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  • Common mistakes made by new programmers without CS backgrounds [on hold]

    - by mblinn
    I've noticed that there seems to be a class of mistakes that new programmers without CS backgrounds tend to make, that programmers with CS backgrounds tend not to. I'm not talking about not understanding source control, or how to design large programs, or a whole host of other things that both freshly minted CS graduates and non-CS graduates tend to not understand, I'm talking about basic mistakes that having a CS background will prevent a programmer from making. One obvious and well trod example is that folks who don't have a basic understanding of formal languages will often try to parse arbitrary HTML or XML using regular expressions, and possibly summon Cthulu in the process. Another fairly common one that I've seen is using common data structures in suboptimal ways like using a vector and a search function as if it were a hash map. What sorts of other things along these lines would you look out for when on-boarding a batch of newly minted, non-CS programmers.

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  • Reasons Programmers Leave

    - by Kane
    I am interested in finding out why programmers leave their jobs and if the reasons for leaving have resurfaced in your now job? Is the reason for leaving simply down to remuneration, location, I hate my boss / coworker, lack of recognition or retirement / new career path. Update: I am responsible for a team of programmers and testers and I would like to better understand what could motivate my team to leave, and hopefully try to address such issues.

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  • Are programmers getting lazier and less competent

    - by Skeith
    I started programming in C++ at uni and loved it. In the next term we changed to VB6 and I hated it. I could not tell what was going on, you drag a button to a form and the ide writes the code for you. While I hated the way VB functioned I cannot argue that it was faster and easier than doing the same thing in C++ so i can see why it is a popular language. Now I am not calling VB developers lazy in just saying it easier than C++ and I have noticed that a lot of newer languages are following this trend such a C#. This leads me to think that as more business want quick results more people will program like this and sooner or later there will be no such thing as what we call programming now. Future programmers will tell the computer what they want and the compiler will write the program for them like in star trek. Is this just an under informed opinion of a junior programmer or are programmers getting lazier and less competent in general? EDIT: A lot of answers say why re invent the wheel and I agree with this but when there are wheels available people are not bothering to learn how to make the wheel. I can google how to do pretty much anything in any language and half the languages do so much for you when it come to debugging they have no idea what there code does of how to fix the error. That's how I cam up with the theory that programmers are becoming lazier and less competent as no one cares how stuff works just that it does until it does not.

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  • Do you ask questions in real life like you do at SE.com?

    - by tactoth
    At this website I find amazing questions for programmers. Then I realized that I don't discuss these questions with my colleagues as often. You see, we're all programmers and we are supposed to have talked about these, (in a everyday conversation what we can talk would be more meaningful because it's faster) but we don't. So what about you? Do you enjoy discussing interesting programmer related topics with your programmer friends?

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  • Do you Kung Foo? [closed]

    - by Darknight
    As a programmer who also trains in martial arts (Wing Tsun + Escrima + Judo). I am really interested to know if there are other fellow programmers who also practice martial arts. Do you practice martial arts? or do you know of programmers who practice martial arts. Further question: Do you see any analogy between your art and programming. [Apologies for the terrible pun in the title :) but I do like it cheesy...]

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  • Job Interview at Starbucks for Programmers [closed]

    - by Soner Gönül
    My friend is called for a job interviewing at Starbucks a few days ago. IMHO, but these kind of places a not very suitable environment for interviewing specialy for programmers. Actually, my question has 2 sides; Side of Interviewers: If you are interviewing at starbucks with a candidate as an Interviewer, How candidate should act there you prefer? What he/she should do or not? What would you pay attention on his/her? Side of Candidate: How you should act instead of interviewing in a meeting room? Should you drink something or not (if Interviewer ask)? Should you ask a question like "Why am I interviewing in this place?" What is the advantages and disadvantages of an interviewing by programmers in this kind of places?

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  • Are there any famous one-man-army programmers?

    - by DFectuoso
    Lately I have been learning of more and more programmers who think that if they were working alone, they would be faster and would deliver more quality. Usually that feeling is attached to a feeling that they do the best programming in their team and at the end of the day the idea is quite plausible. If they ARE doing the best programming, and worked alone (and more maybe) the final result would be a better piece of software. I know this idea would only work if you were passionate enough to work 24/7, on a deadline, with great discipline. So after considering the idea and trying to learn a little more, I wonder if there are famous one-man-army programmers that have delivered any (useful) software in the past?

