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  • Scheduling parameterized reports in Crystal Reports Server

    - by SarekOfVulcan
    I'm trying to set up a report to run monthly in Crystal Reports Server 2008 that will give me the next month's Affordable Care Plan termination dates. However, as far as I can tell, I can only give it a particular date string, not "7 days after the report is scheduled". How do I do this? (Same question for CR2008, actually, but the server is the one I'm interested in right now.) Thanks!

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  • How to convert SSRS 2008 Server reports to SSRS 2008 Client Reports

    - by Nasser Hajloo
    I have a large SSRS 2008 Server Report Project (more than 200 reports). Currently my companystrategy has been changed and we want to convert these server reports to client reports. All of the Server reports uses Storeprocedures (or in some cases from the SQl Functions) All of them work properly andthere is no problem Beause of project scale it is not a good idea to create all of server reports in client again. SO I want to check How to convert SSRS 2008 Server reports to SSRS 2008 Client Reports? RDL to RDLC. Note : I knowthat Client reports use Dataset And I have to create Dataset. I'm also looking for a way to generate these dataset too.but for now I'm just looking for a way to convert RDL files to RDLC files. If there are anyApplication which can convert RDL XML to RDLC XML let me know. Any help appriciate.

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  • SQL SERVER – SSMS: Top Object and Batch Execution Statistics Reports

    - by Pinal Dave
    The month of June till mid of July has been the fever of sports. First, it was Wimbledon Tennis and then the Soccer fever was all over. There is a huge number of fan followers and it is great to see the level at which people sometimes worship these sports. Being an Indian, I cannot forget to mention the India tour of England later part of July. Following these sports and as the events unfold to the finals, there are a number of ways the statisticians can slice and dice the numbers. Cue from soccer I can surely say there is a team performance against another team and then there is individual member fairs against a particular opponent. Such statistics give us a fair idea to how a team in the past or in the recent past has fared against each other, head-to-head stats during World cup and during other neutral venue games. All these statistics are just pointers. In reality, they don’t reflect the calibre of the current team because the individuals who performed in each of these games are totally different (Typical example being the Brazil Vs Germany semi-final match in FIFA 2014). So at times these numbers are misleading. It is worth investigating and get the next level information. Similar to these statistics, SQL Server Management studio is also equipped with a number of reports like a) Object Execution Statistics report and b) Batch Execution Statistics reports. As discussed in the example, the team scorecard is like the Batch Execution statistics and individual stats is like Object Level statistics. The analogy can be taken only this far, trust me there is no correlation between SQL Server functioning and playing sports – It is like I think about diet all the time except while I am eating. Performance – Batch Execution Statistics Let us view the first report which can be invoked from Server Node -> Reports -> Standard Reports -> Performance – Batch Execution Statistics. Most of the values that are displayed in this report come from the DMVs sys.dm_exec_query_stats and sys.dm_exec_sql_text(sql_handle). This report contains 3 distinctive sections as outline below.   Section 1: This is a graphical bar graph representation of Average CPU Time, Average Logical reads and Average Logical Writes for individual batches. The Batch numbers are indicative and the details of individual batch is available in section 3 (detailed below). Section 2: This represents a Pie chart of all the batches by Total CPU Time (%) and Total Logical IO (%) by batches. This graphical representation tells us which batch consumed the highest CPU and IO since the server started, provided plan is available in the cache. Section 3: This is the section where we can find the SQL statements associated with each of the batch Numbers. This also gives us the details of Average CPU / Average Logical Reads and Average Logical Writes in the system for the given batch with object details. Expanding the rows, I will also get the # Executions and # Plans Generated for each of the queries. Performance – Object Execution Statistics The second report worth a look is Object Execution statistics. This is a similar report as the previous but turned on its head by SQL Server Objects. The report has 3 areas to look as above. Section 1 gives the Average CPU, Average IO bar charts for specific objects. The section 2 is a graphical representation of Total CPU by objects and Total Logical IO by objects. The final section details the various objects in detail with the Avg. CPU, IO and other details which are self-explanatory. At a high-level both the reports are based on queries on two DMVs (sys.dm_exec_query_stats and sys.dm_exec_sql_text) and it builds values based on calculations using columns in them: SELECT * FROM    sys.dm_exec_query_stats s1 CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(sql_handle) AS s2 WHERE   s2.objectid IS NOT NULL AND DB_NAME(s2.dbid) IS NOT NULL ORDER BY  s1.sql_handle; This is one of the simplest form of reports and in future blogs we will look at more complex reports. I truly hope that these reports can give DBAs and developers a hint about what is the possible performance tuning area. As a closing point I must emphasize that all above reports pick up data from the plan cache. If a particular query has consumed a lot of resources earlier, but plan is not available in the cache, none of the above reports would show that bad query. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com)Filed under: SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Server Management Studio, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL Tagged: SQL Reports

