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  • Error loading operating system: format Windows 7 to Windows XP Service Pack 3

    - by Blerta
    I saw that there are other questions like mine here. But O also saw that some problems where solved with fixmbr from a Windows 7 recovery console, but that didn't work for me. I bought my laptop with Vista installed and later reformated and used Windows 7. During formatting with Windows 7 I had some problems with my hard drive and found out it was dead so I bought a new one. I wanted to reformat with Windows XP,because Windows 7 is consuming more RAM that it is able handle and I wanted to use it for other programs. So I formatted with Windows XP Service Pack 3 but after first reboot a message appeared: "Error loading operating system" Reading here, I assumed that maybe I had installed it on the wrong partition and maybe having two OS now, so I used fixmbr but it is still not starting up. Anyway I am sure that is not the case of two operating systems. Is there any chance that when the computer designed to work with Vista you would face problems with Windows XP? Like not recognizing a hard drive?

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  • What extra permission settings were added in Windows Server 2003 over Windows Server 2000?

    - by Jon Seigel
    We have a domain controller currently running Windows Server 2000, and we're in the process of upgrading some of our workstations to Windows 7. The problem is that users are getting access denied messages to things they should be able to do, even trivial things like deleting shortcuts from the desktop. The users run at less than administrative levels, which we want to maintain. We think this is caused by Windows 7 having extra security permission settings that are getting defaulted to denied, because the new settings wouldn't actually exist in the Windows 2000 profiles. The reason I'm asking about Windows 2003 Server is because we have an available license of that, and not to 2008 (which would likely solve the problem completely, but costs $). So what I'd like to find out is if the permission settings in 2003 will be sufficient for our needs to justify upgrading the domain controller to 2003.

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  • Problems linking to social networks in Windows 8

    - by Andrew Cooper
    I've upgraded my laptop to Windows 8 (from Windows 7) and I'm having problems with getting information to show in the People and Messaging apps. I've linked my Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn accounts to my Live Id, and on Windows 7 I was able to see my Friends' facebook activity in Windows Live Messenger. In the Windows 8 People app I can see all my contacts from Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, and I can see the on-line status of at least my Facebook contacts. I can also see the profiles details of each contact, but I don't get anything in the "What's New" view. The Messaging app is just blank. I assume I should be able to send messages to my contacts, but I can't see any way to do it. Am I missing something?

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  • NET START command not passing parameters in Windows Server 2008

    - by Amanbbk
    My application calls a Stored Procedure, through the stored procedure I am calling a Windows Service using the NET START command as follows: SELECT @Cmd = 'Net Start ServiceName /"' + @param1 + '" /"' + @param2 + '"' Now the parameters passed here are not reaching the OnStart method. These values are blank. Protected Overrides Sub OnStart(ByVal args() As String) Try service1= New Service service1.param2 = args(1) service1.param1 = args(0) Here I get args(0) as the name of service instead of the value that is passed, and args(1) is blank. Although the args.Getlength(0) returns 2. The service starts successfully, it invokes the executable, but the parameters are not there. What can be the reason? Administrative access might be required in NET START command? Has the syntax changed for NET START command in Windows Server 2008? Windows Services do not accept parameters in Windows Server 2008? The same thing is running fine on Windows Server 2003.

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  • Windows Azure PowerShell for Node.js

