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  • How to recover data from a failing hard drive?

    - by intuited
    An external 3½" HDD seems to be in danger of failing — it's making ticking sounds when idle. I've acquired a replacement drive, and want to know the best strategy to get the data off of the dubious drive with the best chance of saving as much as possible. There are some directories that are more important than others. However, I'm guessing that picking and choosing directories is going to reduce my chances of saving the whole thing. I would also have to mount it, dump a file listing, and then unmount it in order to be able to effectively prioritize directories. Adding in the fact that it's time-consuming to do this, I'm leaning away from this approach. I've considered just using dd, but I'm not sure how it would handle read errors or other problems that might prevent only certain parts of the data from being rescued, or which could be overcome with some retries, but not so many that they endanger other parts of the drive from being saved. I guess ideally it would do a single pass to get as much as possible and then go back to retry anything that was missed due to errors. Is it possible that copying more slowly — e.g. pausing every x MB/GB — would be better than just running the operation full tilt, for example to avoid any overheating issues? For the "where is your backup" crowd: this actually is my backup drive, but it also contains some non-critical and bulky stuff, like music, that aren't backups, i.e. aren't backed up. The drive has not exhibited any clear signs of failure other than this somewhat ominous sound. I did have to fsck a few errors recently — orphaned inodes, incorrect free blocks/inodes counts, inode bitmap differences, zero dtime on deleted inodes; about 20 errors in all. The filesystem of the partition is ext3.

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  • Boot Ubuntu on USB flash drive in Mac OS X 10.4... and Ubuntu

    - by thetester
    I would like to create an OS-agnostic installation of Ubuntu on a flash drive, that boots under Ubuntu and under Mac OS X. Ideally the process would look like: Install Ubuntu 11.10 (or 12.04 if necessary) on a flash drive (from Ubuntu). Boot from flash drive (on PC) to modify files, etc. Plug drive into Mac with OS X 10.4, boot to Ubuntu from it, and use. I have an 8G flash drive. What is the sanest way to do this?

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  • Universal Pen Drive Linux Will Not Burn IOS Ubuntu 13.10 To USB [duplicate]

    - by Nick
    This question already has an answer here: How to create a bootable USB stick? 4 answers Universal Pen Drive Linux will not let me burn the iso to my usb. Whenever I attempt it it says 'can not open file 'E:*where I put my downloads*\ubuntu-13.10-desktop-amd64.iso' as archive'. Any help please. I just want to move to ubuntu and hopefully never have to use windows again :D Please help me and walk me through this process.

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  • What precautions should I take when moving a hard drive from one computer to another?

    - by Colin Dean
    I'm planning to move a hard drive from one server machine to another. The hard drive is an IDE drive. The motherboards are different, as are the memory and such. In this instance, graphics isn't a problem because this is just Ubuntu Server. Are there any precautions I should take, or steps I can do beforehand, in order to make this go as smoothly as possible? I've of course already backed up /home directories and configurations in /etc and /var.

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  • Ubuntu not mounting brand-new external drive

    - by user245115
    I bought a brand new 3TB external drive for my birthday coming up, It's a WD My Book, it came as NTFS, and I'm trying to make it mount using a simple script on boot. (Not /etc/fstab, I ruined my comp. using that by accident and had to re-install, I'm instead having a script run in /etc/init.d) The thing is, it's under /dev/sdf and I want it to mount in /exhd, the script seems to run but it doesn't mount it, any help here?

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  • How can I format my active hard drive to NTFS?

    - by Ghost
    Believe it or not, I'm not too happy with Ubuntu. Well, let me rephrase that. I like it, but the only thing I don't like about it is that it's too much of a hassle to get a game to work. I'm trying to install Windows 7 with a 4GB flash drive, but my error that comes up is that my hard drive I'm trying to install on is in ext4. I need to format it to read NTFS. I can't seem to find any topics on how to format an active hard drive. I found a topic that explains how to move Ubuntu to a new drive, but it's a bit confusing to me. Please help! (Please don't disregard this topic just because I want to go back to windows)

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  • In a pinch, is it worthwhile to run a bootable USB drive for my primary PC for an extended period?

    - by jason
    My hard drive has crashed, and I won't be able to buy a new one for a month or two. I've got a 16GB USB 3.0 flash drive that I'd like to have running a persistent ubuntu or ubuntu gnome distro. While it's not the best solution, is it a solution, or is it just a good way to wear out a flash drive? I plan on mostly storing things in Google Drive, so other than wearing out the flash drive, are there any risks involved?

