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  • LUKOIL Overseas Holding Optimizes Oil Field Development Projects with Integrated Project Management

    - by Melissa Centurio Lopes
    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} LUKOIL Overseas Group is a growing oil and gas company that is an integral part of the vertically integrated oil company OAO LUKOIL. It is engaged in the exploration, acquisition, integration, and efficient development of oil and gas fields outside the Russian Federation to promote transforming LUKOIL into a transnational energy company. In 2010, the company signed a 20-year development project for the giant, West Qurna 2 oil field in Iraq. Executing 10,000 to 15,000 project activities simultaneously on 14 major construction and drilling projects in Iraq for the West Qurna-2 project meant the company needed a clear picture, in real time, of dependencies between its capital construction, geologic exploration and sinking projects—required for its building infrastructure oil field development projects in Iraq. LUKOIL Overseas Holding deployed Oracle’s Primavera P6 Enterprise Project Portfolio Management to generate structured project management information and optimize planning, monitoring, and analysis of all engineering and commercial activities—such as tenders, and bulk procurement of materials and equipment—related to oil field development projects. A word from LUKOIL Overseas Holding Ltd. “Previously, we created project schedules on desktop computers and uploaded them to the project server to be merged into one big file for each project participant to access. This was not scalable, as we’ve grown and now run up to 15,000 activities in numerous projects and subprojects at any time. With Oracle’s Primavera P6 Enterprise Project Portfolio Management, we can now work concurrently on projects with many team members, enjoy absolute security, and issue new baselines for all projects and project participants once a week, with ease.” – Sergey Kotov, Head of IT and the Communication Office, LUKOIL Mid-East Ltd. Oracle Primavera Solutions: · Facilitated managing dependencies between projects by enabling the general scheduler to reschedule all projects and subprojects once a week, realigning 10,000 to 15,000 project activities that the company runs at any time · Replaced Microsoft Project and a paper-based system with a complete solution that provides structured project data · Enhanced data security by establishing project management security policies that enable only authorized project members to edit their project tasks, while enabling each project participant to view all project data that are relevant to that individual’s task · Enabled the company to monitor project progress in comparison to the projected plan, based on physical project assets to determine if each project is on track to conclude within its time and budget limitations To view the full list of solutions view here. “Oracle Gold Partner Parma Telecom was key to our successful Primavera deployment, implementing the software’s basic functionalities, such as project content, timeframes management, and cost management, in addition to performing its integration with our enterprise resource planning system and intranet portal within ten months and in accordance with budgets,” said Rafik Baynazarov, head of the master planning and control office, LUKOIL Mid-East Ltd. “ To read the full version of the customer success story, please view here.

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  • Inside Red Gate - Project teams

