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  • Recover data from an ''unpartitioned'' hard drive

    - by Rafael S. Calsaverini
    I'm trying to recover data from a hdd for a friend from work. He was using it on an old win98 PC (so I guess it was a FAT 16 filesystem). When he installed the drive on a new PC his Windows XP can't recognize the filesystem and give an error message saying that the drive is unformatted. I tried to mount the hdd under linux but no partitions appear to be associated with the drive (I have only /dev/sdb associated with that drive and no /dev/sdb1 or sdb2 etc). I've found many articles on the web on how to recover partitions (with scripts like dd and ddrescue) but how do I make it when I have no partitions and the system say my drive is unpartioned? Is it possible to create a new partition without loosing the data?

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  • Hard drive placement

    - by zm15
    I'm a video editor working with large HD files. I am building a new computer and need some help. I will be running 2 hard drives. One with the operating system and all the programs. And one with all the project files I will be working from. I am keeping these seperate. I will be purchasing a 10k rpm hard drive. So i will have a 10k rpm drive, and a 7200rpm drive. Should I put the OS on the faster drive, or put my working files on the faster drive?

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  • What makes an Apple hard drive special?

    - by Michael Shnitzer
    The Mac Pro has a specific hard drive for sale in the Apple Store for $549.00. The drive has the following specs: Serial ATA 3GB per second 7200 RPM Amazon has a hard drive with the same specs for $169.99. The only difference I can tell is that the Apple hard drive label says it has "Apple HDD Firmware". What exactly is the benefit of this firmware and is there something I am missing that make up for the price difference in these two drives? Update: My initial comparison between the two drive was unfair. Apparently 2TB drives that are 3 GB/S and 7200 RPM are quiet a bit more than $169.99. Dell has a 2 TB SATA Caviar Black from Western Digital that is $319.99, which is closer to Apple's price.

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  • When is it time to buy a new hard drive, and what considerations go into buying a new hard drive?

    - by user1125620
    I've had my current hard drive for about 4-5 years now, and I've never had a problem with it before, but now it's making whirring noises. It's done this before and, last time, the noise did go away the next day, but I have accumulated quite a bit of information that I wouldn't want to lose on the drive. HD Tune Pro and Berlac Advisor both said the drive was healthy, and I wouldn't want to get a new one unless it was absolutely necessary or was going to show drastic performance improvements. My only knock against the drive would be that Visual Studio takes longer to load than I'd like it to. HD Tune Pro says the average read speed is 54.3MB/s. I'm not sure if that's good or bad, but it seems about average compared to similar drives on http://www.hdtune.com/testresults.html. Model #: WDC WD5000AAJS-22YFA0 So, should hard drives be replaced after a certain amount of time? Has mine reached that point? Would a new hard drive be any faster?

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  • EXT4 external hard drive for use with multiple systems

    - by EXTdumb
    I recently bought a external hard drive to store some data on. I use Linux but I am not a power user. If I format the drive to EXT4, is it possible for the permissions to ever screw up and I lost access to my data? I will be plugging the drive into several different linux based computers at work and I frequently hop distros on my main home machine. I need to make sure I don't lose any data because I overlooked something. I am not familiar with EXT 3 or 4. So far I have done this : Formatted drive to EXT4 ran gksudo thunar and changed the permissions to my user account and all settings to read/write Wrote all the files I need to the drive I really appreciate any help.

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  • Ubuntu not showing hard drive

    - by ojek
    I have a laptop which had a broken installation of Windows 7 installed on it. I created a Ubuntu live USB and tried installing Ubuntu over that Windows 7. After a few minutes, I got an error message, so I needed to restart the computer. Now the laptop says that there is no bootable device - reasonable message given that there was an error during Linux installation. However: BIOS can see my hard drive, When I start Ubuntu in live mode, and try either sudo fdisk -l or gparted, it doesn't show any hard disk drives. I am 90% sure that the hard drive is broken, but it is weird that BIOS can see it, and Ubuntu doesn't. How can I be 100% sure about that hard drive? Is there any additional way of detecting my hard drive from Ubuntu?

