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  • Windows 7 x64 "upgrade" repair fails

    - by Polynomial
    I've been running into issues with Windows Update, which I can't seem to fix. The hotfixes don't work, nor does the Windows update readyness tool, or the manual SP1 upgrade. I get various esoteric errors which nobody seems to have a fix for. Looks like some of the update cache is corrupt and digital signatures seem to be broken on some packages / Windows Update components. Long story short, I have discovered the only option is to do a repair operation on the OS, to repair everything. It's so corrupt that only a complete replacement will fix it. According to various sources (including MSKB) one can perform a repair by running an in-place upgrade. I've got the Windows 7 Ultimate retail disc, which I've inserted into my machine. I ran setup.exe and went through in the following order: Install now Go online to get latest updates (I've also tried not getting updates) Wait for updates to be downloaded Select Windows 7 Ultimate (x64 architecture) and click next Accept the T&Cs, click next Click Upgrade At this point it spends a minute on the "checking compatibility" screen, after which I get the following error: The following issues are preventing Windows from upgrading. Cancel the upgrade, complete each task, and then restart the upgrade to continue. You can’t upgrade 64-bit Windows to a 32-bit version of Windows. To upgrade, obtain a 64-bit version of the installation disc, or go online to see how to install Windows 7 and keep your files and settings. 32-bit Windows cannot be upgraded to a 64-bit version of Windows. To upgrade, obtain a 32-bit version of the Windows installation disc. It also mentions a warning about potential conflicts with a storage driver and VS2010, but that doesn't seem to be the blocking issue. My currently installed version of Windows is Ultimate 64-bit (absolutely sure of this) and the disc is definitely a x86 / x64 combined Ultimate retail disc. There seem to be a few people who have run into this (e.g. this question), but I've not seen any answers. I've checked the event viewer, but can't spot anything in there that's related. Any idea how I can get this working? P.S: Just to pre-empt the inevitable "are you suuuuuuuuuuuuure it's x64 Ultimate?" questions:

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  • Map a Network Drive from XP to Windows 7

    - by Mysticgeek
    We’ve received a lot of questions about mapping a drive from XP to Windows 7 to access data easily. Today we look at how to map a drive in Windows 7, and how to map to an XP drive from Windows 7. With the new Homegroup feature in Windows 7, it makes sharing data between computers a lot easier. But you might need to map a network drive so you can go directly into a folder to access its contents. Mapping a network drive may sound like “IT talk”, but the process is fairly easy. Map Network Drive in Windows 7 Note: All of the computers used in this article are part of the same workgroup on a home network. In this first example we’re mapping to another Windows 7 drive on the network. Open Computer and from the toolbar click on Map Network Drive. Alternately in Computer you can hit “Alt+T” to pull up the toolbar and click on Tools \ Map Network Drive. Now give it an available drive letter, type in the path or browse to the folder you want to map to. Check the box next to Reconnect at logon if you want it available after a reboot, and click Finish. If both machines aren’t part of the same Homegroup, you may be prompted to enter in a username and password. Make sure and check the box next to Remember my credentials if you don’t want to log in every time to access it. The drive will map and the contents of the folder will open up. When you look in Computer, you’ll see the drive under network location. This process works if you want to connect to a server drive as well. In this example we map to a Home Server drive. Map an XP Drive to Windows 7 There might be times when you need to map a drive on an XP machine on your network. There are extra steps you’ll need to take to make it work however. Here we take a look at the problem you’ll encounter when trying to map to an XP machine if things aren’t set up correctly. If you try to browse to your XP machine you’ll see a message that you don’t have permission. Or if you try to enter in the path directly, you’ll be prompted for a username and password, and the annoyance is, no matter what credentials you put in, you can’t connect. To solve the problem we need to set up the Windows 7 machine as a user on the XP machine and make them part of the Administrators group. Right-click My Computer and select Manage. Under Computer Management expand Local Users and Groups and click on the Users folder. Right-click an empty area and click New User. Add in the user credentials, uncheck User must change password at next logon, then check Password never expires then click Create. Now you see the new user you created in the list. After the user is added you might want to reboot before proceeding to the next step.   Next we need to make the user part of the Administrators group. So go back into Computer Management \ Local Users and Groups \ Groups then double click on Administrators. Click the Add button in Administrators Properties window. Enter in the new user you created and click OK. An easy way to do this is to enter the name of the user you created then click Check Names and the path will be entered in for you. Now you see the user as a member of the Administrators group. Back on the Windows 7 machine we’ll start the process of mapping a drive. Here we’re browsing to the XP Media Center Edition machine. Now we can enter in the user name and password we just created. If you only want to access specific shared folders on the XP machine you can browse to them. Or if you want to map to the entire drive, enter in the drive path where in this example it’s “\\XPMCE\C$” –Don’t forget the “$” sign after the local drive letter. Then login… Again the contents of the drive will open up for you to access. Here you can see we have two drives mapped. One to another Windows 7 machine on the network, and the other one to the XP computer.   If you ever want to disconnect a drive, just right-click on it and then Disconnect. There are several scenarios where you might want to map a drive in Windows 7 to access specific data. It takes a little bit of work but you can map to an XP drive from Windows 7 as well. This comes in handy where you have a network with different versions of Windows running on it. Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Find Your Missing USB Drive on Windows XPMake Vista Index Your Network ConnectionsEasily Backup & Import Your Wireless Network Settings in Windows 7Quickly Open Network Connections List in Windows 7 or VistaHow To Find Drives Easily with Desk Drive TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 PCmover Professional Kill Processes Quickly with Process Assassin Need to Come Up with a Good Name? Try Wordoid StockFox puts a Lightweight Stock Ticker in your Statusbar Explore Google Public Data Visually The Ultimate Excel Cheatsheet Convert the Quick Launch Bar into a Super Application Launcher

