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  • Users suddenly missing write permissions to the root drive c within an active directory domain

    - by Kevin
    I'm managing an active directory single domain environment on some Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2 and Windows Server 2012 machines. Since a few weeks I got a strange issue. Some users (not all!) report that they cannot any longer save, copy or write files to the root drive c, whether on their clients (vista, win 7) nor via remote desktop connection on a Windows Server 2008 machine. Even running programs that require direct write permissions to the root drive without administrator permissions fail to do so since then. The affected users have local administrator permissions. The question I'm facing now is: What caused this change of system behavior? Why did this happen? I didn't find out yet. What was the last thing I did before it happened? The last action that was made before it happened was the rollout of a GPO containing network drive mappings for the users depending on their security group membership. All network drives are located on a linux server with samba enabled. We did not change any UAC settings, and they have always been activated. However I can't imagine that rolling out this GPO caused the problem. Has anybody faced an issue like that? Just in case: I know that it is for a specific reason that an user without administrative privileges is prevented from writing to the root drive since windows vista and the implementation of UAC. I don't think that those users should be able to write to drive c, but I try to figure out why this is happening and a few weeks ago this was still working. I also know that a user who is a member of the local administrators group does not execute anything with administrator permissions per default unless he or she executes a program with this permissions. What did I do yet? I checked the permissions of the affected programs, the affected clients/server. Didn't find something special. I checked ALL of our GPOs if there exist any restrictions that could prevent the affected users from writing to the root drive. Did not find any settings. I checked the UAC settings of the affected users and compared those to other users that still can write to the root drive. Everything similar. I googled though the internet and tried to find someone who had a similar problem. Did not find one. Has anybody an idea? Thank you very much. Edit: The GPO that was rolled out does the following (Please excuse if the settings are not named exactly like that, I translated the settings into english): **Windows Settings -- Network Drive Mappings -- Drive N: -- General:** Action: Replace **Properties:** Letter: N Location: \\path-to-drive\drivename Re-Establish connection: deactivated Label as: Name_of_the_Share Use first available Option: deactivated **Windows Settings -- Network Drive Mappings -- Drive N: -- Public: Options:** On error don't process any further elements for this extension: no Run as the logged in user: no remove element if it is not applied anymore: no Only apply once: no **Securitygroup:** Attribute -- Value bool -- AND not -- 0 name -- domain\groupname sid -- sid-of-the-group userContext -- 1 primaryGroup -- 0 localGroup -- 0 **Securitygroup:** Attribute -- Value bool -- OR not -- 0 name -- domain\another-groupname sid -- sid-of-the-group userContext -- 1 primaryGroup -- 0 localGroup -- 0 Edit: The Error-Message of an affected users says the following: Due to an unexpected error you can't copy the file. Error-Code 0x80070522: The client is missing a required permission. The command icacls C: shows the following: NT-AUTORITY\SYSTEM:(OI)(CI)(F) PRE-DEFINED\Administrators:(OI)(CI)(F) computername\username:(OI)(CI)(F) A college just told me that also the primary domain-controller (PDC) changed from Windows Server 2008 to Windows Server 2012. That also may be a reason. Any suggestions?

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  • A Forming Repository of Script Samples for Automating Windows Server 2012 and Windows 8

    - by Jialiang
    Compared with Windows Server 2008/R2 that provides about 230 cmdlets, Windows Server 2012 beats that by a factor of over 10 shipping ~ 2,430 cmdlets.  You can automate almost every aspect of the server.   The new PowerShell 3.0, like Windows Server 2012, has a ton of new features.  In this automation script-centric move, Microsoft All-In-One Script Framework (AIOSF) is ready to support IT Pros with many new services and offerings coming this year.  We sincerely hope that the IT community will benefit from the effort. Here is the first one among our new services and offerings:  The team is preparing a large set of Windows 8 / Windows Server 2012 script samples based on frequently asked IT tasks that we collect in TechNet forums and support calls to Microsoft.   Because the script topics come from frequently asked IT tasks, we hope that these script samples can be helpful to many IT Pros worldwide.   With the General Availability of Windows Server 2012, we release the first three Windows Server 2012 / Windows 8 script samples today.    Get Network Adapter Properties in Windows Server 2012 and Windows 8 (PowerShell) http://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/scriptcenter/Get-Network-Adapter-37c5a913 Description: This script could be used to get network adapter properties and advanced properties in Windows Server 2012 and Windows 8. It combines the outputs of Get-NetAdapter and Get-NetAdapterAdvancedProperty. It can generate a report of network adapter configuration settings. Use Scenarios: In a real world, IT Administrators are required to check the configuration of network adapters after the deployment of new servers. One typical example is the duplex setting of network adapters. Also, IT administrators need to maintain a server list which contains network adapter configuration settings in a regular basis. Before Windows Server 2012, IT administrators often feel difficulties to handle these tasks. Acknowledgement: Thanks Greg Gu from AIOSF for collecting this script topic, and writing the script sample.  Thanks James Adams (Microsoft Premier Field Engineer) for reviewing the script sample and ensuring its quality.   How to batch create virtual machines in Windows Server 2012 (PowerShell) http://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/scriptcenter/How-to-batch-create-9efd1811 Description: This PowerShell Script illustrates how to batch create multiple virtual machines based on comma delimited file by using PowerShell 3.0 in Windows Server 2012. Use Scenarios: IT admin requires to batch creating virtual machines in Windows Server 2012, although they can use few commands due to the lack of programming knowledge. Although it’s a set of Hyper-V command-lets within Windows PowerShell, IT Admins are reluctant to use them except simple a command which is widely used. Acknowledgement: Thanks Anders Wang from AIOSF for collecting this script topic and writing the script sample.  Thanks Christopher Norris for reviewing the script sample and ensuring its quality before publishing.   Remove Windows Store Apps in Windows 8 (PowerShell) http://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/scriptcenter/Remove-Windows-Store-Apps-a00ef4a4 Description: This script can be used to remove multiple Windows Store Apps from a user account in Windows 8. It provides a list of installed Windows Store applications. You can specify the application IDs, and remove them all at once. Use Scenarios: 1. In Windows 8, you can remove a single Windows Store App by right-clicking the tile in the Start menu and choosing the uninstall command.  However, no command is provided for removing multiple Windows Store Apps all at once. If you want to do so, you can use this script sample. 2. Sometimes Windows Store Apps may crash in Windows 8.  Even though you can successfully uninstall and reinstall the App, the application may still crash after the reinstallation.  In this situation, you can use this example script to remove these Windows Store Apps cleanly. Acknowledgement: Thanks Edward Qi from AIOSF for collecting the script idea and composing the script sample.  Thanks James Adams (Microsoft Premier Field Engineer) for reviewing the script sample and ensuring its quality.   This is just the beginning, and more and more script samples are coming.  You can follow our blog (http://blogs.technet.com/b/onescript) to get the latest customer-driven script samples for Windows Server 2012 and Windows 8.