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  • Create a Persistent Bootable Ubuntu USB Flash Drive

    - by Trevor Bekolay
    Don’t feel like reinstalling an antivirus program every time you boot up your Ubuntu flash drive? We’ll show you how to create a bootable Ubuntu flash drive that will remember your settings, installed programs, and more! Previously, we showed you how to create a bootable Ubuntu flash drive that would reset to its initial state every time you booted it up. This is great if you’re worried about messing something up, and want to start fresh every time you start tinkering with Ubuntu. However, if you’re using the Ubuntu flash drive to diagnose and solve problems with your PC, you might find that a lot of problems require guess-and-test cycles. It would be great if the settings you change in Ubuntu and the programs you install stay installed the next time you boot it up. Fortunately, Universal USB Installer, a great little program from Pen Drive Linux, can do just that! Note: You will need a USB drive at least 2 GB large. Make sure you back up any files on the flash drive because this process will format the drive, removing any files currently on it. Once Ubuntu has been installed on the flash drive, you can move those files back if there is enough space. Put Ubuntu on your flash drive Universal-USB-Installer.exe does not need to be installed, so just double click on it to run it wherever you downloaded it. Click Yes if you get a UAC prompt, and you will be greeted with this window. Click I Agree. In the drop-down box on the next screen, select Ubuntu 9.10 Desktop i386. Don’t worry if you normally use 64-bit operating systems – the 32-bit version of Ubuntu 9.10 will still work fine. Some useful tools do not have 64-bit versions, so unless you’re planning on switching to Ubuntu permanently, the 32-bit version will work best. If you don’t have a copy of the Ubuntu 9.10 CD downloaded, then click on the checkbox to Download the ISO. You’ll be prompted to launch a web browser; click Yes. The download should start immediately. When it’s finished, return the the Universal USB Installer and click on Browse to navigate to the ISO file you just downloaded. Click OK and the text field will be populated with the path to the ISO file. Select the drive letter that corresponds to the flash drive that you would like to use from the dropdown box. If you’ve backed up the files on this drive, we recommend checking the box to format the drive. Finally, you have to choose how much space you would like to set aside for the settings and programs that will be stored on the flash drive. Considering that Ubuntu itself only takes up around 700 MB, 1 GB should be plenty, but we’re choosing 2 GB in this example because we have lots of space on this USB drive. Click on the Create button and then make yourself a sandwich – it will take some time to install no matter how fast your PC is. Eventually it will finish. Click Close. Now you have a flash drive that will boot into a fully capable Ubuntu installation, and any changes you make will persist the next time you boot it up! Boot into Ubuntu If you’re not sure how to set your computer to boot using the USB drive, then check out the How to Boot Into Ubuntu section of our previous article on creating bootable USB drives, or refer to your motherboard’s manual. Once your computer is set to boot using the USB drive, you’ll be greeted with splash screen with some options. Press Enter to boot into Ubuntu. The first time you do this, it may take some time to boot up. Fortunately, we’ve found that the process speeds up on subsequent boots. You’ll be greeted with the Ubuntu desktop. Now, if you change settings like the desktop resolution, or install a program, those changes will be permanently stored on the USB drive! We installed avast! Antivirus, and on the next boot, found that it was still in the Accessories menu where we left it. Conclusion We think that a bootable Ubuntu USB flash drive is a great tool to have around in case your PC has problems booting otherwise. By having the changes you make persist, you can customize your Ubuntu installation to be the ultimate computer repair toolkit! Download Universal USB Installer from Pen Drive Linux Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Create a Bootable Ubuntu USB Flash Drive the Easy WayCreate a Bootable Ubuntu 9.10 USB Flash DriveReset Your Ubuntu Password Easily from the Live CDHow-To Geek on Lifehacker: Control Your Computer with Shortcuts & Speed Up Vista SetupHow To Setup a USB Flash Drive to Install Windows 7 TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 Test Drive Windows 7 Online Download Wallpapers From National Geographic Site Spyware Blaster v4.3 Yes, it’s Patch Tuesday Generate Stunning Tag Clouds With Tagxedo Install, Remove and HIDE Fonts in Windows 7

