Search Results

Search found 53991 results on 2160 pages for 'asp net'.

Page 9/2160 | < Previous Page | 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16  | Next Page >

  • Daily tech links for .net and related technologies - Apr 8-10, 2010

    - by SanjeevAgarwal
    Daily tech links for .net and related technologies - Apr 8-10, 2010 Web Development Using RIA DomainServices with ASP.NET and MVC 2 - geekswithblogs Using AntiXss As The Default Encoder For ASP.NET - Phil Haack New Syntax for HTML Encoding Output in ASP.NET 4 (and ASP.NET MVC 2) - Scott Gu Multi-Step Processing in ASP.NET - Dave M. Bush MvcContrib - Portable Area – Visual Studio project template - erichexter Encoding/Decoding URIs and HTML in the .NET 4 Client Profile - Pete Brown Jon Takes Five...(read more)

    Read the article

  • Asp.net override Membership settings at runtime (asp.net mvc)

    - by minal
    I had an application that hooked onto 1 single database. The app now needs to hook into multiple databases. What we want to do is, using the same application/domain/hostname/virtual dir give the user the option on the login screen to select the "App/Database" they want to connect into. Each database has the App tables/data/procs/etc as well as the aspnet membership/roles stuff. When the user enters the username/password and selects (select list) the application, I want to validate the user against the selected applications database. Presently the database connection string for membership services is saved in the web.config. Is there any way I can override this at login time? Also, I need the "remember me" function to work smoothly as well. How does this work when the user comes back to the app in 5 hours... This process should be able to identify the user and application and log in appropriately.

    Read the article

  • Looking into ASP.Net MVC 4.0 Mobile Development - part 2

    - by nikolaosk
    In this post I will be continuing my discussion on ASP.Net MVC 4.0 mobile development. You can have a look at my first post on the subject here . Make sure you read it and understand it well before you move one reading the remaining of this post. I will not be writing any code in this post. I will try to explain a few concepts related to the MVC 4.0 mobile functionality. In this post I will be looking into the Browser Overriding feature in ASP.Net MVC 4.0. By that I mean that we override the user agent for a given user session. This is very useful feature for people who visit a site through a device and they experience the mobile version of the site, but what they really want is the option to be able to switch to the desktop view. "Why they might want to do that?", you might wonder.Well first of all the users of our ASP.Net MVC 4.0 application will appreciate that they have the option to switch views while some others will think that they will enjoy more the contents of our website with the "desktop view" since the mobile device they view our site has a quite large display.  Obviously this is only one site. These are just different views that are rendered.To put it simply, browser overriding lets our application treat requests as if they were coming from a different browser rather than the one they are actually from. In order to do that programmatically we must have a look at the System.Web.WebPages namespace and the classes in it. Most specifically the class BrowserHelpers. Have a look at the picture below   In this class we see some extension methods for HttpContext class.These methods are called extensions-helpers methods and we use them to switch to one browser from another thus overriding the current/actual browser. These APIs have effect on layout,views and partial views and will not affect any other ASP.Net Request.Browser related functionality.The overridden browser is stored in a cookie. Let me explain what some of these methods do. SetOverriddenBrowser() -  let us set the user agent string to specific value GetOverriddenBrowser() -  let us get the overridden value ClearOverriddenBrowser() -  let us remove any overridden user agent for the current request   To recap, in our ASP.Net MVC 4.0 applications when our application is viewed in our mobile devices, we can have a link like "Desktop View" for all those who desperately want to see the site with in full desktop-browser version.We then can specify a browser type override. My controller class (snippet of code) that is responsible for handling the switching could be something like that. public class SwitchViewController : Controller{ public RedirectResult SwitchView(bool mobile, string returnUrl){if (Request.Browser.IsMobileDevice == mobile)HttpContext.ClearOverriddenBrowser();elseHttpContext.SetOverriddenBrowser(mobile ? BrowserOverride.Mobile : BrowserOverride.Desktop);return Redirect(returnUrl);}} Hope it helps!!!!

    Read the article

  • How to implement Survey page using ASP.NET MVC?

    - by Aleks
    I need to implement the survey page using ASP.NET MVC (v.4) That functionality has already been implemented in our project using ASP.NET WebForms. (I really searched a lot for real examples of similar functionality implemented via MVC, but failed) Goal: staying on the same page (in webforms -'Survey.aspx') each time user clicks 'Next Page', load next bunch of questions (controls) which user is going to answer. Type of controls in questions are defined only in run-time (retrieved from Data Base). To explain better the question I manually created (rather simple) mark-up below of 'two' pages (two loads of controls): <%@ Page Language="C#" AutoEventWireup="true" CodeBehind="Survey.aspx.cs" Inherits="WebSite.Survey" %> <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd"> <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"> <head runat="server"> <title></title> </head> <body> <form id="form1" runat="server"> <div><h2>Internal Survey</h2></div> <div><h3>Page 1</h3></div> <div style="padding-bottom: 10px"><div><b>Did you have internet disconnections during last week?</b></div> <asp:RadioButtonList ID="RadioButtonList1" runat="server"> <asp:ListItem>Yes</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>No</asp:ListItem> </asp:RadioButtonList> </div> <div style="padding-bottom: 10px"><div><b>Which days of the week suit you best for meeting up ?</b></div> <asp:CheckBoxList ID="CheckBoxList1" runat="server"> <asp:ListItem>Monday</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Tuesday</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Wednesday</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Thursday</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Friday</asp:ListItem> </asp:CheckBoxList> </div> <div style="padding-bottom: 10px"> <div><b>How satisfied are you with your job? </b></div> <asp:RadioButtonList ID="RadioButtonList2" runat="server"> <asp:ListItem>Very Good</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Good</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Bad</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Very Bad</asp:ListItem> </asp:RadioButtonList> </div> <div style="padding-bottom: 10px"> <div><b>How satisfied are you with your direct supervisor ? </b></div> <asp:RadioButtonList ID="RadioButtonList3" runat="server"> <asp:ListItem>Not Satisfied</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Somewhat Satisfied</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Neutral</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Satisfied</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Very Satisfied</asp:ListItem> </asp:RadioButtonList> </div> <div style="padding-bottom: 10px"> <asp:Button ID="Button1" runat="server" Text="Next Page" onclick="Button1_Click" /> </div> </form> </body> </html> PAGE 2 <%@ Page Language="C#" AutoEventWireup="true" CodeBehind="Survey.aspx.cs" Inherits="WebSite.Survey" %> <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd"> <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"> <head runat="server"> <title></title> </head> <body> <form id="form1" runat="server"> <div><h2>Internal Survey</h2></div> <div><h3>Page 2</h3></div> <div style="padding-bottom: 10px"><div><b>Did admininstators fix your internet connection in time ?</b></div> <asp:RadioButtonList ID="RadioButtonList1" runat="server"> <asp:ListItem>Yes</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>No</asp:ListItem> </asp:RadioButtonList> </div> <div style="padding-bottom: 10px"><div><b>What's your overal impression about the job ?</b></div> <asp:TextBox ID="TextBox1" runat="server" Height="88px" Width="322px"></asp:TextBox> </div> <div style="padding-bottom: 10px"> <div><b>Select day which best suits you for admin support ? </b></div> <asp:DropDownList ID="DropDownList1" runat="server"> <asp:ListItem>Select day</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Monday</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Wednesday</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Friday</asp:ListItem> </asp:DropDownList> </div> <div style="padding-bottom: 10px"> <asp:Button ID="Button1" runat="server" Text="Next Page" onclick="Button1_Click" /> </div> </form> </body> </html>

    Read the article

  • Cannot get net 4.5rc to work

    - by ThomasD
    I have installed .net 4.5rc from http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/netframework/hh854779.aspx because I would like to use the new spatial features when developing with visual visual web developer 2010 express. But when I want to change the target framework to .net 4.5 in the project properties it is not there. I have checked the directory in C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework64 and can see that there is no v4.5 folder but the v4.0 directory has been updated with a timestamp corresponding to when I installed v4.5. The version of the v4.0 directory is v4.0.30319. I am running windows 7 on my computer. Any ideas why I cannot find v4.5 ? thanks Thomas *UPDATE Based on the comment below I have found out that I am running 4.5. For others reading this post, .net 4.5 replaces the files in the .net 4.0 directory but without renaming the directory to .net 4.5 (a bit confusing). To check whether your assemblies have been updated check the product version of eg. system.dll (right click - details). According to this post http://www.west-wind.com/weblog/posts/2012/Mar/13/NET-45-is-an-inplace-replacement-for-NET-40 if the product version is above 17000 it is running 4.5.