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  • Ubuntu 12.10 + Windows 7 - No option to install alongside windows 7

    - by user1828314
    I have a 64-bit Windows 7 OS installed at the moment. I have used GPartEd to shrink the current Windows 7 partition on my 720GB HDD to 200GB. I have then made a new NTFS partition of 200GB which I will keep for later on as a shared drive between both Windows 7 and Ubuntu. So in GPartEd I now have 3 partitions which were all automatically there from the Windows 7 installation, I only shrank the 3rd one from the 698GB or so that it was to 200GB and created the 200GB for the shared drive. I first tried creating another 200GB partition at this stage to install Ubuntu too but when I burnt the DVD and loaded it, Ubuntu gave me no option to install alongside Windows, only the option to erase the entire disk and install Ubuntu on the blank drive...not what I want to do. So I tried installing it through clicking 'Something else', it downloaded all the install files but didn't install. I then had a lot of problems with getting the DVD drive to work and what not but now have this fixed so I can use Windows again. So now I've used GPartEd to delete the partitions so again I'm now left with the 3 partitions there which Windows 7 automatically installs and a 200GB NTFS partition I will later use as a shared drive. Booting up from the Ubuntu disc and again there is no option to install alongside Windows 7. How do I get it to do so? All I would like is Windows 7 and Ubuntu on a dual boot, with a 200GB NTFS partition to dump my work onto so that I can access it from both OS's. Thanks.

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  • Does Windows XP automatically reassemble UDP fragments?

    - by Matt Davis
    I've got a Windows application that receives and processes XML messages transmitted via UDP. The application collects the data using Windows "raw" sockets, so the entire layer 3 packet is visible. We've recently run across a problem that has me stumped. If the XML messages (i.e., UDP packets) are large (i.e., 1500 bytes), they get fragmented as expected. Ordinarily, this will cause the XML processor to fail because it attempts to process each UDP packet as if it is a complete XML message. This is a known short-coming in the system at this stage of its development. On Windows 7, this is exactly what happens. The fragments are received and logged, but no processing occurs. On Windows XP, however, the same fragments are seen, and the XML processor seems to handle everything just fine. Does Windows XP automatically reassemble UDP fragments? I guess I could expect this for a normal UDP socket, but it's not expected behavior for a "raw" socket, IMO. Further, if this is the case on Windows XP, why isn't the behavior the same on Windows 7? Is there a way to enable this?

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  • Watch YouTube in Windows 7 Media Center

    - by Mysticgeek
    Have you been looking for a way to watch your favorite viral videos from YouTube and Dailymotion from the couch? Today we take a look at an easy to use plugin which allows you to watch streaming video in Windows 7 Media Center. Install Macrotube The first thing we need to do is download and install the plugin called Macrotube (link below) following the defaults through the install wizard. After it’s installed, open Windows 7 Media Center and you’ll find Macrotube in the main menu. Currently there are three services available…YouTube, Dailymotion, and MSN Soapbox. Just select the service where you want to check out some videos. You can browse through different subjects or categories… Or you can search the the service by typing in what you’re looking for…with your remote or keyboard. There is the ability to drill down you search content by date, rating, views, and relevance. There are a few settings available such as the language beta, auto updates, and appearance. Now just kick back and browse through the different services and watch what you want from the comfort of your couch or on your computer. Conclusion This neat project is still in development and the developer is continuing to add changes through updates. It only works with Windows 7 Media Player, but there is a 32 & 64-bit version. Sometimes we experiences certain videos that wouldn’t play and it did crash a few times, but that is to be expected with a work in progress. But overall, this is a cool plugin that will allow you to watch your favorite online content from WMC. Download Macrotube and get more details and troubleshooting help fro the GreenButton forum Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Using Netflix Watchnow in Windows Vista Media Center (Gmedia)Integrate Hulu Desktop and Windows Media Center in Windows 7Automatically Start Windows 7 Media Center in Live TV ModeWatch TV Programming Without a TV Tuner In Window 7 Media CenterAutomatically Mount and View ISO files in Windows 7 Media Center TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 NachoFoto Searches Images in Real-time Office 2010 Product Guides Google Maps Place marks – Pizza, Guns or Strip Clubs Monitor Applications With Kiwi LocPDF is a Visual PDF Search Tool Download Free iPad Wallpapers at iPad Decor

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  • Getting Started with Media Browser for Windows Media Center