    - by shiju
    The Windows Azure PowerShell for Node.js is a command-line tool that  allows the Node developers to build and deploy Node.js apps in Windows Azure using Windows PowerShell cmdlets. Using Windows Azure PowerShell for Node.js, you can develop, test, deploy and manage Node based hosted service in Windows Azure. For getting the PowerShell for Node.js, click All Programs, Windows Azure SDK Node.js and run  Windows Azure PowerShell for Node.js, as Administrator. The followings are the few PowerShell cmdlets that lets you to work with Node.js apps in Windows Azure Create New Hosted Service New-AzureService <HostedServiceName> The below cmdlet will created a Windows Aazure hosted service named NodeOnAzure in the folder C:\nodejs and this will also create ServiceConfiguration.Cloud.cscfg, ServiceConfiguration.Local.cscfg and ServiceDefinition.csdef and deploymentSettings.json files for the hosted service. PS C:\nodejs> New-AzureService NodeOnAzure The below picture shows the files after creating the hosted service Create Web Role Add-AzureNodeWebRole <RoleName> The following cmdlet will create a hosted service named MyNodeApp along with web.config file. PS C:\nodejs\NodeOnAzure> Add-AzureNodeWebRole MyNodeApp The below picture shows the files after creating the web role app. Install Node Module npm install <NodeModule> The following command will install Node Module Express onto your web role app. PS C:\nodejs\NodeOnAzure\MyNodeApp> npm install Express Run Windows Azure Apps Locally in the Emulator Start-AzureEmulator -launch The following cmdlet will create a local package and run Windows Azure app locally in the emulator PS C:\nodejs\NodeOnAzure\MyNodeApp> Start-AzureEmulator -launch Stop Windows Azure Emulator Stop-AzureEmulator The following cmdlet will stop your Windows Azure in the emulator. PS C:\nodejs\NodeOnAzure\MyNodeApp> Stop-AzureEmulator Download Windows Azure Publishing Settings Get-AzurePublishSettings The following cmdlet will redirect to Windows Azure portal where we can download Windows Azure publish settings PS C:\nodejs\NodeOnAzure\MyNodeApp> Get-AzurePublishSettings Import Windows Azure Publishing Settings Import-AzurePublishSettings <Location of .publishSettings file> The following cmdlet will import the publish settings file from the location c:\nodejs PS C:\nodejs\NodeOnAzure\MyNodeApp>  Import-AzurePublishSettings c:\nodejs\shijuvar.publishSettings Publish Apps to Windows Azure Publish-AzureService –name <Name> –location <Location of Data centre> The following cmdlet will publish the app to Windows Azure with name “NodeOnAzure” in the location Southeast Asia. Please keep in mind that the service name should be unique. PS C:\nodejs\NodeOnAzure\MyNodeApp> Publish-AzureService –name NodeonAzure –location "Southeast Asia” –launch Stop Windows Azure Service Stop-AzureService The following cmdlet will stop your service which you have deployed previously. PS C:\nodejs\NodeOnAzure\MyNodeApp> Stop-AzureService Remove Windows Azure Service Remove-AzureService The following cmdlet will remove your service from Windows Azure. PS C:\nodejs\NodeOnAzure\MyNodeApp> Remove-AzureService Quick Summary for PowerShell cmdlets Create  a new Hosted Service New-AzureService <HostedServiceName> Create a Web Role Add-AzureNodeWebRole <RoleName> Install Node Module npm install <NodeModule> Running Windows Azure Apps Locally in Emulator Start-AzureEmulator -launch Stop Windows Azure Emulator Stop-AzureEmulator Download Windows Azure Publishing Settings Get-AzurePublishSettings Import Windows Azure Publishing Settings Import-AzurePublishSettings <Location of .publishSettings file> Publish Apps to Windows Azure Publish-AzureService –name <Name> –location <Location of Data centre> Stop Windows Azure Service Stop-AzureService Remove Windows Azure Service Remove-AzureService

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  • Moving physical windows 7 to Hyper - V on windows 2008 r2

    - by ekamtaj
    Hey Guys, I have a Windows 7 on a PC, but I want to install Windows 2008 R2 on the computer. I also want to keep Windows 7 on as a VM. Can I use disk2vhd? http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/ee656415.aspx Can I create a windows & full backup and restore it on Hyper-V? Please let me know what will work best and if you have any other suggestions.

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  • Windows 7 replacement of Vista's Windows Meeting Space

    - by Jason Pearce
    Microsoft Vista came with a free collaboration tool called Windows Meeting Space, which is not included in Windows 7 Enterprise nor can I find a stand alone link to download. Is there a similar tool included in Windows 7 that I'm missing or a replacement Microsoft product (perhaps Microsoft SharedView) that you would recommend? Ideally a tool that is compatabile with our existing Vista Windows Meeting Space users.