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  • How to Change and Manually Start and Stop Automatic Maintenance in Windows 8

    - by Lori Kaufman
    Windows 8 has a new feature that allows you to automatically run scheduled daily maintenance on your computer. These maintenance tasks run in the background and include security updating and scanning, Windows software updates, disk defragmentation, system diagnostics, among other tasks. We’ve previously shown you how to automate maintenance in Windows 7, Vista, and XP. Windows 8 maintenance is automatic by default and the performance and energy efficiency has been improved over Windows 7. The program for Windows 8 automatic maintenance is called MSchedExe.exe and it is located in the C:\Windows\System32 directory. We will show you how you can change the automatic maintenance settings in Windows 8 and how you can start and stop the maintenance manually. NOTE: It seems that you cannot turn off the automatic maintenance in Windows 8. You can only change the settings and start and stop it manually. Can Dust Actually Damage My Computer? What To Do If You Get a Virus on Your Computer Why Enabling “Do Not Track” Doesn’t Stop You From Being Tracked

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  • How to make a folder (D:\xyz) accessible to only me in Windows-XP?

    - by claws
    Hello, I'm using Windows XP on my lab computer. There is a global folder (d:\xyz). This is my folder and I want this folder to be accessible to only me. It should be invisible even if it is visible they shouldn't be able to open this folder. For now my account has administrative privilages. After few days, I don't know if the Admin lets me have these privilages or not. I heard that soon our XP machines will be upgraded to either vista or windows 7. Will the method of making folder in accessible change for other Windows OSes? How to accomplish this?

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  • Windows 8 Upgrade : From Windows 7 Trial

    - by Golmaal
    This is a bit complicated it seems. I own Windows Vista Ultimate 64-bit (Retail). It was okay, but around a couple of weeks ago I had some system crash and at that time I decided that I will install Windows 8 as soon as it comes out. However, because of some problems in Vista, at the time of crash, I installed Windows 7 trial. I had some urgent work to do which I accomplished and then I switched the PC off. Now I have purchased Windows 8 Pro Upgrade ($40 version). If I go for a clean install, will it be able to install Windows 8 on not-activated Windows 7? During activation, if it asks for Vista serial number, I can provide it. Or will I first have to install Vista and then only it will allow me to install Windows 8? Also, I used the Upgrade Assistant to download Windows 8 on my laptop (Windows 7 OEM). Will it work on my above mentioned desktop?

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  • Windows 8 permissions vs Windows 7 [closed]

    - by Saturn2888
    Possible Duplicate: How do I disable administrator prompt in Windows 8? When I upgraded from Windows 7 Pro 64-bit to Windows 8 Pro 64-bit, I noticed some permissions issues extremely problematic to my using the OS. When running Windows 7 or Vista with UAC off, I was able to navigate around the filesystem as if I was on Windows XP and prior such that I didn't have to run as administrator and could copy and edit files wherever I wanted. In Windows 8, turning off UAC no longer does this. Does anyone know how to get Windows 8's permissions to act like Windows 7 and Vista when UAC is disabled? NOTE: I did a clean install on my laptop with Windows 8, and it has the same issues.

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  • Will an app made for windows store support WindowsRT, windows8 and windows 8 mobile?