    - by DigitalGeekery
    If you are a Windows Media Center user, you’ll really want to check out Media Browser. The Media Browser plug-in for Windows Media Center takes your digital media files and displays them in a visually appealing, user friendly interface, complete with images and metadata. Requirements Windows 7 or Vista Microsoft .Net 3.5 Framework  Preparing your Media Files For Media Browser to be able to automatically download images and metadata for your media libraries, your files will have to be correctly named. For example, if you have an mp4 file of the movie Batman Begins, it needs to be named Batman Begins.mp4. It cannot be Batmanbegins.mp4 or Batman-begins.mp4. Otherwise, it’s unlikely that Media Browser will display images and metadata. If you find some of your files aren’t pulling cover art or metadata, double-check the official title of the media on a site like IMBD.com. TV Show files TV show files are handled a bit differently. Every TV series in your collection must have a main folder with the show’s name and individual subfolders for each season. Here is an example of folder structure and supported naming conventions. TV Shows\South Park\Season 1\s01e01 – episode 1.mp4 TV Shows\South Park\Season 1\South Park 1×01 – episode 1.mp4 TV Shows\South Park\Season 1\101 – episode 1.mp4  Note: You need to always have a Season 1 folder even if the show only has only one season. If you have several seasons of a particular show, but don’t happen to have Season 1, simply create a blank season 1 folder. Without a season 1 folder, other seasons will not display properly. Installation and Configuration Download and run the latest Media Browser .msi file by taking the defaults. (Download link below) When you reach the final window, leave the “Configure initial settings” box checked, and click “Finish.” You may get a pop up window informing you that folder permissions are not set correctly for Media Browser. Click “Yes.” Adding Your Media The Browser Configuration Tool should have opened automatically. If not, you can open it by going to Start > All Programs > Media Browser > Media Browser Configuration Wizard. To begin adding media files, click “Add.” Browse for a folder that contains media files and click “OK.” Here we are adding a folder with a group of movie files. You can add multiple folders to each media library. For example, if you have movie files stored in 4 or 5 different folders, you can add them all under a single library in Media Browser.  To add additional folders, click the “Add” button on the right side under your currently added folder. The “Add” button to the left will add an additional Media Library, such as one for TV Shows. When you are finished, close out of the Media Browser Configuration Tool. Open Windows Media Center. You will see Media Browser tile on the main interface. Click to open it. When you initially open Media Browser, you will be prompted to run the initial configuration. Click “OK.” You will see a few general configuration options. The important option is the Metadata. Leave this option checked (it is by default) if you wish to pull images & other metadata for your media. When finished, click “Continue,” and then “OK” to restart Media Browser. When you re-enter Media Browser you’ll see your Media Categories listed below, and recently added files in the main display. Click on a Media Library to view the files.   Click “View” at the top to check out some of the different display options to choose from. Below you see can “Detail.” This presents your videos in a list to the left. When you hover over a title, the synopsis and cover art is displayed to the right. “Cover Flow” displays your titles in a right to left format with mirror cover art. “Thumb Strip” displays your titles in a strip along the bottom with a synopsis, image, and movie data above. Configurations Settings and options can be changed through the Media Browser Configuration Tool, or directly in Media Browser by clicking on the “Wrench” at the bottom right of the main Media Browser page. Certain settings may only be available in one location or the other. Some will be available in both places.   Plug-ins and Themes Media Browser features a variety of Plug-ins and Themes that can add optional customization and slick visual appeal. To install plug-ins or themes, open the Media Browser Configuration Tool. Click on the “plug-ins” tab, and then the “More Plug-ins…” button. Note: Clicking on “Advanced” at the top will reveal several additional configuration tabs. Browse the list of plug-ins on the left. When you find want you like, select it and then click “Install.” When the install is complete, you’ll see them listed under “Installed Plug-ins.” To activate any installed theme, click on the “Display” tab. Select it from the Visual Theme drop down list. Close out of the Media Browser Configuration Tool when finished. Some themes, such as the “Diamond” theme shown below, include optional views and settings which can be accessed through a configuration button at the top of the screen. Clicking on the movie gives you additional images and information such as a synopsis, runtime, IMDB rating…   … and even actors and character names.   All that’s left is to hit “Play” when you’re ready to watch.   Conclusion Media Browser is a fantastic plug-in that brings an entirely different level of media management and aesthetics to Windows Media Center. There are numerous additional customizations and configurations we have not covered here such as adding film trailers, music support, and integrating Recorded TV. Media Browser will run on both Windows 7 and Vista. Extenders are also supported but may require additional configuration. Download Media Browser Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Using Netflix Watchnow in Windows Vista Media Center (Gmedia)Schedule Updates for Windows Media CenterIntegrate Hulu Desktop and Windows Media Center in Windows 7Add Color Coding to Windows 7 Media Center Program GuideIntegrate Boxee with Media Center in Windows 7 TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 If it were only this easy SyncToy syncs Files and Folders across Computers on a Network (or partitions on the same drive) Classic Cinema Online offers 100’s of OnDemand Movies OutSync will Sync Photos of your Friends on Facebook and Outlook Windows 7 Easter Theme YoWindoW, a real time weather screensaver

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  • How To Skip Commercials in Windows 7 Media Center