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  • Windows Movie Maker 2012 No Sound issue with Windows 8.1

    - by zzlalani
    I've windows 8.1 pro Build 9600 x64 installed, I have recently installed Windows Movie Maker 2012 (Latest) via Windows Live Essential, Now when I run Movie Maker it disable Movie Maker sound as well as all windows sound and keeps it mute until I close Movie Maker, as per their suggestion Huge Problems With Movie Maker Sound I have also updated my audio drivers, I'm using Dell Inspiron 15R 5520, and I have this audio device/driver Conexant HD CX20672-21Z Audio Driver with Version 8.54.37.0,A03 Last Updated 12/20/2013 I need to edit and create a video by this weekend and this is the only tool I know how to use,

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  • Windows 8 Pro Upgrade but no previous version of Windows installed

    - by Vineet Bhatia
    I have a license for Windows 7 but don't have it currently installed anywhere. I bought the Windows 8 Pro Upgrade. Do I need to install Windows 7 and then upgrade or is there a easier way to install Windows 8 Pro Upgrade? When I try to activate I am getting an error Code: 0xC004F061. Description: The software licensing service determined that the specified product key can only be used for upgrading, not for clean installations.

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  • Smss.exe - setting any core affinity breaks rdp on Windows 7 / Windows Server 2012

    - by Hetman
    I have tried to set core affinity of smss.exe to not run on one critical core on Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008r2. It turns out that simply setting the core affinity to anything (even the full mask that smss.exe already has) seems to work but prevents users from rdp'ing into the machine until it is restarted. The users already logged in may continue to use their sessions. This behaviour does not occur on Windows 8/Windows Server 2012. Does anyone know why it is happening?

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  • Dig Deeper in Windows Defrag via Command Prompt

    - by Matthew Guay
    Windows users have learned over the years that they need to keep their computers defragmented to keep running at top speed.  While Windows Vista and 7 automatically defrag your disks, here’s some ways you can dig deeper into Windows Defragmenter Latest Features How-To Geek ETC The 50 Best Registry Hacks that Make Windows Better The How-To Geek Holiday Gift Guide (Geeky Stuff We Like) LCD? LED? Plasma? The How-To Geek Guide to HDTV Technology The How-To Geek Guide to Learning Photoshop, Part 8: Filters Improve Digital Photography by Calibrating Your Monitor Our Favorite Tech: What We’re Thankful For at How-To Geek Snowy Christmas House Personas Theme for Firefox The Mystic Underground Tunnel Wallpaper Ubunchu! – The Ubuntu Manga Available in Multiple Languages Breathe New Life into Your PlayStation 2 Peripherals by Hooking Them Up to Your Computer Move the Window Control Buttons to the Left Side in Windows Fun and Colorful Firefox Theme for Windows 7

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  • How to Disable Access to the Registry in Windows 7

    - by Mysticgeek
    If you don’t know what your doing in the Registry, you can mess up your computer pretty good. Today we show you how to prevent users from accessing the Registry and making any changes to it. Using Local Group Policy Editor Note: This method uses Group Policy Editor which is not available in Home versions of Windows. First type gpedit.msc into the Search box in the Start menu. When Group Policy Editor opens, navigate to User Configuration \ Administrative Templates then select System. Under Setting in the right panel double-click on Prevent access to registry editing tools. Select the radio button next to Enabled, click OK, then close out of Group Policy Editor. Now if a user tries to access the Registry… They will get the following message advising they cannot access it.   Using Registry Enabler & Disabler 3 If you’re using Home or Starter version of Windows 7, you can use a neat utility called Registry Enabler & Disabler (link below). This app works on XP and Vista as well. There is no installation involved so you can run it from a flash drive, disable the registry, then take the flash drive with you while a the user is on the machine.   Again, if the user tries to access the Registry they will get the following error… Using one of these options will stop users from gaining access to the Registry or running any registry hacks. Of course if you have a shared computer, you may want to set up other users with a Standard Account, as they won’t be able to make changes to the Registry anyway. Download Registry Enabler & Disabler 3 Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Disable Notification Balloons in XPDisable/Enable Lock Workstation Functionality (Windows + L)Disable Windows Mobility Center in Windows 7 or VistaRegistry Hack to Disable Writing to USB DrivesSpeed Up Disk Access by Disabling Last Access Updating in Windows XP TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips Acronis Online Backup DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows Fun with 47 charts and graphs Tomorrow is Mother’s Day Check the Average Speed of YouTube Videos You’ve Watched OutlookStatView Scans and Displays General Usage Statistics How to Add Exceptions to the Windows Firewall Office 2010 reviewed in depth by Ed Bott