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  • How to run a bootable USB drive as my primary PC for an extended period?

    - by jason
    My hard drive has crashed, and I won't be able to buy a new one for a month or two. I've got a 16GB USB 3.0 flash drive that I'd like to have running a persistent ubuntu or ubuntu gnome distro. While it's not the best solution, is it a solution, or is it just a good way to wear out a flash drive? I plan on mostly storing things in Google Drive, so other than wearing out the flash drive, are there any risks involved?

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  • Replacing Failing RAID 1 Drive

    - by mrduclaw
    I hope this is a simple question, but I simply don't know anything about RAID. Some time ago I received a machine that, as I understand it, has two drives in it under RAID 1 (or so that one drive is mirrored on the other and appears as just 1 drive to the OS). Recently, one of these drives has started marking a clicking noise and I would like to replace it. I believe the machine has a hardware RAID controller on the motherboard that handles the RAID stuff, but if it matters the Operating System is Windows XP 32-bit. Is the solution to my problem as simple as buying another drive that is of the same capacity and plugging it in where the clicking drive is currently? Or could I possibly lose everything if the drive that's clicking is the one being mirrored on to the other drive? Is there some menu I need to find before unhooking things? Any best practices out there? I'm sure I'm leaving out some required information, so please just tell me what I'm missing. Thanks!

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  • Can I rename the CD or DVD RW drive to meaning ful name

    - by Mirage
    I have 7 cd drives. Now i am writing the CDs using NTI MEdia Maker. The problem is all the drive have weird name in the writer like HL DVD RW S224 or something. IT is very hard to find which drive is which. Is there any way to define the Name liek Drive 1, Drive 2 so that in the writer the name come up like that so that if some cd fails to write i can find which drive is that

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  • power management of USB-enclosed hard drives

    - by intuited
    With a typical USB hard drive enclosure, is the full range of drive power management functionality available? In what may be an unrelated matter: is it possible to suspend a PC without unmounting an attached USB-powered drive, and then remounting it on resume? This is the behaviour I'm currently seeing (running Ubuntu linux 10.10). Are there certain models or brands that provide more complete control over this aspect of drive operation? My Friendly Neighbourhood Computer Store carries (part of) the Vantec Nexstar product line.

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  • How to update the hard disk device drivers for a ghosted hard drive image so it can run on different hardware: Ultra ATA > SATA

    - by rism
    I've ghosted a Winxp machine from one laptop with Ultra ATA drive, and would like to set it up on another laptop as a multiboot option on another hard driver with a SATA drive. I can install the partition fine but if i make it active and try to boot it it blue screens. The blue screen is so fast i cant even read it, other than to make out it's saying "something", im picking probably hard drive as it goes through POST fine. So basically i would like to boot into my Win7 OS, and then somehow manipulate the XP partition to use updated drivers for the new hard drive/laptop so that i can then at least boot into the XP OS on the new machine and update all the other drivers in safe mode or whatever to get it to run. I assume someone is going to tell me to just do a fresh install, but that kinda defeats the purpose of ghosting at this point. There is a significant amount of personalisation, development setup on the XP machine that i would like to just transfer as is. As it stands ive invested minmal time in getting it to run, just a ghost and recovery and then a blue screen boot or two, so its still well worth it to me, time wise to try this way. Thanks.

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  • How harmful is a hard disk spin cycle?

    - by Gilles
    It is conventional wisdom¹ that each time you spin a hard disk down and back up, you shave some time off its life expectancy. The topic has been discussed before: Is turning off hard disks harmful? What's the effect of standby (spindown) mode on modern hard drives? Common explanations for why spindowns and spinups are harmful are that they induce more stress on the mechanical parts than ordinary running, and that they cause heat variations that are harmful to the device mechanics. Is there any data showing quantitatively how bad a spin cycle is? That is, how much life expectancy does a spin cycle cost? Or, more practically, if I know that I'm not going to need a disk for X seconds, how large should X be to warrant spinning down? ¹ But conventional wisdom has been wrong before; for example, it is commonly held that hard disks should be kept as cool as possible, but the one published study on the topic shows that cooler drives actually fail more. This study is no help here since all the disks surveyed were powered on 24/7.

