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  • Programming languages, positional languages and natural languages

    - by Vitalij Zadneprovskij
    Some programming languages are modeled on machine code, like assembly languages. Other languages are modeled on a natural language, the English language. Others are not modeled on either machine code or natural language. Languages such as PROLOG, for example, don't follow either model. I came across this Perl module Lingua::Romana::Perligata, that allows to write programs using a syntax that is very similar to Latin. Are there programming languages that have less positional syntax? Are there other languages or modules that allow you to write in syntaxes inspired by other natural languages, like French, Hebrew or Farsi? There is a very long list on Wikipedia, but most of those projects are dead. There is a related question on StackOverflow. The answer that was accepted is "Use Google".

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  • Would learning any (linguistic) language in particular further your programming career?

    - by Anonymous
    It seems apparent that English is the dominant international language for programming based on previous P.SE questions (though a highly upvoted comment correctly points out that asking a question like that on a predominantly English site will skew the results). However, is there benefit in learning a foreign language for software development? For example, do the Chinese have completely different software tools, languages, technologies, etc? How about Japanese, Russian, and other non-latin based languages? Is there an entire world of software development languages, tools and so on that only exist in these other languages? Or do people that know these languages use the tools and languages we know and love?

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  • Would learning any (linguistic) language imparticular further your programming career?

    - by Anonymous
    It seems apparent that English is the dominant international language for programming (in the West, at least!) based on previous P.SE questions. Or maybe not, given that a highly upvoted comment correctly points out that asking a question like that on a predominantly English site will skew the results. This question is about whether there is a benefit in learning a foreign language for software development. For example, do the Chinese have completely different software tools, langugages, technologies etc? How about Japanese, Russian, and other non-latin based languages? Am I/are we missing an entire world of software development languages, tools and so on that only exist in these other languages? Or do people that know these languages still learn and program using the tools and languages we all know and love?

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  • Imperative Programming v/s Declarative Programming v/s Functional Programming

    - by kaleidoscope
    Imperative Programming :: Imperative programming is a programming paradigm that describes computation in terms of statements that change a program state. In much the same way as the imperative mood in natural languages expresses commands to take action, imperative programs define sequences of commands for the computer to perform. The focus is on what steps the computer should take rather than what the computer will do (ex. C, C++, Java). Declarative Programming :: Declarative programming is a programming paradigm that expresses the logic of a computation without describing its control flow. It attempts to minimize or eliminate side effects by describing what the program should accomplish, rather than describing how to go about accomplishing it. The focus is on what the computer should do rather than how it should do it (ex. SQL). A  C# example of declarative v/s. imperative programming is LINQ. With imperative programming, you tell the compiler what you want to happen, step by step. For example, let's start with this collection, and choose the odd numbers: List<int> collection = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 }; With imperative programming, we'd step through this, and decide what we want: List<int> results = new List<int>(); foreach(var num in collection) {     if (num % 2 != 0)           results.Add(num); } Here’s what we are doing: *Create a result collection *Step through each number in the collection *Check the number, if it's odd, add it to the results With declarative programming, on the other hand, we write the code that describes what you want, but not necessarily how to get it var results = collection.Where( num => num % 2 != 0); Here, we're saying "Give us everything where it's odd", not "Step through the collection. Check this item, if it's odd, add it to a result collection." Functional Programming :: Functional programming is a programming paradigm that treats computation as the evaluation of mathematical functions and avoids state and mutable data. It emphasizes the application of functions.Functional programming has its roots in the lambda calculus. It is a subset of declarative languages that has heavy focus on recursion. Functional programming can be a mind-bender, which is one reason why Lisp, Scheme, and Haskell have never really surpassed C, C++, Java and COBOL in commercial popularity. But there are benefits to the functional way. For one, if you can get the logic correct, functional programming requires orders of magnitude less code than imperative programming. That means fewer points of failure, less code to test, and a more productive (and, many would say, happier) programming life. As systems get bigger, this has become more and more important. To know more : http://stackoverflow.com/questions/602444/what-is-functional-declarative-and-imperative-programming http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb669144.aspx http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperative_programming   Technorati Tags: Ranjit,Imperative Programming,Declarative programming,Functional Programming

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  • What's The Difference Between Imperative, Procedural and Structured Programming?