    - by Simon Cooper
    Within each division in Red Gate, development effort is structured around one or more project teams; currently, each division contains 2-3 separate teams. These are self contained units responsible for a particular development project. Project team structure The typical size of a development team varies, but is normally around 4-7 people - one project manager, two developers, one or two testers, a technical author (who is responsible for the text within the application, website content, and help documentation) and a user experience designer (who designs and prototypes the UIs) . However, team sizes can vary from 3 up to 12, depending on the division and project. As an rule, all the team sits together in the same area of the office. (Again, this is my experience of what happens. I haven't worked in the DBA division, and SQL Tools might have changed completely since I moved to .NET. As I mentioned in my previous post, each division is free to structure itself as it sees fit.) Depending on the project, and the other needs in the division, the tech author and UX designer may be shared between several projects. Generally, developers and testers work on one project at a time. If the project is a simple point release, then it might not need a UX designer at all. However, if it's a brand new product, then a UX designer and tech author will be involved right from the start. Developers, testers, and the project manager will normally stay together in the same team as they work on different projects, unless there's a good reason to split or merge teams for a particular project. Technical authors and UX designers will normally go wherever they are needed in the division, depending on what each project needs at the time. In my case, I was working with more or less the same people for over 2 years, all the way through SQL Compare 7, 8, and Schema Compare for Oracle. This helped to build a great sense of camaraderie wihin the team, and helped to form and maintain a team identity. This, in turn, meant we worked very well together, and so the final result was that much better (as well as making the work more fun). How is a project started and run? The product manager within each division collates user feedback and ideas, does lots of research, throws in a few ideas from people within the company, and then comes up with a list of what the division should work on in the next few years. This is split up into projects, and after each project is greenlit (I'll be discussing this later on) it is then assigned to a project team, as and when they become available (I'm sure there's lots of discussions and meetings at this point that I'm not aware of!). From that point, it's entirely up to the project team. Just as divisions are autonomous, project teams are also given a high degree of autonomy. All the teams in Red Gate use some sort of vaguely agile methodology; most use some variations on SCRUM, some have experimented with Kanban. Some store the project progress on a whiteboard, some use our bug tracker, others use different methods. It all depends on what the team members think will work best for them to get the best result at the end. From that point, the project proceeds as you would expect; code gets written, tests pass and fail, discussions about how to resolve various problems are had and decided upon, and out pops a new product, new point release, new internal tool, or whatever the project's goal was. The project manager ensures that everyone works together without too much bloodshed and that thrown missiles are constrained to Nerf bullets, the developers write the code, the testers ensure it actually works, and the tech author and UX designer ensure that people will be able to use the final product to solve their problem (after all, developers make lousy UI designers and technical authors). Projects in Red Gate last a relatively short amount of time; most projects are less than 6 months. The longest was 18 months. This has evolved as the company has grown, and I suspect is a side effect of the type of software Red Gate produces. As an ISV, we sell packaged software; we only get revenue when customers purchase the ready-made tools. As a result, we only get a sellable piece of software right at the end of a project. Therefore, the longer the project lasts, the more time and money has to be invested by the company before we get any revenue from it, and the riskier the project becomes. This drives the average project time down. Small project teams are the core of how Red Gate produces software, and are what the whole development effort of the company is built around. In my next post, I'll be looking at the office itself, and how all 200 of us manage to fit on two floors of a small office building.

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  • Simple Project Templates