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  • Share functions between Crystal Reports without Crystal Reports Server?

    - by Aidan Ryan
    We have several reports that do the same formatting operations (e.g. displaying "PASS" or "FAIL" if a value is within a particular range.) Without Crystal Reports Server, is there a way to share functions between reports so that they do not need to be duplicated? I understand I could do this with a user function library but I would prefer not to port all of the crystal functions to UFL. Using Crystal Reports 2008.

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  • Partner Webcast - Oracle Reports to BI Publisher migration

    - by dmitry.nefedkin(at)oracle.com
    Normal 0 false false false RU X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} Monday, March 21, 2011 9 a.m. CET (10 a.m. EET) Description Oracle Reports, a component of Oracle Fusion Middleware is Oracle's classic, high-fidelity enterprise reporting tool. Oracle remains committed to the development of this technology, and to the ongoing release as a component of the Oracle Fusion Middleware platform, but also enables conversion of Oracle Reports to Oracle BI Publisher. Oracle Business Intelligence Publisher (BI Publisher)--Oracle's enterprise reporting server to author, manage, and deliver all types of highly formatted documents. Extremely efficient and highly scalable, BI Publisher can generate tens of thousands of documents per hour with minimal impact to transactional systems. After a quick introduction to BI Publisher we will look at the process of Oracle Reports to BI Publisher convestion. AgendaOracle Reports strategy & support policyReporting challengesBenefits of BI PublisherOracle Reports -> BI Publisher Conversion UtilityDemoUpgrade BI Publisher to 11gQ&A Delivery Format This Free online Live Internet Seminar will be delivered over the Web and Conference Call. Duration: 1hour To register, click HERE. For any questions please contact [email protected]

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  • Crystal Reports: 3 New Uses For Sub Reports

    I hate sub reports and always consider them the last resort in any reporting solution. The negative effect on performance and maintainability is just not worth the easy ride they give the report writer. Nine times out of ten reporting requirements can be met using a little forethought and planning (and a solid understanding of formulas). With that said, there are a few novel ways of using sub reports which will not affect performance and actually prove a boon to the developer.

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  • Grep Crystal Reports (with Sub-reports)

    - by Anne
    I need a way to quickly search a large number of Crystal reports (with sub-reports) for the names of several stored procedures. (Trying to find dependencies.) I'm running Windows XP and downloaded this grep program - http://www.wingrep.com/download.htm. So far, I'm not convinced that it's working. Does anyone know of a reliable way, other than opening each report and sub-report, to search Crystal reports for the existence of a file name? Thanks in advance for any tips.

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  • Setting data source for reports in Crystal Reports 2008 Java (performance)

    - by Daniel
    Hi, we have Crystal Reports 2008 on the server, and use the Java SDK to display reports and convert them to PDF. Since the server hat its own database, we have to set the data source on the DatabaseController to make CR connect to this database. We do it like specified in the docs, and tried the functions in CRJavaHelper, but for a reason unknown to me setting the connection string takes 300ms to 1500ms. What is the fastest way to tell Crystal which datasource to use in its reports? I already saw a JNDI name somewhere, but i don't believe CR actually does a JNDI lookup to find an existing datasource, doesn't it?