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  • Use an Ubuntu Live CD to Securely Wipe Your PC’s Hard Drive

    - by Trevor Bekolay
    Deleting files or quickly formatting a drive isn’t enough for sensitive personal information. We’ll show you how to get rid of it for good using a Ubuntu Live CD. When you delete a file in Windows, Ubuntu, or any other operating system, it doesn’t actually destroy the data stored on your hard drive, it just marks that data as “deleted.” If you overwrite it later, then that data is generally unrecoverable, but if the operating system don’t happen to overwrite it, then your data is still stored on your hard drive, recoverable by anyone who has the right software. By securely delete files or entire hard drives, your data will be gone for good. Note: Modern hard drives are extremely sophisticated, as are the experts who recover data for a living. There is no guarantee that the methods covered in this article will make your data completely unrecoverable; however, they will make your data unrecoverable to the majority of recovery methods, and all methods that are readily available to the general public. Shred individual files Most of the data stored on your hard drive is harmless, and doesn’t reveal anything about you. If there are just a few files that you know you don’t want someone else to see, then the easiest way to get rid of them is a built-in Linux utility called shred. Open a terminal window by clicking on Applications at the top-left of the screen, then expanding the Accessories menu and clicking on Terminal. Navigate to the file that you want to delete using cd to change directories and ls to list the files and folders in the current directory. As an example, we’ve got a file called BankInfo.txt on a Windows NTFS-formatted hard drive. We want to delete it securely, so we’ll call shred by entering the following in the terminal window: shred <file> which is, in our example: shred BankInfo.txt Notice that our BankInfo.txt file still exists, even though we’ve shredded it. A quick look at the contents of BankInfo.txt make it obvious that the file has indeed been securely overwritten. We can use some command-line arguments to make shred delete the file from the hard drive as well. We can also be extra-careful about the shredding process by upping the number of times shred overwrites the original file. To do this, in the terminal, type in: shred –remove –iterations=<num> <file> By default, shred overwrites the file 25 times. We’ll double this, giving us the following command: shred –remove –iterations=50 BankInfo.txt BankInfo.txt has now been securely wiped on the physical disk, and also no longer shows up in the directory listing. Repeat this process for any sensitive files on your hard drive! Wipe entire hard drives If you’re disposing of an old hard drive, or giving it to someone else, then you might instead want to wipe your entire hard drive. shred can be invoked on hard drives, but on modern file systems, the shred process may be reversible. We’ll use the program wipe to securely delete all of the data on a hard drive. Unlike shred, wipe is not included in Ubuntu by default, so we have to install it. Open up the Synaptic Package Manager by clicking on System in the top-left corner of the screen, then expanding the Administration folder and clicking on Synaptic Package Manager. wipe is part of the Universe repository, which is not enabled by default. We’ll enable it by clicking on Settings > Repositories in the Synaptic Package Manager window. Check the checkbox next to “Community-maintained Open Source software (universe)”. Click Close. You’ll need to reload Synaptic’s package list. Click on the Reload button in the main Synaptic Package Manager window. Once the package list has been reloaded, the text over the search field will change to “Rebuilding search index”. Wait until it reads “Quick search,” and then type “wipe” into the search field. The wipe package should come up, along with some other packages that perform similar functions. Click on the checkbox to the left of the label “wipe” and select “Mark for Installation”. Click on the Apply button to start the installation process. Click the Apply button on the Summary window that pops up. Once the installation is done, click the Close button and close the Synaptic Package Manager window. Open a terminal window by clicking on Applications in the top-left of the screen, then Accessories > Terminal. You need to figure our the correct hard drive to wipe. If you wipe the wrong hard drive, that data will not be recoverable, so exercise caution! In the terminal window, type in: sudo fdisk -l A list of your hard drives will show up. A few factors will help you identify the right hard drive. One is the file system, found in the System column of  the list – Windows hard drives are usually formatted as NTFS (which shows up as HPFS/NTFS). Another good identifier is the size of the hard drive, which appears after its identifier (highlighted in the following screenshot). In our case, the hard drive we want to wipe is only around 1 GB large, and is formatted as NTFS. We make a note of the label found under the the Device column heading. If you have multiple partitions on this hard drive, then there will be more than one device in this list. The wipe developers recommend wiping each partition separately. To start the wiping process, type the following into the terminal: sudo wipe <device label> In our case, this is: sudo wipe /dev/sda1 Again, exercise caution – this is the point of no return! Your hard drive will be completely wiped. It may take some time to complete, depending on the size of the drive you’re wiping. Conclusion If you have sensitive information on your hard drive – and chances are you probably do – then it’s a good idea to securely delete sensitive files before you give away or dispose of your hard drive. The most secure way to delete your data is with a few swings of a hammer, but shred and wipe from a Ubuntu Live CD is a good alternative! Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Reset Your Ubuntu Password Easily from the Live CDScan a Windows PC for Viruses from a Ubuntu Live CDRecover Deleted Files on an NTFS Hard Drive from a Ubuntu Live CDCreate a Bootable Ubuntu 9.10 USB Flash DriveCreate a Bootable Ubuntu USB Flash Drive the Easy Way TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 Office 2010 Product Guides Google Maps Place marks – Pizza, Guns or Strip Clubs Monitor Applications With Kiwi LocPDF is a Visual PDF Search Tool Download Free iPad Wallpapers at iPad Decor Get Your Delicious Bookmarks In Firefox’s Awesome Bar