    Read the article

  • Video Aulas gratuitas de ASP.NET AJAX

    - by renatohaddad
    Olá pessoal, A Microsoft publicou 14 vídeos que cedi a eles a respeito do ASP.NET AJAX. Todos os vídeos são gratuitos, e caso você ainda use o AJAX estas lições podem ajudá-lo bastante. Tenha um excelente estudo. Instalação do AJAX Control Tookit ASP.NET AJAX: Controle calendário ASP.NET AJAX: Controle marca d´água ASP.NET AJAX: Controle Numeric Up Down ASP.NET AJAX: Controle botão de confirmação ASP.NET AJAX: Filtros de digitação ASP.NET AJAX: Validação de dados ASP.NET AJAX: Controle Accordion ASP.NET AJAX: Controle Accordion com banco de dados ASP.NET AJAX: Controle de painel ASP.NET AJAX: Controle TAB ASP.NET AJAX: Sempre visível ASP.NET AJAX: Controle Update Panel ASP.NET AJAX: Controle Update Progress Bons estudos! Renato Haddad

    Read the article

  • Integrate Bing Search API into ASP.Net application

    - by sreejukg
    Couple of months back, I wrote an article about how to integrate Bing Search engine (API 2.0) with ASP.Net website. You can refer the article here http://weblogs.asp.net/sreejukg/archive/2012/04/07/integrate-bing-api-for-search-inside-asp-net-web-application.aspx Things are changing rapidly in the tech world and Bing has also changed! The Bing Search API 2.0 will work until August 1, 2012, after that it will not return results. Shocked? Don’t worry the API has moved to Windows Azure market place and available for you to sign up and continue using it and there is a free version available based on your usage. In this article, I am going to explain how you can integrate the new Bing API that is available in the Windows Azure market place with your website. You can access the Windows Azure market place from the below link https://datamarket.azure.com/ There is lot of applications available for you to subscribe and use. Bing is one of them. You can find the new Bing Search API from the below link https://datamarket.azure.com/dataset/5BA839F1-12CE-4CCE-BF57-A49D98D29A44 To get access to Bing Search API, first you need to register an account with Windows Azure market place. Sign in to the Windows Azure market place site using your windows live account. Once you sign in with your windows live account, you need to register to Windows Azure Market place account. From the Windows Azure market place, you will see the sign in button it the top right of the page. Clicking on the sign in button will take you to the Windows live ID authentication page. You can enter a windows live ID here to login. Once logged in you will see the Registration page for the Windows Azure market place as follows. You can agree or disagree for the email address usage by Microsoft. I believe selecting the check box means you will get email about what is happening in Windows Azure market place. Click on continue button once you are done. In the next page, you should accept the terms of use, it is not optional, you must agree to terms and conditions. Scroll down to the page and select the I agree checkbox and click on Register Button. Now you are a registered member of Windows Azure market place. You can subscribe to data applications. In order to use BING API in your application, you must obtain your account Key, in the previous version of Bing you were required an API key, the current version uses Account Key instead. Once you logged in to the Windows Azure market place, you can see “My Account” in the top menu, from the Top menu; go to “My Account” Section. From the My Account section, you can manage your subscriptions and Account Keys. Account Keys will be used by your applications to access the subscriptions from the market place. Click on My Account link, you can see Account Keys in the left menu and then Add an account key or you can use the default Account key available. Creating account key is very simple process. Also you can remove the account keys you create if necessary. The next step is to subscribe to BING Search API. At this moment, Bing Offers 2 APIs for search. The available options are as follows. 1. Bing Search API - https://datamarket.azure.com/dataset/5ba839f1-12ce-4cce-bf57-a49d98d29a44 2. Bing Search API – Web Results only - https://datamarket.azure.com/dataset/8818f55e-2fe5-4ce3-a617-0b8ba8419f65 The difference is that the later will give you only web results where the other you can specify the source type such as image, video, web, news etc. Carefully choose the API based on your application requirements. In this article, I am going to use Web Results Only API, but the steps will be similar to both. Go to the API page https://datamarket.azure.com/dataset/8818f55e-2fe5-4ce3-a617-0b8ba8419f65, you can see the subscription options in the right side. And in the bottom of the page you can see the free option Since I am going to use the free options, just Click the Sign Up link for that. Just select I agree check box and click on the Sign Up button. You will get a recipt pagethat detail your subscription. Now you are ready Bing Search API – Web results. The next step is to integrate the API into your ASP.Net application. Now if you go to the Search API page (as well as in the Receipt page), you can see a .Net C# Class Library link, click on the link, you will get a code file named “BingSearchContainer.cs”. In the following sections I am going to demonstrate the use of Bing Search API from an ASP.Net application. Create an empty ASP.Net web application. In the solution explorer, the application will looks as follows. Now add the downloaded code file (“BingSearchContainer.cs”) to the project. Right click your project in solution explorer, Add -> existing item, then browse to the downloaded location, select the “BingSearchContainer.cs” file and add it to the project. To build the code file you need to add reference to the following library. System.Data.Services.Client You can find the library in the .Net tab, when you select Add -> Reference Try to build your project now; it should build without any errors. Add an ASP.Net page to the project. I have included a text box and a button, then a Grid View to the page. The idea is to Search the text entered and display the results in the gridview. The page will look in the Visual Studio Designer as follows. The markup of the page is as follows. In the button click event handler for the search button, I have used the following code. Now run your project and enter some text in the text box and click the Search button, you will see the results coming from Bing, cool. I entered the text “Microsoft” in the textbox and clicked on the button and I got the following results. Searching Specific Websites If you want to search a particular website, you pass the site url with site:<site url name> and if you have more sites, use pipe (|). e.g. The following search query site:microsoft.com | site:adobe.com design will search the word design and return the results from Microsoft.com and Adobe.com See the sample code that search only Microsoft.com for the text entered for the above sample. var webResults = bingContainer.Web("site:www.Microsoft.com " + txtSearch.Text, null, null, null, null, null, null); Paging the results returned by the API By default the BING API will return 100 results based on your query. The default code file that you downloaded from BING doesn’t include any option for this. You can modify the downloaded code to perform this paging. The BING API supports two parameters $top (for number of results to return) and $skip (for number of records to skip). So if you want 3rd page of results with page size = 10, you need to pass $top = 10 and $skip=20. Open the BingSearchContainer.cs in the editor. You can see the Web method in it as follows. public DataServiceQuery<WebResult> Web(String Query, String Market, String Adult, Double? Latitude, Double? Longitude, String WebFileType, String Options) {  In the method signature, I have added two more parameters public DataServiceQuery<WebResult> Web(String Query, String Market, String Adult, Double? Latitude, Double? Longitude, String WebFileType, String Options, int resultCount, int pageNo) { and in the method, you need to pass the parameters to the query variable. query = query.AddQueryOption("$top", resultCount); query = query.AddQueryOption("$skip", (pageNo -1)*resultCount); return query; Note that I didn’t perform any validation, but you need to check conditions such as resultCount and pageCount should be greater than or equal to 1. If the parameters are not valid, the Bing Search API will throw the error. The modified method is as follows. The changes are highlighted. Now see the following code in the SearchPage.aspx.cs file protected void btnSearch_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) {     var bingContainer = new Bing.BingSearchContainer(new Uri(https://api.datamarket.azure.com/Bing/SearchWeb/));     // replace this value with your account key     var accountKey = "your key";     // the next line configures the bingContainer to use your credentials.     bingContainer.Credentials = new NetworkCredential(accountKey, accountKey);     var webResults = bingContainer.Web("site:microsoft.com" +txtSearch.Text , null, null, null, null, null, null,3,2);     lstResults.DataSource = webResults;     lstResults.DataBind(); } The following code will return 3 results starting from second page (by skipping first 3 results). See the result page as follows. Bing provides complete integration to its offerings. When you develop search based applications, you can use the power of Bing to perform the search. Integrating Bing Search API to ASP.Net application is a simple process and without investing much time, you can develop a good search based application. Make sure you read the terms of use before designing the application and decide which API usage is suitable for you. Further readings BING API Migration Guide http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=248077 Bing API FAQ http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=252146 Bing API Schema Guide http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=252151