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  • Toshiba External Hard Drive freezes computer

    - by Ephraim
    I bought a Toshiba Canvio Basics E05A032BAU2XK Portable External 320GB 2.5 Hard Drive: My computer has two Os's on it Win7 and Win XP. I need both. The main one I use is XP. When booting my computer in any OS the computer and hard drive work fine. The same holds true for plugging in the hard drive while running Win7. However, when running WinXP, if the hard drive gets plugged in the computer freezes(my main point is that the HD is portable so it is essential that it does not do this, as I said I usually run XP). After reading some online forums I was informed that there is a compatibility issue with the newest version of Eset Smart Security(I still don't understand this because it works fine in Win7 or when connected on boot...). I disabled the AV and plugged in the HD... Walla! The comnputer did not freeze. However the disk is not recognized in explorer or disk management. In device manager I removed the device and did a scan and installation of device failed. It pretty much sounds like a driver issue but I cannot find any drivers for this HD. In fact, Toshiba claims that there are no downloadable drivers for it and that XP should take care of the drivers itself. What to do? As far as I can tell, all other USB devices work just fine on both OS. Please Help!

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  • How harmful is a hard disk spin cycle?

    - by Gilles
    It is conventional wisdom¹ that each time you spin a hard disk down and back up, you shave some time off its life expectancy. The topic has been discussed before: Is turning off hard disks harmful? What's the effect of standby (spindown) mode on modern hard drives? Common explanations for why spindowns and spinups are harmful are that they induce more stress on the mechanical parts than ordinary running, and that they cause heat variations that are harmful to the device mechanics. Is there any data showing quantitatively how bad a spin cycle is? That is, how much life expectancy does a spin cycle cost? Or, more practically, if I know that I'm not going to need a disk for X seconds, how large should X be to warrant spinning down? ¹ But conventional wisdom has been wrong before; for example, it is commonly held that hard disks should be kept as cool as possible, but the one published study on the topic shows that cooler drives actually fail more. This study is no help here since all the disks surveyed were powered on 24/7.

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  • ubuntu 9.10 installer doesn't recognize the hard drive

    - by dan
    I downloaded Ubuntu 9.10 x86_64 and am trying to install it on a fairly modern system with a Gigabyte GA-MA770-UD3 motherboard. Ubuntu 9.04 installed fine and still will when I stick that disc in, but 9.10 doesn't see my hard drive (western digital 250GB). If I boot from the disc, I can install gparted and it does recognize the drive, but when I try to start the install process from the live disc, Ubuntu again doesn't recognize the hard drive. I checked /var/log/messages and see this: Nov 12 17:28:08 ubuntu activate-dmraid: Serial ATA RAID disk(s) detected. If this was bad, boot with 'nodmraid'. Nov 12 17:28:08 ubuntu activate-dmraid: Enabling dmraid support Nov 12 17:28:08 ubuntu activate-dmraid: ERROR: either the required RAID set not found or more options required. Nov 12 17:28:08 ubuntu activate-dmraid: ERROR: either the required RAID set not found or more options required. Nov 12 17:28:08 ubuntu activate-dmraid: ERROR: either the required RAID set not found or more options required. Nov 12 17:28:08 ubuntu activate-dmraid: no raid sets and with names: "nvidia_ciiajheb-0" Nov 12 17:28:08 ubuntu activate-dmraid: ERROR: either the required RAID set not found or more options required. I checked my BIOS, SATA is enabled and is set to IDE mode, so there shouldn't be software RAID, but nonetheless, I added nodmraid to the boot line and tried again. It still doesn't recognize the drive. I checked /var/log/messages again and now see this: Nov 12 17:49:38 ubuntu activate-dmraid: Serial ATA RAID disk(s) detected. If this was boad, boot with 'nodmraid'. Nov 12 17:49:38 ubuntu activate-dmraid: Enabling dmraid support Nov 12 17:49:38 ubuntu activate-dmraid: WARNING: dmraid disabled by boot option Nov 12 17:49:38 ubuntu activate-dmraid: WARNING: dmraid disabled by boot option Any ideas on things to try? I've tried all of the various BIOS settings for SATA. IDE,RAID, etc. Nothing seems to work.

