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  • Virtual audio driver for Windows?

    - by Ognjen
    Is there any (possibly free or open-source) virtual WDM audio driver for Windows, with additional processing plugins, which would add one more layer between windows applications and actual sound card's WDM audio driver, allowing to: Add software DSPs to general audio output. I would like to be able to use custom effects, like compressor, or stereophonic-to-binaural converter for listening online's streaming media on headphones, etc. Connect its output to some custom buffer instead of the sound card. For example, to be able to record audio, or to send audio via wireless connection to some other wireless source? Virtual audio driver was just my idea how to solve these issues - if you know other way, please share your knowledge. I need this for Windows 7 and/or Windows XP.

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  • Is there a good XP like windows explorer for windows Vista?

    - by Brett Ryan
    I'm still refusing to go to Windows Vista and now Windows 7 mainly due to the windows explorer, I find it cumbersome and hard to use exclusively with a keyboard. I use XP file explorer in the most basic view, the address bar at the top and files always in list view underneath. The reason I do this is because I'm almost blind and do everything from the keyboard and don't touch the mouse whilst navigating through files, this is because I can type "L[ENTER]D[Enter]B[Enter]" and know that I'm in "c:\documents and settings\Brett Ryan", and I can hit [Tab] once to go to the address bar to type in a folder. Can anyone suggest a replacement for windows explorer that brings back this basic navigational behavior?

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  • Windows XP computer can't see Windows 7 shares

    - by Alex Brault
    I am building a network containing notably a laptop running XP and a computer running Windows 7. Both computer have shared folders and the 7 has a shared printer, to which another laptop running 7 is able to print. If I attempt to see the laptop's network shares on the PC, everything works perfectly: I am able to see and enter the folders. The reverse operation however doesn't work. Xp doesn't see the Windows 7 PC. Other things to note: As mentioned above, another Windows 7 computer is able to see the printer and I can ping both computers from either PC. Both computers are in the same workgroup named ALLAITEMENT Password-protected shares are turned off on the PC. The 7 Computer uses 40/56 bit encryption The Windows XP laptop has SP3

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  • XP OEM licensing when reinstalling Windows XP

    - by mindas
    My wife has managed to buy a Dell laptop she was using at her ex-employer that just went bust. The problem with it is the OS (Windows XP) which takes ages to boot and is generally disproportionally slow to the hardware of the machine. So my aim is to sacrifice a day and reinstall it. The problem I am slightly worried about is the licensing/registration/activation hell. Apart from the sticker (with WinXP license key), the laptop has no other paperwork proving this license is legitimate. I believe this was originally an OEM license. Unfortunately, I don't have the the installation CD. This computer also has MS Office installed (which I would like to retain) but it none of MS Office apps would launch due to some obscure error complaining about lack of free disk space (which computer has plenty of). I have absolutely no clue what kind of license this MS Office was. And because the company has gone into the administration, there is no way of getting this information nor installable media. I believe that by buying the hardware I have also acquired the software which I can use as I see fit. Correct me if I'm wrong. Above said, my question would be: What is the easiest way of reinstalling the XP? By easiest I mean avoiding spending my time to prove Microsoft support I've got the right to use the software (insert your computer says noooo joke here) but still being able to get to fresh virgin activated legal state of the XP. I used to work as a sysadmin many years ago so I am not afraid of any technical difficulties. The same question applies to MS Office. I imagine the process would consist of backing up all the data, pulling some bits from the registry and using that on the fresh install. As for reinstall I'd expect to use some sort of OEM Windows repair CD from Dell, right? Are those freely available? My other box (HP) has such a thing and it can't be used on any other brand. I'm sure somebody had to go through this licensing hell and could share his/her tips. Thanks in advance.

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  • Upgrade to Genuine Windows 8 Pro from non genuine Windows 7

    - by mark
    I have a computer with non-genuine windows 7 (cracked with windows loader). I was thinking of buying / upgrading to Windows 8 Pro. I ran Windows8-UpgradeAssistant.exe and was said that I can upgrade to Windows 8 Pro. Can I perform a clean upgrade (format and install) from my current windows 7 to windows 8? In future, in order to re-install Windows 8 do I need to re-install the non-genuine Windows 7 and install on top of it? If my hard disk crash, or I want to install on a new hard disk (clean install), do I need to install windows 7 again before upgrading to Windows 8? If I don't like Windows 8, can I downgrade to Windows 7 genuine?