    - by Geertjan
    The NetBeans sources include a module named "simple.project.templates": In the module sources, Tim Boudreau turns out to be the author of the code, so I asked him what it was all about, and if he could provide some usage code. His response, from approximately this time last year because it's been sitting in my inbox for a while, is below. Sure - though I think the javadoc in it is fairly complete.  I wrote it because I needed to create a bunch of project templates for Javacard, and all of the ways that is usually done were grotesque and complicated.  I figured we already have the ability to create files from templates, and we already have the ability to do substitutions in templates, so why not have a single file that defines the project as a list of file templates to create (with substitutions in the names) and some definitions of what should be in project properties. You can also add files to the project programmatically if you want.Basically, a template for an entire project is a .properties file.  Any line which doesn't have the prefix 'pp.' or 'pvp.' is treated as the definition of one file which should be created in the new project.  Any such line where the key ends in * means that file should be opened once the new project is created.  So, for example, in the nodejs module, the definition looks like: {{projectName}}.js*=Templates/javascript/HelloWorld.js .npmignore=node_hidden_templates/npmignore So, the first line means:  - Create a file with the same name as the project, using the HelloWorld template    - I.e. the left side of the line is the relative path of the file to create, and the right side is the path in the system filesystem for the template to use       - If the template is not one you normally want users to see, just register it in the system filesystem somewhere other than Templates/ (but remember to set the attribute that marks it as a template)  - Include that file in the set of files which should be opened in the editor once the new project is created. To actually create a project, first you just create a new ProjectCreator: ProjectCreator gen = new ProjectCreator( parentFolderOfNewProject ); Now, if you want to programmatically generate any files, in addition to those defined in the template, you can: gen.add (new FileCreator("nbproject", "project.xml", false) {     public DataObject create (FileObject project, Map<String,String> substitutions) throws IOException {          ...     } }); Then pass the FileObject for the project template (the properties file) to the ProjectCreator's createProject method (hmm, maybe it should be the string path to the project template instead, to save the caller trouble looking up the FileObject for the template).  That method looks like this: public final GeneratedProject createProject(final ProgressHandle handle, final String name, final FileObject template, final Map<String, String> substitutions) throws IOException { The name parameter should be the directory name for the new project;  the map is the strings you gathered in the wizard which should be used for substitutions.  createProject should be called on a background thread (i.e. use a ProgressInstantiatingIterator for the wizard iterator and just pass in the ProgressHandle you are given). The return value is a GeneratedProject object, which is just a holder for the created project directory and the set of DataObjects which should be opened when the wizard finishes. I'd love to see simple.project.templates moved out of the javacard cluster, as it is really useful and much simpler than any of the stuff currently done for generating projects.  It would also be possible to do much richer tools for creating projects in apisupport - i.e. choose (or create in the wizard) the templates you want to use, generate a skeleton wizard with a UI for all the properties you'd like to substitute, etc. Here is a partial project template from Javacard - for example usage, see org.netbeans.modules.javacard.wizard.ProjectWizardIterator in javacard.project (or the much simpler one in contrib/nodejs). #This properties file describes what to create when a project template is#instantiated.  The keys are paths on disk relative to the project root. #The values are paths to the templates to use for those files in the system#filesystem.  Any string inside {{ and }}'s will be substituted using properties#gathered in the template wizard.#Special key prefixes are #  pp. - indicates an entry for nbproject/project.properties#  pvp. - indicates an entry for nbproject/private/private.properties #File templates, in format [path-in-project=path-to-template]META-INF/javacard.xml=org-netbeans-modules-javacard/templates/javacard.xmlMETA-INF/MANIFEST.MF=org-netbeans-modules-javacard/templates/EAP_MANIFEST.MF APPLET-INF/applet.xml=org-netbeans-modules-javacard/templates/applet.xmlscripts/{{classnamelowercase}}.scr=org-netbeans-modules-javacard/templates/test.scrsrc/{{packagepath}}/{{classname}}.java*=Templates/javacard/ExtendedApplet.java nbproject/deployment.xml=org-netbeans-modules-javacard/templates/deployment.xml#project.properties contentspp.display.name={{projectname}}pp.platform.active={{activeplatform}} pp.active.device={{activedevice}}pp.includes=**pp.excludes= I will be using the above info in an upcoming blog entry and provide step by step instructions showing how to use them. However, anyone else out there should have enough info from the above to get started yourself!

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  • Front-end structure of large scale Django project

    - by Saike
    Few days ago, I started to work in new company. Before me, all front-end and backend code was written by one man (oh my...). As you know, Django app contains two main directories for front-end: /static - for static(public) files and /templates - for django templates Now, we have large application with more than 10 different modules like: home, admin, spanel, mobile etc. This is current structure of files and directories: FIRST - /static directory. As u can see, it is mixed directories with some named like modules, some contains global libs. one more: SECOND - /templates directory. Some directories named like module with mixed templates, some depends on new version =), some used only in module, but placed globally. and more: I think, that this is ugly, non-maintable, put-in-stress structure! After some time spend, i suggest to use this scheme, that based on module-structure. At first, we have version directories, used for save full project backup, includes: /DEPRECATED directory - for old, unused files and /CURRENT (Active) directory, that contains production version of project. I think it's right, because we can access to older or newer version files fast and easy. Also, we are saved from broken or wrong dependencies between different versions. Second, in every version we have standalone modules and global module. Every module contains own /static and /templates directories. This structure used to avoid broken or wrong dependencies between different modules, because every module has own js app, css tables and local images. Global module contains all libraries, main stylesheets and images like logos or favicon. I think, this structure is much better to maintain, update, refactoring etc. My question is: How do you think, is this scheme better than current? Can this scheme live, or it is not possible to implement this in Django app?