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  • Make Windows Position Your Dual Monitors Correctly

    - by Mysticgeek
    If you have a dual monitor setup and each monitor is a different size or height, it can be annoying trying to move the mouse pointer between them. Here is a quick tip that will help make the process easier. Align Monitors In our example, we’re using Windows 7, but the process is essentially the same in all versions, but getting to Display Settings is different. In Windows 7 open the Start menu and type display settings into the search box and hit Enter. In Vista right-click the desktop and click Personalize. Then from the Personalize appearance and sounds menu click on Display Settings. In XP right-click on the desktop and select Properties then in Display Properties click the Settings tab. Now here is where you can change the appearance of your monitors. In this example we have a larger 22” LCD and a smaller 19” and it can be annoying getting the mouse pointer from one to another depending where you are on each monitor. So what you want to do is simply move each display around to a particular height so it’s easier to get the pointer over. For example with this setting we know we’ll have no problem moving the pointer to the other screen at the top of each display.   Of course here you can flip your monitors around, change the display resolution, orientation, etc. If you have dual monitors where one might be larger or set up higher than the other, then this is a great way to get them finely tuned. You will have to play around with the settings a bit to settle on what works best for you. Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips GeekNewb: Get to Know These Windows 7 HotkeysDual Monitors: Use a Different Wallpaper on Each DesktopSet Windows as Default OS when Dual Booting UbuntuEasily Set Default OS in a Windows 7 / Vista and XP Dual-boot SetupSet XP as the Default OS in a Windows Vista Dual-Boot Setup TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 Download Wallpapers From National Geographic Site Spyware Blaster v4.3 Yes, it’s Patch Tuesday Generate Stunning Tag Clouds With Tagxedo Install, Remove and HIDE Fonts in Windows 7 Need Help with Your Home Network?

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  • Share files - Ubuntu 12.4 and Windows 7 - one network - password not accepted

    - by gotqn
    I ask this question in SuperUser but no one helps me. I hope to get more attention here. I have three computers connected in one network by modem. I want to share files in this network in the most easy way (I have read about solutions using Samba). So, I have three machines: One with Windows 7 One with Windows XP One with Ubuntu 12.04 and I have the following situation: The windows PCs can share files between each other. The windows PCs can see that Ubuntu's one is in the network The PC with Ubuntu can see only the PC with Windows 7, but when I click on a folder it ask to enter the network password and it is not accepting it (I am 100% sure it's the correct one) Is there to fix this situation a little bit - at least to enable the file sharing between the Ubuntu and Windows 7 PCs or I should choose a different approach (please advice).