    - by daniels
    By researching around (books, Wikipedia, similar questions on SE, etc) I came to understand that Imperative programming is one of the major programming paradigms, where you describe a series of commands (or statements) for the computer to execute (so you pretty much order it to take specific actions, hence the name "imperative"). So far so good. Procedural programming, on the other hand, is a specific type (or subset) of Imperative programming, where you use procedures (i.e., functions) to describe the commands the computer should perform. First question: Is there an Imperative programming language which is not procedural? In other words, can you have Imperative programming without procedures? Update: This first question seems to be answered. A language CAN be imperative without being procedural or structured. An example is pure Assembly language. Then you also have Structured programming, which seems to be another type (or subset) of Imperative programming, which emerged to remove the reliance on the GOTO statement. Second question: What is the difference between procedural and structured programming? Can you have one without the other, and vice-versa? Can we say procedural programming is a subset of structured programming, as in the image?

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  • Non-English-based programming languages

    - by Jaime Soto
    The University of Antioquia in Colombia teaches its introductory programming courses in Lexico, a Spanish-based, object-oriented .NET language. The intent is to teach programming concepts in the students' native language before introducing English-based mainstream languages. There are many other Non-English-based programming languages and there is even a related question in Stack Overflow. I have several questions regarding these languages: Has anyone on this site learned to program using a non-English-based language? If so, how difficult was the transition to the first English-based language? Is there any research-based evidence that non-English speakers learn programming faster/better using languages with keywords in their native language instead of English-based languages?

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  • Tellago && Tellago Studios 2010

    - by gsusx
    With 2011 around the corner we, at Tellago and Tellago Studios , we have been spending a lot of times evaluating our successes and failures (yes those too ;)) of 2010 and delineating some of our goals and strategies for 2011. When I look at 2010 here are some of the things that quickly jump off the page: Growing Tellago by 300% Launching a brand new company: Tellago Studios Expanding our customer base Establishing our business intelligence practice http://tellago.com/what-we-say/events/business-intelligence...(read more)

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  • Advice on learning programming languages and math.

    - by Joris Ooms
    I feel like I'm getting stuck lately when it comes to learning about programming-related things; I thought I'd ask a question here and write it all down in the hope to get some pointers/advice from people. Perhaps writing it down helps me put things in perspective for myself aswell. I study Interactive Multimedia Design. This course is based on two things: graphic design on one hand, and web development on the other hand. I have quite a decent knowledge of web-related languages (the usual HTML/JS/PHP) and I'll be getting a course on ASP.NET next year. In my free time, I have learnt how to work with CodeIgniter, aswell as some diving into Ruby (and Rails) and basic iOS programming. In my first year of college I also did a class on Java (19/20 on the end result). This grade doesn't really mean anything though; I have the basics of OOP down but Java-wise, we learnt next to nothing. Considering the time I have been programming in, for example, PHP.. I can't say I'm bad at it. I'm definitely not good or great at it, but I'm decent. My teachers tell me I have the programming thing down. They just tell me I should keep on learning. So that's what I do, and I try to take in as much as possible; however, sometimes I'm unsure where to start and I have this tendency to always doubt myself. Now, for the 'question'. I want to get into iOS programming. I know iOS programming boils down to programming in Cocoa Touch and Objective-C. I also know Obj-C is a superset of C. I have done a class on C a couple of years ago, but I failed miserably. I got stuck at pointers and never really understood them.. Until like a month ago. I suddenly 'got' it. I have been working through a book on Objective-C for a week or so now, and I understand the basics (I'm at like.. chapter 6 or so). However, I keep running into similar problems as the ones I had when I did the C class: I suck at math. No, really. I come from a Latin-Modern Languages background in high school and I had nearly no math classes back then. I wanted to study Computer Science, but I failed there because of the miserable state of my mathematics knowledge. I can't explain why I'm suddenly talking about math here though, because it isn't directly related to programming.. yet it is. For example, the examples in the book I'm reading now are about programming a fraction-calculator. All good, I can do the programming when I get the formulas down.. but it takes me a full day or more to actually get to that point. I also find it hard to come up with ideas for myself. I made one small iOS app the other day and it's just a button / label kind of thing. When I press the button, it generates a random number. That's really all I could come up with. Can you 'learn' that? It probably comes down to creativity, but evidently, I'm not too great at being creative. Are there any sites or resources out there that provide something like a basic list of things you can program when you're just starting out? Maybe I'm focusing on too many things at once. I want to keep my HTML/CSS at a decent level, while learning PHP and CodeIgniter, while diving into Ruby on Rails and learning Objective-C and the iOS SDK at the same time. I just want to be good at something, I guess. The problem is that I can't seem to be happy with my PHP stuff. I want more, something 'harder'; that's why I decided to pick up the iOS thing. Like I said, I have the basics down of a lot of different languages. I can program something simple in Java, in C, in Objective-C as of this week.. but it ends there. Mostly because I can't come up with ideas for more complex applications, and also because I just doubt myself: 'Oh, that's too complex, I can never do that'. And then it ends there. To conclude my rant, let me basically rephrase my questions into a 'tl;dr' part. A. I want to get into iOS programming and I have basic knowledge of C/Objective-C. However, I struggle to come up with ideas of my own and implement them and I also suck at math which is something that isn't directly related to, yet often needed while programming. What can I do? B. I have an interest in a lot of different programming languages and I can't stop reading/learning. However, I don't feel like I'm good in anything. Should I perhaps focus on just one language for a year or longer, or keep taking it all in at the same time and hope I'll finally get them all down? C. Are there any resources out there that provide basic ideas of things I can program? I'm thinking about 'simple' command-line applications here to help me while studying C/Obj-C away from the whole iPhone SDK. Like I said, the examples in my book are mainly math-based (fraction calculator) and it's kinda hard. :( Thanks a lot for reading my post. I didn't plan it to be this long but oh well. Thanks in advance for any answers.