    - by DigitalGeekery
    If you use Windows 7 Media Center to record live TV, you’re probably interested in skipping through commercials. After all, a big reason to record programs is to avoid commercials, right? Today we focus on a fairly simple and free way to get you skipping commercials in no time. In Windows 7, the .wtv file format has replaced the dvr-ms file format used in previous versions of Media Center for Recorded TV. The .wtv file format, however, does not work very well with commercial skipping applications.  The Process Our first step will be to convert the recorded .wtv files to the previously used dvr-ms file format. This conversion will be done automatically by WtvWatcher. It’s important to note that this process deletes the original .wtv file after successfully converting to .dvr-ms. Next, we will use DVRMSToolBox with the DTB Addin to handle commercials skipping. This process does not “cut” or remove the commercials from the file. It merely skips the commercials during playback. WtvWatcher Download and install the WTVWatcher (link below). To install WtvWatcher, you’ll need to have Windows Installer 3.1 and .NET Framework 3.5 SP1. If you get the Publisher cannot be verified warning you can go ahead and click Install. We’ve completely tested this app and it contains no malware and runs successfully.   After installing, the WtvWatcher will pop up in the lower right corner of your screen. You will need to set the path to your Recorded TV directory. Click on the button for “Click here to set your recorded TV path…”   The WtvWatcher Preferences window will open…   …and you’ll be prompted to browse for your Recorded TV folder. If you did not change the default location at setup, it will be found at C:\Users\Public\Recorded TV. Click “OK” when finished. Click the “X” to close the Preferences screen. You should now see WtvWatcher begin to convert any existing WTV files.   The process should only take a few minutes per file. Note: If WtvWatcher detects an error during the conversion process, it will not delete the original WTV file.    You will probably want to run WtvWatcher on startup. This will allow WtvWatcher too constantly scan for new .wtv files to convert. There is no setting in the application to run on startup, so you’ll need to copy the WTV icon from your desktop into your Windows start menu “Startup” directory. To do so, click on Start > All Programs, right-click on Startup and click on Open all users. Drag and drop, or cut and paste, the WtvWatcher desktop shortcut into the Startup folder. DVRMSToolBox and DTBAddIn Next, we need to download and install the DVRMSToolBox and the DTBAddIn. These two pieces of software will do the actual commercial skipping. After downloading the DVRMSToolBox zip file, extract it and double-click the setup.exe file.  Click “Next” to begin the installation.   Unless DVRMSToolBox will only be used by Administrator accounts, check the “Modify File Permissions” box. Click “Next.” When you get to the Optional Components window, uncheck Download/Install ShowAnalyzer. We will not be using that application. When the installation is complete, click “Close.”    Next we need to install the DTBAddin. Unzip the download folder and run the appropriate .msi file for your system. It is available in 32 & 64 bit versions. Just double click on the file and take the default options. Click “Finish” when the install is completed. You will then be prompted to restart your computer. After your computer has restarted, open DVRMSToolBox settings by going to Start > All Programs, DVRMSToolBox, and click on DVRMStoMPEGSettings. On the MC Addin tab, make sure that Skip Commercials is checked. It should be by default.   On the Commercial Skip tab, make sure the Auto Skip option is selected. Click “Save.”   If you try to watch recorded TV before the file conversion and commercial indexing process is complete you’ll get the following message pop up in Media Center. If you click Yes, it will start indexing the commercials if WtvWatcher has already converted it to dvr-ms. Now you’re ready to kick back and watch your recorded tv without having to wait through those long commercial breaks. Conclusion The DVRMSToolBox is a powerful and complex application with a multitude of features and utilities. We’ve showed you a quick and easy way to get your Windows Media Center setup to skip commercials. This setup, like virtually all commercial skipping setups, is not perfect. You will occasionally find a commercial that doesn’t get skipped. Need help getting your Windows 7 PC configured for TV? Check out our previous tutorial on setting up live TV in Windows Media Center. Links Download WTV Watcher Download DVRMSToolBox Download DTBAddin Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Using Netflix Watchnow in Windows Vista Media Center (Gmedia)Increase Skip and Replay Intervals in Windows 7 Media CenterSchedule Updates for Windows Media CenterIntegrate Hulu Desktop and Windows Media Center in Windows 7Add Color Coding to Windows 7 Media Center Program Guide TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 PCmover Professional Make your Joomla & Drupal Sites Mobile with OSMOBI Integrate Twitter and Delicious and Make Life Easier Design Your Web Pages Using the Golden Ratio Worldwide Growth of the Internet How to Find Your Mac Address Use My TextTools to Edit and Organize Text

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  • Add a Sleep Timer to Windows 7 Media Center

    - by DigitalGeekery
    Do you make it a habit of falling asleep at night while watching Windows Media Center? Today we are going to take a look at the MC7 Sleep Timer for Windows 7 Media Center. This simple little plugin allows you to schedule an automatic shutdown time in Media Center. Note: At this point MC7 Sleep Timer doesn’t work with extenders. If you’re using ClamAV or Panda it may detect this plugin as a virus, we’ve tested it and this is a false positive for these two antivirus apps. Installation and Usage Download and install MC7 Sleep Timer. (See download below) After the installation is finished, you will find MC7 Sleep Timer located in the Media Center Extras Library. Click on the tile to open the timer and configure your settings. The MC7 Sleep Timer will open in full screen mode. You can choose to shutdown the PC after 30 or 60 minutes, create a custom length shutdown timer at any 5 minute interval, or select the exact time you want the PC to shutdown.  After setting your PC to shutdown, you’ll get an audio confirmation. To set a custom timer length, scroll to the “Custom timer” option and click right or left on your Media Center remote or, the right or left arrow keys, to choose how many minutes before shutdown. To schedule a shutdown for a certain time, browse to the “Shutdown at time” button, and scroll right or left with the arrow keys on the keyboard or remote. When you’ve chosen your time, hit “Enter” on the keyboard or “OK” on the remote.   Clicking the “Monitor Off” button will turn off only the monitor and “Cancel Timer” will cancel your shutdown request. Conclusion If you often find yourself falling asleep every night watching Media Center and then fumbling and stumbling in the middle of the night to shutdown your computer, MC7 Sleep timer might just be a perfect addition to your Media Center setup. Download MC7 Sleep Timer Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Using Netflix Watchnow in Windows Vista Media Center (Gmedia)Re-Enable Sleep Mode in Windows VistaSchedule Updates for Windows Media CenterIntegrate Hulu Desktop and Windows Media Center in Windows 7Add Color Coding to Windows 7 Media Center Program Guide TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 PCmover Professional Use My TextTools to Edit and Organize Text Discovery Channel LIFE Theme (Win7) Increase the size of Taskbar Previews (Win 7) Scan your PC for nasties with Panda ActiveScan CleanMem – Memory Cleaner AceStock – The Personal Stock Monitor

