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  • I'm a C Programmer, but I can't find a comfortable environment to work in

    - by Jesse Brands
    Hello everyone, Last time I asked a question, I was having issues dealing with Java which I had to do for a course work. I generally use C for my development work - especially personal projects - and I've grown up in what is pretty much a Linux/UNIX world. In this world, it was easy to use C, you had your C compiler (GCC is excellent in that regard) and a wealth of tools such as the command line and vi/emacs/whatever-you-got. However, that was all that I really liked about Linux/UNIX. It really fitted well with the C language; nowadays, I'm somewhat forced into Windows/Mac OS X for most of my work. C seems poorly supported on a mac for starters, there's no GUI API to use and pretty much you get forced into Obj-C. This is not a problem, I like Objective-C, but it's another language I have to learn. Now coming to Windows. Why does everything about Windows Development try to scare me away? It's basically come down to: USE C# AND .NET OR DIE. I don't like C#, I like C, they are fundamentally different. Yet when I make a Windows Forms application in MSVC++ (I know that's not C), I get a main function riddled with weird things I've never heard of before, along with a poor, barely-compliant C/C++ compiler. What am I to do when I just want to program in C, make applications that look and feel like native Windows applications (I am a sucker for aesthetics, and I'm not looking to make something cross-platform. I just want it to work on Windows, and look as native as possible.). C++ is a fine alternative, but it really looks like the only way to make a decent, native feeling Windows application, is to use C#. Am I missing something here? I'd rather not use CYGWIN. Like I said, I want people to install the program, and it should just work out of the box on Windows 7. Program in question involves a Media Player, if anyone is curious what I'm targetting at. Anyone who had the same experiences who can help me out? How can I code something in ANSI C and still have a native feel?

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  • Trainings for Back-end Programmer [closed]

    - by Pius
    I am currently working as an Android developer but I want to continue my career as a back-end developer. I consider my self having a relatively good knowledge of networking, databases and writing low-level code and other stuff that is involved in back- and mid- ends. What would be some good courses, training or whatever to improve as a back-end developer? Not the basic ones but rather more advanced ones (not too much, I'm self-taught). What are the main events in this area?

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  • Where to train while earning to be a Web Programmer

    - by user3295525
    Good day everyone. I'm a fresh graduate of Bachelor of Science in Computer Science and I really love coding in web. But my skills are not that high that's why I want to train while earning in a company but there are so few companies that offer it here. Web Programming is a passion for me and i really love it that's why i want to enhance my skills for my self and for the benefit of the company that will hire me. Do you have any suggestions or recommendations that I can use because I really need a mentor cause my self studying is in limit now. Good day everyone and God bless. P.S. I really love web programming.

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  • I want to be a programmer, work in corporate environment, earn well, learn fast and eventually become a great programmer [on hold]

    - by Shin San
    I'll try to keep this simple: I'm 29, been dabbling with computers for the past 10 years, had entry level jobs in tech support for different apps, been fixing computers for a while and now want to specialize in something. I'm not 100% stranger to programming but haven't gone past if/then/else with anything. A bit of JavaScript, PHP, Python and currently checking out the "SELECT" statement in SQL :)) I'm curious about programming, I enjoy it and I'm thinking of making a living out of it. So, while I'm at it, why not earn a bit more than the average Joe? So, that's why I'm checking what the best solution, the best learning path and the most useful languages are considering: a) how easy/fast can you find a job by knowing it b) how much would I be able to earn c) how fast can I learn it By reading 10-20 articles online I've come up with an example, but I'm here for some expert advice. Example: * ratings from a) and b) point of view #1 sql ; #2 java ; #3 html (please don't start the markup language debate) ; #4 javascript From this ratings, I'd say a good way to go is learn html/css/(javascript or php) for the web part of apps, some SQL/MySQL/whateverSQL for holding data and loads of Java for the program itself. Please let me know if this is a good idea and if so, what should be the order for learning all of the above. Else, please let me know a better way and why it would be better. Many thanks for taking the time to read my question. Best wishes to you guys Edit: if I think Java + SQL + HTML&JavaScript is the way to go, does the order I'm learning them in matter? Or can I try to learn them all at once?

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  • Advice for beginner programmer

    - by user3461957
    I am beginner in software development. I noticed when I try to learn one technology let's say .NET I loose my grip over other for example Java. I thought it would be better to concentrate on one technology either Java or .NET to make significant advancement and be an expert, because they can be many details which one can ignore when keeps on changing between technologies. Is my decision right? Do experts choose this approach? Update: Should I pursue my career knowing one technology or not?