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  • Share and Deliver BI Publisher Reports in Multiple Languages

    - by kanichiro.nishida
    When you share your reports with someone who speak and read in different languages you want your reports to be shown in their language, right ? Well, translating reports with BI Publisher is not only easy but also reduces the maintenance cost a lot. Many of us in the BI Publisher product development team used to work in Globalization and Multi Lingual support, which enables Oracle products and applications to be used in many different languages and countries and territories.  And we have a lot of experience in this area. In fact, being a strategic reporting platform for Oracle EBS, PeopleSoft, JD Edwards, Siebel, and many other Oracle application products, our customers from all over the world are generating thousands of thousands of reports, including out-of-the-box pre-developed reports from Oracle and customer created or customized reports, in their own local language everyday as they operate and manage their business. Today, I’m going to talk about this very topic, how to translate my reports with BI Publisher 11G. Translation Grows, not the Numbers of the Reports Most of the reporting tools, regardless if it’s traditional or new, always take this translation on the back burner. They require their users to copy an original report and translate the whole thing. So when you want to support additional10 languages you will need to have 10 copies of the original. Imagine when you have 50 reports then you will end up having 500 reports (50 x 10) ! Now you need to maintain these 500 reports, whenever you need to make a change in a report you need to apply the same change to the other 10 reports. And as you imagine this is not only a nightmare for IT managements but not acceptable especially for the applications like Oracle EBS that supports over 30 languages. So first thing we did was, very simple, we separated the translation out of the report and marry it to the report only at the report generation. This means, regardless of how many languages you need to support you need to have only one report and translation files for the 10 languages, which would contain the translated letters and words. So let’s say you have 50 reports and need to support 10 languages for those reports you still have only 50 reports and each report now has 10 language translation files. Yes, translation is the one should grow as you add more languages to support, not the report itself! And second, we provide the translation files in XLIFF format, which is an international standard XML based format to exchange and maintain translation strings. So once you generate the XLIFF files for your reports with BI Publisher then you can work with any translation vendors in the world to make a mass translation or you can translate the XML files by yourself by manually updating the translatable strings presented in this text file. Lastly, we made it easier to manage the translation process starting from generating the XLIFF files to uploading the translated XLIFF files back to the BI Publisher server. You can generate, download, upload the XLIFF files from the BI Publisher’s Web interface with your browser and you can see the translated reports right away without needing to shutdown or restart your server. While the translated reports are displayed based on your language preference setting you can also specify a different language when you schedule or deliver the reports so that they can be generated in your customer’s preferred language. What Can I Translate? When it comes to translation there are three things. First, report content translation. When you receive a report you like to see the content like report title, section title, comments, annotation, table column header, and anything that are static and embedded in the report. in your preferred language. We call this Reports Content translation. Second, when you open a report online you might want to see not only the report content being translated but also the report UI, such as report name, parameter name, layout name, and anything that would help you to navigate around the reports, to be translated in your language. We call this Reports UI translation. And this separation of the Reports Content and Reports UI translation makes it very useful especially when you want to navigate through the reports in your preferred language UI but want to generate the reports in your customer’s preferred language. Imagine you are English native speaker and need to generate and send a report to your customers in China. You like to see the report name, parameter name in English so that you can comfortably navigate to the report and generate the report output, but like to see the report generated in Chinese so that the your customers in China can understand the report when they receive it. And lastly, you might want to see even the data presented in the report to be translated. For example, you might want to see product names in an Order Status report to be translated based on the report viewer’s language preference. We call this Reporting Data translation. Since this Reporting Data translation is maintained at the data source level such as Database tables along with the main data, you need to prepare the translation at the data source level first. Then, you want to make sure that your query is switched accordingly based on the language preference setting so that the translated data will be retrieved. How to Translate BI Publisher Reports? Now when it comes to ‘how to translate BI Publisher reports?’ the main focus here is about the translation for the Report Content and Report UI. And I just created this video to show you how to create and manage the translation with BI Publisher 11G. Please take a look at the clip below.   In today’s business world, customers and suppliers are from all over the world regardless of the size of the company or organization. Supporting multiple languages for your reports is no longer something ‘nice to have’, it’s mandatory. BI Publisher is designed to support multi lingual reports from the beginning without any extra hidden cost of license or configuration like other reporting tools such as Crystal Reports. You can support additional languages translation at any time with the very simple steps shown in the video above. Happy translation! Please share your translation experience with us! 