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  • Windows 7 Windows XP mode cannot run - it says "Require Hardware Assisted Virtualization"

    - by Jian Lin
    After installing the 2 files for Windows 7 Windows XP mode, the Start Menu now has Windows Virtual PC Windows XP Mode but clicking on the first merely brings out a folder, and clicking on the second brings out a dialog box that says: "Require Hardware Assisted Virtualization" Does that mean the machine cannot support Windows 7 Windows XP mode? I am running Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit edition. This is the dialog box: Update: the computer is an HP TouchSmart, with American Megatrends BIOS v02.61. I looked into the BIOS set up but it is quite simple and dosen't have something for "hardware assisted virtualization". The CPU is Intel Core 2 Duo T5750.

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  • Is there way to use Windows Easy Transfer on Windows Server 2008

    - by CJM
    At work, I'd been experimenting with using Windows Server 2008 as a desktop machine - I'm a s/w developer so some of the server software was particularly appropriate, but back in the day there was a suggestion that Server 2008 would be faster than Vista (mainly because of less bloat). I'm now wanting to move across to a new Windows 7 workstation; not only does Server 2008 not have Windows Easy Transfer, but I can't attack the problem from the Windows 7 end either - when I try to run the migration wizard it claims that the software 'isnt compatible with this version of Windows'. I'd bet that it would work fine, if only it wasn't for the arbitrary version check... Is there any way to coax this software into working? If not, any good alternatives to Windows Easy Transfer - I don't fancy having to manually copy application settings etc across myself...

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  • Scripting a Windows 2008 Cluster from Windows 2003

    - by glancep
    Our current environment is all Windows 2003. When we migrate a new version of our service to the cluster, we first stop the service with a command like: cluster.exe <clusterName> resource "<serviceName>" /offline We do similarly after the migrate to bring the service back online. Now, we are upgrading our environment to new Windows 2008 servers. However, our build/migrate machine will remain Windows 2003. When issuing the same command from Windwos 2003 to Windows 2008, we get: System error 1722 has occurred (0x000006ba). The RPC server is unavailable. We need to be able to remotely administer a Windows 2008 cluster from a Windows 2003 server in an automated fashion (such as the command-line cluster.exe utility). Is this possible? Thanks, Gideon

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  • Can't find instructions how to use Windows 7 drivers on Windows Server 2008 R2

    - by Robert Koritnik
    Maybe I should post this to http://www.serverfault.com. Windows 7 comes with all sorts of signed drivers so there's high probability that all drivers for your machine will be installed during system setup. On the other hand Windows Server 2008 doesn't event though it's practically the same OS when it comes to drivers. But I know that this has a very good reason. It's a server product, not a desktop one. But the thing is that many power users and developers use server OS on their workstations which are normally desktop machines and would need Windows 7 driver spectrum... Question I know I've been reading about some trick on the internet that first installed Windows 7 on the machine, than do something to get either all Windows 7 driver collection or just those installed, and then install Windows Server 2008 and use those drivers. The thing is: I can't seem to find these instructions on the internet any more. If anybody knows where these are please provide the link for the rest of us.

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  • Windows Update can't install Windows Vista SP1

    - by Harry Johnston
    If you install Windows Vista RTM and run Windows Update, many updates are offered and will successfully install. Once all other updates are installed, Windows Vista service pack 1 is offered. When you attempt to install Windows Vista service pack 1, the service pack installation wizard appears, presenting the license agreement and so on. However, shortly after the installation starts the wizard disappears. Windows Update says that the update was installed successfully. However, service pack 1 is not in fact installed, and will be detected as needed again on the next update check. Repeat ad nauseum. On checking the Windows Update log, error 0x80190194 appears near the beginning of an update check, associated with the URL http://update.microsoft.com/vista/windowsupdate/redir/vistawuredir.cab. Why won't service pack 1 install properly and how do I fix it?

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  • Using Windows 7 drivers in Windows Server 2008 R2

    - by Robert Koritnik
    Maybe I should post this to http://www.serverfault.com. Windows 7 comes with all sorts of signed drivers so there's high probability that all drivers for your machine will be installed during system setup. On the other hand Windows Server 2008 doesn't event though it's practically the same OS when it comes to drivers. But I know that this has a very good reason. It's a server product, not a desktop one. But the thing is that many power users and developers use server OS on their workstations which are normally desktop machines and would need Windows 7 driver spectrum... Question I know I've been reading about some trick on the internet that first installed Windows 7 on the machine, than do something to get either all Windows 7 driver collection or just those installed, and then install Windows Server 2008 and use those drivers. The thing is: I can't seem to find these instructions on the internet any more. If anybody knows where these are please provide the link for the rest of us.