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  • XP OEM licensing when reinstalling Windows XP

    - by mindas
    My wife has managed to buy a Dell laptop she was using at her ex-employer that just went bust. The problem with it is the OS (Windows XP) which takes ages to boot and is generally disproportionally slow to the hardware of the machine. So my aim is to sacrifice a day and reinstall it. The problem I am slightly worried about is the licensing/registration/activation hell. Apart from the sticker (with WinXP license key), the laptop has no other paperwork proving this license is legitimate. I believe this was originally an OEM license. Unfortunately, I don't have the the installation CD. This computer also has MS Office installed (which I would like to retain) but it none of MS Office apps would launch due to some obscure error complaining about lack of free disk space (which computer has plenty of). I have absolutely no clue what kind of license this MS Office was. And because the company has gone into the administration, there is no way of getting this information nor installable media. I believe that by buying the hardware I have also acquired the software which I can use as I see fit. Correct me if I'm wrong. Above said, my question would be: What is the easiest way of reinstalling the XP? By easiest I mean avoiding spending my time to prove Microsoft support I've got the right to use the software (insert your computer says noooo joke here) but still being able to get to fresh virgin activated legal state of the XP. I used to work as a sysadmin many years ago so I am not afraid of any technical difficulties. The same question applies to MS Office. I imagine the process would consist of backing up all the data, pulling some bits from the registry and using that on the fresh install. As for reinstall I'd expect to use some sort of OEM Windows repair CD from Dell, right? Are those freely available? My other box (HP) has such a thing and it can't be used on any other brand. I'm sure somebody had to go through this licensing hell and could share his/her tips. Thanks in advance.

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  • Windows software manager

    - by lydonchandra
    I am using MacPort on OSX, and just wondering if is there an equivalent software for Windows XP/Vista/7 ? The thing is, I need to install ant, maven, git, etc on Windows platform and do not want to manually edit SYSTEM PATH etc. Is there a software that can install ant, maven, git on Windows (just like MacPort)?

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  • How to Easily Put a Windows PC into Kiosk Mode With Assigned Access

    - by Chris Hoffman
    Windows 8.1′s Assigned Access feature allows you to easily lock a Windows PC to a single application, such as a web browser. This feature makes it easy for anyone to configure Windows 8.1 devices as point-of-sale or other kiosk systems. In the past, setting up a Windows PC in kiosk mode involved much more work, requiring the use of third-party software, group policy, or Linux distributions designed around kiosk mode. Assigned Access is available on Windows 8.1 RT, Windows 8.1 Professional, and Windows 8.1 Enterprise. The standard edition of Windows 8.1 doesn’t support Assigned Access. Create a User Account for Assigned Access Rather than turn your entire computer into a locked-down kiosk system, Assigned Access allows you to create a separate user account that can only launch a single app — such as a web browser. To set this up, you must be logged into Windows as a user with administrator permissions. First, open the PC settings app — swipe in from the right or press Windows Key + C to open the charms bar, tap Settings, and tap Change PC settings. In the PC settings app, select Accounts and select Other accounts. Use the Add an account button to create a new Windows account. Select  the “Sign in without a Microsoft account” option and select Local account to create a local user account. You could also create a Microsoft account, but you may not want to do this if you just want a locked-down account with only browser access. If you need to install apps from the Windows Store to use in Assigned Access mode, you’ll have to set up a Microsoft account instead of a local account. A local account will still allow you access to the preinstalled apps, such as Internet Explorer. You may want to create a user account with a blank password. This would make it simple for anyone to access kiosk mode, even if the system becomes locked or needs to be rebooted. The account will be created as a standard user account with limited permissions. Leave it as a standard user account — don’t make it an administrator account. Set Up Assigned Access Once you’ve created an account, you’ll first need to sign into it. If you don’t, you’ll see a “This account has no apps” message when trying to enable Assigned Access. Go back to the welcome screen, log in to the new account you created, and allow Windows to go through the first-time account setup process. If you want to use a non-default app in kiosk mode, install it while logged in as that user account. Once you’re done, log out of the other account, log back in as your administrator account, and go back to the Other accounts screen. Click the Set up an account for assigned access option to continue. Select the user account you created and select the app you want to limit the account to. For a web-based kiosk, this can be a web browser such as the Modern version of Internet Explorer. Businesses can also create their own Modern apps and set them to run in kiosk mode in this way. Note that Microsoft’s documentation says “web browsers are not good choices for assigned access” because they require more permissions than average Modern (or “Windows Store”) apps. However, if you want to provide a kiosk for web-browsing, using Assigned Access is a much better option than using Guest Mode and offering up a full Windows desktop. When you’re done, restart your PC and log in as the Assigned Access account. Windows will automatically open the app you chose and won’t allow a user to leave that app. Standard Windows 8 features like the charms bar, app switcher, and Start screen won’t appear. Pressing the Windows key once will do nothing. To sign out of Assigned Access mode, press the Windows key five times — quickly — while signed in. You’ll be sent back to the standard login screen. The account will actually still be logged in and the app will remain running — this method just “locks” the screen and allows another user to log in. Automatically Log Into Assigned Access Whenever your Windows device boots, you can log into the Assigned Access account and turn it into a kiosk system. While this isn’t ideal for all kiosk systems, you may want the device to automatically launch the specific app when it boots without requiring any login process. To do so, you’ll just need to have Windows automatically log into the Assigned Access account when it boots. This option is hidden and not available in the standard Control Panel. You’ll need to use the hidden netplwiz Control Panel tool to set up automatic login on boot. If you didn’t create a password for the user account, leave the Password field empty while configuring this. Security Considerations If you’re using this feature to turn a Windows 8.1 system into a kiosk and leaving it open to the public, remember to consider security. Anyone could come up to the system, press the Windows key five times, and try to log into your standard administrator user account. Ensure the administrator user account has a strong password so people won’t be able to get past the kiosk system’s limitations and tamper with the system. Even Windows 8′s detractors have to admit that it’s an ideal system for a touch-screen kiosk device, running either a browser or another specific application. Assigned Access finally makes this easy to set up on Windows systems in the real world — no IT experience, third-party software, or Linux distributions necessary.     