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  • Project Management and Scheduling Techniques

    - by Alec Smart
    Hello, I know this is probably the nth project management question. But am trying to move my team onto a more robust project management technique. Am wondering what is the best technique to use? I know that probably no technique is best, but which are the most popular techniques? Poker planning? Evidence Based Scheduling? COCOMO? Agile? Scrum? XP? Which one to use? Also, suppose I use EBS, wouldn't it be too time consuming to break down every single activity into fine grained tasks? E.g. "Design" is a goal, what kind of fine-grained tasks will I have under it? Is this is a waste of time i.e. dividing work into so many micro parts. Usually when I give my programmers a task, I follow up every week, and they complete quite a lot of the task assigned to them (the tasks are very broad e.g. X module). Is EBS worth it? Are there any white-papers on it so that I can implement it on my own? (instead of using Fogbugz) Most of my projects are web-based projects. Thank you for your time.

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  • Agile project management, agile development: early integration

    - by Matías Fidemraizer
    I believe that agile works if everything is agile. In software development area, in my opinion, if team members' code is integrated early, code will be more in sync and this has a lot of pros: Early integration helps team members to avoid painful merges. Encourages better coding habits, because everyone makes sure that they don't break co-workers' code everyday. Both developers and architects (code reviewers) may detect bad design decisions or just wrong development directions in real-time, preventing useless work. Actually I'm talking about getting the latest version of code base and checking-in your own code to the source control in a daily basis. When you start your coding day (i.e. you arrive to your work), your first action is updating your code base with the latest version from the source control. In the other hand, when you're about an hour to leave from your work and go home, your last action is checking-in your code to the source control and be sure that your day work doesn't break the project's build process. Rather than updating and checking-in your code once you finished an entire task, I believe the best approach is fixing small and flexible personal milestones and checking-in the code once you finish one of these. I really believe that this coding approach fits better in the agile project management concept. Do you know some document, blog post, wiki, article or whatever that you can suggest me that could be in sync with my opinion?. And, do you find any problem working with this approach?. Thank you in advance.

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  • Software development project inception phase

    - by john ryan
    Currently our team develops Web Applications and now we are going to Windows Forms applications. I have created the inception phase for our Windows Forms project structure. eg: ApplicationSolution --> Security Project(Login Authentication) a. Users will be registered with different applications in our application database. eg: ProjectApplicationId|ProjectName | UserId 1 |ProjectApplication1| user 2 |ProjectApplication2| user b. Execute Application (Start) c. On Security dialog, application automatically get the userid of the user and see all the application it is registered using System.Security.Principal.WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent() eg: Prototype Welcome User! Please Choose Appliations you are registered on below: ProjectApplication1 <--this will be a dropdown ProjectApplication2 Password: [*********************] [Access Application Button] d. User selects the application with its password e. If the password is incorrect (application.exit()) else execute Selected Application eg: ProjectApplication1 is selected then execute ProjectApplication1 --> ProjectApplication1 --> ProjectApplication2 --> Many to come ++ if ProjectApplications has been closed then restart security Application. My questions on this use case: Is my use case possible? Can you give me any recommendations ? Currently we use setup and deployment to create installer in each Windows Forms application.