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  • Future of Programmers [closed]

    - by Brian Paul
    Possible Duplicate: Will programmers be around in a few years? I have a passion of web development, but have been wondering of late, what is the future of web programming, and just programming in general. I will give an example to illustrate this, companies now most of them buy/ are willing to spend more money to implement enterprise level products, coming from big companies, than hiring a programmer, because when you look at the long term,instead of paying this programmer, and being tied to his ideas and skills, better buy a product, which you are guaranteed high level functions and support. Therefore what will be the future to programmers?

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  • Is BDD actually writable by non-programmers?

    - by MattiSG
    Behavior-Driven Development with its emblematic “Given-When-Then” scenarios syntax has lately been quite hyped for its possible uses as a boundary object for software functionality assessment. I definitely agree that Gherkin, or whichever feature definition script you prefer, is a business-readable DSL, and already provides value as such. However, I disagree that it is writable by non-programmers (as does Martin Fowler). Does anyone have accounts of scenarios being written by non-programmers, then instrumented by developers? If there is indeed a consensus on the lack of writability, then would you see a problem with a tool that, instead of starting with the scenarios and instrumenting them, would generate business-readable scenarios from the actual tests?

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  • How to improve the programmers work environment

    - by CraigS
    I manage a team of six programmers, working on diverse systems. We work in an open plan office, with members sitting in cubicles. A lot of people on these forums are big on private offices, but that is not an option for me. But I was wondering if there were ideas for other ways to improve and energize the working environment and experience. One suggestion is more plants. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

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  • How do programmers in the west see programmers in the east?

    - by vinoth
    The eastern part of the world (India/China/Philippines ) mainly provide outsourcing services to the western world (USA and Europe). Do you have the experience of working with offshore teams? If yes, how was it? Do you hold any generalized ideas or opinions about the programmers from the East (e.g. Are they cooperative, do they deliver on time or do they do quality work?). What are these based on?

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  • Should experienced programmers know database queries?

    - by Shamim Hafiz
    There are so many programmers out there who are also an expert at Query writing and Database design. Should this be a core requirement to be an expert programmer or software engineer? Though there are lots of similarities in the way queries and codes are developed, my personal opinion is, Queries seem to have a different Structure than Code and it can be tough to Master both simultaneously due to the different approaches.

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  • How did programming work when programmers used punchcards?

    - by Thomas Dignan
    I saw this: Learning to program on punchcards and I've seen this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_programming_in_the_punched_card_era but they leave much to be desired. Can anyone explain to me how programmers programmed when they used punchcards? Specifically, the system of input computers used to derive instructions from the punched card itself. I do not know much about retrocomputers, so any one system of input you are familiar with would be fine. More general answers are also appreciated.

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  • Do programmers have a higher IQ? [closed]

    - by Laurent Pireyn
    Do programmers have a higher intellectual quotient than the average 100? Has anybody conducted studies on that topic? Don't get me wrong! I consider IQ as a limited measure that only evaluates the analytical part of one's intelligence. Furthermore, I think that intelligence is only one among many characteristics, and that it should not be used to judge or discriminate people. My question should be read in that context.

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  • How many programmers are female? [closed]

    - by Cawas
    Let's just assume gender and sex do matter and this question isn't so pointless as some may say. I believe gender distribution do say a lot about any given job although I find it very hard to explain why. So, is there any source on the web we can use to have a plain high number referencing female versus male programmers on any given space (country, community, company, etc)? Not asking why nor anything else. Just statistical numbers.

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  • Windows Phone 7 For Silverlight Programmers

      This is the first in a series of mini-tutorials on Windows Phone 7 Programming for Silverlight Programmers. Goals: Rapid introduction to Win Phone 7 for experienced Silverlight Programmers Design and implementation of WP7 Silverlight HVP Audience: Silverlight Programmers who want to learn to program the new Windows Phone 7. Once the fundamentals are covered, the target [...]...Did you know that DotNetSlackers also publishes .net articles written by top known .net Authors? We already have over 80 articles in several categories including Silverlight. Take a look: here.

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  • Best social networking places for programmers.

    - by Chevex
    I love the programming industry a lot, but I don't have many colleagues that aren't introverted and/or anti-social, or self-centered. What are some good places online to find programming friends that I could share my adventures with? I love stack overflow and related sites but they are more technical and don't really allow you to put up a personal project just for people to see and critique. Any suggestions? A good forum would be great! The only ones I can find are usually full of inexperienced people who just "want" to be a programmer. I'm looking more for a place who's members are already programmers discussing programming topics.

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  • What should web programmers know about cryptography?