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  • Windows 7 boot failure after update

    - by Jake
    Installed some windows 7 updates today, mostly just optional fixes and it installed an update to my IntelliType or IntelliPoint drivers (Keyboard & Mouse). It asked to reboot, computer gets to the windows load screen and redirects to the repair utility. Repair utility failed, it said if I recently installed a device, unplug it and try to restart. So I unplugged my keyboard and mouse, restarted. Nothing. I noticed that all the errors seemed to be Windows 7 thinking the installation was on another one of my slave drives. For example, my windows installation is on C:, but I have other drives, like G:, X:, etc... So it said "Critical Boot File G:\Windows\system32\drivers\amdxata.sys is corrupt, but why not C:\ ? So I unplugged ALL other hard drives, it still tried loading X:, even though the only one plugged in was C: I have the windows disk, but that didn't seem to help. I was thinking I need to fix my boot.ini or something simple like that was corrupt, the hard drives seem fine. I'm screwed, it's finals week.

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  • After update to Windows 8.1 brigthness isn't working (changing)

    - by Bibo
    I just update my Windows 8 to Windows 8.1 by Windows Store and I have some problems. My notebook is Acer Aspire Timelinex 3820TG and I know it's little old for Windows 8 but I install them and works fine (I updated my HDD to SSD). Now I just updated Windows and I have problem with changing brightness on my dedicated graphic card (Ati HD 5650). First I can changing brigthness with fn + keys but It just changing level in OS. No change in real. I tried reinstall drivers, install drivers for my card from Acer with compatibility to Windows 7 and without change. When I switch to integrated card changing brightness works. I think the problem is with drivers but I don't know how to get it working. Thanks for help Bonus question: I have another problem (but this one is not so important). Does anyone knows what msietxghh.exe is doing? Everytime when my system runs (after update) I get message that this program stops working but I just cancel and looks everything works fine.

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  • Multiple Homed Windows 2008 Server / Windows 7 Client

    - by Daniel Scott
    I have a small Windows 2008 network, with some Windows 7 clients. The clients are both laptops with docking stations and I would like them to communicate with the Windows 2008 server (for filesharing) through the wired network whilst they're docked. Internet connectivity for all machines (clients and server) is via a Wireless LAN, so the wireless adapter in the Windows 7 clients stays active while they're docked. When the laptops are un-docked, it would be nice to still be able to contact the windows 2008 server for print sharing (and slower file sharing) - hence the server also being on the wireless LAN. The windows 2008 server is running Active Directory, DHCP and DNS. It controls DHCP leases on the wired network and holds the DNS records for "myserver.mycompany.local", which is what the filesharing clients connect to. Ideally I'd like the DNS records to return the wired IP first so that this is the address that the laptops will attempt initially - but there doesn't seem to be a way to do that? At present the server's IP on the wireless LAN comes out of an nslookup above the wired Lan IP. The multi-homing works perfectly - but in the wrong order! Switch on the wireless lan and ping myserver and it goes to the wireless IP. Disable the wireless on the client and do the same ping again and after a couple of seconds it starts pinging the wired address. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to make this work in a predictable order? - or even if it can work. Alternative 1? If it can't work, then would this work: Remove the wireless adapter from the server, put a wireless router/bridge on the wired network (set up to route to/from the wireless LAN's subnet), then configure the clients with two routes to the (now) single IP of the server with metrics favouring direct communication over the wired LAN first? Alternative 2? Should I instead single-home the laptops so all of their connectivity is via the wired-LAN while they're docked? (and route via the windows 2008 server - or a dedicated wireless bridge/router)? My concern here is that I'd like undocking to be seamless - and if the clients are in the middle of downloading something from the internet I wouldn't want whatever they're doing interupted as they switch IP addresses onto the Wireless network. Perhaps this isn't the case and I'm concerned over nothing? Any thoughts? :) UPDATE I seem to have cracked it (at least DNS entries come out in the order I hope for - and pinging the server with various combinations of wired, wireless and both interfaces enabled uses the IP I want) ... I set the binding order of the NICs on the Server (which is acting as Domain Controller, DHCP and DNS server) so that the Wired NIC is before the Wireless adapter. (Start -- type "Network Interfaces" -- Select "View Network Connections" -- Press Alt to show classic dropdown menus -- Advanced -- Advanced Settings) Now, an nslookup (from the client) of the server's hostname returns the Wired IP first, followed by the Wireless IP. The wired IP now seems to be used whenever it's contactable. Incidentally, the metrics on the wired and wireless routes (on the client) also favour the wired LAN (based on Windows' automatically assigned metrics) - but this was always the case, even when I was having trouble getting the wired IP to be "favoured". I'm not entirely sure if this is coincidence - or if a DNS server running on Windows, handing back IP addresses for itself does actually take the binding order of it's own network interfaces into account? It would be interesting to hear from someone who can confirm or deny that (or confirm that the binding order on the server plays a role for some other reason?)