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  • hard drive recognized by bios but not by windows

    - by tehgeekmeister
    I'm adding a new hard drive (A seagate ST31000340NS; I had links in here but I don't have enough reputation to post them. Interestingly, the bios recognizes it as a ST31000340AS, but it was bought as the other number...) to a friend's hp pavilion d4650e (mobo specs; google the model if you want the rest of the info, can't do more than one link.). Have had a hell of a time with it. Finally figured out that the hard drive needed a jumper set to limit the speed to 1.5gbps so the mobo would recognize it, and the bios DOES recognize it now. But not windows (using windows 7), using add new hardware or diskmgmt.msc. According to my friend, who was at the computer when it first booted after adding the jumper, a new hardware found dealio popped up saying something about raid, but I can't provide more info then that since I didn't see it. Ubuntu livecd recognized the drive before we changed the jumper. Haven't checked since then. XP didn't recognize it, that's the OS we started with. Upgraded to 7 hoping it might fix the problem. The only other info I can think of that might be immediately relevant is that the drive is plugged into the fifth sata channel, and the first channel is empty. Is this a problem? I assume not, because the two other drives (in a raid 0) and the cd and dvd drives are also on channels past the first one, and are recognized. Ask questions and I'll update with info!

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  • Building a PC, advice on SSD/Hybrid Hard Drives

    - by Jamie Hartnoll
    I am looking at building a new PC, it's mainly for office (graphics heavy) use and programming. Looking for good performance with opening and closing programs and files as well as a fast boot. I plan to have 3 primary hard drives Windows 7 Programs (photoshop etc) Current Files (There'll also be a large storage capacity back up drive, but this will be the Seagate drive I already have.) So, my question is, looking at standard "old fashioned" hard drives and SSD drives, obviously there's a massive price difference. I have been looking at drives like this: http://www.ebuyer.com/268693-corsair-120gb-force-3-ssd-cssd-f120gb3-bk-cssd-f120gb3-bk and this: http://www.ebuyer.com/321969-momentus-xt-750gb-sata-2-5in-7200rpm-hybrid-8gb-ssd-in-st750lx003 Having no experience of using either I don't know what's the most efficient thing to go for. Clearly the SSD will have better performance, but: If, for example, I had an SSD for Windows (say about 100gB), that would clearly give me the boot speed I want, then I guess my real questions are: If I were to buy one more SSD, would it give the greatest improvement on standard performance if used to store programs, or currently used files? Given that the OS is on an SSD, should I not bother with the 3 drives and instead, partition that Hybrid drive to store programs and currently used files on it? Obviously, option two is cheaper and option one could cause me storage issues, but that's when I can dump files I am not currently using onto another drive. Any, I am open to suggestions... so what do you suggest?!

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  • Coffee spilled inside computer, damaged hard drive

    - by Harpreet
    Today coffee spilled over my table, and some of it (very less) reached the PC case placed under the table. I think little bit of it got inside the PC case through the front. As that happened the fan started running very fast and made noise. I tried to restart to see if it becomes fine, but the computer didn't start again. First it gave an error of "Alert! Air temperature sensor not detected" and didn't start. Next I tried again multiple times of starting the computer but then it gave some memory error. I was not able to start the computer. Incase there's a problem in hard disk or something related to memory, is there any way we can extract our work or data? I am scared if I am not able to extract my work in case some problem occurs like that. What options would I have? Help!! EDIT: I have attached the photo here and you can see the area spilt in red circle. The hard drive electronics have been affected and internal speaker may also have been affected. Any advise on cleaning and if hard drive can work? EDIT 2: Are there any professional services offered to extract data from blemished hard disk, like this one, in case I am not able to run it personally?

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  • ubuntu 9.10 installer doesn't recognize the hard drive