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  • Pen drive cannot be mounted

    - by DUKE
    I get the following message when I insert my pen drive to USB port. I am unable to format it as well. (This pen drive earlier used as a bootable drive for Ubuntu 12.04) I am using Ubuntu 12.04 LTS. lsusb command in the terminal gives the following message: [email protected]:~$ lsusb Bus 001 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub Bus 002 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub Bus 003 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub Bus 004 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub Bus 001 Device 002: ID 0424:2513 Standard Microsystems Corp. Bus 002 Device 002: ID 0424:2513 Standard Microsystems Corp. Bus 001 Device 003: ID 0a5c:4500 Broadcom Corp. BCM2046B1 USB 2.0 Hub (part of BCM2046 Bluetooth) Bus 001 Device 004: ID 1c4f:0002 SiGma Micro Keyboard TRACER Gamma Ivory Bus 002 Device 003: ID 05ac:8242 Apple, Inc. IR Receiver [built-in] Bus 002 Device 004: ID 093a:2510 Pixart Imaging, Inc. Optical Mouse Bus 001 Device 007: ID 05ac:8281 Apple, Inc. Bus 001 Device 008: ID 0951:1653 Kingston Technology

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  • Running Ubuntu Server from a USB key / thumb drive (being mindful of flash's write limitations)

    - by andybjackson
    Having become disillusioned with hacking Buffalo NAS devices, I've decided to roll my own home server. After some research, I have settled on an HP Proliant Microserver with Ubuntu Server and a ZFS RAID-Z array for data. I settled on this configuration after trying and regretfully rejecting FreeNAS because the Logitech Media Server (LMS) software isn't available on the AMD64 flavour of this platform and because I think Debian/Ubuntu server is a better future-proof platform. I considered Open Media Vault, but concluded that it isn't quite yet ready for my purposes. That said, FreeNAS does include the option to run itself off a 2GB+ flash device like USB key or thumb drive. Apparently FreeNAS is mindful of the write limitations of flash devices and so creates virtual disks for running the OS, writing only the required configuration information back to flash. This would give me an extra data drive slot. Q: Can Ubuntu Server be configured sensibly to run off a flash device such as a USB key/thumb drive? If so, how? The write limitations of flash should be accounted for.

