sort of file deletion: function EmptyDir($dir) { $handle=opendir($dir); while (($file = readdir($handle))!==false) { echo "$file <br>"; @unlink($dir.'/'.$file); } closedir($handle); } EmptyDir('images'); Or a PHP script that takes a user's sensitive input and posts it to Google sitemap or something? I hope this doesnt get closed off as subjective as there surely must be a ranking order of dangerous code. So i'm asking for the No.1 spot :) DISCLAIMER: I have no grudges against anyone, just curious for the answer!

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  • Junior software developer - How to understand web applications in depth?

    - by nat_gr
    I am currently a junior developer in web applications and specifically in ASP.NET MVC technology. My problem is that the C# senior developer in the company has no experience with this technology and I try to learn without any guidance. I went through all tutorials (e.g music store), codeplex projects and also read Pro ASP.NET MVC 4. However, most of the examples are about CRUD and e-commerce applications. What I don't understand is how dependency injection fits in web applications (I have realized that is not only used for facilitating unit testing) or when I should use a custom model binder or how to model the business logic when there is already a database schema in place. I read the forum quite often and it would very helpful if some experienced developer could give me an insight about how to proceed. Do I need to read some books to understand the overall idea behind web applications? And what kind of application should I start building myself - I don't think it would be useful to create similar examples with the tutorials.

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  • Why are invariants important in Computer Science

    - by Antony Thomas
    I understand 'invariant' in its literal sense. I also recognize them when I type code. But I don't think I understand the importance of this term in the context of computer science. Whenever I read conversations\white papers about language design from famous programmers\computer scientists, the term 'invariant' keeps popping up as a jargon; and that is the part I don't understand. What is so special about it?

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  • Advice on selecting programming languages to concentrate on? (2nd year IT security student)

    - by Tyler J Fisher
    I'm in the process of considering which programming languages I should devote the majority of my coding studies to. I'm a 2nd year CS student, majoring in IT security. What I want to do/work with: Intelligence gathering Relational databases Virus design Snort network IPS Current coding experience (what I'm going to keep): Java - intermediate HTML5 - intermediate SQL (MySQL, Oracle 11g) - basic BASH - basic I'm going to need to learn (at least) one of the following languages in order to be successful in my field. Languages to add (at least 1): Ruby (+Metasploit) C++ (virus design, low-level driver interaction, computationally intensive applications) Python (import ALL the things) My dilemma: If I diversify too broadly, I won't be able to focus on, and improve in a specific niche. Does anyone have any advice as to how I should select a language? What I'm considering + why I'm leaning towards Ruby because of Metasploit support, despite lower efficiency when compared to Python. Any suggestions based on real-world experience? Should I focus on Ruby, Python, or C++? Both Ruby, and Python have been regarded as syntactically similar to Java which my degree is based around. I'm going to be studying C++ in two years as a component of my malicious code class. Thanks, Tyler

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  • Hiring a Junior Developer, What should I ask?

    - by Jeremy
    We are currently hiring a junior developer to help me out, as I have more projects than I can currently manage. I have never hired anyone who wasn't a friend or at least an acquaintance. I have a phone interview with the only applicant that actually stood out to me (on paper), but I have never done this before. Our projects are all high scalability, data intensive web applications that process millions of transactions an hour, across multiple servers and clients. To be language/stack specific, we use ASP.Net MVC2, WebForms and C# 4, MSSQL 2008 R2, all running atop Windows Server 2008 R2 What should I ask him? How should I structure the phone call?

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  • Five new junior developers and lots of complex tasks. What's now?

    - by mxe
    Our company has hired five new junior developers to help me to developer our product. Unfortunately the new features and incoming bug fixes usually require deeper knowledge than a recently graduated developer usually has (threading/concurrency, debugging performance bottlenecks in a complex system, etc.) Delegating (and planning) tasks which they (probably) can solve, answering their questions, mentoring/managing them, reviewing their code use up all of my time and I often feel that I could solve the issues less time than the whole delegating process takes (counting only my time). In addition I don't have time to solve the tasks which require deeper system knowledge/more advanced skills and it does not seem that it will change in the near future. So, what's now? What should I do to use their and my time effectively?

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  • Please recommend a good book on general IT for junior developer

    - by Rachel
    I have just got a job as a junior java developer and I am finding learning the code fine as I taught myself to pass the interview tests, trouble is I have a biology degree and know little about general IT and computer /network jargon. I don't want to be seen as a total idiot and non - techie so please can you recommend a book I can read / study to quickly increase my general background knowledge so that I can compete on a level with IT graduates!