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  • Windows 7 - Windows get autoselected

    - by DjRikyx
    I have a really annoying problem in Windows 7. I just updated Windows vista to Windows 7 32bit The problem is that every second the top windows is being selected. To explain better what happens: I open task manager and leave it there, then i select a icon on desktop, after 1 second, the icon is deselected and Task Manager windows is selected. Also i see windows borders blinking, every second. This is Annoying, because every time i do a right click or selecting a menu in any application, every second the menu get closed... I do not know what is doing this, i searched in task manager for some 'bad' application running, but seems ok, tried closing all programs but it's still there. If i restart the computer first i don't get that problem, but after a while it start.. I noticed that When using Visual Studio Express 2012, but i don't think is the problem, because also if i close VS the problem remains. Hope you can help me, i'm getting hungry!! It's annoying!

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  • Complete Guide to Networking Windows 7 with XP and Vista

    - by Mysticgeek
    Since there are three versions of Windows out in the field these days, chances are you need to share data between them. Today we show how to get each version to be share files and printers with one another. In a perfect world, getting your computers with different Microsoft operating systems to network would be as easy as clicking a button. With the Windows 7 Homegroup feature, it’s almost that easy. However, getting all three of them to communicate with each other can be a bit of a challenge. Today we’ve put together a guide that will help you share files and printers in whatever scenario of the three versions you might encounter on your home network. Sharing Between Windows 7 and XP The most common scenario you’re probably going to run into is sharing between Windows 7 and XP.  Essentially you’ll want to make sure both machines are part of the same workgroup, set up the correct sharing settings, and making sure network discovery is enabled on Windows 7. The biggest problem you may run into is finding the correct printer drivers for both versions of Windows. Share Files and Printers Between Windows 7 & XP  Map a Network Drive Another method of sharing data between XP and Windows 7 is mapping a network drive. If you don’t need to share a printer and only want to share a drive, then you can just map an XP drive to Windows 7. Although it might sound complicated, the process is not bad. The trickiest part is making sure you add the appropriate local user. This will allow you to share the contents of an XP drive to your Windows 7 computer. Map a Network Drive from XP to Windows 7 Sharing between Vista and Windows 7 Another scenario you might run into is having to share files and printers between a Vista and Windows 7 machine. The process is a bit easier than sharing between XP and Windows 7, but takes a bit of work. The Homegroup feature isn’t compatible with Vista, so we need to go through a few different steps. Depending on what your printer is, sharing it should be easier as Vista and Windows 7 do a much better job of automatically locating the drivers. How to Share Files and Printers Between Windows 7 and Vista Sharing between Vista and XP When Windows Vista came out, hardware requirements were intensive, drivers weren’t ready, and sharing between them was complicated due to the new Vista structure. The sharing process is pretty straight-forward if you’re not using password protection…as you just need to drop what you want to share into the Vista Public folder. On the other hand, sharing with password protection becomes a bit more difficult. Basically you need to add a user and set up sharing on the XP machine. But once again, we have a complete tutorial for that situation. Share Files and Folders Between Vista and XP Machines Sharing Between Windows 7 with Homegroup If you have one or more Windows 7 machine, sharing files and devices becomes extremely easy with the Homegroup feature. It’s as simple as creating a Homegroup on on machine then joining the other to it. It allows you to stream media, control what data is shared, and can also be password protected. If you don’t want to make your Windows 7 machines part of the same Homegroup, you can still share files through the Public Folder, and setup a printer to be shared as well.   Use the Homegroup Feature in Windows 7 to Share Printers and Files Create a Homegroup & Join a New Computer To It Change which Files are Shared in a Homegroup Windows Home Server If you want an ultimate setup that creates a centralized location to share files between all systems on your home network, regardless of the operating system, then set up a Windows Home Server. It allows you to centralize your important documents and digital media files on one box and provides easy access to data and the ability to stream media to other machines on your network. Not only that, but it provides easy backup of all your machines to the server, in case disaster strikes. How to Install and Setup Windows Home Server How to Manage Shared Folders on Windows Home Server Conclusion The biggest annoyance is dealing with printers that have a different set of drivers for each OS. There is no real easy way to solve this problem. Our best advice is to try to connect it to one machine, and if the drivers won’t work, hook it up to the other computer and see if that works. Each printer manufacturer is different, and Windows doesn’t always automatically install the correct drivers for the device. We hope this guide helps you share your data between whichever Microsoft OS scenario you might run into! Here are some other articles that will help you accomplish your home networking needs: Share a Printer on a Home Network from Vista or XP to Windows 7 How to Share a Folder the XP Way in Windows Vista Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Delete Wrong AutoComplete Entries in Windows Vista MailSvchost Viewer Shows Exactly What Each svchost.exe Instance is DoingFixing "BOOTMGR is missing" Error While Trying to Boot Windows VistaShow Hidden Files and Folders in Windows 7 or VistaAdd Color Coding to Windows 7 Media Center Program Guide TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 Icelandic Volcano Webcams Open Multiple Links At One Go NachoFoto Searches Images in Real-time Office 2010 Product Guides Google Maps Place marks – Pizza, Guns or Strip Clubs Monitor Applications With Kiwi

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  • How to Assign a Static IP Address in XP, Vista, or Windows 7