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  • Crystal reports 11 RDC (COM API) displays printer dialog even when I tell it not to prompt

    - by bdonlan
    I'm using Crystal Reports 11's RDC (COM) API to print. My code looks like this: HRESULT res = m_Report->SelectPrinter(b_driver, b_device, b_port); if (FAILED(res)) return res; // For these calls, the #import wrapper throws on error m_Report->PutPrinterDuplex(dmDuplex); m_Report->PutPaperSize(dmPaperSize); m_Report->PutPaperSource((CRPaperSource)pdlg->GetDevMode()->dmDefaultSource); if (m_Report->GetPaperOrientation() == crDefaultPaperOrientation) m_Report->PutPaperOrientation(crPortrait); VARIANT vfalse; VariantInit(&vfalse); vfalse.vt=VT_BOOL; vfalse.boolVal=0; res = m_Report->PrintOut(vfalse); However, at the end of all this, crystal reports still shows its own printer selection dialog - but only for some reports, it seems. Why does crystal reports show a print dialog even when I pass false for promptUser? And how, then, can I suppress crystal reports' internal printer selection dialog and force it to use my values? Edit: Whoops, CR11, not CR9. Some further information: The reports that work properly (ie, do not show the print dialog) are generated internally using the RDC API; we create a new report object, import subreports into it, then print the result. No problem there. The reports that do not work properly (ie, force the print dialog to open) have been created with a previous version of crystal reports; however, opening and saving the report does not seem to help. Sample reports in the Crystal Reports installation directory show the same problem. I tried reproducing with VBScript; however, the result was that nothing was printed at all (no dialog, no nothing): Set app = CreateObject("CrystalRuntime.Application.11") Set report = app.OpenReport("C:\Program Files\Business Objects\Crystal Reports 11.5\Samples\en\Reports\General Business\Inventory Crosstab.rpt") report.PrintOut(True) rem Testing with a True parameter to force a print dialog - but no printout and nothing appears (no error either though)

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  • Crystal Reports: 3 New Uses For Sub Reports

    I hate sub reports and always consider them the last resort in any reporting solution. The negative effect on performance and maintainability is just not worth the easy ride they give the report writer. Nine times out of ten reporting requirements can be met using a little forethought and planning (and a solid understanding of formulas). With that said, there are a few novel ways of using sub reports which will not affect performance and actually prove a boon to the developer.Did you know that DotNetSlackers also publishes .net articles written by top known .net Authors? We already have over 80 articles in several categories including Silverlight. Take a look: here.

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  • Crystal Reports: 3 New Uses For Sub Reports

    I hate sub reports and always consider them the last resort in any reporting solution. The negative effect on performance and maintainability is just not worth the easy ride they give the report writer. Nine times out of ten reporting requirements can be met using a little forethought and planning (and a solid understanding of formulas). With that said, there are a few novel ways of using sub reports which will not affect performance and actually prove a boon to the developer.Did you know that DotNetSlackers also publishes .net articles written by top known .net Authors? We already have over 80 articles in several categories including Silverlight. Take a look: here.