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  • Project Management Software / 1 maybe 2 developers

    - by Ominus
    I am looking for software that I can use to "manage" multiple projects (5 - 10). Here are the features I would like but any recommendation is welcome. Bug/Feature tracking on a per project basis. Some way to keep all documents, diagrams, specs, requirements, in one place with the project. Better yet a tool where all these things or most of them could be authored. Task management during the development phase with milestones and estimates/actuals. Git integration I have been doing contract work and i have been doing really well for myself as far as getting projects but its becoming VERY hard to manage everything in an efficient manner. I am trying to learn about best practices when it comes to software programming methodologies and the more I read the more i realize that I am just managing these projects poorly. I am getting things done but the more I take on the less "solid" everything is. I am afraid if I don't get some good solid tools/practices in place I am going to do my customers and myself a disservice. The problem is that there are SO many options that its hard to weed through them all. I was at a point today where I had decided that I would just code my own (there is some irony here)! Obviously everyone has their likes dislikes I would love to hear from some of you lone programmers and how you manage everything since our needs aren't exactly the same thing that a large team might need. I also want a solution that can scale to 2 maybe 3 developers if I end up hiring some people to help with my work load. Thanks again for your usual insights!

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  • What Project Management Software should I use?

    - by Vecdid
    I am looking for either an MS tool like project or an open source equivalent. Yes I could google it, but I am looking for some insight from some people whp handle the end of the software I would as a programmer. The tool has to run using IIS as the webserver. What are some of the best features of your suggestion?

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  • need a project design tool

    - by santosh
    I am looking for simple and easy to use tools through which I can get project's visual picture of folder/file tree stucture , its classes, functions and objects, relations between classes and files.

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  • Project Idea - Android

    - by Darren Young
    Hi, I am trying to come up with some project ideas for my final year at University, and I think that I have one that would offer be a (massive) challenge, and something I could potentially make money from. I just want to check something. Is it possible(from a photograph), to be able to determine somebodys face and the individual parts of that face - eyes, ears, nose, etc? This will probably be via Android. Thanks.

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  • Resources for using TFS for Agile Project Development?

    - by Amy P
    Our company just installed TFS for us to start using for project development processes and source control. They want us to start using it to manage our projects as well. We have a small team, no current bug or task tracking software, and 2 developers of the 3 have experience with any actual methodologies. What books, websites, and/or other information can you recommend for us to use to get started?

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  • Open source project home page

    - by Oskar Kjellin
    I've created a software that I want to be able to market. I'd like to be able to post it on forums etc and for that I need a home page. Is there any open source C# project home pages that you can use? The functionality I'm looking for is like adding new versions (perhaps a version control from the software), downloading and user guides. So what I want is pretty basic: I want to be able to upload and let the users download. I've written this on my own as well but I guess that if there are open source projects that have done this they're probably better. This can't be such a rare problem so please lead me to some resources so that I can create my page and publish my software! :)

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  • Is there an algorithm for converting quaternion rotations to Euler angle rotations?

    - by Will Baker
    Is there an existing algorithm for converting a quaternion representation of a rotation to an Euler angle representation? The rotation order for the Euler representation is known and can be any of the six permutations (i.e. xyz, xzy, yxz, yzx, zxy, zyx). I've seen algorithms for a fixed rotation order (usually the NASA heading, bank, roll convention) but not for arbitrary rotation order. Furthermore, because there are multiple Euler angle representations of a single orientation, this result is going to be ambiguous. This is acceptable (because the orientation is still valid, it just may not be the one the user is expecting to see), however it would be even better if there was an algorithm which took rotation limits (i.e. the number of degrees of freedom and the limits on each degree of freedom) into account and yielded the 'most sensible' Euler representation given those constraints. I have a feeling this problem (or something similar) may exist in the IK or rigid body dynamics domains. Solved: I just realised that it might not be clear that I solved this problem by following Ken Shoemake's algorithms from Graphics Gems. I did answer my own question at the time, but it occurs to me it may not be clear that I did so. See the answer, below, for more detail. Just to clarify - I know how to convert from a quaternion to the so-called 'Tait-Bryan' representation - what I was calling the 'NASA' convention. This is a rotation order (assuming the convention that the 'Z' axis is up) of zxy. I need an algorithm for all rotation orders. Possibly the solution, then, is to take the zxy order conversion and derive from it five other conversions for the other rotation orders. I guess I was hoping there was a more 'overarching' solution. In any case, I am surprised that I haven't been able to find existing solutions out there. In addition, and this perhaps should be a separate question altogether, any conversion (assuming a known rotation order, of course) is going to select one Euler representation, but there are in fact many. For example, given a rotation order of yxz, the two representations (0,0,180) and (180,180,0) are equivalent (and would yield the same quaternion). Is there a way to constrain the solution using limits on the degrees of freedom? Like you do in IK and rigid body dynamics? i.e. in the example above if there were only one degree of freedom about the Z axis then the second representation can be disregarded. I have tracked down one paper which could be an algorithm in this pdf but I must confess I find the logic and math a little hard to follow. Surely there are other solutions out there? Is arbitrary rotation order really so rare? Surely every major 3D package that allows skeletal animation together with quaternion interpolation (i.e. Maya, Max, Blender, etc) must have solved exactly this problem?