    - by AnhSirk Dasarp
    I am very much confused about these. I would like to develop app for windows 8 , Windows RT , and windows mobile. I have windows 8 OS installed in my laptop. As far as I know, Windows RT is for ARM based devices. HERE ARE MY QUESTIONS: I develop an app, and put in windows store. Will that can be downloaded from a ARM based device ,which runs on Windows RT, AND from a windows 8 laptop , and same from a Windows 8 mobile? OR should it be different apps ?

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  • Grub2 -- Dualboot Ubuntu LTS 12.04 and Windows 7 -- Detects two Windows 7 (loader) entries

    - by DarkIron112
    this is the first question I have ever asked the Ubuntu Community. :D I'm fairly new to Ubuntu, but I understand the basics and know how to navigate the Terminal. I also know how to ask for/research my problems before asking for/ help. I have scoured the internet high and low and learned much of how Grub2 works. But nothing has helped me to solve my problem. My problem is this: I have a computer that has three hard drives. It previously had Windows XP, but I upgraded to Windows 7. I also installed Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin). During my installation of Windows 7, there was a failure and I had to restart the installation. Afterwards, I installed Ubuntu. After some trouble removing all traces of the XP OS (Ubuntu auto-detected it, but not Windows 7) I got the two OSes working flawlessly. Or, almost. When booting up, Grub2 used to display Ubuntu, Ubuntu Recovery Mode, Other Versions of Linux, memtest, followed by "Windows 7 (loader) on /dev/sda1" and "Windows 7 (loader) on /dev/sdb1". I eventually removed Recovery Mode, Other Versions, and Memtest. Now, when I run: sudo update-grub I get this print-out: Generating grub.cfg ... Found linux image: /boot/vmlinuz-3.2.0-26-generic Found initrd image: /boot/initrd.img-3.2.0-26-generic Found Windows 7 (loader) on /dev/sda1 Found Windows 7 (loader) on /dev/sdb1 I would like to remove "Windows 7 (loader) on /dev/sda1", as it is a broken entry that shouldn't exist, and must have been installed during my first Windows 7 attempt. I cannot find a Windows 7 entry in /etc/grub.d... And I don't know where to look. Here is a layout of my hard drives: /dev/sda1/ (1.82 TiB), NTFS ("Media") /dev/sdb1/ (100 Mib), NTFS ("System Reserved") /dev/sdb2/ (149 GiB), NTFS ("Windows 7") /dev/sdb3/ (149 GiB), Extended (" ") /dev/sdb4/ (145 GiB), ext4 (" ") /dev/sdb5/ (4 GiB), linux-swap (" ") /dev/sdc1/ (488.28 GiB), NTFS ("Downloads") /dev/sdc2/ (488.28 GiB), NTFS ("AltMedia") /dev/sdc3/ (886.45 GiB), NTFS ("Personal") unallocated (2.09 MiB), unallocated What I think has happened: Windows 7 installed first and badly. I installed it again. First, there was Windows XP to guide where the bootloader went to so it was put on /dev/sdb1/. But, the second time no such guide existed so the machine put another bootloader on /dev/sda1/. sda1, by the way, is the only partition on a 2TB drive. No boot record partition appears to exist according to gedit. I'm not sure where Grub2 is getting this information from. But, there it is. Is there anything somebody can do to help me? Or, is there any more information I should add? Thank you, community!

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  • Triple boot WIndows 7, Windows 8, and Mountain Lion on Macbook Pro

    - by Nathan
    Ok, So I have a bit of a unique situation here I could use some help on. I've modded my summer 2011 MBPro to have 2 harddrives by replacing the optical drive. OSX Mountain Lion is installed on a single partition of a 120GB SSD. The second drive is 750GB, partitioned as 550GB, 150GB, and ~50GB. I've set the 550GB to act as my OSX homefolder, but I'd like to install windows 7 and Windows 8 on the remaining partitions. It Took a while, but by following this guide, I eventually found a way to install Windows without a CD/DVD drive by following this http://huguesval.com/blog/2012/02/installing-windows-7-on-a-mac-without-superdrive-with-virtualbox/ It worked flawlessly for creating both windows 7 and windows 8 images that I could clone onto FAT32 partitions. However, I have encountered a problem when trying to triple boot. After I put Windows 8 onto the ~50GB partition and tried to boot into windows 7 I get an error that says something like: error: 0x0000000e The Boot selection failed because the required device is inaccessible. If I re-clone the windows 7 image onto the drive and select the option to "replace BCD" file for the drive, windows 7 will boot but windows 8 now gives me the same exact error. I realize this is a pretty extensive setup, but if anyone has some insight I'd love to hear it.