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  • What stands out on a Juniors CV

    - by DeanMc
    Hi all, I am looking for advice, hopefully from people more experienced that me. I am going to start applying for junior positions for .net development in the summer. At the moment the only thing on my CV is a project I have done for Windows Phone 7 called sprout sms. It allows the user to send webtext as provided by Irish Operators. The app is doing well and is top ten in my local marketplace (Ireland). By trade I am a salesman and that is the extent of most of my employment. I haven't been to college and due to financial commitments I would not be able to go down the road of full time education. I have kept up to date with various .net related tech in a junior capacity and am looking to now change careers. What I am look to see is what stands out on a juniors CV. My lack of education stands against me so I am looking to offset this with practical experience. I am open to all suggestions and from the end of this month I am free to pursue "notches" which will make my CV stand out. So in short if you where hiring a Junior, what would you like to see that would make you take a second look or request an interview? NOTE: I do fear this is a subjective subject, rather than debate what is the best items to have on a Juniors CV I would like to concentrate on what info you would give to a junior who is looking to apply for a job this year. Thanks to all that respond.

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  • Why do business analysts and project managers get higher salaries than programmers?

    - by jpartogi
    We have to admit that programming is much more difficult than creating documentation or even creating Gantt chart and asking progress to programmers. So for us that are naives, knowing that programming are generally more difficult, why does business analysts and project managers gets higher salary than programmers? What is it that makes their job a high paying job when even at most time programmers are the ones that goes home late?

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  • Software developer needs Validation for VA Chap 31 to purchase Macbook Pro vs. PC [closed]

    - by David
    I am currently attending college with a path of software development and working towards my BS thanks to VA Chap 31. My old original Macbook Pro is near dead and no longer upgradable on the software or hardware side. The VA has offered to purchase a PC laptop for me (Because my syllabi says computer required), but I do not want to go backwards. I have a lot invested in OS X software and Mac peripherals, not to mention I prefer to program in an Apple environment. PC vs. Mac costs are so drastically different that I must validate my request for a new Macbook Pro. In my request to the VA, I stated the above and some other topics but they requested more validation. Can anyone recommend issues, reasons, etc. to help me validate this purchase by the VA for school? Thanks in advance for your help, David

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  • Masters or Second Bachelors Degree..or neither

    - by drD
    I have a degree in Business Administration, because at the time I didn't know what I wanted to do. I have been interested in programming for the past 2 years and have taken some action to self-teach. My experience/ knowledge base is limited to the following: -Read Kochan's Programming in C -Read IOS and Objective-C from the Big Nerd Ranch series -Obtained a C++ at NYU - thought it would be a good way to start to get a grasp on OO & design I would like to continue developing my skills, but most of all, re-orient how I am perceived as a professional. I am fully aware of how much a novice to this subject and would greatly appreciate any guidance anyone could give me. I currently have a job so full-time is not an option My goal is to become a software/ applications developer My questions are: -Should i take up a second bachelors in computer science? or a masters? or continue taking professional certificate programs (how are these viewed?) -If masters in computer science, would that make sense, if I dont have the formal foundation? (being a chief without ever being an Indian) -General advice for a novice to develop skill Thank You in advanced for helping me out.

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  • Junior developer introduction to job industry

    - by lady_killer
    I am a junior developer at my second working experience, the first one using PHP with WordPress and currently on Groovy on Grails. I like coding, I attend meetup to discuss technology etc but I still did not understand how to become a real professional with the "know how" attitude. I read Clean Coder, the author advises to spend 20 hours per week of my spare time to learn new technologies and to keep myself up to date. I do not find this realistic, if you want to have a bit of a social life, and I also noticed that learning at work, at least in the places where I worked, is not ideal. No support from seniors for new projects, no pair programming and code reviews, no company trainings, one hour a week tech meetings where seniors walk away after a bit because they already know the topic discussed and so on. Sometimes is quite hard to keep the motivation... My questions are: Is our industry supposed to be like this? Is there real team working in the sense of sharing knowledge and help juniors to get up to speed? Are we supposed to learn new technologies or technology features just in our spare time?Clean Coder says football players do not train during official matches and our working hours are like official matches, we should just perform and learn in other moments. Is it really like this? How can I improve my skills with no support? Is it enough to read books and try out the exercises and perhaps some katas? In almost 5 month of Groovy on Grails experience at work, I have never had the opportunity to create anything from scratch, just worked on existing issues where it was even really difficult to get the domain knowledge from senior devs.