    - by dan
    I downloaded Ubuntu 9.10 x86_64 and am trying to install it on a fairly modern system with a Gigabyte GA-MA770-UD3 motherboard. Ubuntu 9.04 installed fine and still will when I stick that disc in, but 9.10 doesn't see my hard drive (western digital 250GB). If I boot from the disc, I can install gparted and it does recognize the drive, but when I try to start the install process from the live disc, Ubuntu again doesn't recognize the hard drive. I checked /var/log/messages and see this: Nov 12 17:28:08 ubuntu activate-dmraid: Serial ATA RAID disk(s) detected. If this was bad, boot with 'nodmraid'. Nov 12 17:28:08 ubuntu activate-dmraid: Enabling dmraid support Nov 12 17:28:08 ubuntu activate-dmraid: ERROR: either the required RAID set not found or more options required. Nov 12 17:28:08 ubuntu activate-dmraid: ERROR: either the required RAID set not found or more options required. Nov 12 17:28:08 ubuntu activate-dmraid: ERROR: either the required RAID set not found or more options required. Nov 12 17:28:08 ubuntu activate-dmraid: no raid sets and with names: "nvidia_ciiajheb-0" Nov 12 17:28:08 ubuntu activate-dmraid: ERROR: either the required RAID set not found or more options required. I checked my BIOS, SATA is enabled and is set to IDE mode, so there shouldn't be software RAID, but nonetheless, I added nodmraid to the boot line and tried again. It still doesn't recognize the drive. I checked /var/log/messages again and now see this: Nov 12 17:49:38 ubuntu activate-dmraid: Serial ATA RAID disk(s) detected. If this was boad, boot with 'nodmraid'. Nov 12 17:49:38 ubuntu activate-dmraid: Enabling dmraid support Nov 12 17:49:38 ubuntu activate-dmraid: WARNING: dmraid disabled by boot option Nov 12 17:49:38 ubuntu activate-dmraid: WARNING: dmraid disabled by boot option Any ideas on things to try? I've tried all of the various BIOS settings for SATA. IDE,RAID, etc. Nothing seems to work.

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  • Is this hard disk dead?

    - by Korjavin Ivan
    Not sure, is this right site for this Q, but let me try Last time i have problem with hard disk. Sometimes its do strange sound, and i get it from logs: $dmesg | grep ata4 [29409.945516] ata4.00: exception Emask 0x10 SAct 0xf SErr 0x90202 action 0xe frozen [29409.945529] ata4.00: irq_stat 0x00400000, PHY RDY changed [29409.945538] ata4: SError: { RecovComm Persist PHYRdyChg 10B8B } [29409.945546] ata4.00: failed command: READ FPDMA QUEUED [29409.945562] ata4.00: cmd 60/30:00:56:22:5f/00:00:00:00:00/40 tag 0 ncq 24576 in [29409.945573] ata4.00: status: { DRDY } [29409.945580] ata4.00: failed command: READ FPDMA QUEUED [29409.945594] ata4.00: cmd 60/18:08:8e:22:5f/00:00:00:00:00/40 tag 1 ncq 12288 in [29409.945605] ata4.00: status: { DRDY } [29409.945611] ata4.00: failed command: READ FPDMA QUEUED [29409.945625] ata4.00: cmd 60/08:10:46:02:66/00:00:00:00:00/40 tag 2 ncq 4096 in [29409.945635] ata4.00: status: { DRDY } [29409.945641] ata4.00: failed command: READ FPDMA QUEUED [29409.945656] ata4.00: cmd 60/80:18:ee:04:66/00:00:00:00:00/40 tag 3 ncq 65536 in [29409.945666] ata4.00: status: { DRDY } [29409.945679] ata4: hard resetting link [29413.976083] ata4: softreset failed (device not ready) [29413.976097] ata4: applying SB600 PMP SRST workaround and retrying [29414.148070] ata4: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300) [29414.184986] ata4.00: SB600 AHCI: limiting to 255 sectors per cmd [29414.243280] ata4.00: SB600 AHCI: limiting to 255 sectors per cmd [29414.243292] ata4.00: configured for UDMA/133 [29414.243324] ata4: EH complete [680674.804563] ata4: exception Emask 0x50 SAct 0x0 SErr 0x90a02 action 0xe frozen [680674.804575] ata4: irq_stat 0x00400000, PHY RDY changed [680674.804584] ata4: SError: { RecovComm Persist HostInt PHYRdyChg 10B8B } [680674.804603] ata4: hard resetting link [680678.840561] ata4: softreset failed (device not ready) Is this ata4 sata hard drive dead? Must i change it ASAP ? Need I specify more info?

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  • Dropped WD External Harddisk, now it's shown as "Not initialized"

    - by Phelios
    So, the WD my passport external harddisk is dropped, and after that, the computer is unable to read it anymore. I was hopping if I can just find another case to try if the harddisk is still readable, but looks like the hard drive itself is not a normal SATA or PATA drive. I think it's modified. So, I can't find another case that I can try on. In the computer, I still can see the drive in the "Disk Management", but it's shown as Uninitialized, no size, and no drive letter. I've also tried a couple of recovery tools. Some can't detect at all, there is one (find and mount software) that can detect but shows 0 size. None of them can recover the data. WD is willing to replace it with a new one, but I still need to recover the data. Any way I can recover the data? UPDATE: I tried initialized it from the windows Disk Manager, but it give error "The request could not be performed because of an I/O device error."