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  • Google Drive Update keeps throwing an error when I try to save a thumbnail

    - by Dano64
    The Base64 string checks out fine. I was able to export it to another website and download it again as my image. When I try to do an update using the Drive Javascript api, it just keeps returning this error: Invalidvaluefor:Notavalidbase64bytestring I also true making the string URL safe. Per this page https://google-api-client-libraries.appspot.com/documentation/drive/v2/python/latest/drive_v2.files.html Am I doing something wrong here, the documentation says send Base64, the string is valid and, the string is intact throughout the process, but Google will not accept it? I am using the javascript api, I think there is maybe a bug sending the thumbnail using the javascript api. This is the request Request URL:https://www.googleapis.com/upload/drive/v2/files/?uploadType=multipart Request Method:POST Status Code:400 Bad Request **Request Headers** :host:www.googleapis.com :method:POST :path:/upload/drive/v2/files/?uploadType=multipart :scheme:https :version:HTTP/1.1 accept:*/* accept-encoding:gzip,deflate,sdch accept-language:en-US,en;q=0.8 authorization:Bearer ya29.AHES6ZQr...YXDacdY4 content-length:14313 content-type:multipart/mixed; boundary="--mpart_delim" origin:https://www.googleapis.com x-javascript-user-agent:google-api-javascript-client/1.1.0-beta x-origin:https://app.pinteract.com x-referer:https://app.pinteract.com **Query String Parameters** uploadType:multipart **Request Payload** ----mpart_delim Content-Type: application/json {"id":null,"title":"Test Pinup.pint","mimeType":"application/vnd.pinteract.pint","thumbnail":{"mimeType":"image/png","image":"iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUh...UVORK5CYII%3D"}} ----mpart_delim Content-Type: application/vnd.pinteract.pint Content-Transfer-Encoding: binary { "header" : {"id":"215A660A"} "members" : [ {"id":"100523752012631912873"} ], "manifest" : [ {"id":"0000","ele":[],"own":"100523752012631912873","dtc":1371679680000,"txt":"&Delta; Created","typ":0} ], "elements" : [ {"id":"0F54","x":560,"y":264,"bak":"#44ff44","own":"100523752012631912873","srt":"544","sta":0,"wid":120,"hgt":120,"dtc":0,"rec":"","txt":"This is Note"} ] } ----mpart_delim-- **Response Headers** content-length:10848 content-type:application/json date:Mon, 01 Jul 2013 14:41:33 GMT server:HTTP Upload Server Built on Jun 25 2013 11:32:14 (1372185134) status:400 Bad Request version:HTTP/1.1 This is the Response { "error": { "errors": [ { "domain": "global", "reason": "invalid", "message": "Invalid value for: Not a valid base64 byte string: iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUg...AASUVORK5CYII%3D" } ], "code": 400, "message": "Invalid value for: Not a valid base64 byte string: iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSU...lRtkAAAAASUVORK5CYII%3D" } } Raw Base64 String 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"}],"code":400,"message":"Invalidvaluefor:Notavalidbase64bytestring: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 Url Encoded Base64 String 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vTBjYZx7khoK6e82AZgu5JQ4Bqi%2BoZ%2F10m3e8bAgSQE8dOQE7CJMh3e5fL%2BoylJiCKom3HSoBYDqdp%2BpjYLfX%2FTa%2FUBBw5cmSSMbb1WAhgLNqYJMnLZZfL0seAZrN5rwDzfyGhWa%2FXNx48%2BOaT%2FRCv%2BiIIT0%2FvvbfRaFwjvOFoMSErLdxeq9Uu27v3le390mFg0IftpptvXetURXDefPyxn01B1apWtapVrWpVq1rVqla1t9L%2BI8AAvydNUrElRtkAAAAASUVORK5CYII%3D

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  • BIOS not detecting working SATA hard drive.

    - by Evan
    Some time ago my power supply died. It's a long story from then till now, but the important bit is that I ended up with a new hard drive and a new power supply. I tested to see if my original hard drive was still alive, and it booted and worked perfectly until I turned it off. When I started it again it would not boot. I bought new SATA cables, assuming that the one I had was not seating properly (it was cheap and wobbly), but no dice. Upon start-up I am presented with a message telling me to insert boot media into the selected drive or add a drive and restart. Neither the new or the old drive is detected by BIOS, my Vista install disk, or from my bootable Linux USB drive. When I remove all of the RAM the computer ceases outputting visual information, and upon reinstalling the ram and starting up again gives me a "failed overclock" error. So, does anyone have an idea as to what might be going on? I'm completely lost at this point.