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  • Project Management - Asana / activeCollab / basecamp / alternative / none

    - by rickyduck
    I don't know whether this should be on programmers - I've been looking at the above three apps over the past few weeks just for myself and I'm in two minds. All three look good, are easy to use, and I came to this conclusion; Asana is the easiest to use ActiveCollab is the feature rich and easiest flow BaseCamp is the best UX / design But I didn't really find my workflow was any more quicker / efficient, in fact it was a bit slower and organized. Is there a realistic place for them in workflow - should programmers use them for themselves, or only when a project manager can take control of it?

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  • Project Kapros: A Custom-Built Workstation Featuring an In-Desk Computer

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    While we’ve seen our fair share of case mods, it’s infrequent we see one as polished and built-in as this custom built work station. What started as an IKEA Galant desk, ended as a stunningly executed desk-as-computer build. High gloss paint, sand-blasted plexiglass windows, custom lighting, and some quality hardware all come together in this build to yield a gorgeous setup with plenty of power and style to go around. Hit up the link below for a massive photo album build guide detailing the process from start to finish. Project Kapros: IKEA Galant PC Desk Mod [via Kotaku] How to Stress Test the Hard Drives in Your PC or Server How To Customize Your Android Lock Screen with WidgetLocker The Best Free Portable Apps for Your Flash Drive Toolkit

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  • How to determine number of resources to be allocated in a software project

    - by aditi
    Last day I have been interviewed and the interviwer asked me as given the outline of a project, how can we determine the number of resources to be needed for the same? I donot know to do do so? Is there any standard way of doing so? or is it based on the experience? or how.... I am pretty new in this activity and my knowledge is zero at present .... so any clear explanation with some example(simple) will help me(and people like me) to understand this. Thanks

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  • Why do large IT projects tend to fail or have big cost/schedule overruns?

    - by Pratik
    I always read about large scale transformation or integration project that are total or almost total disaster. Even if they somehow manage to succeed the cost and schedule blow out is enormous. What is the real reason behind large projects being more prone to failure. Can agile be used in these sort of projects or traditional approach is still the best. One example from Australia is the Queensland Payroll project where they changed test success criteria to deliver the project. See some more failed projects in this SO question Have you got any personal experience to share?

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  • Motivating developers in a project perceived as **dull** ?

    - by Fanatic23
    As a manager, I can't always end up generating work that'd be cutting edge. Some of the projects do run on maintenance mode, and generate a healthy free cash flow for the company. As a developer what would it take for you to stick around in this project? I have been thinking of re-branding the work, but I could do with a lot of help here. Appreciate a single response per post. Please don't suggest an increased pay-packet, this creates more problems than it solves.