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  • How can I set my bootloader to load my primary (C:) partition?

    - by acidzombie24
    I created 4 partitions and want to use them to have seperate Windows XP, Windows 7, (possibly) Windows Vista installations, and "WinDummy" (to test applications in Vista, XP or another OS). I used Norton Ghost to install an OS to the drive in about 3 minutes. My problem is that I installed the spare first on the 4th partition, then Windows 7 on the second. I tried to set the bootloader (with easybcd) to use the first partition - but it doesn't want to. Heres my debug screen on easybcd As you can see, the device is set to H and i cant figure out how to change it. I can make my bootloader use Windows 7 first, but I can't make it use my C: install of XP instead of my spare H:. How would I fix this? Windows Boot Manager -------------------- identifier {9dea862c-5cdd-4e70-acc1-f32b344d4795} device partition=H: description Windows Boot Manager locale en-US inherit {7ea2e1ac-2e61-4728-aaa3-896d9d0a9f0e} default {bc2d8409-8640-11de-aa7e-a477d86453c4} resumeobject {bc2d8405-8640-11de-aa7e-a477d86453c4} displayorder {bc2d8409-8640-11de-aa7e-a477d86453c4} {bc2d8406-8640-11de-aa7e-a477d86453c4} {bc2d8404-8640-11de-aa7e-a477d86453c4} {466f5a88-0af2-4f76-9038-095b170dc21c} toolsdisplayorder {b2721d73-1db4-4c62-bf78-c548a880142d} timeout 3 Real-mode Boot Sector --------------------- identifier {bc2d8409-8640-11de-aa7e-a477d86453c4} device partition=C: path \NTLDR description Windows XP Windows Boot Loader ------------------- identifier {bc2d8406-8640-11de-aa7e-a477d86453c4} device partition=D: path \Windows\system32\winload.exe description Windows 7 locale en-US inherit {6efb52bf-1766-41db-a6b3-0ee5eff72bd7} recoverysequence {bc2d8407-8640-11de-aa7e-a477d86453c4} recoveryenabled Yes osdevice partition=D: systemroot \Windows resumeobject {bc2d8405-8640-11de-aa7e-a477d86453c4} nx OptIn Windows Boot Loader ------------------- identifier {bc2d8404-8640-11de-aa7e-a477d86453c4} device partition=E: path \Windows\system32\winload.exe description Blank osdevice partition=E: systemroot \Windows Windows Legacy OS Loader ------------------------ identifier {466f5a88-0af2-4f76-9038-095b170dc21c} device partition=H: path \ntldr description Windows XP Spare

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  • Microphone not working in Windows Virtual PC (on Windows 7)