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  • Create a Shortcut to Put Your Windows Computer into Hibernation

    - by Mysticgeek
    Putting your Windows computer into Hibernation Mode allows you to save power, and quickly access your desktop again when you need it. Here we show how to create a shortcut to put your PC in Hibernation Mode quickly. Note: Here we show how to create the shortcut in Windows 7 and add it to the Taskbar. But creating the shortcut should work in XP and Vista as well. Create Shortcut  Right-click an empty area on your desktop and select New \ Shortcut from the Context Menu. In the Create Shortcut window type or copy the following in the location field… C:\Windows\System32\rundll32.exe powrprof.dll, SetSuspendState 0,1,0 Now give the shortcut a name such as Hibernate Computer or whatever you want to call it. Now you have the shortcut on your desktop, but you might want to change the icon to something else. Change Shortcut Icon Right-click the shortcut icon and select Properties. Select the Shortcut Tab and click the Change Icon button. In the Look for icons in this file field copy and past the following then click OK. %SystemRoot%\system32\SHELL32.dll This brings up a list of included Windows icons you can choose from. Select whatever you want it to be. There are a couple of Power icons in the directory…click OK. Of course you can choose any icon you want, if you customize your icons just browse to the directory they are in. For more on selecting icons check out our article on how to customize your icons in Windows 7 or how to change a file type’s icon. Now you will see the icon in the Shortcut Properties window, click OK. Here we have a nice looking shortcut that you can use to put your machine into Hibernation. Or here we used a customized Star Trek icon just to make things more interesting… You can pin the shortcut to the Taskbar for easy access. Conclusion If Hibernation is not enabled on your Windows 7 system you can easily manage it. By creating a shortcut and pinning to the Taskbar, it allows you to put your machine into Hibernation Mode quick and easy. If you like to customize your desktop with unique icons check out our posts on a Sci-Fi icon pack or Video Game icon pack. Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Create a Shortcut for Locking Your Computer Screen in Windows 7 or VistaCreate Shutdown / Restart / Lock Icons in Windows 7 or VistaHow To Manage Hibernate Mode in Windows 7Microsoft Releases Pre-SP1 Updates for Windows VistaCreate a Shortcut or Hotkey to Run CCleaner Silently TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips Xobni Plus for Outlook All My Movies 5.9 CloudBerry Online Backup 1.5 for Windows Home Server Snagit 10 10 Superb Firefox Wallpapers OpenDNS Guide Google TV The iPod Revolution Ultimate Boot CD can help when disaster strikes Windows Firewall with Advanced Security – How To Guides

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  • Error codes 80070490 and 8024200D in Windows Update

    - by Sammy
    How do get past these stupid errors? The way I have set things up is that Windows Update tells me when there are new updates available and then I review them before installing them. Yesterday it told me that there were 11 new updates. So I reviewed them and I saw that about half of them were security updates for Vista x64 and .NET Framework 2.0 SP2, and half of them were just regular updates for Vista x64. I checked them all and hit the Install button. It seemed to work at first, updates were being downloaded and installed, but then at update 11 of 11 total it got stuck and gave me the two error codes you see in the title. Here are some screenshots to give you an idea of what it looks like. This is what it looks like when it presents the updates to me. This is how it looks like when the installation fails. I'm not sure if you're gonna see this very well but these are the updates it's trying to install. Update: This is on Windows Vista Ultimate 64-bit with integrated SP2, installed only two weeks ago on 2012-10-02. Aside from this, the install is working flawlessly. I have not done any major changes to the system like installing new devices or drivers. What I have tried so far: - I tried installing the System Update Readiness Tool (the correct one for Vista x64) from Microsoft. This did not solve the issue. Microsoft resource links: Solutions to 80070490 Windows Update error 80070490 System Update Readiness Tool fixes Windows Update errors in Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008 R2, and Windows Server 2008 Solutions to 8024200D: Windows Update error 8024200d Essentially both solutions tell you to install the System Update Readiness Tool for your system. As I have done so and it didn't solve the problem the next step would be to try to repair Windows. Before I do that, is there anything else I can try? Microsoft automatic troubleshooter If I click the automatic troubleshooter link available on the solution web page above it directs me to download a file called windowsupdate.diagcab. But after download this file is not associated to any Windows program. Is this the so called Microsoft Fix It program? It doesn't have its icon, it's just blank file. Does it need to be associated? And to what Windows program?