    Read the article

  • How to work RavenDB Id with ASP.NET MVC Routes

    - by shiju
    By default RavenDB's Id would be sperated by "/". Let's say that we have a category object, the Ids would be like "categories/1". This will make problems when working with ASP.NET MVC's route rule. For a route category/edit/id, the uri would be category/edit/categories/1. You can solve this problem in two waysSolution 1 - Change Id SeparatorWe can use different Id Separator for RavenDB Ids in order to working with ASP.NET MVC route rules. The following code specify that Ids would be seperated by "-" rather than the default "/"  documentStore = new DocumentStore { Url = "http://localhost:8080/" };  documentStore.Initialize();  documentStore.Conventions.IdentityPartsSeparator = "-"; The above IdentityPartsSeparator would be generate Ids like "categories-1"Solution 2 - Modify ASP.NET MVC Route Modify the ASP.NET MVC routes in the Global.asax.cs file, as shown in the following code  routes.MapRoute(     "WithParam",                                           // Route name     "{controller}/{action}/{*id}"                         // URL with parameters     );  We just put "*" in front of the id variable that will be working with the default Id separator of RavenDB

    Read the article

  • Webcast MSDN: Introducción a páginas Web ASP.NET con Razor Syntax

    - by carlone
    Estimados [email protected]: Mañana tendré el gusto de estar compartiendo nuevamente con ustedes un webcast. Estan invitados:   Id. de evento: 1032487341 Moderador(es): Carlos Augusto Lone Saenz. Idiomas: Español. Productos: Microsoft ASP.NET y Microsoft SQL Server. Público: Programador/desarrollador de programas. Venga y aprenda en esta sesión, sobre el nuevo modelo de programación simplificado, nueva sintaxis y ayudantes para web que componen las páginas Web ASP.NET con 'Razor'. Esta nueva forma de construir aplicaciones ASP.NET se dirige directamente a los nuevos desarrolladores de la plataforma. NET y desarrolladores, tratando de crear aplicaciones web rápidamente. También se incluye SQL Compact, embedded database que es xcopy de implementar. Vamos a mostrar una nueva funcionalidad que se ha agregado recientemente, incluyendo un package manager que hace algo fácil el agregar bibliotecas de terceros para sus aplicaciones. Registrarse aqui: https://msevents.microsoft.com/CUI/EventDetail.aspx?EventID=1032487341&Culture=es-AR

    Read the article

  • Monitoring ASP.NET Application

    - by imran_ku07
        Introduction:          There are times when you may need to monitor your ASP.NET application's CPU and memory consumption, so that you can fine-tune your ASP.NET application(whether Web Form, MVC or WebMatrix). Also, sometimes you may need to see all the exceptions(and their details) of your application raising, whether they are handled or not. If you are creating an ASP.NET application in .NET Framework 4.0, then you can easily monitor your application's CPU or memory consumption and see how many exceptions your application raising. In this article I will show you how you can do this.       Description:           With .NET Framework 4.0, you can turn on the monitoring of CPU and memory consumption by setting AppDomain.MonitoringEnabled property to true. Also, in .NET Framework 4.0, you can register a callback method to AppDomain.FirstChanceException event to monitor the exceptions being thrown within your application's AppDomain. Turning on the monitoring and registering a callback method will add some additional overhead to your application, which will hurt your application performance. So it is better to turn on these features only if you have following properties in web.config file,   <add key="AppDomainMonitoringEnabled" value="true"/> <add key="FirstChanceExceptionMonitoringEnabled" value="true"/>             In case if you wonder what does FirstChanceException mean. It simply means the first notification of an exception raised by your application. Even CLR invokes this notification before the catch block that handles the exception. Now just update global.asax.cs file as,   string _item = "__RequestExceptionKey"; protected void Application_Start() { SetupMonitoring(); } private void SetupMonitoring() { bool appDomainMonitoringEnabled, firstChanceExceptionMonitoringEnabled; bool.TryParse(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["AppDomainMonitoringEnabled"], out appDomainMonitoringEnabled); bool.TryParse(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["FirstChanceExceptionMonitoringEnabled"], out firstChanceExceptionMonitoringEnabled); if (appDomainMonitoringEnabled) { AppDomain.MonitoringIsEnabled = true; } if (firstChanceExceptionMonitoringEnabled) { AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FirstChanceException += (object source, FirstChanceExceptionEventArgs e) => { if (HttpContext.Current == null)// If no context available, ignore it return; if (HttpContext.Current.Items[_item] == null) HttpContext.Current.Items[_item] = new RequestException { Exceptions = new List<Exception>() }; (HttpContext.Current.Items[_item] as RequestException).Exceptions.Add(e.Exception); }; } } protected void Application_EndRequest() { if (Context.Items[_item] != null) { //Only add the request if atleast one exception is raised var reqExc = Context.Items[_item] as RequestException; reqExc.Url = Request.Url.AbsoluteUri; Application.Lock(); if (Application["AllExc"] == null) Application["AllExc"] = new List<RequestException>(); (Application["AllExc"] as List<RequestException>).Add(reqExc); Application.UnLock(); } }               Now browse to Monitoring.cshtml file, you will see the following screen,                            The above screen shows you the total bytes allocated, total bytes in use and CPU usage of your application. The above screen also shows you all the exceptions raised by your application which is very helpful for you. I have uploaded a sample project on github at here. You can find Monitoring.cshtml file on this sample project. You can use this approach in ASP.NET MVC, ASP.NET WebForm and WebMatrix application.       Summary:          This is very important for administrators/developers to manage and administer their web application after deploying to production server. This article will help administrators/developers to see the memory and CPU usage of their web application. This will also help administrators/developers to see all the exceptions your application is throwing whether they are swallowed or not. Hopefully you will enjoy this article too.   SyntaxHighlighter.all()

    Read the article

  • New Validation Attributes in ASP.NET MVC 3 Future

    - by imran_ku07
         Introduction:             Validating user inputs is an very important step in collecting information from users because it helps you to prevent errors during processing data. Incomplete or improperly formatted user inputs will create lot of problems for your application. Fortunately, ASP.NET MVC 3 makes it very easy to validate most common input validations. ASP.NET MVC 3 includes Required, StringLength, Range, RegularExpression, Compare and Remote validation attributes for common input validation scenarios. These validation attributes validates most of your user inputs but still validation for Email, File Extension, Credit Card, URL, etc are missing. Fortunately, some of these validation attributes are available in ASP.NET MVC 3 Future. In this article, I will show you how to leverage Email, Url, CreditCard and FileExtensions validation attributes(which are available in ASP.NET MVC 3 Future) in ASP.NET MVC 3 application.       Description:             First of all you need to download ASP.NET MVC 3 RTM Source Code from here. Then extract all files in a folder. Then open MvcFutures project from mvc3-rtm-sources\mvc3\src\MvcFutures folder. Build the project. In case, if you get compile time error(s) then simply remove the reference of System.Web.WebPages and System.Web.Mvc assemblies and add the reference of System.Web.WebPages and System.Web.Mvc 3 assemblies again but from the .NET tab and then build the project again, it will create a Microsoft.Web.Mvc assembly inside mvc3-rtm-sources\mvc3\src\MvcFutures\obj\Debug folder. Now we can use Microsoft.Web.Mvc assembly inside our application.             Create a new ASP.NET MVC 3 application. For demonstration purpose, I will create a dummy model UserInformation. So create a new class file UserInformation.cs inside Model folder and add the following code,   public class UserInformation { [Required] public string Name { get; set; } [Required] [EmailAddress] public string Email { get; set; } [Required] [Url] public string Website { get; set; } [Required] [CreditCard] public string CreditCard { get; set; } [Required] [FileExtensions(Extensions = "jpg,jpeg")] public string Image { get; set; } }             Inside UserInformation class, I am using Email, Url, CreditCard and FileExtensions validation attributes which are defined in Microsoft.Web.Mvc assembly. By default FileExtensionsAttribute allows png, jpg, jpeg and gif extensions. You can override this by using Extensions property of FileExtensionsAttribute class.             Then just open(or create) HomeController.cs file and add the following code,   public class HomeController : Controller { public ActionResult Index() { return View(); } [HttpPost] public ActionResult Index(UserInformation u) { return View(); } }             Next just open(or create) Index view for Home controller and add the following code,  @model NewValidationAttributesinASPNETMVC3Future.Model.UserInformation @{ ViewBag.Title = "Index"; Layout = "~/Views/Shared/_Layout.cshtml"; } <h2>Index</h2> <script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.validate.min.js")" type="text/javascript"></script> <script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.validate.unobtrusive.min.js")" type="text/javascript"></script> @using (Html.BeginForm()) { @Html.ValidationSummary(true) <fieldset> <legend>UserInformation</legend> <div class="editor-label"> @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Name) </div> <div class="editor-field"> @Html.EditorFor(model => model.Name) @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Name) </div> <div class="editor-label"> @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Email) </div> <div class="editor-field"> @Html.EditorFor(model => model.Email) @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Email) </div> <div class="editor-label"> @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Website) </div> <div class="editor-field"> @Html.EditorFor(model => model.Website) @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Website) </div> <div class="editor-label"> @Html.LabelFor(model => model.CreditCard) </div> <div class="editor-field"> @Html.EditorFor(model => model.CreditCard) @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.CreditCard) </div> <div class="editor-label"> @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Image) </div> <div class="editor-field"> @Html.EditorFor(model => model.Image) @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Image) </div> <p> <input type="submit" value="Save" /> </p> </fieldset> } <div> @Html.ActionLink("Back to List", "Index") </div>             Now just run your application. You will find that both client side and server side validation for the above validation attributes works smoothly.                      Summary:             Email, URL, Credit Card and File Extension input validations are very common. In this article, I showed you how you can validate these input validations into your application. I explained this with an example. I am also attaching a sample application which also includes Microsoft.Web.Mvc.dll. So you can add a reference of Microsoft.Web.Mvc assembly directly instead of doing any manual work. Hope you will enjoy this article too.   SyntaxHighlighter.all()