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  • The Windows Azure Software Development Kit (SDK) and the Windows Azure Training Kit (WATK)

    - by BuckWoody
    Windows Azure is a platform that allows you to write software, run software, or use software that we've already written. We provide lots of resources to help you do that - many can be found right here in this blog series. There are two primary resources you can use, and it's important to understand what they are and what they do. The Windows Azure Software Development Kit (SDK) Actually, this isn't one resource. We have SDK's for multiple development environments, such as Visual Studio and also Eclipse, along with SDK's for iOS, Android and other environments. Windows Azure is a "back end", so almost any technology or front end system can use it to solve a problem. The SDK's are primarily for development. In the case of Visual Studio, you'll get a runtime environment for Windows Azure which allows you to develop, test and even run code all locally - you do not have to be connected to Windows Azure at all, until you're ready to deploy. You'll also get a few samples and codeblocks, along with all of the libraries you need to code with Windows Azure in .NET, PHP, Ruby, Java and more. The SDK is updated frequently, so check this location to find the latest for your environment and language - just click the bar that corresponds to what you want: http://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/develop/downloads/ The Windows Azure Training Kit (WATK) Whether you're writing code, using Windows Azure Virtual Machines (VM's) or working with Hadoop, you can use the WATK to get examples, code, PowerShell scripts, PowerPoint decks, training videos and much more. This should be your second download after the SDK. This is all of the training you need to get started, and even beyond. The WATK is updated frequently - and you can find the latest one here: http://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/develop/net/other-resources/training-kit/     There are many other resources - again, check the http://windowsazure.com site, the community newsletter (which introduces the latest features), and my blog for more.

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  • Make windows 7 client compatible with windows 2003 server

    - by caspert
    Hi, I am sysadmin for a small business with 30 clients. We have a server running windows 2003 and all the client-computers run windows XP. Now this is not an important issue, but it would be nice if it worked. My personal (home) computer is running windows 7 RC. When I bring my home-computer to work and log into the network with domain\username it logs me in just fine. Although, approving my profile, letting me into the network, including all network drives and printers, it does not download the profile fully. I do believe it might be getting the roaming profiles. So all my user- items, documents etc. attached to the profile does not show up on Windows 7. Is there any way to make it fully download the profile? as it does with Windows XP.

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  • No option for keeping installed programs when upgrading Windows 7 to Windows 8

    - by Nison Maël
    (Related : How can I upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 8 and keep my files and applications? ) I'm trying to upgrade my Windows 7 Pro (msdnaa) to Windows 8 Pro (msdnaa). The Windows 8 is the final version (I don't have access to previews on msdnaa anymore). As you can see on the related question accepted answer, Windows 8 should give an option to keep installed programs. But it does not. The only available options are "Keep only personal datas" and "Nothing". Any idea ? I'm running with SP1. I've got two partitions (one of them only contains data of a virtual machine). The two operating systems have the same architecture (64 bits). Screenshot:

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  • Connecting Windows XP to Windows 7 directly using cable

    - by TPR
    These are the problems I am encountering. XP can access Windows 7, not the other way around (which is fine, because I don't need it the other way currently) File transfer is too slow like 0.031 MB/s even though netperf and netCPS list around 8-9 MB/s. I disabled firewall on both computers. Both are same workgroup. I left homegroup on Windows 7. Windows 7 sees the connection as unidentified network. 10.1.1.2 (XP) and 10.1.1.1 (Windows 7) Subnet mask 255.255.255.0 Default gateway and DNS are empty for both of them. Both computer are connected to internet using wireless (using home network), and both of them are connected to each other using wire! If anybody has any pointers, do let me know. I have no problem doing such setup with both computers being Windows 7. This time one of them is XP though, and that seems to be the problem.