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  • Recover data from hard drive with partitions (but not most data) overwritten

    - by Macha
    I have a 500GB hard drive I've been keeping around to recover data from that I removed from a failing NAS drive that got sort of... erratic at the end. I finally got rid of the NAS when during a firmware update it removed the partition table. Fast forward to a week ago, when I was building a new PC, and a mixup resulted in me placing the hard drive in question in the new PC and installing Windows XP on the first 100GB. I'm presuming any data on that first 100GB is now gone, but for the rest of it, is there any way I can recover it at home, as professional data recovery is currently too expensive? I have a blank 1TB HDD if I can store any images of that hard drive on. The problem was definitely with the NAS and not the hard drive, as the hard drive had a successful install of Windows when mistakenly place in the new PC, and there were capacitors in the NAS's circuitry clearly broken. The data I want to recover (in order of priority) is: High: Some jpgs of family photos. Medium: Some RAW files. (There are also jpg versions of all of these) Low: Some mp3s, avis and ISOs, I can re-rip most of these if need be, but it'd be handy not to have to. (I don't need a backup lecture, and if you can hold it in from nagging Jeff Atwood for it, you can hold it in from nagging me for it) In short: The partition tables are gone and overwritten. The data is not overwritten, except for an amount equal to the size of a Windows XP SP3 installation.

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  • BIOS not detecting working SATA hard drive

    - by user28927
    Some time ago my power supply died. It's a long story from then till now, but the important bit is that I ended up with a new hard drive and a new power supply. I tested to see if my original hard drive was still alive, and it booted and worked perfectly until I turned it off. When I started it again it would not boot. I bought new SATA cables, assuming that the one I had was not seating properly (it was cheap and wobbly), but no dice. Upon start-up I am presented with a message telling me to insert boot media into the selected drive or add a drive and restart. Neither the new or the old drive is detected by BIOS, my Vista install disk, or from my bootable Linux USB drive. When I remove all of the RAM the computer ceases outputting visual information, and upon reinstalling the ram and starting up again gives me a "failed overclock" error. So, does anyone have an idea as to what might be going on? I'm completely lost at this point.

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  • Windows XP consuming drive letters

    - by billdehaan
    This one's a bit of a stumper. I'm running XP SP3, current with all fixes, etc. My problem is that I can assign a drive letter to a container file (explained below), it works just fine. But once I close the container, the drive letter is no longer available until the next boot. I've got some confidential data that I've placed in a container volume. I've used TrueCrypt (www.truecrypt.com) and FreeOTFE (www.freeotfe.org), with both installed and portable versions for both, with the same result. I open the container file, assign it to a drive letter (say R:), and run some portable apps that are within the volume. When I'm done, I close the container, and the drive letter is released. Fine so far. However, when I attempt to re-open it, the previous drive letter (in this case R:) is no longer available. It's not mapped to anything, it's just unavailable. Even attempting something like "subst R: C:\" returns "Invalid Parameter - R:". I can use the S: drive, no problem, but the next day I have to use T:, then U:, etc. Eventually, I have to reboot to reclaim all of of the drive letters. Unfortunately, everything I've read about drive letters relates to USB assignments, which doesn't apply here. I've tried the "show hidden" command (set devmgr_show_nonpresent_devices=1) with no success. And the Disk Management tool doesn't apply either, since it's not a physical drive. Does anyone know where Windows keeps the list of drive letters? And is there anything short of a reboot that can be used to reset it?

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  • Drive Shows No Files But Half Space Gone

    - by Chance Robertson
    I have a 500 GB USB drive. When I go to Windows Explorer or Finder, the drive shows that about half the drive is free. However, when I open either drive in Windows 7 or OS X, no files how up. I have tried to look at the files through the command line and nothing shows. A while back, I hooked it up to my MacBookPro and there was a quick message that said the drive was not ejected properly, blah, blah. And of course I did not read the message and hit OK. It there any way to get back my files from the drive?