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  • T-SQL Tuesday #005: Creating SSMS Custom Reports

    - by Mike C
    This is my contribution to the T-SQL Tuesday blog party, started by Adam Machanic and hosted this month by Aaron Nelson . Aaron announced this month's topic is "reporting" so I figured I'd throw a blog up on a reporting topic I've been interested in for a while -- namely creating custom reports in SSMS. Creating SSMS custom reports isn't difficult, but like most technical work it's very detailed with a lot of little steps involved. So this post is a little longer than usual and includes a lot of...(read more)

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  • T-SQL Tuesday #005: Creating SSMS Custom Reports

    - by Mike C
    This is my contribution to the T-SQL Tuesday blog party, started by Adam Machanic and hosted this month by Aaron Nelson . Aaron announced this month's topic is "reporting" so I figured I'd throw a blog up on a reporting topic I've been interested in for a while -- namely creating custom reports in SSMS. Creating SSMS custom reports isn't difficult, but like most technical work it's very detailed with a lot of little steps involved. So this post is a little longer than usual and includes a lot of...(read more)

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  • Including BLOB images in your PDF Reports

    - by thatjeffsmith
    Earlier this year we walked through how to work with BLOBs in Oracle SQL Developer. So you already know how to INSERT, UPDATE and view the BLOBs stored in your tables. But now I want to show you how to include those images in your PDF reports. You know how to work with SQL Developer reports, right? No? OK, let’s do a quick run down memory lane then: How to Build a Bar Chart Child reports – click on parent record for on-the-fly children records Alright, so if you have a GRID report that contains a BLOB column, you have the option of including the BLOB contents when you create a PDF export: At design time, specify how you want the BLOB content to be treated when you export to PDF Note that you must specify the treatment of the BLOBs in the report design. You won’t be prompted when you launch the Export wizard dialog. When you open your PDF, there will be a link to the image. Click it. Click then confirm. It will launch the default image viewer on your machine. I hope your pictures are more excited than mine.

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  • Grandparent – Parent – Child Reports in SQL Developer