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  • Apply Skins to Add Some Flair to Windows Media Player 12

    - by DigitalGeekery
    Tired of the same look and feel of Windows Media Player in Windows 7? We’ll show you how to inject new life into your media experience by applying skins in WMP 12. Adding Skins In Library view, click on View from the Menu and select Skin Chooser. By default, WMP 12 comes with only a couple of modest skins. When you select a skin from the left pane, a preview will be displayed to the right. To apply one of the skins, simply select it from the pane on the left and click Apply Skin.   You can also switch to the currently selected skin in the Skin chooser by selecting Skin from the View menu, or by pressing Crtl + 2. Media Player will open in Now Playing mode. Click on the Switch to Library button at the top left to return to Library view.     Ok, so the included skins are a little boring. You can find additional skins by selecting Tools > Download > Skins.   Or, by clicking on More Skins from within the Skin chooser.   You will be taken the the Microsoft website where you can choose from dozens of skins to download and install. Select a skin you’d like to try and click the link to download.   If prompted with a warning message about files containing scripts that access your library, click Yes. Note: These warning boxes may look a bit different depending on your browser. We are using Chrome for this example.   Click on View Now.   Your new skin will be on display. To get back to the Library mode, find and click the Return to Full Mode button.    Some skins may launch video in a separate window.   If you want to delete one of the skins, select it from the list within the Skin chooser and click the red “X.” You can also press the delete key on your keyboard.   Then click Yes to confirm.   Conclusion Using skins is a quick and easy way to add some style to Windows Media Player and switching back and forth between skins is a breeze. Regardless of your interests, you are sure to find a skin that fits your tastes. You may find WMP skins on other sites, but sticking with Microsoft’s website will ensure maximum compatibility. Skins for Windows Media Player Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Make VLC Player Look like Windows Media Player 10Make VLC Player Look like Windows Media Player 11Make VLC Player Look like Winamp 5 (Kinda)Fixing When Windows Media Player Library Won’t Let You Add FilesInstall and Use the VLC Media Player on Ubuntu Linux TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips VMware Workstation 7 Acronis Online Backup DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Use Flixtime To Create Video Slideshows Creating a Password Reset Disk in Windows Bypass Waiting Time On Customer Service Calls With Lucyphone MELTUP – "The Beginning Of US Currency Crisis And Hyperinflation" Enable or Disable the Task Manager Using TaskMgrED Explorer++ is a Worthy Windows Explorer Alternative

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  • Display a Text Message During Bootup of Windows 7

    - by Mysticgeek
    Sometimes you might want to leave a text message for a user before they log into a Windows 7 computer. Today we show you a neat trick that allows you to leave a message they can read before logging in. Add a Text Message To add a message, click on Start and enter regedit into the Search box and hit Enter. Navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Current Version\Policies\System and double-click on legalnoticecaption. In the Value data field enter in the header you want…for instance your company name or the name of your computer…whatever you want it to be, then click OK. Then double-click on legalnoticetext … And in the Value data field enter in the message you want to display and click OK. Close out of Registry Editor and reboot the computer.   After the machine reboots you’ll see the text message you just created at the Welcome screen.   You can include whatever text message you want to be included for the user to read before they log in. This is a neat trick if you have a company or school and want to show a particular message to the user before they log into the machine. Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Start Your Computer More Quickly by Delaying the Startup of a Service in VistaCopy Windows Error Messages to the ClipboardHide the Recycle Bin Icon Text on Windows VistaHow To Disable Annoying Blinking Text in FirefoxStupid Geek Tricks: Using the Quick Zoom Feature in Outlook TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 Combine MP3 Files Easily QuicklyCode Provides Cheatsheets & Other Programming Stuff Download Free MP3s from Amazon Awe inspiring, inter-galactic theme (Win 7) Case Study – How to Optimize Popular Wordpress Sites Restore Hidden Updates in Windows 7 & Vista