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  • Great Programmer Productivity - Accounting for 10,000 fold difference?

    - by TheImpact
    "A great lathe operator commands several times the wage of an average lathe operator, but a great writer of software code is worth 10,000 times the price of an average software writer." - Bill Gates Say there's a "great" software engineer and an "average" software engineer on the same team. How can you account for one engineer being 10,000 times more productive? I can't quite fathom this, given they're both taking on their share of features, bugs and investigations, and consistently deliver with quality. Would my description possibly justify them to be above "average"? "great"? In a corporation like Microsoft, what % of software engineers are "average"? What % "great"?

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  • Should a programmer "think" for the client?

    - by P.Brian.Mackey
    I have gotten to the point where I hate requirements gathering. Customer's are too vague for their own good. In an agile environment, where we can show the client a piece of work to completion it's not too bad as we can make small regular corrections/updates to functionality. In a "waterfall" type in environment (requirements first, nearly complete product next) things can get ugly. This kind of environment has led me to constantly question requirements. E.G. Customer wants "automatically convert input to the number 1" (referring to a Qty in an order). But what they don't think about is that "input" could be a simple type-o. An "x" in a textbox could be a "woops" not I want 1 of those "toothpaste" products. But, there's so much in the air with requirements that I could stand and correct for hours on end smashing out what they want. This just isn't healthy. Working for a corporation, I could try to adjust the culture to fit the agile model that would help us (no small job, above my pay grade). Or, sweep ugly details under the rug and hope for the best. Maybe my customer is trying to get too close to the code? How does one handle the problem of "thinking for the client" without pissing them off with too many questions?

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  • Benefits of Masters of Engineering Professional Practice for the lowly (yet aspiring) programmer

    - by Peter Turner
    I've been looking into in state online degree programs 'to fit my busy lifestyle' (i.e. three children, wife and hour and a half commute). One interesting one I've found is that Master of Engineering in Professional Practice. It looks more useful and practical than a MBA in project management. I'll contact the admission dept there about the specifics. But here I'm just asking in general. Do the courses in this degree apply to software engineering/development in even an abstract sense. The university I'm looking at does not have a Software Engineering major in the school of engineering. I'm not interested in architecture astronomy, but I am interested in helping my company succeed and being able to communicate technical information at a high and effective level as well as being able to lead my co-programmers toward a more robust end product. So my multipart question is: What might be the real benefit to me and my brain and How do I convince my boss (the owner of the company, who does do some tuition reimbursement) that just because it doesn't say anything about software that it might still do us some good? Oh, and how do I get past the fact that a masters degree would make me more qualified to be the project manager than... the project manager? (who is my supervisor)

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  • How to explain OOP to a matlab programmer?

    - by Oak
    I have a lot of friends who come from electrical / physical / mechanical engineering background, and are curious about what is "OOP" all about. They all know Matlab quite well, so they do have basic programming background; but they have a very hard time grasping a complex type system which can benefit from the concepts OOP introduces. Can anyone propose a way I can try to explain it to them? I'm just not familiar with Matlab myself, so I'm having troubles finding parallels. I think using simple examples like shapes or animals is a bit too abstract for those engineers. So far I've tried using a Matrix interface vs array-based / sparse / whatever implementations, but that didn't work so well, probably because different matrix types are already well-supported in Matlab.

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  • Good structure of IT / programmer CV

    - by tomas
    Hi, company where I applied for a job requires a very detailed CV mainly of programming languages, frameworks, technology. My CV have 3 pages but for this company is not enough detailed. ;) What structure have your CV in programming languages, frameworks, technology, third-party libraries? Any sample of good structured CV. (as pdf file) Of course I had used the google but I found a dozen same old things. I would like have someting orignal and fresh. Any inspiration? I do not know what to write for example C #. C# OOP, delagate, event, generic, LINQ other WPF control, data template, converter, style, triggers..? Prims, Caliburn, MEF ? Also which skills from OS, IDE, util is suitably to have in CV. I would’t have a 10 pages CV or have bad and immense structure of CV. Sory for my english

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  • How to become a "faster" programmer?