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  • Modern programming language with intuitive concurrent programming abstractions

    - by faif
    I am interested in learning concurrent programming, focusing on the application/user level (not system programming). I am looking for a modern high level programming language that provides intuitive abstractions for writing concurrent applications. I want to focus on languages that increase productivity and hide the complexity of concurrent programming. To give some examples, I don't consider a good option writing multithreaded code in C, C++, or Java because IMHO my productivity is reduced and their programming model is not intuitive. On the other hand, languages that increase productivity and offer more intuitive abstractions such as Python and the multiprocessing module, Erlang, Clojure, Scala, etc. would be good options. What would you recommend based on your experience and why?

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  • Functional Languages that compile to Android's Dalvik VM?

    - by Berin Loritsch
    I have a software problem that fits the functional approach to programming, but the target market will be on the Android OS. I ask because there are functional languages that compile to Java's VM, but Dalvik bytecode != Java bytecode. Alternatively, do you know if the dx utility can intelligently convert the .class files generated from functional languages like Scala? Edit: In order to add a bit more helpfulness to the community, and also to help me choose better, can I refine the question a bit? Have you used any alternate languages with Dalvik? Which ones? What are some "gotchas" (problems) that I might run into? Is performance acceptable? By that, I mean the application still feels responsive to the user. I've never done mobile phone development, but I grew up on constrained devices and I'm under no illusion that there is a cost to using non-standard languages with the platform. I just need to know if the cost is such that I should shoe-horn my approach into default language (i.e. apply functional principles in the OOP language).

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  • Languages/Methods to Learn for Scientific Computing?:

    - by Zéychin
    I'm a second-semester Junior working towards a Computer Science degree with a Scientific Computing concentration and a Mathematics degree with a concentration on Applied Discrete Mathematics. So, number crunching and such rather than a bunch of regular expressions, interface design, and networking. I've found that I'm not learning new relevant languages from my coursework and am interested in what the community would recommend me to learn. I know as far as programming methods go, I need to learn more about parallelizing programs, but if there's anything else you can recommend, I would appreciate it. Here's a list of the languages with which I am very experienced (web technologies omitted as they barely apply here). Any recommendations for additional languages I should learn would be very much appreciated!: Java C C++ Fortran77/90/95 Haskell Python MATLAB

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  • Which programming language for text editing?

    - by Ali
    I need a programming language for text editing and processing (replace, formatting, regex, string comparison, word processing, text analysis, etc). Which programming language is more powerful and has more functions for this purpose? Since I work PHP for my web projects, I currently use PHP; but the fact is that PHP is a scripting language for web applications, my current project is offline. I am curious if other programming languages such as Perl, Python, C, C++, Java, etc have more functionality for this purpose, and worth of shifting the project?

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  • Is there a procedural graphical programming environment?

    - by Marc
    I am searching for a graphical programming environment for procedural programming in which you can integrate some or all of the common sources of calculation procedures, such as Excel sheets, MATLAB scripts or even .NET assemblies. I think of something like a flowchart configurator in which you define the procedures via drag& drop using flow-statements (if-else, loops, etc.). Do you know of any systems heading in this direction?