    - by davidhaskins
    Should programmers who build websites/web applications understand cryptography? I have no idea how most crypographic algorithms work, and I really don't understand the differences between md5/des/aes/etc. Have any of you found any need for an in-depth understanding of cryptography? I haven't needed it, but I wonder if perhaps I'm missing something. I've used salt + md5 hash to encrypt passwords, and I tell webservers to use SSL. Beyond that, I can't say I've used much else, nor can I say with any certainty how secure these methods are. I only use them because other people claim they are safe. Have you ever found a need to use cryptography in web programming aside from these two simple examples?

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  • How do programmers deal with Project Lead/Managers?

    - by Simon
    Project Managers/Technical Leads sometimes tend to be over enthusiastic when it comes to software. But during code reviews if instead of functionality of the code the only complain one hears is about formatting/spacing and similar trivial things, when there are far better things to discuss (Among other things I have noticed the sometimes during the so called "reviews" suggestions are made that implementation needs a re-write just because it doesnt use the most happening technology/buzzword) How do fellow programmers deal with such scenarios? or is this just a one off? (or is the fault entirely on me )If you have similar experience and what you did to overcome it? Feel free to share.

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  • How do I let programmers know something useful?

    - by Shane
    Quite often I go through pain to discover how to do something useful, in this case how to get PHP running on Google App Engine without the 'resin.jar too big' problem, but I have nowhere to let people know. In this particular case, the web answers were incomplete, outdated or plain wrong. I could create a blog, but it's overkill. I just want let programmers know a quick solution/approach. I'm not sure it's the done thing to ask a question and then answer it. In short, it'd be nice to be able to just dump a sort of combined question/answer/snippet, then let others comment as usual, shoot it down, like it, whatever. How do the rest of you approach this? Cheers, Shane

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  • Over a million COBOL programmers in the world?

    - by Lucas McCoy
    I think I heard on a previous StackOverflow podcast that COBOL was used as the programming language for traffic lights (or something like that), so this got me interested. I did a quick Google search and found this little article: Today, Cobol is everywhere, yet largely unheard of by millions of people who interact with it daily when using the ATM, stopping at traffic lights or buying a product online. The statistics on Cobol attest to its huge influence on the business world: There are over 220 billion lines of Cobol in existence, a figure which equates to about 80 per cent of the world’s actively used code. There over a million Cobol programmers in the world. There are 200 times as many Cobol transactions that take place each day than Google searches. I didn't really trust the source seeing as how it's on some random PHPBB forum. So how accurate are these figures? Are there really 220 billion lines of COBOL? I assume a few people/companies still use COBOL, but how many?

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  • Should Swing knowledge be required from Java programmers?

    - by Anto
    Swing is an integral part of the Java API. It is also the most popular GUI framework for Java. I still wonder, should every Java programmer still know, or at least be pretty familiar with, Swing (possibly excluding web developers)? There are alternatives (e.g. SWT), but they are not very widely used (compared to Swing). What do you think about requiring Swing knowledge from Java programmers? If such knowledge is important, to what degree? Are the basics enough or not? The reason I wonder is because I really don't like Swing but wonder if I still should brush up my skills in it. I'm able to create simple GUIs in it, but I would definitely not say that I know Swing well.

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  • Should Swing knowledge be required from Java programmers?

    - by Anto
    Swing is an integral part of the Java API. It is also the most popular GUI framework for Java. I still wonder, should every Java programmer still know, or at least be pretty familiar with, Swing (possibly excluding web developers)? There are alternatives (e.g. SWT), but they are not very widely used (compared to Swing). What do you think about requiring Swing knowledge from Java programmers? If such knowledge is important, to what degree? Are the basics enough or not? The reason I wonder is because I really don't like Swing but wonder if I still should brush up my skills in it. I'm able to create simple GUIs in it, but I would definitely not say that I know Swing well.

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  • Do programmers possess the means of production? [closed]

    - by Peter Turner
    I was reading (err listening) to The Servile State by Hilare Belloc this morning and pondering whether or not I possessed the means of production, as did the peasant of the middle ages; as did not his descendants after the oligarchs of England forced him into servility. The means of production was the arable land that the serf was seated on, which even though not legally his, was illegal to evict him from. So, as programmers, with the hither-to-unknown supply of free tools and resources, have we reclaimed as a class of workers, unlike any others, the means of production. Given the chance, a midrange PC and a stable internet connection, could we not each of us be wholly self sufficient and not just wage earners?

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