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  • Convert Video and Remove Commercials in Windows 7 Media Center with MCEBuddy 1.1

    - by DigitalGeekery
    Today look at MCEBuddy for Windows 7 Media Center. This handy app automatically takes your recorded TV files and converts them to MP4, AVI, WMV, or MPEG format. It even has the option to cut out those annoying commercials during the conversion process. Installation and Configuration Download and extract MCE Buddy. (Download link below) Run the setup.exe file and take all the default settings.   Open MCEBuddy Configuration by going to Start > All Programs > MCEBuddy > MCEBuddy Configuration.   Video Paths The MCEBuddy application is comprised of a single window. The first step you’ll want to take is to define your Source and Destination paths. The “Source” will most likely be your Recorded TV directory. The Destination should NOT be the same as the Source folder. Note: The Recorded TV directory in Windows 7 Media Center will only display and play WTV & DVR-MS files. To watch the converted MP4, AVI, WMV, or MPEG files in Windows Media Center you’ll need to add them to your Video Library or Movie Library. Video Conversion Next, choose your preferred format for conversion from the “Convert to” drop down list. The default is MP4 with the H.264 codec. You’ll find a wide variety of formats. The first set of conversion options in the drop down list will resize the video to 720 pixels wide. The next two sections maintain the original size, and the final section is for a variety of portable devices.   Next, you’ll see a group of check boxes below the “Convert to” drop down list. The Commercial Skipping option will cut the commercials while converting the file. Sort By Series will create a sub-folder in your Destination folder for each TV show. Delete Original will delete the WTV file after conversion is complete. (This option is not recommended unless you are sure your files are converting properly and you no longer need the WTV file.) Start Minimized is ideal if you want to run MCEBuddy on Windows startup. Note: MCEBuddy installs and uses Comskip for commercial cutting by default. However, if you have ShowAnalyzer installed, it will use that application instead. Advanced Options To choose a specific time of day to perform the conversions, click the checkbox under the “Advanced Options,” and select the starting and ending times for conversion. For example, convert between 2 hours and 5 hours would be between 2 am and 5am. If you want MCEBuddy to constantly look for and immediately convert new recordings, leave the box unchecked.   The “Video age” option lets you choose a specific number of days to wait before performing the conversion. This can be useful if you want to watch the recordings first and delete those you don’t wish to convert. You can also choose the “Sub Directories” if you’d like MCEBuddy to convert files that are in a sub-folder in your “Source” directory. Second Conversion As you might expect, this option allows MCEBuddy to perform a second conversion of your file. This can be useful if you want to use your first conversion to create a higher quality MP4 or AVI file for playback on a larger screen, and a second one for a portable device such as Zune or iPhone. The same options from the first conversion are also available for the second. You’ll want to choose a separate Destination folder for the second conversion.   Start and Monitor Progress To start converting your video files, simply press the “Start” button at the bottom. You’ll be able to follow the progress in the “Current Activity” section. When all the video files have finished converting, or there are no current files to convert, MCEBuddy will display a “Started – Idle” status. Click “Stop” if you don’t want MCEBuddy to continue scanning for new files.   Conclusion MCEBuddy 1.1 will convert all WTV files in it’s source folder. If you want to pick and choose which recordings to convert, you may want to define a source folder different than the Recorded TV folder and then just copy or move the files you wish to convert into the new source folder. The conversion process does take a good bit of time. If you choose the commercial skipping and second conversion options it can take several hours to fully convert one TV recording. Overall, MCEBuddy makes a nice Media Center addition for those that want to save some space with smaller size files, convert Recorded TV files for their portable device, or automatically remove commercials. If you’re looking for a different method to skip commercials check out our post on how to skip commercials in Windows 7 Media Center. 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