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  • Recursive languages vs context-sensitive languages

    - by teehoo
    In Chomsky's hierarchy, the set of recursive languages is not defined. I know that recursive languages are a subset of recursively enumerable languages and that all recursive languages are decidable. What I'm curious about is how recursive languages compare to context-sensitive languages. Can I assume that context-sensitive languages are a strict subset of recursive languages, and therefore all context-sensitive languages are decidable?

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  • Difference between extensible programming and extendible programming?

    - by loudandclear
    What exactly is the different between "extensible programming" and "extendible programming?" Wikipedia states the following: The Lisp language community remained separate from the extensible language community, apparently because, as one researcher observed, any programming language in which programs and data are essentially interchangeable can be regarded as an extendible [sic] language. ... this can be seen very easily from the fact that Lisp has been used as an extendible language for years. If I'm understanding this correctly, it says "Lisp is extendible implies Lisp is not extensible". So what do these two terms mean, and how do they differ?

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  • Managed Languages vs Compiled Language difference?

    - by l46kok
    I get confused when people try to make a distinction between compiled languages and managed languages. From experience, I understand that most consider compiled languages to be C,C++ while managed languages are Java,C# (There are obviously more, but these are just few examples). But what exactly is the core difference between the two types of languages? My understanding is that any program, regardless of what language you use is essentially "compiled" into a low-level machine code which is then interpreted, so does that kinda make managed languages a subset of compiled languages (That is, all managed languages are compiled languages but not the other way around)?

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  • Why (not) logic programming?

    - by Anto
    I have not yet heard about any uses of a logical programming language (such as Prolog) in the software industry, nor do I know of usage of it in hobby programming or open source projects. It (Prolog) is used as an academic language to some extent, though (why is it used in academia?). This makes me wonder, why should you use logic programming, and why not? Why is it not getting any detectable industry usage?

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  • Differentiate procedural language(c) from oop languages(c++)

    - by niko
    I have been trying to differentiate c and c++(or oop languages) but I don't understand where the difference is. Note I have never used c++ but I asked my friends and some of them to differentiate c and c++ They say c++ has oop concepts and also the public, private modes for definition of variables and which c does not have though. Seriously I have done vb.net programming for a while 2 to 3 months, I never faced a situation to use class concepts and modes of definition like public and private. So I thought what could be the use for these? My friend explained me a program saying that if a variable is public, it can be accessed anywhere I said why not declare it as a global variable like in c? He did not get back to my question and he said if a variable is private it cannot be accessed by some other functions I said why not define it as a local variable, even these he was unable to answer. No matter where I read private variables cannot be accessed whereas public variables can be then why not make public as global and private as local whats the difference? whats the real use of public and private ? please don't say it can be used by everyone, I suppose why not we use some conditions and make the calls? I have heard people saying security reasons, a friend said if a function need to be accessed it should be inherited first. He explained saying that only admin should be able to have some rights and not all so that functions are made private and inherited only by the admin to use Then I said why not we use if condition if ( login == "admin") invoke the function he still did not answer these question. Please clear me with these things, I have done vb.net and vba and little c++ without using oop concepts because I never found their real use while I was writing the code, I'm a little afraid am I too back in oop concepts?

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  • Introducing functional programming constructs in non-functional programming languages