    - by thatjeffsmith
    You’ll never see one of these family stickers on my car, but I promise not to judge…much. Parent – Child reports are pretty straightforward in Oracle SQL Developer. You have a ‘parent’ report, and then one or more ‘child’ reports which are based off of a value in a selected row or value from the parent. If you need a quick tutorial to get up to speed on the subject, go ahead and take 5 minutes Shortly before I left for vacation 2 weeks agao, I got an interesting question from one of my Twitter Followers: @thatjeffsmith any luck with the #Oracle awr reports in #SQLDeveloper?This is easy with multi generation parent>child Done in #dbvisualizer — Ronald Rood (@Ik_zelf) August 26, 2012 Now that I’m back from vacation, I can tell Ronald and everyone else that the answer is ‘Yes!’ And here’s how Time to Get Out Your XML Editor Don’t have one? That’s OK, SQL Developer can edit XML files. While the Reporting interface doesn’t surface the ability to create multi-generational reports, the underlying code definitely supports it. We just need to hack away at the XML that powers a report. For this example I’m going to start simple. A query that brings back DEPARTMENTs, then EMPLOYEES, then JOBs. We can build the first two parts of the report using the report editor. A Parent-Child report in Oracle SQL Developer (Departments – Employees) Save the Report to XML Once you’ve generated the XML file, open it with your favorite XML editor. For this example I’ll be using the build-it XML editor in SQL Developer. SQL Developer Reports in their raw XML glory! Right after the PDF element in the XML document, we can start a new ‘child’ report by inserting a DISPLAY element. I just copied and pasted the existing ‘display’ down so I wouldn’t have to worry about screwing anything up. Note I also needed to change the ‘master’ name so it wouldn’t confuse SQL Developer when I try to import/open a report that has the same name. Also I needed to update the binds tags to reflect the names from the child versus the original parent report. This is pretty easy to figure out on your own actually – I mean I’m no real developer and I got it pretty quick. <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?> <displays> <display id="92857fce-0139-1000-8006-7f0000015340" type="" style="Table" enable="true"> <name><![CDATA[Grandparent]]></name> <description><![CDATA[]]></description> <tooltip><![CDATA[]]></tooltip> <drillclass><![CDATA[null]]></drillclass> <CustomValues> <TYPE>horizontal</TYPE> </CustomValues> <query> <sql><![CDATA[select * from hr.departments]]></sql> </query> <pdf version="VERSION_1_7" compression="CONTENT"> <docproperty title="" author="" subject="" keywords="" /> <cell toppadding="2" bottompadding="2" leftpadding="2" rightpadding="2" horizontalalign="LEFT" verticalalign="TOP" wrap="true" /> <column> <heading font="Courier" size="10" style="NORMAL" color="-16777216" rowshading="-1" labeling="FIRST_PAGE" /> <footing font="Courier" size="10" style="NORMAL" color="-16777216" rowshading="-1" labeling="NONE" /> <blob blob="NONE" zip="false" /> </column> <table font="Courier" size="10" style="NORMAL" color="-16777216" userowshading="false" oddrowshading="-1" evenrowshading="-1" showborders="true" spacingbefore="12" spacingafter="12" horizontalalign="LEFT" /> <header enable="false" generatedate="false"> <data> null </data> </header> <footer enable="false" generatedate="false"> <data value="null" /> </footer> <security enable="false" useopenpassword="false" openpassword="" encryption="EXCLUDE_METADATA"> <permission enable="false" permissionpassword="" allowcopying="true" allowprinting="true" allowupdating="false" allowaccessdevices="true" /> </security> <pagesetup papersize="LETTER" orientation="1" measurement="in" margintop="1.0" marginbottom="1.0" marginleft="1.0" marginright="1.0" /> </pdf> <display id="null" type="" style="Table" enable="true"> <name><![CDATA[Parent]]></name> <description><![CDATA[]]></description> <tooltip><![CDATA[]]></tooltip> <drillclass><![CDATA[null]]></drillclass> <CustomValues> <TYPE>horizontal</TYPE> </CustomValues> <query> <sql><![CDATA[select * from hr.employees where department_id = EPARTMENT_ID]]></sql> <binds> <bind id="DEPARTMENT_ID"> <prompt><![CDATA[DEPARTMENT_ID]]></prompt> <tooltip><![CDATA[DEPARTMENT_ID]]></tooltip> <value><![CDATA[NULL_VALUE]]></value> </bind> </binds> </query> <pdf version="VERSION_1_7" compression="CONTENT"> <docproperty title="" author="" subject="" keywords="" /> <cell toppadding="2" bottompadding="2" leftpadding="2" rightpadding="2" horizontalalign="LEFT" verticalalign="TOP" wrap="true" /> <column> <heading font="Courier" size="10" style="NORMAL" color="-16777216" rowshading="-1" labeling="FIRST_PAGE" /> <footing font="Courier" size="10" style="NORMAL" color="-16777216" rowshading="-1" labeling="NONE" /> <blob blob="NONE" zip="false" /> </column> <table font="Courier" size="10" style="NORMAL" color="-16777216" userowshading="false" oddrowshading="-1" evenrowshading="-1" showborders="true" spacingbefore="12" spacingafter="12" horizontalalign="LEFT" /> <header enable="false" generatedate="false"> <data> null </data> </header> <footer enable="false" generatedate="false"> <data value="null" /> </footer> <security enable="false" useopenpassword="false" openpassword="" encryption="EXCLUDE_METADATA"> <permission enable="false" permissionpassword="" allowcopying="true" allowprinting="true" allowupdating="false" allowaccessdevices="true" /> </security> <pagesetup papersize="LETTER" orientation="1" measurement="in" margintop="1.0" marginbottom="1.0" marginleft="1.0" marginright="1.0" /> </pdf> <display