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  • Can't mount hard drive. Ubuntu 12.04

    - by Sam
    I am trying to recover some pictures on my 320 GB Hard Disk, so I put in a Live Ubuntu CD and am in that right now. In the devices list, it shows my USB drive, but not my 320 GB Hard Disk. I can see the disk in Disk Utility (it says it's on /dev/sda), but it's not mounted, and it says it has a few bad sectors but it is OK. In Disk Usage Analyzer, it says my maximum capacity is 13.4 GB, so it's definitely not using the 320 GB Hard Disk. I tried the following: sudo mkdir /media/newhd (worked) sudo mount /dev/sda /media/newhd (didn't work. it says I must specify the filesystem type) I then tried: fsck.ext4 -f /dev/sda (didn't work. Said: Superblock invalid, trying to backup blocks. then: Bad magic number in super-block while trying to open /dev/sda. The superblock could not be read or does not describe a correct ext2 filesystem. If the device is valid and it contains an ext2 filesystem (and not swap or ufs or something else), then the superblock is corrupt, and you might try running e2fsck with an alternate superblock) Does anyone have any ideas? The whole problem started when my Windows Vista said "Can't find operating system". Any ideas on how I can get on to my hard drive at /dev/sda?

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  • Recovering data from an external hard drive

    - by CCallaghan
    I have a WD Elements 2GB hard drive (formatted NTFS). I accidentally kicked out the USB cable while writing data to the disk, and now I can't access most of the data. Although this was ostensibly my backup drive, there is a great deal of important material on there which was only on there. I realise how idiotic this makes me. (So, formatting is not an option.) Things I've tried/information I've gathered: Windows Explorer will recognise the drive itself. However, it will not access most directories therein (and will sometimes crash when exploring). I can access all of the directories through the command line, but the dir command will often report that it can't read any files in most of the directories. The situation was similar when I hooked it up to an Ubuntu machine: the file explorer crashed, but I could access directories - but not files in those directories - via terminal commands. Several files I tried to copy out either resulted in an I/O error being reported or resulted in the command line crashing. The Disk Management utility on Windows reports a healthy disk formatted as NTFS and not RAW. It also indicates the correct amount of space used up and its capacity (so it seems that the files are not deleted). I've tried to run chkdsk, but that hangs on Step 2 (checking indexes) at 74%. Step 1 reported no bad sectors. I tried Recuva, but that didn't seem to work (stalled at 0% for half an hour). I should also note that the disk doesn't seem to be spinning smoothly; it seems to be chopping back, like it's reading the same sector over and over again. I noticed this after I kicked out the cable. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Update: It would seem the problem has taken a turn for the worse. The external hard drive now shows up on my computer as a local disk and is not mountable by Linux.

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  • Could I have destroyed Partitioning-Scheme/Filesystem of HDDs with External Harddrive Case with builtin Raid-Controller?

    - by th3m3s
    I had just recently bought a Fantec QB-35US3R to have a nice box on my desk to make some backups to. Along with the HDD-Bay I had ordered some 4TB HDDs to let them run in Raid 5, which is handled by the hardware RAID controller of the Fantec HDD-Bay. The QB-35US3R arrived a few days before the hard drives, so I got impatient and had the idea to put three old 1TB disks in the Fantec device, just to test it... Long story short: I made a backup of the most important data on these three disks before they broke. I had set the configuration scheme to RAID 3 at the Fantec device. It seems, that the Fantec RAID controller has "somehow" destroyed the partitioning scheme or the file system, because when put into a HDD docking station, they get recognized by the OS (Ubuntu/Linux) but are not mountable anymore. I tried to recover the data from one HDD via gParted (parted), which ran some hours without success. Here I stopped, before trying other tools, cos I read that the longer a hard drive is running after a the partitioning got destroyed, the worse it gets. What could the HDD-Bay probably have done to my lovely hard drive disks? Is there some routine a RAID controller is executing, when it wants to create a RAID system? Like erasing the partition table (seems not plausible to me.) or writing some information to every hard drive in the RAID (seems more likely to me.)? Is there a chance to recover the data from these HDDs, or is the change a RAID controller makes so significant, that no software is of help?

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