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  • How to boot windows 8 in a dual boot along with windows 7?

    - by GoldDove
    I have installed a WIndows 8 evaluation about a week ago. Usually, it asks me every time I turn on my computer whether to boot into windows 8 or windows 7. The default was windows 8 after 30 seconds. I changed that just yesterday to be default windows 7 after 5 seconds. And after I changed the setting, I went ahead and went into windows 8 and did my work. Today, when I turned on my computer, it is failing to ask me which one to boot it in. It simply boots directly into Windows 7. Is there any reason for this? Can I no longer boot into Windows 8?

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  • Transferring a Windows 8 license and proper un- and reinstallation

    - by Kiwi
    Long story short I have two computers: a laptop and a desktop computer. Both have Windows 7 on them. I buy the Windows 8 Pro upgrade. To see if it screws up anything, I install it on my laptop as a guinea pig. I intend to use Windows 8 for my main computer, my desktop, but I want to test it on the laptop, so I know I don’t risk losing access to my desktop and the data on it. I never use my laptop, and only used it, because it already has a Windows 7 installation on it. The problem At some point, I must have entered the license key on my laptop, because when I go to the activation screen on my desktop, I get this: Uh-oh. I can’t use the key on my desktop. Now how the hell do I transfer the key from my laptop to my desktop computer? Answers and suggestions so far Let’s just say that I tried everything possible to get some answers on this matter. The best response I got from Microsoft is this: To install Windows 8 on your desktop, do the following: Uninstall Windows 8 on your laptop Afterwards, install Windows 8 on your desktop If it won’t activate, call product activation at (...) I am not a fan of that last point. The error message does allude to such a solution, however: If you’ve reinstalled Windows or made changes to your hardware recently, you may be able to use your current key. The question My main question is this: has anyone been in a similar situation, and if so, what did you do to resolve this? Failing that, what is the proper way to uninstall the Windows 8 installation on my laptop, and reinstall the Windows 8 installation on my desktop? Ad 1 I have already tried using the “reset” feature on my laptop, but that only resulted in a new Windows 8 installation that was already activated. But which is the right way to uninstall the installation in a way that allows me to use the license key on the desktop computer? Ad 2 Which is the proper way to reinstall the Windows 8 installation on my desktop computer? Why do I even have to reinstall it in the first place? I won’t get around to do this, until my USB key with 3.0 support arrives in the mail, but it is going to be a while, until I find a assuaging response to the best way to go about this anyway.

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  • How to boot windows 8 in a dual boot along with windows 7? [migrated]

    - by GoldDove
    I have installed a WIndows 8 evaluation about a week ago. Usually, it asks me every time I turn on my computer whether to boot into windows 8 or windows 7. The default was windows 8 after 30 seconds. I changed that just yesterday to be default windows 7 after 5 seconds. And after I changed the setting, I went ahead and went into windows 8 and did my work. Today, when I turned on my computer, it is failing to ask me which one to boot it in. It simply boots directly into Windows 7. Is there any reason for this? Can I no longer boot into Windows 8?

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  • Which Windows 8 edition should I update to from Windows 7 Home Premium?

    - by Max
    I have Windows 7 Home Premium on my laptop, need to upgrade to Windows 8. If there were a Windows 8 Home Premium midway between those two I would've chosen that... but there are only two Windows 8 or Windows 8 Pro, so I'm a bit confused, as I don't want the former to be like Windows 7 Basic. My usage is mostly coding, game development, mid-performance gaming and some benchmarking and video editing. Your recommendations please?

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  • Update Metadata and Cover Art in Windows Media Player 12