    - by Clay Nichols
    I"m using Windows Virtual PC on Windows 7 (host) running Windows XP (as the Guest O/S) I'm trying to get the Microphone working. When I Enable Integration Features: Microphone does not work When I run the Sound Recorder, the record button is disabled. If I look at Sound settings, there are no options for the Mic (it's all disabled "grayed out"). Speakers work Copy & Paste works When I Disable Integration Features: Microphone and speakers work Copy and Paste does not (as expected) Drag'n Drop copying does not work in either situation. What I've Tried Verified that the Windows XP Mode Virtual PC guest also has the same symptoms (Mic doesn't work) and audio out (speakers) do work. I"m going to try (but have little hope) to: -Uninstall and Reinstall the Integration addin for Virtual PC

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  • Windows 7 Desktop/Start Menu Redirection: Server O/S: Windows Server 2003 And Server 2008

    - by Moody Tech
    Hi, I am new here so I am might be asking a question which has already been answered [however I can't see it in the suggested answers above] I manage a network which is split into a parent domain and a child domain. Recently I have been looking at when to migrate to Windows 7. The child domain users [authenticated by the 2008 based (child) domain] get the redirected Desktop [as expected] but not the Start Menu. The parent domain users [authenticated by the 2003 based (parent) domain] get neither desktop nor Start Menu redirected. Does anyone here know how to successfully redirect the properties for these users as desired? Many thanks.

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  • Windows 7 Desktop/Start Menu Redirection: Server O/S: Windows Server 2003 And Server 2008

    - by VerGuy
    Hi, I am new here so I am might be asking a question which has already been answered [however I can't see it in the suggested answers above] I manage a network which is split into a parent domain and a child domain. Recently I have been looking at when to migrate to Windows 7. The child domain users [authenticated by the 2008 based (child) domain] get the redirected Desktop [as expected] but not the Start Menu. The parent domain users [authenticated by the 2003 based (parent) domain] get neither desktop nor Start Menu redirected. Does anyone here know how to successfully redirect the properties for these users as desired? Many thanks.

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  • Windows XP SP3 client over NAT to a Windows 2008 R2 SP1 file server disconnection

    - by Patrick Pellegrino
    we just transferred a pilot group from our old(!!) Netware infrastructure to an Microsoft infrastructure. Since then, our users got problems accessing their files. They all experience disconnection from the mapped drives. The file server is access via a WAN connection by a firewall (Sonicwall) between both network and we do NAT. All clients have Windows XP SP3 and the file server is an Windows 2008 R2 SP1. On the file server I got many Event Id 2012. Many post over the Internet suggested a problem between the SMB protocol and NAT. We need a short term fix to continue to transfer users from Netware to Microsoft after what will work to remove the NATing. I found this MS KB http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2444558 that suggested a kind of workaround for Windows 7 clients but I can found anything for Windows XP. Anyone can help me with this ? We don't want to stop the project and do a network job before migrating. Regards. Update: Our few Windows 7 computers doesn't seem to have this issue.

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  • Install Windows 7 over Windows XP - Permissions

    - by andreas
    Hello, i want to install Windows 7 in a workstation where windows xp is currently installed. The system has 2 hard drives with 5 partitions and there are permissions on folders on different partitions. After the installation of Windows 7 will these permissions be visible? Will the permissions be lost? Will i have to re-gain control over the folders in these partitions? Thanks,

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  • Add Spell Checking to Your Favorite Windows Apps