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  • Updating and organizing class diagrams in a growing C++ project

    - by vanna
    I am working on a C++ project that is getting bigger and bigger. I do a lot of UML so it is not really hard to explain my work to co-workers. Lately though I implemented a lot of new features and I gave up updating by hand my Dia UML diagrams. I once used the class diagram of Visual Studio, which is my IDE but didn't get clear results. I need to show my work on a regular basis and I would like to be as clear as possible. Is there any tool that could generate a sort of organized map of my work (namespaces, classes, interactions, etc.) ?

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  • Ant: project dependencies in a flat project layout with ivy

    - by MH
    Hello, I have two (Eclipse-) projects. Project A depends on project B, but the projects aren't nested i.e. project A is not a subproject of project B. Apache Ivy is responsible for the dependency management. When I run the compile task in Project A, is there any way to trigger the compile task (in project B) automatically (for example if the jar file of project B doesn't exist)? Thanks a million in advance.

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  • Project Codenames - Yea or Nay?

    - by rmx
    Where I work, most of our projects have (or at least attempt) descriptive, useful names. However we have a few with names that make no sense: I found that an assembly named WiFi which actually has nothing whatsoever to do with wi-fi, but is a codename. When I asked why, I was told that it's to protect company secrets incase some intern has few too many at the pub on Friday and starts chatting about the brand new 'WiFi' project he's been working on. Its clear that some people find enjoyment in finding silly / amusing codenames for their projects (like in this question). My question is: is it really a good idea to use codenames for your projects or are you better off spending the time to decide upon a descriptive name? My opinion is that in the long-run its better to give your projects relevant names. My reasoning is that if you can't think of a decent name, perhaps you don't really know the requirements well enough. I think there are better ways to 'protect company secrets' and I find it quite confusing when the name does not correlate at all with the content. It's just common sense, surely?! So do you use codenames and what the your reasons for or against this seemingly common, yet annoying (to me at least) practice?

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  • A project idea I've got...

    - by Mr Teeth
    Hi, Next year I will be doing a final year project at Uni. I've already thought of one and was wondering what you guys think of it. I want to create a University Information Search for prospective students who are trying to look for an affordable University to attend. It will depend on the student's family income and the grades they get. They enter in those two parameters (and some more) and it comes up with a list of suitable Unis based on their criteria. This is not about the price of tution fee. It's mostly to do with the cost of living. Stuff like: Rent (if living in a private flat). Student Accomadation. Cost of traveling to your home and back (for holidays). ...and some other stuff stuff I haven't thought about yet. It'll mostly be GUI driven with some textual information. I'm also thinking of using it as a website interface. What do you guys think? Can I program something like this Java? If there's any holes you see in my idea please tell me.

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  • Project Euler problem 214, How can i make it more efficient?

    - by Once
    I am becoming more and more addicted to the Project Euler problems. However since one week I am stuck with the #214. Here is a short version of the problem: PHI() is Euler's totient function, i.e. for any given integer n, PHI(n)=numbers of k<=n for which gcd(k,n)=1. We can iterate PHI() to create a chain. For example starting from 18: PHI(18)=6 = PHI(6)=2 = PHI(2)=1. So starting from 18 we get a chain of length 4 (18,6,2,1) The problem is to calculate the sum of all primes less than 40e6 which generate a chain of length 25. I built a function that calculates the chain length of any number and I tested it for small values: it works well and fast. sum of all primes<=20 which generate a chain of length 4: 12 sum of all primes<=1000 which generate a chain of length 10: 39383 Unfortunately my algorithm doesn't scale well. When I apply it to the problem, it takes several hours to calculate... so I stop it because the Project Euler problems must be solved in less than one minute. I thought that my prime detection function might be slow so I fed the program with a list of primes <40e6 to avoid the primality test... The code runs now a little bit faster, but there is still no way to get a solution in less than a few hours (and I don't want this). So is there any "magic trick" that I am missing here ? I really don't understand how to be more efficient on this one... I am not asking for the solution, because fighting with optimization is all the fun of Project Euler. However, any small hint that could put me on the right track would be welcome. Thanks !

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