    - by DigitalGeekery
    If you use Windows Media Player 12 in Windows 7, you may notice some of your media is missing information when displayed in the library. Today we look at how to edit and update metadata and cover art in WMP 12. By default, Windows Media Player will pull metadata, such as the title, artist, album, and cover art from the Internet. If you did not accept that default option during setup, we’ll need to turn the feature on first. Select Tools > Options from the top Menu bar. On the Library tab, ensure that Retrieve additional information form the Internet is checked. Click OK. Editing Metadata Now we’re ready to update some files. Find a media file with incorrect details or cover art. Right-click on the title and select Find album info. This will bring up the Find album information window. Here you’ll see the existing information that Windows Media Player interpreted as correct on the left side. The results of  WMP’s search for the media information are on the right. Click on Artists,  Albums , or Tracks to scroll through the search results and try to find a match. You can also type in new keywords in the Search box and hit enter (or click the Search button) to perform a new search.   If you find a correct match for your media file, click to select it and click Next. You’ll be prompted to confirm your selection, then click Finish. You should now see your media file displayed properly in Windows Media Player. Manually Entering Metadata If your search for the correct media information comes up empty, you can always manually enter the information yourself. On the Find album information window, click Edit under Existing Information. You can edit the existing information in the text boxes or the Genre dropdown box. There are a couple hidden text boxes below. Click next to Contributing Artist or Composer to enter that information.   Choosing Your Own Cover Art If your media file doesn’t pull the proper cover art, or if you simply wish to find a different image, you can add your own. Search online for a suitable image. An ideal size would be around 300 x 300 pixels, give or take. Right-click on the image copy the image. You’ll need to switch to Expanded title (if you haven’t already) to paste the image.   Paste your new image by right-clicking on the current image and select Paste album art. Note: If the image is not suitable size or type, the Paste album art option will not be available. Your new cover art will appear in Windows Media Player.   Even though it is pulled from the Internet, cover art is cached on your computer and will still be available when you are disconnected from the Internet. Are you new to Windows Media Player? If so, check out our article on how to Manage your music with Windows Media Player. Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Make VLC Player Look like Windows Media Player 11Fixing When Windows Media Player Library Won’t Let You Add FilesMake VLC Player Look like Windows Media Player 10Add Images and Metadata to Windows 7 Media Center Movie LibraryMake VLC Player Look like Winamp 5 (Kinda) TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 Awe inspiring, inter-galactic theme (Win 7) Case Study – How to Optimize Popular Wordpress Sites Restore Hidden Updates in Windows 7 & Vista Iceland an Insurance Job? Find Downloads and Add-ins for Outlook Recycle !

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  • Create Music Playlists in Windows 7 Media Center

    - by DigitalGeekery
    One of the new features in Windows 7 Media Center is the ability to easily create music playlists without using Media Player. Today we’ll take a closer look at how to create them directly in Media Center. Create Manual Playlists Open Windows Media Center and select the Music Library. From within the Music Library, choose playlists from the top menu.   Then select Create Playlist. Give your new playlist a name, and select Next. Choose Music Library and select Next.    Select “songs” from the top menu, choose the songs for your playlist from your library, and select Next when finished. You can also click Select All to add all songs to your playlist, or clear all to remove them. Note: you can also sort by artist, album, genre, etc. from the top menu.   Now you can review and edit your playlist. Click the up and down pointers to move songs up and down in the playlist, or “X” to remove them. You can also go back and add additional songs by selecting Add More. Click Create when you are finished.   Auto Playlists Windows Media Center also allows you to create six different auto playlists. These are dynamic playlists based on pre-defined criteria. Auto Playlists include All Music, Music added in the last month, Music auto rated at 5 stars, Music played in the last month, Music played the most, and Music rated 4 or 5 stars. These Auto Playlists will change dynamically as your library and listening habits change. Your new music playlists can be found under playlists in the music library. Select play playlist to start the music. Now kick back and enjoy the music from your playlist. Conclusion While earlier versions of WMC allowed you to create playlists, you had to do it through Windows Media Player. This is a nice new feature for music lovers who use WMC and prefer to do everything with a remote. Do you already have playlists that you’ve created in Windows Media Player? Windows Media Center can play those too. If your playlists are in the default Music folder, Media Center will detect them automatically and add them to your Music Library. Plus, any playlists you create in Media Center are also available for Media Player. For more on creating Playlists in Media Player, check out our previous articles on how to create a custom playlist in Windows Media Player 12, and how to create auto playlists in WMP 12. Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips How To Rip a Music CD in Windows 7 Media CenterCreate Custom Playlists in Windows Media Player 12Using Netflix Watchnow in Windows Vista Media Center (Gmedia)How to Create Auto Playlists in Windows Media Player 12Fixing When Windows Media Player Library Won’t Let You Add Files TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips Xobni Plus for Outlook All My Movies 5.9 CloudBerry Online Backup 1.5 for Windows Home Server Snagit 10 How to Forecast Weather, without Gadgets Outlook Tools, one stop tweaking for any Outlook version Zoofs, find the most popular tweeted YouTube videos Video preview of new Windows Live Essentials 21 Cursor Packs for XP, Vista & 7 Map the Stars with Stellarium

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  • Make Text and Images Easier to Read with the Windows 7 Magnifier