    Read the article

  • Handling HTTP 404 Error in ASP.NET Web API

    - by imran_ku07
            Introduction:                     Building modern HTTP/RESTful/RPC services has become very easy with the new ASP.NET Web API framework. Using ASP.NET Web API framework, you can create HTTP services which can be accessed from browsers, machines, mobile devices and other clients. Developing HTTP services is now become more easy for ASP.NET MVC developer becasue ASP.NET Web API is now included in ASP.NET MVC. In addition to developing HTTP services, it is also important to return meaningful response to client if a resource(uri) not found(HTTP 404) for a reason(for example, mistyped resource uri). It is also important to make this response centralized so you can configure all of 'HTTP 404 Not Found' resource at one place. In this article, I will show you how to handle 'HTTP 404 Not Found' at one place.         Description:                     Let's say that you are developing a HTTP RESTful application using ASP.NET Web API framework. In this application you need to handle HTTP 404 errors in a centralized location. From ASP.NET Web API point of you, you need to handle these situations, No route matched. Route is matched but no {controller} has been found on route. No type with {controller} name has been found. No matching action method found in the selected controller due to no action method start with the request HTTP method verb or no action method with IActionHttpMethodProviderRoute implemented attribute found or no method with {action} name found or no method with the matching {action} name found.                                          Now, let create a ErrorController with Handle404 action method. This action method will be used in all of the above cases for sending HTTP 404 response message to the client.  public class ErrorController : ApiController { [HttpGet, HttpPost, HttpPut, HttpDelete, HttpHead, HttpOptions, AcceptVerbs("PATCH")] public HttpResponseMessage Handle404() { var responseMessage = new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.NotFound); responseMessage.ReasonPhrase = "The requested resource is not found"; return responseMessage; } }                     You can easily change the above action method to send some other specific HTTP 404 error response. If a client of your HTTP service send a request to a resource(uri) and no route matched with this uri on server then you can route the request to the above Handle404 method using a custom route. Put this route at the very bottom of route configuration,  routes.MapHttpRoute( name: "Error404", routeTemplate: "{*url}", defaults: new { controller = "Error", action = "Handle404" } );                     Now you need handle the case when there is no {controller} in the matching route or when there is no type with {controller} name found. You can easily handle this case and route the request to the above Handle404 method using a custom IHttpControllerSelector. Here is the definition of a custom IHttpControllerSelector, public class HttpNotFoundAwareDefaultHttpControllerSelector : DefaultHttpControllerSelector { public HttpNotFoundAwareDefaultHttpControllerSelector(HttpConfiguration configuration) : base(configuration) { } public override HttpControllerDescriptor SelectController(HttpRequestMessage request) { HttpControllerDescriptor decriptor = null; try { decriptor = base.SelectController(request); } catch (HttpResponseException ex) { var code = ex.Response.StatusCode; if (code != HttpStatusCode.NotFound) throw; var routeValues = request.GetRouteData().Values; routeValues["controller"] = "Error"; routeValues["action"] = "Handle404"; decriptor = base.SelectController(request); } return decriptor; } }                     Next, it is also required to pass the request to the above Handle404 method if no matching action method found in the selected controller due to the reason discussed above. This situation can also be easily handled through a custom IHttpActionSelector. Here is the source of custom IHttpActionSelector,  public class HttpNotFoundAwareControllerActionSelector : ApiControllerActionSelector { public HttpNotFoundAwareControllerActionSelector() { } public override HttpActionDescriptor SelectAction(HttpControllerContext controllerContext) { HttpActionDescriptor decriptor = null; try { decriptor = base.SelectAction(controllerContext); } catch (HttpResponseException ex) { var code = ex.Response.StatusCode; if (code != HttpStatusCode.NotFound && code != HttpStatusCode.MethodNotAllowed) throw; var routeData = controllerContext.RouteData; routeData.Values["action"] = "Handle404"; IHttpController httpController = new ErrorController(); controllerContext.Controller = httpController; controllerContext.ControllerDescriptor = new HttpControllerDescriptor(controllerContext.Configuration, "Error", httpController.GetType()); decriptor = base.SelectAction(controllerContext); } return decriptor; } }                     Finally, we need to register the custom IHttpControllerSelector and IHttpActionSelector. Open global.asax.cs file and add these lines,  configuration.Services.Replace(typeof(IHttpControllerSelector), new HttpNotFoundAwareDefaultHttpControllerSelector(configuration)); configuration.Services.Replace(typeof(IHttpActionSelector), new HttpNotFoundAwareControllerActionSelector());         Summary:                       In addition to building an application for HTTP services, it is also important to send meaningful centralized information in response when something goes wrong, for example 'HTTP 404 Not Found' error.  In this article, I showed you how to handle 'HTTP 404 Not Found' error in a centralized location. Hopefully you will enjoy this article too.

    Read the article

  • running asp.net 3.5 and asp.net 2.0 in same site

    - by cori
    We're running ASP.Net 2.0 on our corporate web site, and I'd like to get it up to ASP.Net 3.5 as smoothly as possible. The project/solution architecture in VS 2005 is an ASP.Net 2.0 web project and an .Net 2.0 data access layer project which is used by the site code. Upon opening the projects in a new VS 2008 solution they seemed to be converted to .Net 3.5 with a minimum of fuss - they built correctly out of the box, deployed successfully, and seem to work just fine, which is exactly as I would expect given that .Net 2.0 and 3.5 share a common runtime. The major difference after the conversion is that the web.config file's referenced dlls are now the 3.5 versions. What I would like to do is to update the site piecemeal; as I make modifications to a given page send the 3.5 verson of that page over to our webserver and not update the whole site at once. In testing on our dev box this approach seems to be working fine - the site code is interacting with the .Net 3.5 data access layer without difficulty, a handful of pages are running 3.5 page-behind code (by this I mean that they're running assemblies built in VS 2008 - the site is using single-page assemblies for code behind), the 3.5 web.config is in place, and the bulk of the site is running code-behind assemblies built in VS2005. Everything looks great. Which makes me worried that I'm missing something. Is this architecture workable, or is there a problem lying is wait for m that I haven't considered?

    Read the article

  • HttpModule with ASP.NET MVC not being called

    - by mgroves
    I am trying to implement a session-per-request pattern in an ASP.NET MVC 2 Preview 1 application, and I've implemented an IHttpModule to help me do this: public class SessionModule : IHttpModule { public void Init(HttpApplication context) { context.Response.Write("Init!"); context.EndRequest += context_EndRequest; } // ... etc... } And I've put this into the web.config: <system.web> <httpModules> <add name="SessionModule" type="MyNamespace.SessionModule" /> </httpModules> <system.webServer> <modules runAllManagedModulesForAllRequests="true"> <remove name="SessionModule" /> <add name="SessionModule" type="MyNamespace.SessionModule" /> </modules> However, "Init!" never gets written to the page (I'm using the built-in VS web server, Cassini). Additionally, I've tried putting breakpoints in the SessionModule but they never break. What am I missing?

    Read the article

  • Losing Session between Classic ASP and ASP.NET

    - by Aaron
    The company that I work for is making a transition between classic ASP programs and ASP.NET programs for our intranet software. Eventually, everything will be written in ASP.NET, but because of time constraints, there are still a number of programs that use classic ASP. To compensate we've written features that allow for redirects and autologins between classic ASP programs and ASP.NET programs. I've been starting to see a problem, though, with holding the session state for our ASP.NET software. If a user uses an ASP.NET program, then does work in a classic ASP program, then goes back to that ASP.NET program, often times, the user's authentication for the ASP.NET program is still in place, yet the user's session is lost, resulting in an error whenever a function is performed within the program. I'm trying to capture the loss of the session state in global.asax's Session_End event, which would redirect the user to the login page, but that hasn't worked. Has anyone else faced a similar issue with users moving back and forth between classic ASP and ASP.NET and losing sessions? Is that even my real issue here? It's the only thing that I can see as being a problem. Thanks for any help.