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  • I have a password protected USB drive with hidden partition, how to convert to normal USB drive?

    - by deddebme
    I have a generic USB drive which has password protection, and I want to stop this password protection mechanism and to use it as a normal 8GB USB drive. I received this USB drive as a gift in Hong Kong, and there was no instruction menu whatsoever, not even the manufacturer name. When I plug the drive in Windows XP, the removable drive comes up as a read only 5.28MB partition with two files. When I try to add or remove any files or formatting it, it will says the drive is write protected. After launching the Login.exe and typed in the password, a 8GB read/writeable partition will be shown, and I'm free to do anything to it. But once after the drive is unplugged and replugged, the same read only partition will still comes out no matter what I did to the hidden partition. Anyone knows about this kind if USB drive? What did the manufacturer do to hide the partition? Is there a way to "low-level" formatting this drive to convert (or revert) it to a normal drive? Before typing in the password: After typing in the password:

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  • Cloned Windows 7 to new HDD and want to change the drive letter to C

    - by Hoppe
    I used Clonezilla to clone my existing hard drive to a new one I bought. I then changed the BIOS to set the new drive as the first in the boot sequence. I'm pretty sure that I'm still running Windows 7 on the old drive. My old drive is marked as C. Now that I don't have a disk drive any more, how I do I swap the drive letter from J: to C:? I tried to change it in the disk management section of "Manage", but it reports: "the parameter is incorrect".

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  • Disc drive busy on MacBook, with disc stuck inside.

    - by ayaz
    I have a white MacBook, running Snow Leopard, 10.6.3 with the latest updates. I popped in a DVD that the system failed to mount. I did not see any conspicuous errors. As a result of this failure, the DVD got stuck in the drive. Neither pressing the eject button on the keyboard nor running the diskutil eject command caused the DVD to come out. The commands drutil eject and drutil tray open could not get the DVD to budge at all. The 'mount' and 'eject' buttons on the window for Disk Utility are dimmed out, while it is written in the middle for the DVD drive that that particular disc drive is busy. This is not the first time this has happened with me. I know that I will ultimately have to resort to rebooting the system and holding down the eject button to get the DVD to come out. But, is there any workaround that does not involve rebooting the system and prying the disc out? The drive on this MacBook does not have a needle-pin reset button -- at least, I couldn't find it anywhere. Any help will be greatly appreciated. Many thanks.

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  • Hitching and Slowness Due to HDD Activity on Ubuntu, But Not Windows?

    - by Espionage724
    It's been bothering me for months now, but I've noticed in Ubuntu (or any distro of Linux I've tried), any major I/O activity will cause hitching and general slowness. For example, if I try doing a file transfer from my network computer to the computer I'm using and try moving the mouse after a while, it might not respond for a second or so. Similar incidents occur in other cases too (right-clicking to get a context menu takes a few seconds, hitting the drop-down application bar takes a while, etc). My HDD isn't top-notch (a WD Blue 500GB 7200RPM drive) but I don't recall it being nearly this bad in Windows 7, 8, or 8.1. CPU activity during file transfers is relatively low (less than 10-20% on all cores of a Phenom II X4 @ 3.3Ghz). I'm using Gnome System Monitor (on Xubuntu) and can't seem to see what kind of HDD activity is occurring though. I have 8GB of RAM too, which is moderately being used (2.5GB), but shouldn't be a problem either. Any ideas what's up? I've tried kernels between 3.8 and 3.11 (i'm using saucy currently with 3.11).