    - by DigitalGeekery
    Do you have impaired vision or find it difficult to read small print on your computer screen? Today, we’ll take a closer look at how to magnify that hard to read content with the Magnifier in Windows 7. Magnifier was available in previous versions of Windows, but the Windows 7 version comes with some notable improvements. There are now three screen modes in Magnifier. Full Screen and Lens mode, however, require Windows Aero to be enabled. If your computer doesn’t support Aero, or if you’re not using am Aero theme, Magnifier will only work in Docked mode. Using Magnifier in Windows 7 You can find the Magnifier by going to Start > All Programs > Accessories > Ease of Access > Magnifier.   Alternately, you can type magnifier into the Search box in the Start Menu and hit Enter. On the Magnifier toolbar, choose your View mode by clicking Views and choosing from the available options. Clicking the plus (+) and minus (-) buttons will zoom in or zoom out. You can change the zoom in/out percentage by adjusting the slider bar. You can also enable color inversion and select tracking options. Click OK when finished to save your settings.   After a brief period, the Magnifier Toolbar will switch to a magnifying glass icon. Simply click the magnifying glass to display the Magnifier Toolbar again.   Docked Mode In Docked mode, a portion of the screen is magnified and docked at the top of the screen. The rest of your desktop will remain in it’s normal state. You can then control which area of the screen is magnified by moving your mouse.   Full Screen Mode This magnifies your entire screen and follows your mouse as you move it around. If you loose track of where you are on the screen, use the Ctrl + Alt + Spacebar shortcut to preview where your mouse pointer is on the screen.   Lens Mode The Lens screen mode is similar to holding a magnifying glass up to your screen. Full screen mode magnifies the area around the mouse. The magnified area moves around the screen with your mouse.    Shortcut Keys Windows key + (+) to zoom in Windows key + (-) to zoom out Windows key + ESC to exit Ctrl + Alt + F – Full screen mode Ctrl + Alt + L – Lens mode Ctrl + Alt + D – Dock mode Ctrl + Alt + R – Resize the lens Ctrl + Alt + Spacebar – Preview full screen Conclusion Windows Magnifier is a nice little tool if you have impaired vision or just need to make items on the screen easier to read. Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips New Features in WordPad and Paint in Windows 7How-To Geek on Lifehacker: How to Make Windows Vista Less AnnoyingUsing Comments in Word 2007 DocumentsMake Your PC Look Like Windows Phone 7Use Image Placeholders to Display Documents Faster in Word TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips HippoRemote Pro 2.2 Xobni Plus for Outlook All My Movies 5.9 CloudBerry Online Backup 1.5 for Windows Home Server Windows Media Player Plus! – Cool WMP Enhancer Get Your Team’s World Cup Schedule In Google Calendar Backup Drivers With Driver Magician TubeSort: YouTube Playlist Organizer XPS file format & XPS Viewer Explained Microsoft Office Web Apps Guide

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  • 7 Ways Modern Windows 8 Apps Are Different From Windows Desktop Apps

    - by Chris Hoffman
    Windows 8 apps – originally known as Metro-style apps and now known as Windows 8 style, Modern UI style, or Windows Store style apps, depending on which Microsoft employee you ask — are very different from traditional desktop apps. The Modern interface isn’t just a fresh coat of paint. The new Windows Runtime, or WinRT, application architecture (not to be confused with Windows RT) is very different from the Windows desktop we’re used to. How To Delete, Move, or Rename Locked Files in Windows HTG Explains: Why Screen Savers Are No Longer Necessary 6 Ways Windows 8 Is More Secure Than Windows 7

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  • Create Windows Bootloader/Boot into Windows from Ubuntu

    - by Kincaid
    I have computer that dual-boots (or tri-boots) Windows 8 Release Preview, Windows 7, and Ubuntu 12.04. Grub boots between Windows 8 and Ubuntu; for which I use primarily. Recently, I have decided I wanted to remove Ubuntu, as I hardly used it. As a stupid mistake, I deleted the Ubuntu partition before changing the bootloader to replace Grub. Whenever I know boot the machine, it gives me the "grub-rescue" prompt -- I am unable to boot into either Windows (8 nor 7), nor Ubuntu (except via USB, of course). I do not have any Windows 7/8 recovery media, so that isn't an option. Please note that after I deleted the Ubuntu partition, I put the PC into hibernate, and then turned it on. This means the C:\ [Windows 8] drive cannot be mounted. I don't know if that is bad, but it definitely doesn't make things better. I am currently booting Ubuntu via USB, in an effort to restore the Windows bootloader solutions. I have looked into using boot-repair to solve the problem using the instructions here, although after attempting to apply the changes, it gave the error: "Please install the [mbr] packages. Then try again." I don't know why I'm getting this error; is there a way to install the 'mbr packages?' I honestly don't know what exactly they are, nor how to install them. Is there any options I have not yet exhausted to be able to boot back into Windows, in the case that there is a better way? In the end, I want to set the bootloader to boot into Windows 8, but booting into either Windows 7 or 8 is fine -- I can use EasyBCD from there. Is there a simple solution to this? I've checked BIOS, and I haven't been able to find a way to boot into Windows. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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  • Reinstall Acer OEM Windows 8, Windows 8 Recovery for Acer Aspire V5 122p