    - by Asian Angel
    Some but not all Windows apps have built-in spell checking of some sort. If you want to add spell checking to all of your apps (or a select group) then join us as we look at tinySpell. Note: There is a paid version of this software (tinySpell+) available as well for those who want extra functionality. tinySpell in Action The installation process is simple and straightforward…as soon as you have finished installing tinySpell you will see your new “System Tray Icon”. You can see tinySpell’s “Context Menu” here. Before going any further you may want to have a look through the settings to make any desired display modifications. During our tests we found it very helpful to modify the Spelling Tip options…it will make for a much nicer and easier to read display when you have a spelling error. Clicking on the Applications… Command in the Context Menu will bring up the following window. You can really finesse how active tinySpell will be here: Create a special list of apps that tinySpell will not monitor Create a custom list of apps that tinySpell will monitor If you have any particular or unique words that you would like to add to tinySpell’s Dictionary ahead of time you can do that by clicking on the Dictionary… Command in the Context Menu. Want to check the spelling of a word ahead of time or find that you are just curious about how it is spelled? Click on Open spelling window in the Context Menu to access a special spell check window. For our example we misspelled “spelling” on purpose…notice that the word has turned red. Clicking on the Check Mark Button will open a drop-down list with suggested spellings for the word that you are inquiring about. Click on the appropriate listing if you intend to copy and paste the word. Next we moved on to Notepad. As we were typing tinySpell alerted us when we typed the word “app”. You will hear a small default system sound and see a small popup as shown here if tinySpell thinks a word has been misspelled. The System Tray Icon will also change to a yellow color. You can access the list of suggested spellings by either left clicking on the small popup or the System Tray Icon. If the word is a properly spelled “abbreviation” (or special/custom) like our word here you can select Add to dictionary. Going further in our text document we once again purposely misspelled “spelling”… Left clicking on the popup gave us access to the drop-down list of suggested spellings… And clicking on the correct spelling automatically inserted it into our document in place of the misspelled word. As you can see here tinySpell was even monitoring file names when we went to save the document. Very thorough indeed. Conclusion If your favorite app does not have built-in spell checking, then tinySpell will definitely be a welcome (and very helpful) addition to your Windows system. They offer a portable version as well so you can take it with you to any PC. Links Download tinySpell *Note: The download link is located approximately half-way down the page. Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Quick Tip: Spell Check Firefox Text Input FieldsEdit the Windows Live Writer Custom DictionaryAccess Your Favorite Google Services in Chrome the Easy WayLaunch External Apps from FirefoxNinite Makes Installing Software Incredibly Simple TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips All My Movies 5.9 CloudBerry Online Backup 1.5 for Windows Home Server Snagit 10 VMware Workstation 7 OpenDNS Guide Google TV The iPod Revolution Ultimate Boot CD can help when disaster strikes Windows Firewall with Advanced Security – How To Guides Sculptris 1.0, 3D Drawing app

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  • Make Your PC Look Like Windows Phone 7

    - by Matthew Guay
    Windows Phone 7 offers a unique and exciting UI that displays lots of information efficiently on the screen.  And with a simple Rainmeter theme, you can have the same UI and content directly on your Windows 7 desktop. Turn your Desktop into a Windows Phone 7 lookalike To give your Windows 7 desktop a Windows Phone 7 makeover, first you need to have the free Rainmeter application installed.  If you do not have it installed, download it from the link below and run the setup.  Accept the license agreement, and install it with the default settings. By default Rainmeter will automatically run when you start your computer.  If you do not want this, you can uncheck the box during the setup. Now, download the Omnimo UI theme for Rainmeter (link below).  You will need to unzip the folder first. This theme uses the Segoe UI and the Segoe UI Light font, so Windows Vista users need to install the segoeuil.ttf font first, and XP users need to install both the segoeui.ttf and the segoeuil.ttf font first.  Copy the appropriate fonts to C:\Windows\Fonts, or in Vista double-click on the font and select Install. Now, run the Rainmeter theme setup.  Double-click on the Rainstaller.exe in the Omnimo folder. Click Express install to add the theme and skin to Rainmeter. Click Finish, and by default Rainmeter will open with your new theme. When the new theme opens the first time, you will be asked to read the readme, or simply go to the gallery. When you open the gallery, you can choose from a wide variety of tiles and gadgets to place on your desktop.  You can also choose a different color scheme for your tiles. Once you’re done, click the X in the top right hand corner to close the Gallery.  Welcome to your Windows Phone 7 desktop!  Many of the gadgets are dynamic, and you can change the settings for most of them.  The only thing missing is the transition animations that Windows Phone 7 shows when you launch an application. To make it look even more like Windows Phone 7, you can change your background to black.  This makes the desktop theme really dramatic. And, if you want to add gadgets or change the color scheme, simply click on the + logo on the top. Windows Phone 7 Desktop Wallpapers If you’d prefer to simply change your background, My Microsoft Life has several very nice Windows Phone 7 wallpapers available for free.  Click the link below to download these and other Microsoft-centric wallpapers. If you can’t wait to get the new Windows phone 7, this is a great way to start experiencing the beauty of the phone UI on your desktop. Links Download Rainmeter Download the Omnimo UI Rainmeter theme Download Windows Phone 7 inspired wallpapers Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Try out Windows Phone 7 on your PC todayTest All Features of Windows Phone 7 On Your PCHow-To Geek on Lifehacker: How to Make Windows Vista Less AnnoyingCreate a Shortcut or Hotkey to Mute the System Volume in WindowsMake Ubuntu Automatically Save Changes to Your Session TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 Norwegian Life If Web Browsers Were Modes of Transportation Google Translate (for animals) Roadkill’s Scan Port scans for open ports Out of 100 Tweeters Out of band Security Update for Internet Explorer