id="null" type="" style="Table" enable="true"> <name><![CDATA[Child]]></name> <description><![CDATA[]]></description> <tooltip><![CDATA[]]></tooltip> <drillclass><![CDATA[null]]></drillclass> <CustomValues> <TYPE>horizontal</TYPE> </CustomValues> <query> <sql><![CDATA[select * from hr.jobs where job_id = :JOB_ID]]></sql> <binds> <bind id="JOB_ID"> <prompt><![CDATA[JOB_ID]]></prompt> <tooltip><![CDATA[JOB_ID]]></tooltip> <value><![CDATA[NULL_VALUE]]></value> </bind> </binds> </query> <pdf version="VERSION_1_7" compression="CONTENT"> <docproperty title="" author="" subject="" keywords="" /> <cell toppadding="2" bottompadding="2" leftpadding="2" rightpadding="2" horizontalalign="LEFT" verticalalign="TOP" wrap="true" /> <column> <heading font="Courier" size="10" style="NORMAL" color="-16777216" rowshading="-1" labeling="FIRST_PAGE" /> <footing font="Courier" size="10" style="NORMAL" color="-16777216" rowshading="-1" labeling="NONE" /> <blob blob="NONE" zip="false" /> </column> <table font="Courier" size="10" style="NORMAL" color="-16777216" userowshading="false" oddrowshading="-1" evenrowshading="-1" showborders="true" spacingbefore="12" spacingafter="12" horizontalalign="LEFT" /> <header enable="false" generatedate="false"> <data> null </data> </header> <footer enable="false" generatedate="false"> <data value="null" /> </footer> <security enable="false" useopenpassword="false" openpassword="" encryption="EXCLUDE_METADATA"> <permission enable="false" permissionpassword="" allowcopying="true" allowprinting="true" allowupdating="false" allowaccessdevices="true" /> </security> <pagesetup papersize="LETTER" orientation="1" measurement="in" margintop="1.0" marginbottom="1.0" marginleft="1.0" marginright="1.0" /> </pdf> </display> </display> </display> </displays> Save the file and ‘Open Report…’ You’ll see your new report name in the tree. You just need to double-click it to open it. Here’s what it looks like running A 3 generation family Now Let’s Build an AWR Text Report Ronald wanted to have the ability to query AWR snapshots and generate the AWR reports. That requires a few inputs, including a START and STOP snapshot ID. That basically tells AWR what time period to use for generating the report. And here’s where it gets tricky. We’ll need to use aliases for the SNAP_ID column. Since we’re using the same column name from 2 different queries, we need to use different bind variables. Fortunately for us, SQL Developer’s clever enough to use the column alias as the BIND. Here’s what I mean: Grandparent Query SELECT snap_id start1, begin_interval_time, end_interval_time FROM dba_hist_snapshot ORDER BY 1 asc Parent Query SELECT snap_id stop1, begin_interval_time, end_interval_time, :START1 carry FROM dba_hist_snapshot WHERE snap_id > :START1 ORDER BY 1 asc And here’s where it gets even trickier – you can’t reference a bind from outside the parent query. My grandchild report can’t reference a value from the grandparent report. So I just carry the selected value down to the parent. In my parent query SELECT you see the ‘:START1′ at the end? That’s making that value available to me when I use it in my grandchild query. To complicate things a bit further, I can’t have a column name with a ‘:’ in it, or SQL Developer will get confused when I try to reference the value of the variable with the ‘:’ – and ‘::Name’ doesn’t work. But that’s OK, just alias it. Grandchild Query Select Output From Table(Dbms_Workload_Repository.Awr_Report_Text(1298953802, 1,:CARRY, :STOP1)); Ok, and the last trick – I hard-coded my report to use my database’s DB_ID and INST_ID into the AWR package call. Now a smart person could figure out a way to make that work on any database, but I got lazy and and ran out of time. But this should be far enough for you to take it from here. Here’s what my report looks like now: Caution: don’t run this if you haven’t licensed Enterprise Edition with Diagnostic Pack. The Raw XML for this AWR Report <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?> <displays> <display id="927ba96c-0139-1000-8001-7f0000015340" type="" style="Table" enable="true"> <name><![CDATA[AWR Start Stop Report Final]]></name> <description><![CDATA[]]></description> <tooltip><![CDATA[]]></tooltip> <drillclass><![CDATA[null]]></drillclass> <CustomValues> <TYPE>horizontal</TYPE> </CustomValues> <query> <sql><![CDATA[SELECT snap_id start1, begin_interval_time, end_interval_time FROM dba_hist_snapshot ORDER BY 1 asc]]></sql> </query> <display id="null" type="" style="Table" enable="true"> <name><![CDATA[Stop SNAP_ID]]></name> <description><![CDATA[]]></description> <tooltip><![CDATA[]]></tooltip> <drillclass><![CDATA[null]]></drillclass> <CustomValues> <TYPE>horizontal</TYPE> </CustomValues> <query> <sql><![CDATA[SELECT snap_id stop1, begin_interval_time, end_interval_time, :START1 carry FROM dba_hist_snapshot WHERE snap_id > :START1 ORDER BY 1 asc]]></sql> </query> <display id="null" type="" style="Table" enable="true"> <name><![CDATA[AWR Report]]></name> <description><![CDATA[]]></description> <tooltip><![CDATA[]]></tooltip> <drillclass><![CDATA[null]]></drillclass> <CustomValues> <TYPE>horizontal</TYPE> </CustomValues> <query> <sql><![CDATA[Select Output From Table(Dbms_Workload_Repository.Awr_Report_Text(1298953802, 1,:CARRY, :STOP1 ))]]></sql> </query> </display> </display> </display> </displays> Should We Build Support for Multiple Levels of Reports into the User Interface? Let us know! A comment here or a suggestion on our SQL Developer Exchange might help your case!