    - by Nick Gotch
    My last job evaluation included just one weak point: timeliness. I'm already aware of some things I can do to improve this but what I'm looking for are some more. Does anyone have tips or advice on what they do to increase the speed of their output without sacrificing its quality? How do you estimate timelines and stick to them? What do you do to get more done in shorter time periods? Any feedback is greatly appreciated, thanks,

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  • Google is good or bad for programmer? [closed]

    - by Vikas
    Recently I was being interviewed by a company and faced one question. The interviewer asked me a question and at that time I didn't know the answer but if I had been asked about just 4 months ago, I could have answered it. The question was from new language that I learned just 4 months ago. But I just get overview of the language and just get started working on that. Whenever I face difficultly, I google it. That means we do not have to memorize the whole programming language book! So in that situation I felt that Google screwed my job! Not talking subjectively, Is it good to google all the time?

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  • Best accounting software for freelance/contractor programmer? [closed]

    - by user1352034
    I know this isn't exactly a programming question but I am hoping to find some programmers who freelance or do contractor work in the US. I have started to work on side jobs and have been billing my clients using Paypal. I then would store those records in a Google excel doc but realize this will get out of hand as time goes on and am looking for a good solution. I am no accountant so I am not sure of everything I would need but I am guessing basic invoicing, expenses, reporting, integration with paypal, etc.. Any contractors or freelancers in here could recommend what they use? I have researched a few but would like to hear what other people are using and how it is working out for them. Thanks for your time!

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  • Motivation Problems, Middle School Programmer [closed]

    - by Anonymous
    I'm in middle school at the moment and have been programming for about a year and a half. I mostly work with Python and Ruby, and am currently learning Rails. I know, you can never learn enough, it takes a looong time to master a subject, but I feel like I don't have much left to learn :(. I've learned many concepts in Python, learned basically the whole std lib and have written a ton of programs, same with Ruby. In Ruby I've also done a lot of metaprogramming. After I've learned all the concepts, and written a lot of programs, there is nothing really left for me to do! What can I do, now that I've learned all the concepts, and written some programs? I can't get a job working with real developers, and the programming camp I went to last year was far too easy.

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  • Should every programmer keep a "Lessons Learned" journal?

    - by gablin
    Every time I've finished a project, there is always something that I've learned (otherwise I don't find it very motivating). But I can't remember everything, and much later I may stumble across the same problem that I encountered in a previous project but no longer how I solved it (or at least what attempts I made). So would it be a good idea to write this down in a journal of some sort? I know that writing stuff down feels like writing documentation (which not everyone enjoys doing), and hope our memory to serve us when needed. But having it documented, it could be shared with other programmers and learn what lessons they learned. So, what do you think?

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  • 3D Modeling Software for Programmer [closed]

    - by Pathachiever11
    I've recently learned how to make games for Unity3d, and now I want to start making games! I can't wait to start! However, before I can make 3D games, I need to learn 3D modeling for character design, level design, and some animation. What is the easiest 3D modeling software, compatible with Unity3d? I do not want to spend too much time learning the software. From what I've heard, Blender is a bit complicated to use. Maya and 3dsMax seem very powerful. Could someone point me in the right direction? I don't want to spend a lot of time learning. I know its not that easy, but you guys have experience, you guys probably know out of all which one is easier and powerful. Could you recommend a software? Many Thanks!

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  • Best sources to find your go-to programmer

    - by user66851
    After exhausting many resources, time, interviews etc, I cannot seem to find the correct programming talent for our company. Any other resources you suggest besides Dice, Linkedin, Craigslist, University Job Boards, Poaching techniques....its been months now! Specifically, we designed proprietary data-manipulation and data-gathering technology, and are looking for skilled programmers requiring skills of PHP5/MySQL, Javascript/HTML/CSS , cross-browser compatibility/optimization, web interface development, familiarity with source control (SVN or GIT), any L/AMP stack, and/or related application protocols, GCC-supported languages, Zend Framework and/or jQuery.

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  • ASP.NET book for desktop programmer. [closed]

    - by RealityDysfunction
    Fellow programmers, I have been learning C# for a while now, but my ultimate goal is to develop ASP.NET applications. A few ASP.NET books I looked at either start with absolute basics...What is C#? What is a function...or Assume that I have developed web apps in other languages like PHP...I am looking for a book that is tailored for people who already know desktop programming but wish to learn ASP.NET. Did anybody come across such a book? Many Thanks.

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  • Passive Income for a programmer : Teaching

    - by Victor
    While looking into passive income streams for someone with a Science/math/Engineering/Programming background, I ran into various ideas. I was looking to generate a passive income that would not take too much of an initiall learning curve. And it occurs to me that teaching/writing books/ on High School math/Physics/English is something I can do without a lot of prepwork. I am in Toronto . what are the average income opportunities for something like this? Where should I start looking?