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  • The 50 Best Registry Hacks that Make Windows Better

    - by The Geek
    We’re big fans of hacking the Windows Registry around here, and we’ve got one of the biggest collections of registry hacks you’ll find. Don’t believe us? Here’s a list of the top 50 registry hacks that we’ve covered. It’s important to note that you should never hack the registry if you don’t know what you’re doing, because your computer will light on fire and some squirrels may be injured. Also, you should create a System Restore point before doing so. Otherwise, keep reading Latest Features How-To Geek ETC The 50 Best Registry Hacks that Make Windows Better The How-To Geek Holiday Gift Guide (Geeky Stuff We Like) LCD? LED? Plasma? The How-To Geek Guide to HDTV Technology The How-To Geek Guide to Learning Photoshop, Part 8: Filters Improve Digital Photography by Calibrating Your Monitor Our Favorite Tech: What We’re Thankful For at How-To Geek Snowy Christmas House Personas Theme for Firefox The Mystic Underground Tunnel Wallpaper Ubunchu! – The Ubuntu Manga Available in Multiple Languages Breathe New Life into Your PlayStation 2 Peripherals by Hooking Them Up to Your Computer Move the Window Control Buttons to the Left Side in Windows Fun and Colorful Firefox Theme for Windows 7

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  • Networking Windows 7 and Vista

    - by foosion
    How do you set up a Windows Vista Home Basic desktop (wired) and a Windows 7 Home Premium laptop (wifi) on a home network so that they can share files and the printers connected to the desktop? The Win7 laptop may also be used on other networks. I'm going to have to set this up for my parents when I visit shortly. I currently use XP and am not really familiar with Vista or Win7 network setup. Would it be difficult to share between the Vista and Win7 machines and and XP machine? If not, how to add that?

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  • How can I connect to a Windows server using a Command Line Interface? (CLI)

    - by HopelessN00b
    Especially with the option to install Server Core in Server 2008 and above, connecting to Windows servers over a CLI is increasingly useful ability, if not one that's very widespread amongst Windows administrators. Practically every Windows GUI management tool has an option to connect to a remote computer, but there is no such option present in the built-in Windows CLI (cmd.exe), which gives the initial impression that this might not be possible. Is it possible to remotely management or administer a Windows Server using a CLI? And if so, what options are there to achieve this?

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  • HOw to give static ip to router from window XP LAN

    - by Captain Planet
    I have the USB modem internet connection. I am using ICS sharing in XP to share my internet connection. ON window XP LAN i have set up the LAN IP as 192.168.137.1 255.255.255.0 Now i have joined the cable from that XP LAN to another LAPTOP running vista Now if set the LAN on VISTA to get ip automatically them internet don't work but if manually set the ip to 192.168.137.3 255.255.255.0 gateway 192.168.137.1 Then my internet works But i want to join that LAN cable from XP to rouer so that i can use router to divide internet. But i don't know how i can give static ipto router because i think somehow that LAN on XP is not giving the IP address

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  • Windows XP Does Not Follow CNAME Shares

    - by user49349
    I am supporting a mix of Windows XP Pro and Windows 7 desktops in my Active Directory network, and I am having an odd issue with XP and CNAME records. Say I have a record in my DNS for a server with an A name of something like STORAGE.company.local and give it a CNAME of NAS.company.local. I can go onto an XP and 7 computer, and ping NAS and it will automatically resolve to STORAGE.company.local. If I am on Windows 7 and go to run and enter \\STORAGE or \\NAS, it will go to that server in Explorer. If I do the same in XP, STORAGE will work but NAS will not. It just times out Is there some setting buried in XP to make this work properly?

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  • XP Mode as a server, Win 7 as a client

    - by Spyro
    I have two virtual machines (XP Mode). They are connected to each other by a network setting - Internal Network. It is the only working setting. This is the only way I got two virtual XP to ping each other. Now I want to connect each of them from the application that runs on Windows 7 which is hosting both virtual machines, but I can't do that. The firewall on both XP-Mode machines is disabled. Any other networking setting added as additional adapter on Xp-Mode machine does not allow me to connect from Windows 7. So my question is this - how to enable connection from Windows 7 application to XP mode application (client - server)? Point 2 (pass message) work perfectly because of the "internal network" setting. The problem is point 1 and 3.

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