    - by Giorgio
    This question has been going through my mind quite a lot lately and since I haven't found a convincing answer to it I would like to know if other users of this site have thought about it as well. In the recent years, even though OOP is still the most popular programming paradigm, functional programming is getting a lot of attention. I have only used OOP languages for my work (C++ and Java) but I am trying to learn some FP in my free time because I find it very interesting. So, I started learning Haskell three years ago and Scala last summer. I plan to learn some SML and Caml as well, and to brush up my (little) knowledge of Scheme. Well, a lot of plans (too ambitious?) but I hope I will find the time to learn at least the basics of FP during the next few years. What is important for me is how functional programming works and how / whether I can use it for some real projects. I have already developed small tools in Haskell. In spite of my strong interest for FP, I find it difficult to understand why functional programming constructs are being added to languages like C#, Java, C++, and so on. As a developer interested in FP, I find it more natural to use, say, Scala or Haskell, instead of waiting for the next FP feature to be added to my favourite non-FP language. In other words, why would I want to have only some FP in my originally non-FP language instead of looking for a language that has a better support for FP? For example, why should I be interested to have lambdas in Java if I can switch to Scala where I have much more FP concepts and access all the Java libraries anyway? Similarly: why do some FP in C# instead of using F# (to my knowledge, C# and F# can work together)? Java was designed to be OO. Fine. I can do OOP in Java (and I would like to keep using Java in that way). Scala was designed to support OOP + FP. Fine: I can use a mix of OOP and FP in Scala. Haskell was designed for FP: I can do FP in Haskell. If I need to tune the performance of a particular module, I can interface Haskell with some external routines in C. But why would I want to do OOP with just some basic FP in Java? So, my main point is: why are non-functional programming languages being extended with some functional concept? Shouldn't it be more comfortable (interesting, exciting, productive) to program in a language that has been designed from the very beginning to be functional or multi-paradigm? Don't different programming paradigms integrate better in a language that was designed for it than in a language in which one paradigm was only added later? The first explanation I could think of is that, since FP is a new concept (it isn't new at all, but it is new for many developers), it needs to be introduced gradually. However, I remember my switch from imperative to OOP: when I started to program in C++ (coming from Pascal and C) I really had to rethink the way in which I was coding, and to do it pretty fast. It was not gradual. So, this does not seem to be a good explanation to me. Or can it be that many non-FP programmers are not really interested in understanding and using functional programming, but they find it practically convenient to adopt certain FP-idioms in their non-FP language? IMPORTANT NOTE Just in case (because I have seen several language wars on this site): I mentioned the languages I know better, this question is in no way meant to start comparisons between different programming languages to decide which is better / worse. Also, I am not interested in a comparison of OOP versus FP (pros and cons). The point I am interested in is to understand why FP is being introduced one bit at a time into existing languages that were not designed for it even though there exist languages that were / are specifically designed to support FP.

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  • Functional programming constructs in non-functional programming languages

    - by Giorgio
    This question has been going through my mind quite a lot lately and since I haven't found a convincing answer to it I would like to know if other users of this site have thought about it as well. In the recent years, even though OOP is still the most popular programming paradigm, functional programming is getting a lot of attention. I have only used OOP languages for my work (C++ and Java) but I am trying to learn some FP in my free time because I find it very interesting. So, I started learning Haskell three years ago and Scala last summer. I plan to learn some SML and Caml as well, and to brush up my (little) knowledge of Scheme. Well, a lot of plans (too ambitious?) but I hope I will find the time to learn at least the basics of FP during the next few years. What is important for me is how functional programming works and how / whether I can use it for some real projects. I have already developed small tools in Haskell. In spite of my strong interest for FP, I find it difficult to understand why functional programming constructs are being added to languages like C#, Java, C++, and so on. As a developer interested in FP, I find it more natural to use, say, Scala or Haskell, instead of waiting for the next FP feature to be added to my favourite non-FP language. In other words, why would I want to have only some FP in my originally non-FP language instead of looking for a language that has a better support for FP? For example, why should I be interested to have lambdas in Java if I can switch to Scala where I have much more FP concepts and access all the Java libraries anyway? Similarly: why do some FP in C# instead of using F# (to my knowledge, C# and F# can work together)? Java was designed to be OO. Fine. I can do OOP in Java (and I would like to keep using Java in that way). Scala was designed to support OOP + FP. Fine: I can use a mix of OOP and FP in Scala. Haskell was designed for FP: I can do FP in Haskell. If I need to tune the performance of a particular module, I can interface Haskell with some external routines in C. But why would I want to do OOP with just some basic FP in Java? So, my main point is: why are non-functional programming languages being extended with some functional concept? Shouldn't it be more comfortable (interesting, exciting, productive) to program in a language that has been designed from the very beginning to be functional or multi-paradigm? Don't different programming paradigms integrate better in a language that was designed for it than in a language in which one paradigm was only added later? The first explanation I could think of is that, since FP is a new concept (it isn't new at all, but it is new for many developers), it needs to be introduced gradually. However, I remember my switch from imperative to OOP: when I started to program in C++ (coming from Pascal and C) I really had to rethink the way in which I was coding, and to do it pretty fast. It was not gradual. So, this does not seem to be a good explanation to me. Also, I asked myself if my impression is just plainly wrong due to lack of knowledge. E.g., do C# and C++11 support FP as extensively as, say, Scala or Caml do? In this case, my question would be simply non-existent. Or can it be that many non-FP programmers are not really interested in using functional programming, but they find it practically convenient to adopt certain FP-idioms in their non-FP language? IMPORTANT NOTE Just in case (because I have seen several language wars on this site): I mentioned the languages I know better, this question is in no way meant to start comparisons between different programming languages to decide which is better / worse. Also, I am not interested in a comparison of OOP versus FP (pros and cons). The point I am interested in is to understand why FP is being introduced one bit at a time into existing languages that were not designed for it even though there exist languages that were / are specifically designed to support FP.