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  • How can I let prospective employers know I'm a great developer?

    - by Zoe Gagnon
    I've recently read through Joel's guide to finding great developers (http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/FindingGreatDevelopers.html), and I feel really strongly that I am smart and get things done. The problem is, I didn't learn how to get things done until about halfway through college, so my GPA is less than stellar. Additionally, I've got a few other things going against me: late into the job market (~30), no internship, state college instead of university, and when I graduated, I pretty much had to take the first job that offered. With all of these things piled together, my resume (the first step to getting a job), is not terribly impressive. What can I do to let people know that I'm a great developer and would complement the best companies in the world?

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  • How to pick a great working team?

    - by Javierfdr
    I've just finished my master and I'm starting to dig into the laboral world, i.e. learning how programming teams and technology companies work in the real world. I'm starting to design the idea of my own service or product based on free software, and I will require a well coupled, enthusiast and fluid team to build and the idea. My problem is that I'm not sure which would be the best skills to ask for a programming team of 4-5 members. I have many friends and acquaintances, with whom I've worked during my studies. Must of those ones I have in mind are very capable and smart people, with a good logic and programming base, although some of them have some characteristics that I believe that could influtiate negatively in the group: lack of communication, fear to debate ideas, hard to give when debating, lack of structured programming (testing, good commenting, previous design and analysis). Some of them have this negative characteristics, but must of them have a lot of enthusiasm, nice working skills (from an individual point of view), and ability to see the whole picture. The question is: how to pick the best team for a large scale project, with a lot of programming? Which of these negative skills do you think are just too influential? Which can be softened with good leadership? Wich good skills are to be expected? And any other opinion about social and programming skills of a programming team.

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  • How do I convince my boss to come here and see how "good" companies are doing?

    - by Vimvq1987
    My company is bad, I admit it. Inefficient project management, very low quality code, ... I won't get into it. It's partly based on our country's culture, but mostly because our boss is not looking at how good companies are actually going about producing good software/service. I want to bring my boss here, so he can see these things, to convince him to create a better development place for us. How can I do that? Thank you so much. Ps: If I fail to do this, you know, I'm thinking seriously of leaving

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  • How can I find a good open source project to join?

    - by Lord Torgamus
    I just started working a year ago, and I want to join an open source project for the same reasons as anyone else: help create something useful and develop my skills further. My problem is, I don't know how to find a project where I'll fit in. How can I find a beginner-friendly project? What attributes should I be searching for? What are warning signs that a project might not be the right fit? Are there any tools out there to help match people with open source projects? There's a similar question here, but that question has to do with employment and is limited to PHP/Drupal.

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  • Which programming language should i choose? (much more info inside) [closed]

    - by Andreas
    I am not completely sure if this is the right place to put this question, but since it's the programming thread I guessed that there's many experienced programmers here. :) Ok, hello! My name is Andreas and I am a 16 years old guy from Norway. For some time now I've wanted to learn a programming language. Six months ago I started learning C++, but quit withing a week due to lack of motivation. The same thing happend only 2 months ago when I tried to learn Lua. I wanted to program mods to the game Garry's mod, and was really motivated. Then I stopped playing the game, and the programming stopped with it. Today though I am ready again. The only difference is that I am not completely sure what I want to do with the language. I only want to create something, and I miss the progress of failing and enduring hard work until I finally solve the problem I've worked on for hours. What I am trying to say is; Is there any program out there that allows me, a complete noob (I didn't learn that much in a week, so I like to call myself a beginner), to create apps, mods or something similar but at the same time being qualified as a first time language? I was thinking of Java, because Android, Minecraft and many other applications and games use it. But I've heard that it is going to be replaced by a program called HTML 5 (whatever that is), is this true? I certainly don't want to spend many hours of my life on something that is useless in a year or two. Hopefully I didn't make this too complicated. I know that it is hard to recommend something when I don't have a goal, but I really don't know what to say. Have a good day kind folks! - Andreas EDIT:* I did not know that this was an off topic question, really sorry!

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  • Junior software developer - How to understand web aplications in depth?