    - by Mysticgeek
    When organizing your home network it’s easier to assign each computer it’s own IP address than using DHCP. Here we will take a look at doing it in XP, Vista, and Windows 7. If you have a home network with several computes and devices, it’s a good idea to assign each of them a specific address. If you use DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol), each computer will request and be assigned an address every time it’s booted up. When you have to do troubleshooting on your network, it’s annoying going to each machine to figure out what IP they have. Using Static IPs prevents address conflicts between devices and allows you to manage them more easily. Assigning IPs to Windows is essentially the same process, but getting to where you need to be varies between each version. Windows 7 To change the computer’s IP address in Windows 7, type network and sharing into the Search box in the Start Menu and select Network and Sharing Center when it comes up.   Then when the Network and Sharing Center opens, click on Change adapter settings. Right-click on your local adapter and select Properties. In the Local Area Connection Properties window highlight Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) then click the Properties button. Now select the radio button Use the following IP address and enter in the correct IP, Subnet mask, and Default gateway that corresponds with your network setup. Then enter your Preferred and Alternate DNS server addresses. Here we’re on a home network and using a simple Class C network configuration and Google DNS. Check Validate settings upon exit so Windows can find any problems with the addresses you entered. When you’re finished click OK. Now close out of the Local Area Connections Properties window. Windows 7 will run network diagnostics and verify the connection is good. Here we had no problems with it, but if you did, you could run the network troubleshooting wizard. Now you can open the command prompt and do an ipconfig  to see the network adapter settings have been successfully changed.   Windows Vista Changing your IP from DHCP to a Static address in Vista is similar to Windows 7, but getting to the correct location is a bit different. Open the Start Menu, right-click on Network, and select Properties. The Network and Sharing Center opens…click on Manage network connections. Right-click on the network adapter you want to assign an IP address and click Properties. Highlight Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) then click the Properties button. Now change the IP, Subnet mask, Default Gateway, and DNS Server Addresses. When you’re finished click OK. You’ll need to close out of Local Area Connection Properties for the settings to go into effect. Open the Command Prompt and do an ipconfig to verify the changes were successful.   Windows XP In this example we’re using XP SP3 Media Center Edition and changing the IP address of the Wireless adapter. To set a Static IP in XP right-click on My Network Places and select Properties. Right-click on the adapter you want to set the IP for and select Properties. Highlight Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and click the Properties button. Now change the IP, Subnet mask, Default Gateway, and DNS Server Addresses. When you’re finished click OK. You will need to close out of the Network Connection Properties screen before the changes go into effect.   Again you can verify the settings by doing an ipconfig in the command prompt. In case you’re not sure how to do this, click on Start then Run.   In the Run box type in cmd and click OK. Then at the prompt type in ipconfig and hit Enter. This will show the IP address for the network adapter you changed.   If you have a small office or home network, assigning each computer a specific IP address makes it a lot easier to manage and troubleshoot network connection problems. Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Change Ubuntu Desktop from DHCP to a Static IP AddressChange Ubuntu Server from DHCP to a Static IP AddressVista Breadcrumbs for Windows XPCreate a Shortcut or Hotkey for the Safely Remove Hardware DialogCreate a Shortcut or Hotkey to Eject the CD/DVD Drive TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips HippoRemote Pro 2.2 Xobni Plus for Outlook All My Movies 5.9 CloudBerry Online Backup 1.5 for Windows Home Server Nice Websites To Watch TV Shows Online 24 Million Sites Windows Media Player Glass Icons (icons we like) How to Forecast Weather, without Gadgets Outlook Tools, one stop tweaking for any Outlook version Zoofs, find the most popular tweeted YouTube videos

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  • I have Ubuntu alongside Windows Vista and I cannot reboot Windows Vista

    - by railguage48
    I cannot get into Windows Vista .... I was working in Vista and then I restarted booted up Ubuntu and when I finished in Ubuntu I restarted this time in Vista and all I get is the microsoft box with the vertical stripes running interminably. I ran sudo update-grub this is the result of that command: generating grub.cfg found linux image: /boot/vmlinuz-3.2.0-24-generic found initrd image: /boot/iniytd.img-3.2.0-24-generic found linux image: /boot/vmlinuz-3.0.0-19-generic found linitrd image: /boot/initrd.img-3.0.0-19-generic found windows recovery environment (loader) on /dev/sda1 skipping windows recovery environment (loader) on Wubi system found windows vista (loader) on /dev/sda2 skipping windows vista (loader) on wubi system I do have a backup of my Windows environment on an external hard drive and I can get to it through ubuntu but I am not sure if I can restore Windows Vista from Ubuntu or even if I need to. Thanks for any help.

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  • Create a Slide Show in Windows 7 Media Center

    - by DigitalGeekery
    Are you looking for a nice way to create and display a slide show from your photo collection? Today we’ll show you how to create a slide show, how to add music to it, and watch it from the comfort of your couch in Windows 7 Media Center. Create Slide Show Launch Windows 7 Media Center and click on the Picture Library tile found under Pictures and Videos.   In the Pictures Library, scroll across to slide shows and click on Create Slide show.   Enter a name for the slide show and click Next.   If you are using a Windows Media Center remote, click on the OK button to bring up the onscreen keyboard. Use the directional buttons to navigate across the keyboard and press OK to select each letter. Click Done when finished. Select Picture Library and click Next. Select the pictures to include in your slide show. If using a remote, navigate through the images and press OK to select. If you are using a mouse, simply click on the selections. When you are finished, click Next.    Now, we can review and edit the slide show. Click the up or down pointing arrows to move pictures up and down in the order.  (more intuitive titles would be helpful in this case as opposed to the randomly generated titles in the example below) If you are finished, click Create. You can also choose to go back and add music to your slide show. (or even more pictures) We’ll take a look at adding some music in our example. Click on the Add More button.   Add Music to Your Slide Show Here we’ll select Music Library to add a song. Click Next.   You’ll now be able to browse your Music Library to select songs for your slide show. Select your songs and click Next.   When you are finished adding Music and Pictures click Create.   Once your slide show is saved, you can play it any time by going to clicking on slide shows in the Picture Library, then selecting the slide show title. Select play slide show when you’re ready to enjoy your new production.   If you ever want to edit or delete the slide show, select it in the Picture Library, and scroll to Actions. You’ll see those option under additional commands. You have the option to Edit Slide Show, Burn a CD/DVD, or Delete. Editing Slide Show Settings Within Media Center, go to Tasks… Click on Pictures…   Then choose Slide Shows. From the Slide Show settings you have the option to Show pictures in random order, Show picture information, Show song information, and Use Pan and zoom effect. You can also adjust the length of time to display each picture, and change the background color. Be sure to click Save to apply and changes before exiting. If you choose to show picture information, the picture title, date, and star rating will be displayed in the top right.   If your slide show is accompanied by music and you choose to show song information, you will get a translucent overlay for a few seconds at the beginning of each song to indicate the song, album, and artist. One of the really cool things about creating a slide show in Windows 7 Media Center is you can complete the entire process using just a Media Center remote. Can’t get enough slide shows? Check out how to turn your desktop into a picture slide show in Windows 7. Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Using Netflix Watchnow in Windows Vista Media Center (Gmedia)Add Color Coding to Windows 7 Media Center Program GuideIntegrate Boxee with Media Center in Windows 7Schedule Updates for Windows Media CenterTurn Your Desktop into a Picture Slideshow in Windows 7 TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 Case Study – How to Optimize Popular Wordpress Sites Restore Hidden Updates in Windows 7 & Vista Iceland an Insurance Job? Find Downloads and Add-ins for Outlook Recycle ! Find That Elusive Icon with FindIcons