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  • Where can I find game postmortems with a programmer perspective [on hold]

    - by Ken
    There are a number of interesting game post-mortems in places like GDC vault or gamastura.com. The post-mortems are generally give with a CEO/manager perspective or a designer perspective, or, more often a combination of both e.g DOOM postmortem But I have not been able to find many post-mortems which are primarily from the programmers perspective. I'm looking for discussions and rational for technical choices and tradeoffs and how technical problems were overcome. The motivation here is to learn what kind of problems real game programmers encounter and how they go about solving them. A perfect example of what I'm looking for is Renaud Bédard's excellent GDC talk on the development of Fez, "Cubes all the way down". Where can I find more like that?

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  • Layout of experienced programmer Resume? [closed]

    - by mob1lejunkie
    What layout of resume works best for experienced programmers? Currently my layout is: Contact Details Focus (goal) Technical Skills Professional Experience (Responsibilities + achievements at each job) Education Interests I feel my current layout uses up too much valuable space. Most of the online templates feel like junior Resumes with emphasis on education so I am not sure how I can improve it. I wonder how many hiring managers actually care about goal/objective? To me it looks useless. Also, is it necessary to have summary of technical skills/technologies? If so, would it not make more sense for it to be mentioned later in the Resume rather then at the top? Finally, do you have separate section for achievements? Many thanks.

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  • The cost of Programmer Team Clustering

    - by MarkPearl
    I recently was involved in a conversation about the productivity of programmers and the seemingly wide range in abilities that different programmers have in this industry. Some of the comments made were reiterated a few days later when I came across a chapter in Code Complete (v2) where it says "In programming specifically, many studies have shown order-of-magnitude differences in the quality of the programs written, the sizes of the programs written, and the productivity of programmers". In line with this is another comment presented by Code Complete when discussing teams - "Good programmers tend to cluster, as do bad programmers". This is something I can personally relate to. I have come across some really good and bad programmers and 99% of the time it turns out the team they work in is the same - really good or really bad. When I have found a mismatch, it hasn't stayed that way for long - the person has moved on, or the team has ejected the individual. Keeping this in mind I would like to comment on the risks an organization faces when forcing teams to remain together regardless of the mix. When you have the situation where someone is not willing to be part of the team but still wants to get a pay check at the end of each month, it presents some interesting challenges and hard decisions to make. First of all, when this occurs you need to give them an opportunity to change - for someone to change, they need to know what the problem is and what is expected. It is unreasonable to expect someone to change but have not indicated what they need to change and the consequences of not changing. If after a reasonable time of an individual being aware of the problem and not making an effort to improve you need to do two things... Follow through with the consequences of not changing. Consider the impact that this behaviour will have on the rest of the team. What is the cost of not following through with the consequences? If there is no follow through, it is often an indication to the individual that they can continue their behaviour. Why should they change if you don't care enough to keep your end of the agreement? In many ways I think it is very similar to the "Broken Windows" principles – if you allow the windows to break and don’t fix them, more will get broken. What is the cost of keeping them on? When keeping a disruptive influence in a team you risk loosing the good in the team. As Code Complete says, good and bad programmers tend to cluster - they have a tendency to keep this balance - if you are not going to help keep the balance they will. The cost of not removing a disruptive influence is that the good in the team will eventually help you maintain the clustering themselves by leaving.

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  • Working With Non-SEO Savvy Programmer Personalities

    As you well know, it's extremely important to have the proper site architecture, technical requirements, and site infrastructure which is important for the search engines. Being able to work directly with these technical savvy professionals is a core requirement for any SEO firm or consultant that you bring on to help you with SEO.

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  • Hobbyist programmer releasing software with a donate button

    - by espais
    I'd like to start this with a disclaimer that I realize that a full, clear-cut answer should be sought out by a lawyer. I am more so curious about what other users of this community have done Say that I had a small program that I had developed for fun, that I wished to release to the public. I'll drop it out there with one of the various open-source licenses, and probably put it up on SourceForge or Git in case if anybody should ever want to fork/maintain/check out code. Also say that I wanted to accept donations for the project, with absolutely 0 expectation that people will send any money. However, if somebody donated in order to buy me a beer or a pizza for the work that they liked, I would accept gladly. The question, then, is what are the general requirements of accepting donations? Can it go into a personal account with no questions asked as a "gift," or do I need to setup an LLC to avoid any taxation issues? (US citizen here). Again, yes this should be lawyer discussed, but I also know that many projects that I see have the ability to donate, and assume that the community probably has a decent amount of experience in this regard.

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