    - by nat_gr
    I am currently a junior developer in web applications and specifically in asp.net mvc technology. My problem is that the c# senior developer in the company has no experience with this technology and I try to learn without any guidance. I went through all tutorials (e.g music store), codeplex projects and also read pro asp.net mvc 4. However, most of the examples are about crud and e-commerce applications. What I don't understand is how dependency injection fits in web applications (I have realized that is not only used for facilitating unit testing) or when i should use a custom model binder or how to model the business logic when there is already a database schema in place. I read the forum quite often and it would very helpful if some experienced developers could give me an insight about how to proceed. Do I need to read some books to understand the overall idea behind web applications? And what kind of application should I start building myself - I don't think it would be useful to create similar examples with the tutorials.

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  • How to convince my boss to improve code quality?

    - by Vimvq1987
    The place I'm working for is a service provider. We have a lot of services, which are written to deal with deadline, so their code are really terrible: No coding convention, everyone codes in his own style No unit testing (which is really bad) No refactoring (which is truly worse) No automation build/deployment etc and these code are used again and again, so bad code continue to spread all over my department. I really want to set up a standard quality for our code, by requiring everyone to follow "rules": every line of code which does not follow convention will be rejected, and every function of code which does not pass unit testing will not be committed,...But I don't know how to convince my boss to allow me to do this. I'm relatively new comer, so inspiring people from my works is really hard, and I think it's easier if my boss support me to this. Thank you very much for your advices

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  • Working with a company as a Junior Developer [closed]

    - by user1601973
    We all have started our careers in some way or other. Well, I am a college student based in North America & I am doing my second internship with the same company with which I did my first internship. I came back here because people here were helpful always and supportive. But it just happened today, and I wanted to share this on SO. Well since I started I have been doing documentation and that kind of stuff only as compared to my first internship in which I actually worked along with the developers & learned so many things. Well, I was in a conversation with my Team lead, and he asked me if I completed that particular work or not? Well, That particular work had slipped from my mind. He was indeed I kind of pissed, and said "You don't have to worry about it, I will figure out". Well, I felt so bad and was about to literally cry. I stopped my lunch and then went on to complete that work. I always ask for work in office, and I always try to be an asset for whoever I am working but this was the first time that it happened. What are your thoughts on this and should I apologise or not? I think I should.

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  • Hard Copies VS Soft Copies

    - by Garet Claborn
    Where do you draw the line and say, "OK, I'm actually going to print out this piece of code, spec, formula, or other info and carry it around but these pieces can stay on disk." Well, more importantly why do you draw the line there? I've encountered this a number of times and have some sort of vague conceptions beyond "oh now I'm REALLY stuck, better print this out." I've also found some quicksheets of basic specs to be handy. Really though, I have no particular logic behind what is useful to physically have available in the design and development process. I have a great pile of 'stuff' papers that seemed at least partially relevant at the time, but I only really use about a third of them ever and often end up wishing I had different info on hand. Edit: So this is what I'm hearing in a nutshell: Major parts of the design pattern Common, fairly static and prominently useful code (reference or specs) Some representation of data useful in collaborating or sharing with team Extreme cases of tough problem solving Overwhelmingly,almost never print anything.

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  • Finding Telecommuting Opportunities as a Recent College Graduate

    - by stanigator
    Reading the answers to hiring practices of remote vs. local employees and freelance programming sites, I would like to add this question to the mix. I am a recent college graduate from an electrical engineering background with 2 years worth of work terms in programming (C, C++, VBA, Matlab, etc.) while I was still in school. While I am interested in learning other software tools (such as Python, Ruby on Rails, Javascript, etc.), I want to use the tools I have now in a telecommuting role while I grow my toolset. Despite having 2 years of work experience (and I've lost track of when I have started programming), my status as a recent college graduate may be an obstacle of my credibility to compete for telecommuting (or in fact any) programming opportunities. I don't know how I can go about finding telecommute programming opportunities for someone with my situation. Overall, many of previous places I've worked at liked my work. What are your suggestions? Thanks in advance!

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  • Where can I find simple, but well-written programs to learn from?

    - by user828584
    I've tried a few times to look at the source code for various things from github or other sites, in javascript, C#, PHP, etc. I'm never able to understand the programs as a whole though. I can sort of piece together what a specific snippet of code does, but I quickly lose the context of what I'm looking at and how it fits in. I want to be able to improve, but everything I've tried learning from so far has been too big. Where can I find well-written, but not very complex source code to look at? edit: Sorry, to be more specific, I'm hoping for javascript/php/C#.

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