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  • Subreports in Jasper Reports

    - by Karthikeyan
    Hi all, I am using jasper reports - ireports. i need to create a subreport. i have a Master Reports-- which holds the subreport1 and subreport 2. Subreport 1 and 2 will have individual tables in its details band. So, while compiling master report through java class by filling it with custom datasource it has to print a single page with two table.. this is my task !! i need some more guidance to implement this ? i didnt get much tutorial for it to implement. Pls help me. Thanks in advance

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  • 10 Steps to access Oracle stored procedures from Crystal Reports

    Requirements to access Oracle stored procedures from CR The following requirements must be met in order for CR to access an Oracle stored procedure: 1. You must create a package that defines the REF CURSOR. This REF CURSOR must be strongly bound to a static pre-defined structure (see Strongly Bound REF CURSORs vs Weakly Bound REF CURSORs). This package must be created separately and before the creation of the stored procedure. NOTE Crystal Reports 9 native connections will support Oracle stored procedures created within packages as well as Oracle stored procedures referencing weakly bound REF CURSORs. Crystal Reports 8.5 native connections will support Oracle stored procedures referencing weakly bound REF CURSORs. 2. The procedure must have a parameter that is a REF CURSOR type. This is because CR uses this parameter to access and define the result set that the stored procedure returns. 3. The REF CURSOR parameter must be defined as IN OUT (read/write mode). After the procedure has opened and assigned a query to the REF CURSOR, CR will perform a FETCH call for every row from the query's result. This is why the parameter must be defined as IN OUT. 4. Parameters can only be input (IN) parameters. CR is not designed to work with OUT parameters. 5. The REF CURSOR variable must be opened and assigned its query within the procedure. 6. The stored procedure can only return one record set. The structure of this record set must not change, based on parameters. 7. The stored procedure cannot call another stored procedure. 8. If using an ODBC driver, it must be the CR Oracle ODBC driver (installed by CR). Other Oracle ODBC drivers (installed by Microsoft or Oracle) may not function correctly. 9. If you are using the CR ODBC driver, you must ensure that in the ODBC Driver Configuration setup, under the Advanced Tab, the option 'Procedure Return Results' is checked ON. 10. If you are using the native Oracle driver and using hard-coded date selection within the procedure, the date selection must use either a string representation format of 'YYYY-DD-MM' (i.e. WHERE DATEFIELD = '1999-01-01') or the TO_DATE function with the same format specified (i.e. WHERE DATEFIELD = TO_DATE ('1999-01-01','YYYY-MM-DD'). For more information, refer to kbase article C2008023. 11. Most importantly, this stored procedure must execute successfully in Oracle's SQL*Plus utility. If all of these conditions are met, you must next ensure you are using the appropriate database driver. Please refer to the sections in this white paper for a list of acceptable database drivers. span.fullpost {display:none;}

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