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  • Declarative programming vs. Imperative programming

    - by EpsilonVector
    I feel very comfortable with Imperative programming. I never have trouble expressing algorithmically what I want the computer to do once I figured out what is it that I want it to do. But when it comes to languages like SQL or Relational Algebra I often get stuck because my head is too used to Imperative programming. For example, suppose you have the relations band(bandName, bandCountry), venue(venueName, venueCountry), plays(bandName, venueName), and I want to write a query that says: all venueNames such that for every bandCountry there's a band from that country that plays in venue of that name. In my mind I immediately go "for each venueName iterate over all the bandCountries and for each bandCountry get the list of bands that come from it. If none of them play in venueName, go to next venueName. Else, at the end of the bandCountries iteration add venueName to the set of good venueNames". ...but you can't talk like that in SQL and I actually need to think about how to formulate this, with the intuitive Imperative solution constantly nagging in the back of my head. Did anybody else had this problem? How did you overcome this? Did you figured out a paradigm shift? Made a map from Imperative concepts to SQL concepts to translate Imperative solutions into Declarative ones? Read a good book? PS I'm not looking for a solution to the above query, I did solve it.

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  • Which programming language should I learn? [on hold]

    - by Ashkan
    I'm Ashkan and I'm from Iran, I started programming when I was 13 and I learned a lot of stuff since then, But now I'm totally lost. Since I live in Iran there are no counselor or any professionals out there to help me, so I decided to ask here. I started with Visual Basic and after 1 year I started to learn HTML , CSS , Javascript and JQuery. And for the past 6 months I've been learning PHP,and I have a basic understanding of OOP. I want to move to America to continue my studies and I was wondering which programming language helps me the most to get there? Should I learn C++ or JAVA or should I study Computer Science and Math? also since We are not in a good place financially, I want a programming language that helps me in college and lets me make some money? Thanks in advance and sorry for my poor English skills.

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  • Teaching programming to a non-CS graduate

    - by Shahzada
    I have a couple of friends interested in computer programming, but they're non-CS graduates; some of them have very little experience in software testing field (some of them took some basic software testing courses). I am going to be working with them on teaching basic computer programming, and computer science fundamentals (data structures etc). My questions are; What language should I start with? What are essential computer science topics that I should cover before jumping them into computer programming? What readings can I incorporate to make the topic interesting and non-overwhelming? If we want to spend a year on it, what topics should take priority and must be covered in 12 months? Again, these are non computer science folks, and I want to keep the learning as much fun as possible. Thanks everyone.

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  • Modular programming is the method of programming small task or programs

    Modular programming is the method of programming small task or sub-programs that can be arranged in multiple variations to perform desired results. This methodology is great for preventing errors due to the fact that each task executes a specific process and can be debugged individually or within a larger program when combined with other tasks or sub programs. C# is a great example of how to implement modular programming because it allows for functions, methods, classes and objects to be use to create smaller sub programs. A program can be built from smaller pieces of code which saves development time and reduces the chance of errors because it is easier to test a small class or function for a simple solutions compared to testing a full program which has layers and layers of small programs working together.Yes, it is possible to write the same program using modular and non modular programming, but it is not recommend it. When you deal with non modular programs, they tend to contain a lot of spaghetti code which can be a pain to develop and not to mention debug especially if you did not write the code. In addition, in my experience they seem to have a lot more hidden bugs which waste debugging and development time. Modular programming methodology in comparision to non-mondular should be used when ever possible due to the use of small components. These small components allow business logic to be reused and is easier to maintain. From the user’s view point, they cannot really tell if the code is modular or not with today’s computers.

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  • Android programming vs iPhone Programming?

    - by geena
    Hi, I am doing my finol project and thinking of an mobile app to develop.but i am new to mobile OS world and dont know which is good for me to go on.I mean , in long term which will be more beneficial to me b/w android or iPhone programming as well as to my final project ? :) .......... Thanx for all the suggestions of you guyz :) Well I am, if not so bright, then pretty good at Java and C++ :) Although Objective C is a little different from standard C/C++ but I think I can cope with it. Owning a Mac or running Snow Leopard in VMWare is not going to make much difference in iOS development... or is it? Actually, as it is final project for my BS degree, I am wondering whether is it worth taking as a final project or not (iPhone or Android app)...Or.... Is it better to stick with web/desktop development? and what this means that i have to be a

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