    Read the article

  • ASP.NET 4.0 meta tags and Search engine optimisation

    - by nikolaosk
    I am thinking to create a new series of posts regarding ASP.NET and SEO (Search Engine Optimisation). I am going to start with this post , talking about some new features that make our asp.net apps more SEO friendly. At the end of the day, there is no point having a great application and somehow "scare" the search engines away. This is going to be a short post so let's quickly have a look at meta keywords and ASP.NET 4.0. Meta keywords and description are important elements of a page and make it...(read more)

    Read the article

  • ASP.NET Dynamic Data Deployment Error

    - by rajbk
    You have an ASP.NET 3.5 dynamic data website that works great on your local box. When you deploy it to your production machine and turn on debug, you get the YSD Server Error in '/MyPath/MyApp' Application. Parser Error Description: An error occurred during the parsing of a resource required to service this request. Please review the following specific parse error details and modify your source file appropriately. Parser Error Message: Unknown server tag 'asp:DynamicDataManager'. Source Error: Line 5:  Line 6:  <asp:Content ID="Content1" ContentPlaceHolderID="ContentPlaceHolder1" Runat="Server"> Line 7:      <asp:DynamicDataManager ID="DynamicDataManager1" runat="server" AutoLoadForeignKeys="true" /> Line 8:  Line 9:      <h2><%= table.DisplayName%></h2> Probable Causes The server does not have .NET 3.5 SP1, which includes ASP.NET Dynamic Data, installed. Download it here. The third tagPrefix shown below is missing from web.config <pages> <controls> <add tagPrefix="asp" namespace="System.Web.UI" assembly="System.Web.Extensions, Version=3.5.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31BF3856AD364E35"/> <add tagPrefix="asp" namespace="System.Web.UI.WebControls" assembly="System.Web.Extensions, Version=3.5.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31BF3856AD364E35"/> <add tagPrefix="asp" namespace="System.Web.DynamicData" assembly="System.Web.DynamicData, Version=3.5.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31BF3856AD364E35"/> </controls></pages>     Hope that helps!

    Read the article

  • Log message Request and Response in ASP.NET WebAPI

    - by Fredrik N
    By logging both incoming and outgoing messages for services can be useful in many scenarios, such as debugging, tracing, inspection and helping customers with request problems etc.  I have a customer that need to have both incoming and outgoing messages to be logged. They use the information to see strange behaviors and also to help customers when they call in  for help (They can by looking in the log see if the customers sends in data in a wrong or strange way).   Concerns Most loggings in applications are cross-cutting concerns and should not be  a core concern for developers. Logging messages like this:   // GET api/values/5 public string Get(int id) { //Cross-cutting concerns Log(string.Format("Request: GET api/values/{0}", id)); //Core-concern var response = DoSomething(); //Cross-cutting concerns Log(string.Format("Reponse: GET api/values/{0}\r\n{1}", id, response)); return response; } .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; } .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; } will only result in duplication of code, and unnecessarily concerns for the developers to be aware of, if they miss adding the logging code, no logging will take place. Developers should focus on the core-concern, not the cross-cutting concerns. By just focus on the core-concern the above code will look like this: // GET api/values/5 public string Get(int id) { return DoSomething(); } .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; } The logging should then be placed somewhere else so the developers doesn’t need to focus care about the cross-concern. Using Message Handler for logging There are different ways we could place the cross-cutting concern of logging message when using WebAPI. We can for example create a custom ApiController and override the ApiController’s ExecutingAsync method, or add a ActionFilter, or use a Message Handler. The disadvantage with custom ApiController is that we need to make sure we inherit from it, the disadvantage of ActionFilter, is that we need to add the filter to the controllers, both will modify our ApiControllers. By using a Message Handler we don’t need to do any changes to our ApiControllers. So the best suitable place to add our logging would be in a custom Message Handler. A Message Handler will be used before the HttpControllerDispatcher (The part in the WepAPI pipe-line that make sure the right controller is used and called etc). Note: You can read more about message handlers here, it will give you a good understanding of the WebApi pipe-line. To create a Message Handle we can inherit from the DelegatingHandler class and override the SendAsync method: public class MessageHandler : DelegatingHandler { protected override async Task<HttpResponseMessage> SendAsync(HttpRequestMessage request, CancellationToken cancellationToken) { return base.SendAsync(request, cancellationToken); } } .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; }   If we skip the call to the base.SendAsync our ApiController’s methods will never be invoked, nor other Message Handlers. Everything placed before base.SendAsync will be called before the HttpControllerDispatcher (before WebAPI will take a look at the request which controller and method it should be invoke), everything after the base.SendAsync, will be executed after our ApiController method has returned a response. So a message handle will be a perfect place to add cross-cutting concerns such as logging. To get the content of our response within a Message Handler we can use the request argument of the SendAsync method. The request argument is of type HttpRequestMessage and has a Content property (Content is of type HttpContent. The HttpContent has several method that can be used to read the incoming message, such as ReadAsStreamAsync, ReadAsByteArrayAsync and ReadAsStringAsync etc. Something to be aware of is what will happen when we read from the HttpContent. When we read from the HttpContent, we read from a stream, once we read from it, we can’t be read from it again. So if we read from the Stream before the base.SendAsync, the next coming Message Handlers and the HttpControllerDispatcher can’t read from the Stream because it’s already read, so our ApiControllers methods will never be invoked etc. The only way to make sure we can do repeatable reads from the HttpContent is to copy the content into a buffer, and then read from that buffer. This can be done by using the HttpContent’s LoadIntoBufferAsync method. If we make a call to the LoadIntoBufferAsync method before the base.SendAsync, the incoming stream will be read in to a byte array, and then other HttpContent read operations will read from that buffer if it’s exists instead directly form the stream. There is one method on the HttpContent that will internally make a call to the  LoadIntoBufferAsync for us, and that is the ReadAsByteArrayAsync. This is the method we will use to read from the incoming and outgoing message. public abstract class MessageHandler : DelegatingHandler { protected override async Task<HttpResponseMessage> SendAsync(HttpRequestMessage request, CancellationToken cancellationToken) { var requestMessage = await request.Content.ReadAsByteArrayAsync(); var response = await base.SendAsync(request, cancellationToken); var responseMessage = await response.Content.ReadAsByteArrayAsync(); return response; } } .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; } The above code will read the content of the incoming message and then call the SendAsync and after that read from the content of the response message. The following code will add more logic such as creating a correlation id to combine the request with the response, and create a log entry etc: public abstract class MessageHandler : DelegatingHandler { protected override async Task<HttpResponseMessage> SendAsync(HttpRequestMessage request, CancellationToken cancellationToken) { var corrId = string.Format("{0}{1}", DateTime.Now.Ticks, Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId); var requestInfo = string.Format("{0} {1}", request.Method, request.RequestUri); var requestMessage = await request.Content.ReadAsByteArrayAsync(); await IncommingMessageAsync(corrId, requestInfo, requestMessage); var response = await base.SendAsync(request, cancellationToken); var responseMessage = await response.Content.ReadAsByteArrayAsync(); await OutgoingMessageAsync(corrId, requestInfo, responseMessage); return response; } protected abstract Task IncommingMessageAsync(string correlationId, string requestInfo, byte[] message); protected abstract Task OutgoingMessageAsync(string correlationId, string requestInfo, byte[] message); } public class MessageLoggingHandler : MessageHandler { protected override async Task IncommingMessageAsync(string correlationId, string requestInfo, byte[] message) { await Task.Run(() => Debug.WriteLine(string.Format("{0} - Request: {1}\r\n{2}", correlationId, requestInfo, Encoding.UTF8.GetString(message)))); } protected override async Task OutgoingMessageAsync(string correlationId, string requestInfo, byte[] message) { await Task.Run(() => Debug.WriteLine(string.Format("{0} - Response: {1}\r\n{2}", correlationId, requestInfo, Encoding.UTF8.GetString(message)))); } } .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; }   The code above will show the following in the Visual Studio output window when the “api/values” service (One standard controller added by the default WepAPI template) is requested with a Get http method : 6347483479959544375 - Request: GET http://localhost:3208/api/values 6347483479959544375 - Response: GET http://localhost:3208/api/values ["value1","value2"] .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; }   Register a Message Handler To register a Message handler we can use the Add method of the GlobalConfiguration.Configration.MessageHandlers in for example Global.asax: public class WebApiApplication : System.Web.HttpApplication { protected void Application_Start() { GlobalConfiguration.Configuration.MessageHandlers.Add(new MessageLoggingHandler()); ... } } .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; }   Summary By using a Message Handler we can easily remove cross-cutting concerns like logging from our controllers. You can also find the source code used in this blog post on ForkCan.com, feel free to make a fork or add comments, such as making the code better etc. Feel free to follow me on twitter @fredrikn if you want to know when I will write other blog posts etc.