    - by stwindr
    My Acer Aspire V5-122P-61456G50NSS, model - MS2377, has crashed all together. It came preloaded with Windows 8 and I upgraded to windows 8.1 3-4 days before crash. Unfortunately I did not make any recovery media before the crash. While accessing the eRecovery on Acer store with my PC's serial no. it says nor RCD available for this. I tried recovery by loading recovery manager (Left Alt + F10) Various other advanced startup options (like holding shift key while turning on or pressing F8 key) returns nothing but no luck. However I am able to enter BIOS. After doing research on above condition on various PC forums, now my questions: I read that a 'Windows Recovery Drive' can be made on any PC running Windows 8 and could be used to repair another PC. Does anybody in SuperUser community have that (or a link to download the same from somewhere? as I'm unable to find anybody running windows 8 among my friends). I downloaded a window 8 Pro ISO and made a bootable USB. I was able to go to 'Repair Your Computer' option and after going to 'Reset your PC' option found that my recovery partition has gone/missing. I tried all options available but no luck. Then I tried to install with that Windows 8 Pro ISO but got message: "The product key entered does not match any of the Windows images available for installation. Enter a different product key". before this message I did not got any form to fill product key! Does this mean that the installer was picking up the key from BIOS (OEM Key)? and may be the installation did not succeeded because OEM Windows version was Window 8 and I was trying to install Windows 8 Pro. If that is the case then, could somebody please send me link to download an Windows 8 ISO? I am helpless and couldn't find anywhere on internet (without having to pay for a new key, but I should not pay as the installer will use OEM key).

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  • Automatic Windows Defender Updates with Manual Windows/Microsoft Updates

    - by wag2639
    I've got Windows/Microsoft Update on my Windows 7 laptop set to notify me when updates are available but not to do anything automatically. I also have Windows Defender running and it seems to have daily or semi-daily updates for its signature database but it uses Windows Update utility to get and install these updates. Is there a way to automatically download and install the Windows Defender signature updates but leave the rest of Windows Updates set to manual?

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  • Windows DVD Maker on Windows 8?

    - by cowgod
    Something I really miss in Windows 8 is the Windows DVD Maker. I tried to get it running on Windows 8 by copying the DVD Maker directory from Windows 7 over to Windows 8. When I run it, I get the following error: I had hoped that this could be resolved by installing the Media Center add-on for Windows 8, but that did not have any effect. Several forum posts have suggested installing a codec pack such as the K-Lite codec pack, but I have always had bad experiences with those. I did, however, try to install the Shark007 codec pack, but that didn't work either. I also tried running the following commands (which did complete successfully, mind you) in an elevated command prompt, but they didn't change the outcome. regsvr32 msmpeg2vdec.dll regsvr32 msmpeg2adec.dll regsvr32 msmpeg2enc.dll I know there are other DVD making programs out there, some are even free, but the few I have tried do not compare to Windows DVD Maker's simplicity and beauty. Is there any way to make it work on Windows 8?

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  • Run Windows application as a service?

    - by sh-beta
    What is the cleanest, most reliable way to run a Windows application as a service without touching its code? Use case: NorthScale's 64-bit Windows version of memcached runs as a generic application. I'd like to stick it into a Windows 2003 or 2008 Service so I can start/stop/restart/etc it through the standard interface.

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  • Installing Windows 7 games on Windows 8

    - by soandos
    I wish to play all of the games that I have on Windows 7 by default (chess, freecell, minesweeper, etc) on my Windows 8 machine. I tried to just copy over the relevant .exe files, but when I run them (even in Windows 7 compatibility mode) nothing happens (no errors, no running process, nothing). How can I get my games working? Note: I tried the Into Windows Guide: How To Play Windows 7 Games In Windows 8 and after I downloaded the patch, it still did not work.

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