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  • Migrate Windows Server 2008 to a new hard disk

    - by MainMa
    Hi, I have a machine with Windows Server 2008. I want to change the hard disk drive, but keep everything else. I don't have a cd/dvd drive and don't want to buy it. My first idea was to make a byte-to-byte copy of the disk with Paragon Advanced Recovery. The problem is that when I try to boot from a new hard disk, it says that there were hardware changes and that Windows must be repaired, inviting me to insert the installation disk and follow repair instructions. I searched and found that 1:1 copy is not a correct way to do things. The correct one is to restore Windows to a new hard disk from a full system backup. But to restore, I need to have a dvd drive. I tried to make a copy of the Windows Server 2008 .iso on an USB flash drive, but the drive is not bootable (while the same procedure applied to Paragon Advanced Recovery ISO produces a bootable recovery USB flash drive). Now what else can I do (except buying a dvd drive)? Is there a way either to make Windows work without doing recovery or recover Windows 2008 without using a cd drive?

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  • How can I keep a folder synchronized to an external USB hard drive in Ubuntu?

    - by Cesar
    I have a growing music collection which I manually keep in sync with an external USB drive. Sometimes I edit their ID3 tags, add or delete a file in either the hard drive or the USB drive, and I would like to keep those changes synchronized between both. Does Ubuntu has something available that would help me with this scenario? Preferably something easy to use with a UI. Update: To clarify my question, changes may happen on both the local hard drive or the USB drive, so the sync process must be on both directions.

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  • Repointing iTunes library from failed external drive to local drive

    - by Andy White
    Up until recently I had my iTunes library on an external drive, but the drive was beginning to act up, so as a precaution, I copied all the media files onto my local hard-drive. My external drive is now completely dead, so I'm in a situation where iTunes is still looking for the files on my F: drive, but the drive is gone, so the library references are now all broken links. A complete copy of the library is on my C: drive, so I'm curious what would be the easiest way to repoint my library to the media files on C:? Should I just clear out my library in iTunes and just import the files from C:? Or is there a more automatic way? I don't think I can use the "Consolidate Library" function in iTunes, b/c I no longer have access to the original library media files.

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  • How to Format a USB Drive in Ubuntu Using GParted

    - by Trevor Bekolay
    If a USB hard drive or flash drive is not properly formatted, then it will not show up in the Ubuntu Places menu, making it hard to interact with. We’ll show you how to format a USB drive using the tool GParted. Note: Formatting a USB drive will destroy any data currently stored on it. If you think that your USB drive is already properly formatted, but Ubuntu just isn’t picking it up, try unplugging it and plugging it back in to a different USB slot, or restarting your machine with the device plugged in on start-up. Open a terminal by clicking on Applications in the top-left of the screen, then Accessories > Terminal. GParted should be installed by default, but we’ll make sure it’s installed by entering the following command in the terminal: sudo apt-get install gparted To open GParted, enter the following command in the terminal: sudo gparted Find your USB drive in the drop-down box at the top right of the GParted window. The drive should be unallocated – if it has a valid partition on it, then you may be looking at the wrong drive. Note: Make sure you’re on the correct drive, as making changes on the wrong hard drive with GParted can delete all data on a hard drive! Assuming you’re on the right drive, right-click on the unallocated grey block and click New. In the window that pops up, change the File System to fat32 for USB Flash Drives, NTFS for USB Hard Drives that will be used in Windows, or ext3/ext4 for USB Hard Drives that will be used exclusively in Linux. Add a label if you’d like, and then click Add. Click the green checkmark and then the Apply button to apply the changes. GParted will now format your drive. If you’re formatting a large USB Hard Drive, this can take some time. Once the process is done, you can close GParted, and the drive will now show up in the Places menu. Clicking on the drive will mount it and open it in a File Browser window. It will also add a shortcut to the drive on the Desktop by default. Your USB drive is now ready to store your files! Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Using GParted to Resize Your Windows Vista PartitionInstall an RPM Package on Ubuntu LinuxCreate a Persistent Bootable Ubuntu USB Flash DriveShare Ubuntu Home Directories using SambaCreate a Samba User on Ubuntu TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips Acronis Online Backup DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows Fun with 47 charts and graphs Tomorrow is Mother’s Day Check the Average Speed of YouTube Videos You’ve Watched OutlookStatView Scans and Displays General Usage Statistics How to Add Exceptions to the Windows Firewall Office 2010 reviewed in depth by Ed Bott

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