    Read the article

  • What's new in ASP.Net 4.5 and VS 2012 - part 2

    - by nikolaosk
    This is the second post in a series of posts titled "What's new in ASP.Net 4.5 and VS 2012".You can have a look at the first post in this series, here. Please find all my posts regarding VS 2012, here. In this post I will be looking into the various new features available in ASP.Net 4.5 and VS 2012.I will be looking into the enhancements in the HTML Editor,CSS Editor and Javascript Editor.In order to follow along this post you must have Visual Studio 2012 and .Net Framework 4.5 installed in your machine.Download and install VS 2012 using this link.My machine runs on Windows 8 and Visual Studio 2012 works just fine.I will work fine in Windows 7 as well so do not worry if you do not have the latest Microsoft operating system.1) Launch VS 2012 and create a new Web Forms application by going to File - >New Web Site - > ASP.Net Web Forms Site.2) Choose an appropriate name for your web site.3) I would like to point out the new enhancements in the CSS editor in VS 2012. In the Solution Explorer in the Content folder and open the Site.cssThen when I try to change the background-color property of the html element, I get a brand new handy color-picker. Have a look at the picture below  Please note that the color-picker shows all the colors that have been used in this website. Then you can expand the color-picker by clicking on the arrows. Opacity is also supported. Have a look at the picture below4) There are also mobile styles in the Site.css .These are based on media queries.Please have a look at another post of mine on CSS3 media queries. Have a look at the picture below In this case when the maximum width of the screen is less than 850px there will be a new layout that will be dictated by these new rules. Also CSS snippets are supported. Have a look at the picture below I am writing a new CSS rule for an image element. I write the property transform and hit tab and then I have cross-browser CSS handling all of the major vendors.Then I simply add the value rotate and it is applied to all the cross browser options.Have a look at the picture below.  I am sure you realise how productive you can become with all these CSS snippets. 5) Now let's have a look at the new HTML editor enhancements in VS 2012You can drag and drop a GridView web server control from the Toolbox in the Site.master file.You will see a smart tag (that was only available in the Design View) that you can expand and add fields, format the web server control.Have a look at the picture below 6) We also have available code snippets. I type <video and then press tab twice.By doing that I have the rest of the HTML 5 markup completed.Have a look at the picture below 7) I have new support for the input tag including all the HTML 5 types and all the new accessibility features.Have a look at the picture below   8) Another interesting feature is the new Intellisense capabilities. When I change the DocType to 4.01 and the type <audio>,<video> HTML 5 tags, Intellisense does not recognise them and add squiggly lines.Have a look at the picture below All these features support ASP.Net Web forms, ASP.Net MVC applications and Web Pages. 9) Finally I would like to show you the enhanced support that we have for Javascript in VS 2012. I have full Intellisense support and code snippets support.I create a sample javascript file. I type If and press tab. I type while and press tab.I type for and press tab.In all three cases code snippet support kicks in and completes the code stack. Have a look at the picture below We also have full Intellisense support.Have a look at the picture below I am creating a simple function and then type some sort of XML like comments for the input parameters. Have a look at the picture below. Then when I call this function, Intellisense has picked up the XML comments and shows the variables data types.Have a look at the picture below Hope it helps!!!

    Read the article

  • NoSQL with MongoDB, NoRM and ASP.NET MVC

    - by shiju
     In this post, I will give an introduction to how to work on NoSQL and document database with MongoDB , NoRM and ASP.Net MVC 2. NoSQL and Document Database The NoSQL movement is getting big attention in this year and people are widely talking about document databases and NoSQL along with web application scalability. According to Wikipedia, "NoSQL is a movement promoting a loosely defined class of non-relational data stores that break with a long history of relational databases. These data stores may not require fixed table schemas, usually avoid join operations and typically scale horizontally. Academics and papers typically refer to these databases as structured storage". Document databases are schema free so that you can focus on the problem domain and don't have to worry about updating the schema when your domain is evolving. This enables truly a domain driven development. One key pain point of relational database is the synchronization of database schema with your domain entities when your domain is evolving.There are lots of NoSQL implementations are available and both CouchDB and MongoDB got my attention. While evaluating both CouchDB and MongoDB, I found that CouchDB can’t perform dynamic queries and later I picked MongoDB over CouchDB. There are many .Net drivers available for MongoDB document database. MongoDB MongoDB is an open source, scalable, high-performance, schema-free, document-oriented database written in the C++ programming language. It has been developed since October 2007 by 10gen. MongoDB stores your data as binary JSON (BSON) format . MongoDB has been getting a lot of attention and you can see the some of the list of production deployments from here - http://www.mongodb.org/display/DOCS/Production+Deployments NoRM – C# driver for MongoDB NoRM is a C# driver for MongoDB with LINQ support. NoRM project is available on Github at http://github.com/atheken/NoRM. Demo with ASP.NET MVC I will show a simple demo with MongoDB, NoRM and ASP.NET MVC. To work with MongoDB and  NoRM, do the following steps Download the MongoDB databse For Windows 32 bit, download from http://downloads.mongodb.org/win32/mongodb-win32-i386-1.4.1.zip  and for Windows 64 bit, download  from http://downloads.mongodb.org/win32/mongodb-win32-x86_64-1.4.1.zip . The zip contains the mongod.exe for run the server and mongo.exe for the client Download the NorM driver for MongoDB at http://github.com/atheken/NoRM Create a directory call C:\data\db. This is the default location of MongoDB database. You can override the behavior. Run C:\Mongo\bin\mongod.exe. This will start the MongoDb server Now I am going to demonstrate how to program with MongoDb and NoRM in an ASP.NET MVC application.Let’s write a domain class public class Category {            [MongoIdentifier]public ObjectId Id { get; set; } [Required(ErrorMessage = "Name Required")][StringLength(25, ErrorMessage = "Must be less than 25 characters")]public string Name { get; set;}public string Description { get; set; }}  ObjectId is a NoRM type that represents a MongoDB ObjectId. NoRM will automatically update the Id becasue it is decorated by the MongoIdentifier attribute. The next step is to create a mongosession class. This will do the all interactions to the MongoDB. internal class MongoSession<TEntity> : IDisposable{    private readonly MongoQueryProvider provider;     public MongoSession()    {        this.provider = new MongoQueryProvider("Expense");    }     public IQueryable<TEntity> Queryable    {        get { return new MongoQuery<TEntity>(this.provider); }    }     public MongoQueryProvider Provider    {        get { return this.provider; }    }     public void Add<T>(T item) where T : class, new()    {        this.provider.DB.GetCollection<T>().Insert(item);    }     public void Dispose()    {        this.provider.Server.Dispose();     }    public void Delete<T>(T item) where T : class, new()    {        this.provider.DB.GetCollection<T>().Delete(item);    }     public void Drop<T>()    {        this.provider.DB.DropCollection(typeof(T).Name);    }     public void Save<T>(T item) where T : class,new()    {        this.provider.DB.GetCollection<T>().Save(item);                }  }    The MongoSession constrcutor will create an instance of MongoQueryProvider that supports the LINQ expression and also create a database with name "Expense". If database is exists, it will use existing database, otherwise it will create a new databse with name  "Expense". The Save method can be used for both Insert and Update operations. If the object is new one, it will create a new record and otherwise it will update the document with given ObjectId.  Let’s create ASP.NET MVC controller actions for CRUD operations for the domain class Category public class CategoryController : Controller{ //Index - Get the category listpublic ActionResult Index(){    using (var session = new MongoSession<Category>())    {        var categories = session.Queryable.AsEnumerable<Category>();        return View(categories);    }} //edit a single category[HttpGet]public ActionResult Edit(ObjectId id) {     using (var session = new MongoSession<Category>())    {        var category = session.Queryable              .Where(c => c.Id == id)              .FirstOrDefault();         return View("Save",category);    } }// GET: /Category/Create[HttpGet]public ActionResult Create(){    var category = new Category();    return View("Save", category);}//insert or update a category[HttpPost]public ActionResult Save(Category category){    if (!ModelState.IsValid)    {        return View("Save", category);    }    using (var session = new MongoSession<Category>())    {        session.Save(category);        return RedirectToAction("Index");    } }//Delete category[HttpPost]public ActionResult Delete(ObjectId Id){    using (var session = new MongoSession<Category>())    {        var category = session.Queryable              .Where(c => c.Id == Id)              .FirstOrDefault();        session.Delete(category);        var categories = session.Queryable.AsEnumerable<Category>();        return PartialView("CategoryList", categories);    } }        }  You can easily work on MongoDB with NoRM and can use with ASP.NET MVC applications. I have created a repository on CodePlex at http://mongomvc.codeplex.com and you can download the source code of the ASP.NET MVC application from here