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  • How to improve Windows Aero desktop performance?

    - by Click Ok
    Sincerely I don't understand why in Windows Experience ratings, the "Game Graphics" in my pc is 5.0 and "Graphic Elements" (windows aero desktop performance) is 3.9. How it is possible? My VGA is nice for games but bad for Windows Desktop? What I can do to improve windows aero desktop performance?

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  • Upgrade only one version of XP to Windows 8 on a dual boot computer

    - by Shane
    I have a computer running Windows XP Pro 32-bit and 64-bit in dual boot. I need to retain Windows XP 32-bit Pro, as I have expensive software that will only run on that specific version. I want to upgrade my 64-bit installation of XP to Windows 8 without losing the 32-bit installation. If I simply use the ISO to upgrade from within my XP 64-bit installation, will I retain dual boot for both XP 32-bit and Windows 8?

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  • windows 8 network cant connect to other computers

    - by Sickest
    we just setup a windows 7 ultimate file server, and all the other computers on the network, found the server expect the windows 8 computer. computers on the network: vista, win 7 ultimate, mac os, win 8 (problem) I setup a homegroup on the win 7 server pc, but the windows 8 computer can't find the homegroup, nor can it connect to the server by typing its network ext //server-pc i've tried to turn on all the windows 8 sharing to discovery ON, on Private and Public and all Networks, and got nothing. should be noted that the computer is using norton firewall/AV, im not sure if that's a factor

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  • Everyone can access my Windows 7 Homegroup file shares - Even Windows XP computers

    - by Adrian Grigore
    I have 3 computers in my network, two running Windows 7 and one running Windows XP. I've set up a homegroup on both Windows 7 computers. Also, all computers are in the same Workgroup. The problem is that one of the Windows 7 computers makes all shares accessible to the entire Workgroup instead of just sharing to the Homegroup as it should be. I created the file share in Windows 7 via right-click in the explorer, then click on "Share For" - "Homegroup (Read/Write)" (translated from German, so the actual wording may be different). Also, when I look at the file sharing properties of that folder, Windows Explorer informs me that Users must have a valid account and password for this Computer to access drive shares. Unfortunately this is not true. Being in the same Workgroup is enough to get access. Homegroup restrictions work as expected on my other Windows 7 computer. When trying to browse those shares from the XP computer, I get a dialog asking for a login and password. What might cause homegroup restrictions to fail and how can I fix this?

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  • Error loading operating system: format Windows 7 to Windows XP Service Pack 3

    - by Blerta
    I saw that there are other questions like mine here. But O also saw that some problems where solved with fixmbr from a Windows 7 recovery console, but that didn't work for me. I bought my laptop with Vista installed and later reformated and used Windows 7. During formatting with Windows 7 I had some problems with my hard drive and found out it was dead so I bought a new one. I wanted to reformat with Windows XP,because Windows 7 is consuming more RAM that it is able handle and I wanted to use it for other programs. So I formatted with Windows XP Service Pack 3 but after first reboot a message appeared: "Error loading operating system" Reading here, I assumed that maybe I had installed it on the wrong partition and maybe having two OS now, so I used fixmbr but it is still not starting up. Anyway I am sure that is not the case of two operating systems. Is there any chance that when the computer designed to work with Vista you would face problems with Windows XP? Like not recognizing a hard drive?

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  • After update, suddenly lost ability to access Windows Server 2008 R2 shares from Windows XP clients

    - by Knute Knudsen
    Today I lost the ability to see my Windows Server 2008 R2 shares from any of my 3 Windows XP machines in my small office. The 5 Win7 machines haven't been affected (they are still able to browse/access the 2008 server), but none of my WinXP machines can access the 2008R2 server anymore. Yesterday (and for the previous year) everything was working fine. I do not have a domain setup. I can still access Win7 shares from WinXP clients. Browsing the server logs, I see that the following update was installed last night: > Installation Ready: The following updates are downloaded and ready for > installation. This computer is currently scheduled to install these > updates on ?Thursday, ?November ?15, ?2012 at 3:00 AM: > - Security Update for Windows Server 2008 R2 x64 Edition (KB2761226) > - Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5.1 on Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 for x64-based Systems (KB2729452) > - Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool x64 - November 2012 (KB890830) > - Cumulative Security Update for Internet Explorer 9 for Windows Server 2008 R2 x64 Edition (KB2761451) It seems likely that something was changed in last night's update, but so far I haven't seen anything on microsoft.com to prove it. I did hear that XP is reaching the end of the road soon. Any ideas?

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