    Read the article

  • How to fix: Handler “PageHandlerFactory-Integrated” has a bad module “ManagedPipelineHandler” in its module list

    - by ybbest
    Issue: Recently, I am having issues with deploying asp.net mvc 4 application to Windows Server 2008 R2.After add the necessary role and features and I setup an application in IIS. However , I received the following error message: PageHandlerFactory-Integrated” has a bad module “ManagedPipelineHandler” in its module list   Solution: It turns out that this is because ASP.Net was not completely installed with IIS even though I checked that box in the “Add Feature” dialog.   To fix this, I simply ran the following command at the command prompt %windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\aspnet_regiis.exe -i If I had been on a 32 bit system, it would have looked like the following: %windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.21006\aspnet_regiis.exe –i   References: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6846544/how-to-fix-handler-pagehandlerfactory-integrated-has-a-bad-module-managedpip

    Read the article

  • What’s new in ASP.NET 4.0: Core Features

    - by Rick Strahl
    Microsoft released the .NET Runtime 4.0 and with it comes a brand spanking new version of ASP.NET – version 4.0 – which provides an incremental set of improvements to an already powerful platform. .NET 4.0 is a full release of the .NET Framework, unlike version 3.5, which was merely a set of library updates on top of the .NET Framework version 2.0. Because of this full framework revision, there has been a welcome bit of consolidation of assemblies and configuration settings. The full runtime version change to 4.0 also means that you have to explicitly pick version 4.0 of the runtime when you create a new Application Pool in IIS, unlike .NET 3.5, which actually requires version 2.0 of the runtime. In this first of two parts I'll take a look at some of the changes in the core ASP.NET runtime. In the next edition I'll go over improvements in Web Forms and Visual Studio. Core Engine Features Most of the high profile improvements in ASP.NET have to do with Web Forms, but there are a few gems in the core runtime that should make life easier for ASP.NET developers. The following list describes some of the things I've found useful among the new features. Clean web.config Files Are Back! If you've been using ASP.NET 3.5, you probably have noticed that the web.config file has turned into quite a mess of configuration settings between all the custom handler and module mappings for the various web server versions. Part of the reason for this mess is that .NET 3.5 is a collection of add-on components running on top of the .NET Runtime 2.0 and so almost all of the new features of .NET 3.5 where essentially introduced as custom modules and handlers that had to be explicitly configured in the config file. Because the core runtime didn't rev with 3.5, all those configuration options couldn't be moved up to other configuration files in the system chain. With version 4.0 a consolidation was possible, and the result is a much simpler web.config file by default. A default empty ASP.NET 4.0 Web Forms project looks like this: <?xml version="1.0"?> <configuration> <system.web> <compilation debug="true" targetFramework="4.0" /> </system.web> </configuration> Need I say more? Configuration Transformation Files to Manage Configurations and Application Packaging ASP.NET 4.0 introduces the ability to create multi-target configuration files. This means it's possible to create a single configuration file that can be transformed based on relatively simple replacement rules using a Visual Studio and WebDeploy provided XSLT syntax. The idea is that you can create a 'master' configuration file and then create customized versions of this master configuration file by applying some relatively simplistic search and replace, add or remove logic to specific elements and attributes in the original file. To give you an idea, here's the example code that Visual Studio creates for a default web.Release.config file, which replaces a connection string, removes the debug attribute and replaces the CustomErrors section: <?xml version="1.0"?> <configuration xmlns:xdt="http://schemas.microsoft.com/XML-Document-Transform"> <connectionStrings> <add name="MyDB" connectionString="Data Source=ReleaseSQLServer;Initial Catalog=MyReleaseDB;Integrated Security=True" xdt:Transform="SetAttributes" xdt:Locator="Match(name)"/> </connectionStrings> <system.web> <compilation xdt:Transform="RemoveAttributes(debug)" /> <customErrors defaultRedirect="GenericError.htm" mode="RemoteOnly" xdt:Transform="Replace"> <error statusCode="500" redirect="InternalError.htm"/> </customErrors> </system.web> </configuration> You can see the XSL transform syntax that drives this functionality. Basically, only the elements listed in the override file are matched and updated – all the rest of the original web.config file stays intact. Visual Studio 2010 supports this functionality directly in the project system so it's easy to create and maintain these customized configurations in the project tree. Once you're ready to publish your application, you can then use the Publish <yourWebApplication> option on the Build menu which allows publishing to disk, via FTP or to a Web Server using Web Deploy. You can also create a deployment package as a .zip file which can be used by the WebDeploy tool to configure and install the application. You can manually run the Web Deploy tool or use the IIS Manager to install the package on the server or other machine. You can find out more about WebDeploy and Packaging here: http://tinyurl.com/2anxcje. Improved Routing Routing provides a relatively simple way to create clean URLs with ASP.NET by associating a template URL path and routing it to a specific ASP.NET HttpHandler. Microsoft first introduced routing with ASP.NET MVC and then they integrated routing with a basic implementation in the core ASP.NET engine via a separate ASP.NET routing assembly. In ASP.NET 4.0, the process of using routing functionality gets a bit easier. First, routing is now rolled directly into System.Web, so no extra assembly reference is required in your projects to use routing. The RouteCollection class now includes a MapPageRoute() method that makes it easy to route to any ASP.NET Page requests without first having to implement an IRouteHandler implementation. It would have been nice if this could have been extended to serve *any* handler implementation, but unfortunately for anything but a Page derived handlers you still will have to implement a custom IRouteHandler implementation. ASP.NET Pages now include a RouteData collection that will contain route information. Retrieving route data is now a lot easier by simply using this.RouteData.Values["routeKey"] where the routeKey is the value specified in the route template (i.e., "users/{userId}" would use Values["userId"]). The Page class also has a GetRouteUrl() method that you can use to create URLs with route data values rather than hardcoding the URL: <%= this.GetRouteUrl("users",new { userId="ricks" }) %> You can also use the new Expression syntax using <%$RouteUrl %> to accomplish something similar, which can be easier to embed into Page or MVC View code: <a runat="server" href='<%$RouteUrl:RouteName=user, id=ricks %>'>Visit User</a> Finally, the Response object also includes a new RedirectToRoute() method to build a route url for redirection without hardcoding the URL. Response.RedirectToRoute("users", new { userId = "ricks" }); All of these routines are helpers that have been integrated into the core ASP.NET engine to make it easier to create routes and retrieve route data, which hopefully will result in more people taking advantage of routing in ASP.NET. To find out more about the routing improvements you can check out Dan Maharry's blog which has a couple of nice blog entries on this subject: http://tinyurl.com/37trutj and http://tinyurl.com/39tt5w5. Session State Improvements Session state is an often used and abused feature in ASP.NET and version 4.0 introduces a few enhancements geared towards making session state more efficient and to minimize at least some of the ill effects of overuse. The first improvement affects out of process session state, which is typically used in web farm environments or for sites that store application sensitive data that must survive AppDomain restarts (which in my opinion is just about any application). When using OutOfProc session state, ASP.NET serializes all the data in the session statebag into a blob that gets carried over the network and stored either in the State server or SQL Server via the Session provider. Version 4.0 provides some improvement in this serialization of the session data by offering an enableCompression option on the web.Config <Session> section, which forces the serialized session state to be compressed. Depending on the type of data that is being serialized, this compression can reduce the size of the data travelling over the wire by as much as a third. It works best on string data, but can also reduce the size of binary data. In addition, ASP.NET 4.0 now offers a way to programmatically turn session state on or off as part of the request processing queue. In prior versions, the only way to specify whether session state is available is by implementing a marker interface on the HTTP handler implementation. In ASP.NET 4.0, you can now turn session state on and off programmatically via HttpContext.Current.SetSessionStateBehavior() as part of the ASP.NET module pipeline processing as long as it occurs before the AquireRequestState pipeline event. Output Cache Provider Output caching in ASP.NET has been a very useful but potentially memory intensive feature. The default OutputCache mechanism works through in-memory storage that persists generated output based on various lifetime related parameters. While this works well enough for many intended scenarios, it also can quickly cause runaway memory consumption as the cache fills up and serves many variations of pages on your site. ASP.NET 4.0 introduces a provider model for the OutputCache module so it becomes possible to plug-in custom storage strategies for cached pages. One of the goals also appears to be to consolidate some of the different cache storage mechanisms used in .NET in general to a generic Windows AppFabric framework in the future, so various different mechanisms like OutputCache, the non-Page specific ASP.NET cache and possibly even session state eventually can use the same caching engine for storage of persisted data both in memory and out of process scenarios. For developers, the OutputCache provider feature means that you can now extend caching on your own by implementing a custom Cache provider based on the System.Web.Caching.OutputCacheProvider class. You can find more info on creating an Output Cache provider in Gunnar Peipman's blog at: http://tinyurl.com/2vt6g7l. Response.RedirectPermanent ASP.NET 4.0 includes features to issue a permanent redirect that issues as an HTTP 301 Moved Permanently response rather than the standard 302 Redirect respond. In pre-4.0 versions you had to manually create your permanent redirect by setting the Status and Status code properties – Response.RedirectPermanent() makes this operation more obvious and discoverable. There's also a Response.RedirectToRoutePermanent() which provides permanent redirection of route Urls. Preloading of Applications ASP.NET 4.0 provides a new feature to preload ASP.NET applications on startup, which is meant to provide a more consistent startup experience. If your application has a lengthy startup cycle it can appear very slow to serve data to clients while the application is warming up and loading initial resources. So rather than serve these startup requests slowly in ASP.NET 4.0, you can force the application to initialize itself first before even accepting requests for processing. This feature works only on IIS 7.5 (Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2) and works in combination with IIS. You can set up a worker process in IIS 7.5 to always be running, which starts the Application Pool worker process immediately. ASP.NET 4.0 then allows you to specify site-specific settings by setting the serverAutoStartEnabled on a particular site along with an optional serviceAutoStartProvider class that can be used to receive "startup events" when the application starts up. This event in turn can be used to configure the application and optionally pre-load cache data and other information required by the app on startup.  The configuration settings need to be made in applicationhost.config: <sites> <site name="WebApplication2" id="1"> <application path="/" serviceAutoStartEnabled="true" serviceAutoStartProvider="PreWarmup" /> </site> </sites> <serviceAutoStartProviders> <add name="PreWarmup" type="PreWarmupProvider,MyAssembly" /> </serviceAutoStartProviders> Hooking up a warm up provider is optional so you can omit the provider definition and reference. If you do define it here's what it looks like: public class PreWarmupProvider System.Web.Hosting.IProcessHostPreloadClient { public void Preload(string[] parameters) { // initialization for app } } This code fires and while it's running, ASP.NET/IIS will hold requests from hitting the pipeline. So until this code completes the application will not start taking requests. The idea is that you can perform any pre-loading of resources and cache values so that the first request will be ready to perform at optimal performance level without lag. Runtime Performance Improvements According to Microsoft, there have also been a number of invisible performance improvements in the internals of the ASP.NET runtime that should make ASP.NET 4.0 applications run more efficiently and use less resources. These features come without any change requirements in applications and are virtually transparent, except that you get the benefits by updating to ASP.NET 4.0. Summary The core feature set changes are minimal which continues a tradition of small incremental changes to the ASP.NET runtime. ASP.NET has been proven as a solid platform and I'm actually rather happy to see that most of the effort in this release went into stability, performance and usability improvements rather than a massive amount of new features. The new functionality added in 4.0 is minimal but very useful. A lot of people are still running pure .NET 2.0 applications these days and have stayed off of .NET 3.5 for some time now. I think that version 4.0 with its full .NET runtime rev and assembly and configuration consolidation will make an attractive platform for developers to update to. If you're a Web Forms developer in particular, ASP.NET 4.0 includes a host of new features in the Web Forms engine that are significant enough to warrant a quick move to .NET 4.0. I'll cover those changes in my next column. Until then, I suggest you give ASP.NET 4.0 a spin and see for yourself how the new features can help you out. © Rick Strahl, West Wind Technologies, 2005-2010Posted in ASP.NET  

    Read the article

  • ASP.NET MVC, Web API, Razor, e Open Source (Código Aberto)

    - by Leniel Macaferi
    A Microsoft tornou o código fonte da ASP.NET MVC disponível sob uma licença open source (de código aberto) desde a primeira versão V1. Nós também integramos uma série de grandes tecnologias de código aberto no produto, e agora entregamos jQuery, jQuery UI, jQuery Mobile, jQuery Validation, Modernizr.js, NuGet, Knockout.js e JSON.NET como parte integrante dos lançamentos da ASP.NET MVC. Estou muito animado para anunciar hoje que também iremos liberar o código fonte da ASP.NET Web API e ASP.NET Web Pages (também conhecido como Razor) sob uma licença open source (Apache 2.0), e que iremos aumentar a transparência do desenvolvimento de todos os três projetos hospedando seus repositórios de código no CodePlex (usando o novo suporte ao Git anunciado na semana passada - em Inglês). Isso permitirá um modelo de desenvolvimento mais aberto, onde toda a comunidade será capaz de participar e fornecer feedback nos checkins (envios de código), corrigir bugs, desenvolver novos recursos, e construir e testar os produtos diariamente usando a versão do código-fonte e testes mais atualizada possível. Nós também pela primeira vez permitiremos que os desenvolvedores de fora da Microsoft enviem correções e contribuições de código que a equipe de desenvolvimento da Microsoft irá rever para potencial inclusão nos produtos. Nós anunciamos uma abordagem de desenvolvimento semelhantemente aberta com o Windows Azure SDK em Dezembro passado, e achamos que essa abordagem é um ótimo caminho para estreitar as relações, pois permite um excelente ciclo de feedback com os desenvolvedores - e, finalmente, permite a entrega de produtos ainda melhores, como resultado. Muito importante - ASP.NET MVC, Web API e o Razor continuarão a ser totalmente produtos suportados pela Microsoft que são lançados tanto independentemente, bem como parte do Visual Studio (exatamente da mesma maneira como é feito hoje em dia). Eles também continuarão a ser desenvolvidos pelos mesmos desenvolvedores da Microsoft que os constroem hoje (na verdade, temos agora muito mais desenvolvedores da Microsoft trabalhando na equipe da ASP.NET). Nosso objetivo com o anúncio de hoje é aumentar ainda mais o ciclo de feedback/retorno sobre os produtos, para nos permitir oferecer produtos ainda melhores. Estamos realmente entusiasmados com as melhorias que isso trará. Saiba mais Agora você pode navegar, sincronizar e construir a árvore de código fonte da ASP.NET MVC, Web API, e Razor através do website http://aspnetwebstack.codeplex.com.  O repositório Git atual no site refere-se à árvore de desenvolvimento do marco RC (release candidate/candidata a lançamento) na qual equipe vem trabalhando nas últimas semanas, e esta mesma árvore contém ambos o código fonte e os testes, e pode ser construída e testada por qualquer pessoa. Devido aos binários produzidos serem bin-deployable (DLLs instaladas diretamente na pasta bin sem demais dependências), isto permite a você compilar seus próprios builds e experimentar as atualizações do produto, tão logo elas sejam adicionadas no repositório. Agora você também pode contribuir diretamente para o desenvolvimento dos produtos através da revisão e envio de feedback sobre os checkins de código, enviando bugs e ajudando-nos a verificar as correções tão logo elas sejam enviadas para o repositório, sugerindo e dando feedback sobre os novos recursos enquanto eles são implementados, bem como enviando suas próprias correções ou contribuições de código. Note que todas as submissões de código serão rigorosamente analisadas ??e testadas pelo Time da ASP.NET MVC, e apenas aquelas que atenderem a um padrão elevado de qualidade e adequação ao roadmap (roteiro) definido para as próximas versões serão incorporadas ao código fonte do produto. Sumário Todos nós da equipe estamos realmente entusiasmados com o anúncio de hoje - isto é algo no qual nós estivemos trabalhando por muitos anos. O estreitamento no relacionamento entre a comunidade e os desenvolvedores nos permitirá construir produtos ainda melhores levando a ASP.NET para o próximo nível em termos de inovação e foco no cliente. Obrigado! Scott P.S. Além do blog, eu uso o Twitter para disponibilizar posts rápidos e para compartilhar links. Meu apelido no Twitter é: @scottgu Texto traduzido do post original por Leniel Macaferi.

    Read the article

< Previous Page | 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16  | Next Page >